Archive for April, 2010

24
Apr
10

One cannot help but be in awe when contemplating the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of the mystery every day. The important thing is not to stop questioning; never lose a holy curiosity. – Albert Einstein Week Ending 4.24.2010

Continue reading ‘One cannot help but be in awe when contemplating the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of the mystery every day. The important thing is not to stop questioning; never lose a holy curiosity. – Albert Einstein Week Ending 4.24.2010’

11
Apr
10

“The best portion of a good man’s life is his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love” ~~ William Wordsworth Week ending 4.17.2010

4.17.2010 … cooler days are here again … and blind side is VERY good …happy birthday, mp!

nature: great article …

As of late Friday, there was no end in sight to the disruption.

via Volcano Costs Rise as Plume Spreads – WSJ.com.

-and- … great followup , Dr. Miller …

Perhaps something good can come from the ash cloud, the travelers’ frustration, the loss of money by airlines, the disruption of plans.

Perhaps we can see ourselves in perspective.

Perhaps we can recover a sense of awe.

via Of ash and awe « Hopelens Blog.

places, education: What a complimentary article for Sewanee!

But nothing had fully prepared me for a recent sojourn into a new mythic country where the presentness of the past is ubiquitous and palpable.

It didn’t take me long to see that The University of the South, with its entire environs, is permeated with a sense of living history, art, science, and ideas. The cell phone grid can be accessed well only in certain places. So you’re more likely at any given time to be talking to someone who is actually standing or sitting with you, in person, face-to-face. I emphasize this due to its general rarity now. Real conversations happen everywhere.

via Tom Morris: An Academic Outpost of Heaven.

places, food, Charlotte: I hope to find the Harvest Moon Grille’ cart next week!

Forget hot dogs. An ever-changing menu with locally sourced ingredients makes this bright orange “concession stand” worth seeking out. Founded by Grateful Growers Farm, the trailer rotates locations throughout the week and serves some surprisingly gourmet fare, such as fresh spring rolls with pork belly. Wash it down with the Mooresville-bottled Uncle Scott’s Root Beer. ggfarm.com

via The Street-Food Gourmet.

tv, culture: OK, be gLeeful … Q: Has any friend seen a flash mob? If you are a gLee fan, this one is fun.

events, anniversaries: “Houston, we’ve had a problem.”

Four decades later, it’s easy to forget just how improbable that safe return was, following an oxygen tank explosion that forced the crew to take refuge in the lunar module. There’s a reason that during training the astronauts never simulated that kind of emergency — because everyone knew that if an explosion wrecked your ship and all your power and oxygen vanished, you’d surely wind up dead. It’s a little like taking a driving course and practicing what to do if your car hurtles off a cliff. What’s the point? via Apollo 13 at 40: Houston, We Have a Miracle – TIME.

culture:

FOR the evolutionarily minded, the existence of fairness is a puzzle. What biological advantage accrues to those who behave in a trusting and co-operative way with unrelated individuals? And when those encounters are one-off events with strangers it is even harder to explain why humans do not choose to behave selfishly. The standard answer is that people are born with an innate social psychology that is calibrated to the lives of their ancestors in the small-scale societies of the Palaeolithic. Fairness, in other words, is an evolutionary hangover from a time when most human relationships were with relatives with whom one shared a genetic interest and who it was generally, therefore, pointless to cheat.

World religions such as Christianity, with their moral codes, their omniscient, judgmental gods and their beliefs in heaven and hell, might indeed be expected to enforce notions of fairness on their participants, so this observation makes sense. From an economic point of view, therefore, such judgmental religions are actually a progressive force. That might explain why many societies that have embraced them have been so successful, and thus why such beliefs become world religions in the first place.

via The origins of selflessness: Fair play | The Economist.

technology, education: very interesting …

“Everyone has a blog, from fifth grade to kindergarten, no matter what age,” explained the 11-year-old to a visitor, who paused at her work station during a technology conference at Marie Murphy School in Wilmette.

via Schools’ technology draws national attention :: News :: PIONEER PRESS :: Glenview Announcements.

teenagers, culture: Prom With A Purpose … what a great idea!

The effort is called Prom With A Purpose, the brainchild of senior Andrews Steel, who conceived the idea sometime in August after learning his biology teacher, Ann Schmitz, had been diagnosed with leukemia.

via Whitefield students forgo unusual prom expenses to help teacher, leukemia society  | ajc.com.

places, culture: Disappointing …

Vandals over the past week took advantage of the rare closure of Mount Corcovado, following deadly landslides, to gain access to the Christ the Redeemer statue, spraying black graffiti up the figures head and arms, said Bernardo Issa, head of the Tijuca National Park.On part of Rios landmark — one of the Seven Modern Wonders of the World — someone sprayed screeds about violence and unsolved crimes,

via Rios Christ statue graffitied – Yahoo! News.

education, kith/kin: Congratulations to Randolph Middle School and god son Mike (tall one with red shirt in picture)!

Friday afternoon, the verdict came down: Randolph. Siddu and his teammates could celebrate at last.

via For Randolph Middle – How sweet it is! – CharlotteObserver.com.

Jane Austen: OK it’s the weekend … everybody needs a little Jane.

Read & Hear Jane Austen’s HISTORY OF ENGLAND – The History of England – Wikisource.

-and-

Book Review – Jane’s Fame – How Jane Austen Conquered the World – By Claire Harman – Review – NYTimes.com.

Continue reading ‘“The best portion of a good man’s life is his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love” ~~ William Wordsworth Week ending 4.17.2010’

10
Apr
10

“There is, indeed, something inexpressibly pleasing, in the annual renovation of the world, and the new display of the treasures of nature.” – Samuel Johnson Week Ending 4.10.2010

4.10.2010 … jbt marathoning pilot mountain … ewt enjoying boulder … madt plans to dance the night away … coffee with the trobs … oh, and another unbelievably gorgeous day ..

Supreme Court:

Those comfortable with Stevens’ role as the dean of the court’s liberal bloc hailed his “leadership,” his “commitment to expanding freedom” and his “irreplaceable” perspective.

From the right came admiration of his “devotion to the institution” and “historic service,” coupled with caveats about “different judicial philosophies.”

President Obama lauded Stevens for having “applied the Constitution and the law of the land with fidelity and restraint” and said “his leadership will be sorely missed.”

via Reaction To The Retirement Of Justice John Paul Stevens : NPR.

-and –

Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, the court’s oldest member and leader of its liberal bloc, is retiring. President Barack Obama now has his second high court opening to fill. We can’t say it’s all that surprising, but it’s huge news nonetheless.

via Breaking: Justice Stevens to Step Down – Law Blog – WSJ. Continue reading ‘“There is, indeed, something inexpressibly pleasing, in the annual renovation of the world, and the new display of the treasures of nature.” – Samuel Johnson Week Ending 4.10.2010’

03
Apr
10

“Eat a live frog every morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” -Mark Twain Week ending 4.3.2010

4.3.2010 almost easter … final four … spring break … very random day

Supreme Court:

Appointed in 1975 by President Gerald R. Ford, Justice Stevens was in those days considered a somewhat idiosyncratic moderate. These days, he is lionized by the left. But Justice Stevens rejected those labels on Friday, saying that his judicial philosophy was a conservative one.

“What really for me marks a conservative judge is one who doesn’t decide more than he has to in order to do his own job,” he said, relaxed in shirt sleeves and his signature bow tie in chambers floodlit by April sunshine. “Our job is to decide cases and resolve controversies. It’s not to write broad rules that may answer society’s questions at large.”

via At 89, Stevens Contemplates Law, and How to Leave It – NYTimes.com.

religion:  I have repeatedly thught that this is not my issue … but Ms. Noonan makes me think it is.  Peggy Noonan: The Catholic Church’s Catastrophe – WSJ.com.

Apple iPad:

So, yeah. He pretty much figured it out in five minutes flat. He instinctively pushed the home button when he got stuck. He knew how to make pictures larger, how to draw on the Etch-a-Sketch app (he preferred it to the actual Etch-a-Sketch we had in the office). And, of course, because he’s a boy, he learned how to shoot the shooting games and steer the racing games. I’m not being sexist. It’s just how it is.

via iPad vs. a 5-Year-Old [Video] | Post Pop | Fast Company.

March Madness:

There aren’t a lot of good reasons to root against Butler unless you’re a Dukie, a Mountaineer or a friend of Sparty.

via Four Reasons To Root For, Or Root Against, Each Of The Final Four Teams : NPR.

random, economy: I don’t think so …

With Earth Day right around the corner, what better tribute to Mother Nature — and your wallet — than some DIY, eco-friendly hair treatments?

via Save Money (and the Environment) With Homemade Hair Treatments – StyleList.

random:

Information from millions of taxi trips provides a telling record of the city’s vital signs. The map shows the average number of pickups for different times of the day and days of week, Jan. – March, 200

via Tracking Taxi Flow Across the City – Interactive – NYTimes.com.

random:

Recent research on what is known as the superstar effect demonstrates that such mental collapses aren’t limited to chess. While challenging competitions are supposed to bring out our best, these studies demonstrate that when people are forced to compete against a peer who seems far superior, they often don’t rise to the challenge. Instead, they give up.

According to a paper by Jennifer Brown, an applied macroeconomist at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, Mr. Woods is such a dominating golfer that his presence in a tournament can make everyone else play significantly worse. Because his competitors expect him to win, they end up losing; success becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

via Tiger Woods and the Superstar Effect – WSJ.com.

design, life:

Design thinking is hot. In a time when companies and cities are finding it increasingly difficult to compete, when economic and social problems seem intractable, when our nation’s way of doing business seems wasteful and unimaginative at best, design thinking is being touted as a way to enhance problem-solving and breakthrough creativity.

As I understand it, design thinking is at the intersection of analytical and intuitive thinking. It’s a third-way approach that incorporates left- and right-brain processing.

Design thinking is more than a methodology. Design is a cultural way of thinking.”

via Rethinking thinking itself – Charlotte Business Journal:.

random, The President:

It is official: Barack Obama is the nation’s first black president.

A White House spokesman confirmed that Mr. Obama, the son of a black father from Kenya and a white mother from Kansas, checked African-American on the 2010 census questionnaire.

via Asked to Declare His Race, Obama Checks ‘Black’ on Census – NYTimes.com.

tv:

As the 100th episode nears (April 8), series’ production team gave us some trivia tidbits sure to delight fans. Prepare to be happier than Hodgins hearing he gets to do an experiment!

via Bones, David Boreanaz | ‘Bones’: 24 Fun Facts! | Photo 1 of 25 | EW.com.

Continue reading ‘“Eat a live frog every morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” -Mark Twain Week ending 4.3.2010’




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