Archive for December 19th, 2010

19
Dec
10

12.19.2010 … waiting … isn’t that what advent’s all about … but today I am am waiting for the last child … Jack arrives on the redeye tomorrow at 5:30 am!!clean, clean, clean …

The Supreme Court: Business Finds Receptive Ear in Roberts Court – NYTimes.com.

gLee, high school, Atlanta:

The excitement builds in a cavernous classroom at Marist High School after the school’s elite chamber choir sings a new song, and it’s pitch-perfect.

“Not bad for only the second time seeing this piece,” Sharon Coheley, the school chorus director, says with a smile.

Marist may be well-known as a sports powerhouse, but the private Catholic school is also a singing sensation. The school features 11 choral ensembles, including the Girl’s Trio, the Men’s Quartet and the Vocal Jazz Ensemble. The list goes on, with singers belting out not only the classics but pop song mash-ups, too.

Here and everywhere, school chorus directors are seeing a surge of interest in singing, and they credit shows such as “Glee,” a TV musical comedy about high school misfits who perform high-energy, witty and stylized numbers, and the buzzy show “The Sing-Off,” featuring a cappella groups, for sparking the attraction.

In high school culture, it has led to a phenomenon known as “The Glee Effect,” blurring the line between kids who play sports and those who sing by helping erode negative stereotypes and getting kids thinking about trying something new.

via At high schools, a ‘Glee’ effect  | ajc.com.

pop ups:  lost cultural cache before I get to see a really unique one … 😦

Once heralded as an innovative strategy to draw in holiday shoppers, the concept of the temporary store, or “pop-up,” has quickly become as prevalent as the average corner bodega. Now pop-up stores are more like The Boy Who Cried Wolf: since they appear so often, they’ve lost their cultural caché and are as expected as any other marketing ploy.

via How the USPS Can Rebrand Itself: Clever Pop Up Shops | Co.Design.

Business Finds Receptive Ear in Roberts Court – NYTimes.com.

The excitement builds in a cavernous classroom at Marist High School after the school’s elite chamber choir sings a new song, and it’s pitch-perfect.

Enlarge photo

Bob Andres bandres@ajc.com Brendan Hickey (from left), Branton Wandera, Clark Helman and Braden Finch practice with Marist’s chamber group. Half of the chamber choir members are school athletes.

Enlarge photo

Bob Andres bandres@ajc.com Marist High School’s chamber music group does warm-up exercises at the start of practice. The chamber has the school’s best singers and is increasingly competitive in what some call “The ‘Glee’ effect.”

Enlarge photo

Bob Andres bandres@ajc.com Kelly Garcia and Shelby Curren follow the direction of Marist chorus director Sharon Coheley. Tweens and teens aren’t the only ones beginning to make a joyful noise.

More Atlanta area news »

Cop shoots, kills family dog

Arrest in Gwinnett man’s death

William Laubmann, 71, worldwide landscape architect

2 dead in Atlanta house fire

“Not bad for only the second time seeing this piece,” Sharon Coheley, the school chorus director, says with a smile.

Marist may be well-known as a sports powerhouse, but the private Catholic school is also a singing sensation. The school features 11 choral ensembles, including the Girl’s Trio, the Men’s Quartet and the Vocal Jazz Ensemble. The list goes on, with singers belting out not only the classics but pop song mash-ups, too.

Here and everywhere, school chorus directors are seeing a surge of interest in singing, and they credit shows such as “Glee,” a TV musical comedy about high school misfits who perform high-energy, witty and stylized numbers, and the buzzy show “The Sing-Off,” featuring a cappella groups, for sparking the attraction.

In high school culture, it has led to a phenomenon known as “The Glee Effect,” blurring the line between kids who play sports and those who sing by helping erode negative stereotypes and getting kids thinking about trying something new.

via At high schools, a ‘Glee’ effect  | ajc.com.

Once heralded as an innovative strategy to draw in holiday shoppers, the concept of the temporary store, or “pop-up,” has quickly become as prevalent as the average corner bodega. Now pop-up stores are more like The Boy Who Cried Wolf: since they appear so often, they’ve lost their cultural caché and are as expected as any other marketing ploy.

via How the USPS Can Rebrand Itself: Clever Pop Up Shops | Co.Design.




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