06
Jan
11

‎1.6.2011 … Epiphany Greetings!

holidays, Advent, Epiphany:  Always enjoying learning something new …

Advent January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal”. On this day we as the body of Christ are reminded of our mission to seek to as best we can to be used by God to “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. With this we end the 12 days of Christmas and celebration of the Christmas/Advent season. Next year we will start again. Hope this was a blessing to you. God bless!

via Advent.

-and-

Epiphany is the climax of the Advent/Christmas Season and the Twelve Days of Christmas, which are usually counted from the evening of December 25th until the morning of January 6th, which is the Twelfth Day. In following this older custom of counting the days beginning at sundown, the evening of January 5th is the Twelfth Night. This is an occasion for feasting in some cultures, including the baking of a special King’s Cake as part of the festivities of Epiphany (a King’s Cake is part of the observance of Mardi Gras in French Catholic culture of the Southern USA).

In some church traditions, only the full days are counted so that January 5th is the Eleventh Day of Christmas, January 6th is the Twelfth Day, and the evening of January 6th is counted as the Twelfth Night.

In traditional Christian churches Christmas, as well as Easter, is celebrated as a period of time, a season of the church year, rather than just a day. The Season of the Church Year associated with Christmas actually begins with the first Sunday of Advent, four Sundays before Christmas Day.  Advent is marked by expectation and anticipation in preparing to celebrate the coming of Jesus.  Christmas begins with Christmas Day December 25 and lasts for Twelve Days until Epiphany, January 6, which looks ahead to the mission of the church to the world in light of the Nativity. The one or two Sundays between Christmas Day and Epiphany are sometimes called Christmastide.

For many Protestant church traditions, the season of Epiphany extends from January 6th until Ash Wednesday, which begins the season of Lent leading to Easter.  Depending on the timing of Easter, this longer period of Epiphany includes from four to nine Sundays.  Other traditions, especially the Roman Catholic tradition, observe Epiphany as a single day, with the Sundays following Epiphany counted as Ordinary Time. In some western traditions, the last Sunday of Epiphany is celebrated as Transfiguration Sunday.

The term epiphany means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal.” In Western churches, it remembers the coming of the wise men bringing gifts to visit the Christ child, who by so doing “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. In some Central and South American countries influenced by Catholic tradition, Three Kings’ Day, or the night before, is the time for opening Christmas presents. In some eastern churches, Epiphany or the Theophany commemorates Jesus’ baptism, with the visit of the Magi linked to Christmas. In some churches the day is celebrated as Christmas, with Epiphany/Theophany occurring on January 19th.

via The Season of Epiphany.

Congress, The Constitution:  I agree.  Why edit the Constitution, Republicans?  I think it a great idea to read it … but you should read the entire Constitution.

Today’s reading of the Constitution on the House floor was surely intended by the GOP leadership as a Tea Party moment. But it looks like it has turned into a progressive moment instead.

Before the House started the reading, two Democratic congressmen stood up to inquire about the language the House leadership had deemed appropriate to read aloud on the House floor. While this elicited some laughter in the chamber — oh, the conservatives must have thought with a chuckle, how delightful that the liberals are revealing that they are so ignorant of the Constitution that they need to ask for clarification on its language via parliamentary procedure! — this was a significant, legitimate point. Rather than reading the entire Constitution, with all its flaws and corrections, the GOP-led House was going to read an “edited” version of our Nation’s charter.

One cannot fault members of the House for being reluctant to read the portion of the original Constitution that declared slaves to be three-fifths of a person for purposes of representation, or the fugitive slave clause. But, as Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., so powerfully explained before the reading began today, the fact that these portions of the original Constitution were superseded by Amendments that abolished slavery and guaranteed equality is an important one. These Amendments — as well as the Amendments to secure the vote for women and remove poll taxes from standing in the way of low-income voters, among others — were the result of generations of men and women who gave blood, sweat, and treasure in the struggle to improve our founding charter and create a “more perfect union.”

via Elizabeth B. Wydra: Why Did the GOP “Edit” the Constitution?.

holidays, LOL, me:  My friend Claudia of Tutu.com tweeted the below … and I laughed at myself for not getting the choice of the day before …

National Tutu Day is fast approaching! 02/02/2011! What tutu will YOU be wearing on National Tutu Day?

via Twitter / @Tutu.Com: National Tutu Day is fast ….

Great Recession, Banking Meltdown, Great Recovery, politics, words:  Two things …  1) This is very difficult for anyone in the industry to have their compensation structure dictated by the government … and I believe if the employer has paid back its TARP that should be the end of it.  2) What does “nous” mean?  It means “British informal common sense; practical intelligence” via definition of nous from Oxford Dictionaries Online.

DISPLAYING new-found political nous, Britain’s biggest banks have reportedly asked the government for guidance on “what sort of bonus payments will be acceptable”. One suspects the answer won’t be to their liking.

The bankers’ entreaties follow the recent announcement of EU and Financial Services Authority (FSA) guidelines on bonuses. The new rules, an effort to end “over-individualistic behaviour”, will limit upfront cash awards to 20-30% of the total bonus, and require banks to set aside at least 50% of a bonus for 3-5 years (depending on employees’ “risk profile”). Non-EU banks will have to apply the rules to their European employees, while EU-based banks will have to apply the rules globally.

You don’t have to be a red-clawed capitalist to see this as remarkable and unhealthy regulation. It’s highly unusual for governments to dictate the structure of private sector compensation, and for good reason: Soviet-style pay rules risk introducing far more problems than they solve.

Because the new regulations only address the symptoms of sky-high financial sector compensation, rather than the underlying causes, they amount to squeezing a balloon: financial companies will simply adjust their remuneration structures to maintain similar levels of “benefit” to employees. Starting salaries, for example, have reportedly gone up 15-20% this year alone.

via Financial sector compensation: Bad bonus rules are worse than bad bonuses | The Economist.

etiquette:  I actually think about this when I e-mail someone.  What is the proper way to open and close and e-mail message?  What do you think?

Correspondence styles have changed since 1860, when Abraham Lincoln addressed this letter to Mary Todd Lincoln ‘Dear Wife.’

Like many modern communicators, Ms. Barry, a spokeswoman for Rep. Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, has nixed the salutation “dear” in her emails.

“Dear is a bit too intimate and connotes a personal relationship,” she said.

Ms. Barry said she wants to keep her business communications with the press at “the utmost and highest level of professionalism.”

Across the Internet the use of dear is going the way of sealing wax. Email has come to be viewed as informal even when used as formal communication, leaving some etiquette experts appalled at the ways professional strangers address one another.

People who don’t start communications with dear, says business-etiquette expert Lydia Ramsey, “lack polish.”

“They come across as being abrupt,” says Ms. Ramsey, who founded a Savannah, Ga., etiquette consultancy called Manners That Sell.

via Hey, Folks: Here’s a Digital Requiem for a Dearly Departed Salutation – WSJ.com.

children,education, play, parenting:  Do you think our parents ever thought that they had to teach us how to play.  My generation really screwed this one up as parents …

Ms. Wilson has embraced a growing movement to restore the sometimes-untidy business of play to the lives of children. Her interest was piqued when she toured her local elementary school last year, a few months before Benjamin was to enroll in kindergarten. She still remembered her own kindergarten classroom from 1985: it had a sandbox, blocks and toys. But this one had a wall of computers and little desks.

“There’s no imaginative play anymore, no pretend,” Ms. Wilson said with a sigh.

For several years, studies and statistics have been mounting that suggest the culture of play in the United States is vanishing. Children spend far too much time in front of a screen, educators and parents lament — 7 hours 38 minutes a day on average, according to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation last year. And only one in five children live within walking distance (a half-mile) of a park or playground, according to a 2010 report by the federal Centers for Disease Control, making them even less inclined to frolic outdoors.

via The Movement to Restore Children’s Play Gains Momentum – NYTimes.com.

Arianna Hufffington, TED videos, health:  Great TED video … “Sleep your way to the top, literally.” – as only Arianna could say it!  Arianna Huffington: How to succeed? Get more sleep | Video on TED.com.

Apple, iPad: Apple iPad 2 Rumors Circulate the Web – NYTimes.com.

politics:  Oops, Mr. President.

President Obama’s comment Wednesday that departing White House spokesman Robert Gibbs has worked awfully hard for his “relatively modest” pay of $172,200 may have sounded to some like a rationalization for Gibbs joining the private sector to earn some big bucks.

But the remark to the New York Times got the attention of the Washington Post “Federal Eye” columnist, who posted a lengthy story questioning just how modest such a six-figure salary is in a weak economy with high unemployment and complaints about government spending. Gibbs’ compensation falls just under the $200,000 mark that the pre-tax-compromise Obama administration once pegged as upper income for an individual — and undeserving of a continued tax break from the Bush-era reductions.

via Obama Comment That $172,000 Is ‘Relatively Modest’ Pay Has Tongues Wagging.

history, Civil War: Interesting website … I wonder how many people will plan a vacation around the sesquicentennial celebration of the Civil War?  Civil War in Georgia – Plan a Trip – Georgia Civil War Events and Attractions.

 

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