Archive for March 1st, 2013

01
Mar
13

3.1.13 … walking and resting simulate the believer’s journey through life …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks, The Oratory – Rock Hill SC, Glencairn Garden, Two’s Company,  Pope Benedict’s last day  :

I dragged Allison on a second 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks and adventure.  This time we went to Rock Hill to the Oratory.

IMG_6201

IMG_6194 IMG_6223  IMG_6196

IMG_6215 IMG_6202 IMG_6199

 IMG_6211 IMG_6210 IMG_6208
IMG_6205

The Rock Hill Oratory, founded in 1934, is a part of a worldwide federation of 60 independent houses. It is the oldest and largest house in the United States.Founded by St. Philip Neri in Rome, members of the Oratory are bound not by vows, but by bonds of love. The community remains deliberately small to encourage interpersonal relationships. Governed democratically, the entire community shares in making major decisions with all members having equal rights and responsibilities.

via About Us | The Rock Hill Oratory.

It is a quirky place, filled with Catholic icons and symbols. It’s labyrinth was built in 2002 and is a seven circuit gravel labyrinth …

We encourage seasonal retreats during Advent, Lent or Holy week for individuals or groups, and encourage the faithful to walk the prayer experience in The Labyrinth Prayer Garden on the Oratory grounds.

via About the Center | The Rock Hill Oratory.

As before when I walked with Allison, we walk and talk.  It makes for an interesting Lenten practice.

IMG_6206

IMG_6221 IMG_6218 IMG_6213


One thing Allison and I talked about was Pope Benedict’s last day … because her father was having surgery yesterday, she watched th Pope’s last day non-stop.  We talked about  how much he was loved, how kind he was … 

Pope Benedict XVI’s final farewell Thursday was Page One news Friday around the world. Most front pages chose the striking image of a helicopter flying past the dome of St. Peter’s Basilica carrying the pope to his new pilgrimage. Others chose to show the pope at all angles, resplendent from the front, side and back.

via Newseum | Today’s Front Pages | Top Ten.

After leaving the Oratory, we see a beautiful park, Glencairn Garden.  

IMG_6229

    IMG_6240 IMG_6235 IMG_6230

IMG_6239 IMG_6236

IMG_6233  IMG_6227 IMG_6224 IMG_6217

IMG_6243 IMG_6246 IMG_6245

Glencairn Garden, considered by many to be the jewel of Rock Hill, resides in the heart of Old Town. The Garden began as the six acre backyard of Dr. David and Hazel Bigger, and in 1959, it was transformed by renowned landscape architect Robert Marvin into a beautiful public space. Glencairn is the birthplace of Rock Hill’s annual Come-See-Me festival and remains a popular location for events and concerts. In 2004, a Master Plan for the Garden was adopted by Rock Hill City Council. Howell Beach with Robert Marvin/Howell Beach and Associates has since perpetuated the original landscape design while incorporating many new features into the Master Plan. Significant por- tions of the Master Plan were completed in 2009.

via brochure.

The park is just about to erupt with color … 

Spring (March – May) is a fairy land of color with thousands of azaleas in many varieties.  Pansies, candy tuft, wisteria and periwinkle greet birds and butterflies.  Double file viburnum is nestled beneath lace canopies of pink and white dogwoods.  Redbuds, peonies, saucer magnolia trees, and flowering yoshino and kwanzan cherry trees complete the scene.

via Glencairn Garden.

The last stop on our adventure was Jane’s lovely needlepoint shop … Two’s Company – Needlepoint to Enhance Your Life.

01
Mar
13

3.1.13 … the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again …

high school classics, YA literature, entertainment, The Atlantic Wire:  Rereading books from my YA era is something I’ve always found to be insightful.  While studying for the bar at 25,  I reread Madeleine L’Engle’s trilogy centered on A Wrinkle in Time, which at that time had become a quartet (and I read the 4th book).  When I read them to my children, the quartet had become a quintet …

If the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again, the classics that we read in high school offer endless possibilities for rediscovery, for looking at ourselves then and now. That’s part of what makes Kevin Smokler’s new book, Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread 50 Books You Haven’t Touched Since High School, so much fun. His homages to 50 titles, including Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, The Bluest Eye, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, and even The Scarlet Letter (he writes, “I don’t like it either,” but argues for rereading it nonetheless), offers a truly enjoyable trip down one’s personal memory lane of books. It’s also a love letter to the act of reading, to continual learning, and to making an effort to slow down and savor the good books in life.

Not all of the works Smokler writes about fall into the category of Y.A., or, for that matter, are even books (and his book, of course, is intended for grownups). There are William Shakespeare plays and Emily Dickinson poems and even the fantastic David Foster Wallace essay, “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again.” Many of the books he reconsiders, for instance, To Kill a Mockingbird and The Catcher in the Rye, while not explicitly intended for teens by their authors, have been huge hits among that readership. The Phantom Tollbooth is widely considered a book for younger readers, and A Separate Peace and The Bell Jar—the latter of which a friend told him, “is for teenage girls what On the Road is for teenage boys”—are surely read most by people under 20. But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Y.A. for Grownups, Kevin Smokler, Books, Publishing, Y.A. Fiction/literature: How had I missed this column …

But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus, rereading, ChristCare:  My ChristCare group is indulging me by reading/studying a book I read in high school, Malcolm Muggeridge’s Jesus … the group is journeying with me.  🙂

Tim Cook, Apple, AAPL: 😦

On Wednesday afternoon, Apple CEO Tim Cook addressed investors and the media at the company’s annual shareholders meeting. It was the sixth time in the last five months that Cook has made something like a public appearance; and it is also the sixth time in the past five months that Apple’s stock (AAPL) has closed down after Cook appeared.

Consider this: The last six times that Cook has put himself out there, Apple’s stock declined afterwards. It’s a streak that dates back to October 2012, when Cook introduced the iPad mini, and it is a trend that has gone unbroken for about five months now: When Cook appears, AAPL goes down

via The Last 6 Times Tim Cook Has Talked, Apple’s Stock Has Dropped.

Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader, historic handshake, iconic images, picture is worth a thousand words:  OK, again  I saved this during my sabbatical from blogging … but this is a very significant picture …

June 27, 2012

In a meeting symbolizing the end of years of enmity between British rule and Northern Ireland republicans, Queen Elizabeth shook hands Wednesday with a former Irish Republican Army commander.

Martin McGuinness, now a deputy first minister of Northern Ireland and a member of the pro-republican Sinn Fein party, was a senior IRA member in the years of sectarian violence. During that time, the group was responsible for blowing up the yacht of Lord Louis Mountbatten, the queen’s cousin, killing him and three others while they vacationed off the coast of Northern Ireland in 1979.

The once unthinkable handshake took place away from media eyes — apart from one camera crew — behind closed doors at a charity arts event in Belfast, witnessed by the queen’s husband, Prince Philip, and leading politicians including Irish President Michael Higgins and Northern Ireland’s first minister, Peter Robinson.

The seemingly mundane greeting was widely heralded as a turning point. Peter Sheridan, host of the event, told reporters, “It’s a huge act of reconciliation, you cannot underestimate how important this is.”

via Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader share historic handshake – latimes.com.

.

01
Mar
13

3.1.13 … today’s mantra … make stacks purposeful … 3d printing …

housekeeping, clutter, House Beautiful:  today’s mantra … make stacks purposeful …

Make Stacks Purposeful

Making a neat pile of books and magazines will bring order to a coffee table in a matter of minutes. For this Hamptons home, designer David Lawrence created a sophisticated tabletop display by placing flowers and candles atop the books. The fabric on the sofa is Vizir in Indigo from Old World Weavers. Throw pillows by Ralph Lauren.

via How To Clean House Fast – Organizing And Cleaning Clutter Tips – House Beautiful.

3D Printing, innovation, cutting edge, PBS – YouTube:  Again, make stacks purposeful …

So how about those newfangled three-dee printing machines? I guess they’re a thing. But in all seriousness, PBS Off Book’s overview of the current state of 3D printers and their potential is pretty on target. One worry I have is that 3D printers become synonymous with CNC machines, a category that goes beyond the scope of MakerBots and RepRap machines. 3D printers have a great future, but it’s a whole host of different CNC machines (and those working in concert) that will change the world.

via PBS Off Book on 3D Printing – Tested.

48 Hours, Atlanta, National Geographic Traveler:  As an Atlanta native, I don’t even think about the Aquarium as a must see … maybe i should visit next time I am there …

The world’s largest aquarium, sophisticated restaurants, and an eclectic music scene are but a few of the surprises waiting in this peach of a city.

via 48 Hours in Atlanta – National Geographic Traveler.

Stephen Curry, Warriors, Davidson College, kudos,  YouTube: Kudos to Steph … this video is just fun to watch …

Stephen Curry 54 points vs New York Knicks || HD || (Full Highlights) – YouTube.

Stephen Curry’s career night in Madison Square Garden against the New York Knicks. Curry was 18 of 28 shooting, including 11 of 13 from 3-point range. He also had 7 assists, 6 rebounds and 3 steals. He became just the 13th player to reach the 50-point mark at the arena. His 54 is the third most points scored by a visiting player in Madison Square Garden since 1968, behind Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan.

via Stephen Curry 54 points vs New York Knicks || HD || (Full Highlights) – YouTube.

ducks, duck walk,  D.C., random:  heartwarming …

Around 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Harald Olsen, a Korean translator looking for work — “casualty of the sequester,” he says — thought he was about to go home after having lunch with a friend.

Instead, he and three other people helped escort a family of ten ducks a mile through downtown D.C.

It all started as Olsen was “walking from the World Bank building to the Farragut North Metro station,” he says. “I was heading home after lunch. One benefit of unemployment.”

He was waylaid by a mother duck and her nine ducklings, attracting attention in a park on Pennsylvania Avenue — some admiring attention, and some concern; as Olsen wrote on his Reddit post of the photos, one person called the police, and another called the Humane Society.

But before the arrival of any authorities, the ducks got moving. “Kind of like water flowing downhill, the ducks knew which direction they wanted to go,” says Olsen.

via Ducks Walk Through D.C. With A Four-Person Escort (PHOTOS).

Dr. William Marlin,  Case Western Reserve University, Urbanization and the Detective Novel,  Academic Minute, NPR:  Love this show … but often forget to look it up …

The detective novel grew up with public concerns about  modern, urban life, particularly crime.  But crime as a feature of Western life was not  recognized until the rise of large cities in the early 1800s,  the period when a mass reading public appeared.   The new cities were chaotic, without maps,  police, or even named streets.  New city-dwellers were fascinated by and afraid of crime, they vilified and romanticized criminals, as well as the police who fought them.The first writing on urban crime pretended to be documentary, but it was filled with archetypes and plots from preceding fiction, particularly the gothic novel. The idea of detection and the figure of the detective were introduced in the early nineteenth century by a Frenchman, Francois-Eugene Vidocq.   He had been a soldier, smuggler, convict and stoolie, but he also founded the French  “security services” in 1812.

When Vidocq’s Memoirs were published  in 1828, they were immediately popular and translated into English.  Balzac modeled the character of Vautrin  in Le Pere Goriot on  Vidocq , and Victor Hugo did the same with Jean Valjean in Les Misérables .  In England the interest  in “crime stories” blended with a strong, existing genre called the gothic novel.  Its influence accounts for the dark settings, obscure motives, and  brilliant solutions in the genre.  Vidocq also influenced Charles Dickens, who used detail and character for Great Expectations  In the U. S., Edgar Allan Poe  read both  Dickens and  Vidocq.  Then in five stories between 1840 and 1845,  he then laid out the formal detective story.

via Dr. William Marling, Case Western Reserve University – Urbanization and the Detective Novel | WAMC.

lions, rescuer, heartwarming, YouTube:

Pope Benedict, resignation, end of an era, Twitter:  “Romans …salute” … Just don’t think of “Romans” in contemporary terms … I wonder if I would go to my rooftop and wave?

Rachel Donadio — NYT

@RachelDonadio

Romans stand on rooftops waving flags to salute the pope as he flies by helicopter into retirement. sunny here today. nice weather for it.

“Do Not Be Afraid”, Dr. James Howell,  

St. Fr

ancis’ Prayer Before the Crucifix, YouTube:  “Look carefully how you walk” … “walk intentionally” … A theme of mine this Lenten season … for some reason I saved this one during my non blogging year … seemed a good one to post today. “Do Not Be Afraid” Dr. James Howell – YouTube. And during his sermon he mentioned this prayer …

St. Francis’ Prayer Before the Crucifix

Most High glorious God, enlighten the darkness of my heart.

Give me right faith, sure hope and perfect charity.

Fill me with understanding and knowledge that I may fulfill your command.

via Friar Jack’s E-spirations: St. Francis’ Prayer Before the Crucifix.

art, Renaissance art, Africans, The Economist:  Something I never thought about … like yesterday, i never thought about Southern art and the Romantic period …

The exhibition ends on a high note with a four-foot tall, gilded-wood statue of Saint Benedict of Palermo. Benedict was born in Sicily to Ethiopian slaves and freed at the age of 18. He became a Franciscan monk and inspired many with his goodness and equanimity. By the early 17th century Benedict was venerated in Italy, Spain and Latin America. He is the patron saint of African-Americans, and churches devoted to his name can be found as far afield as Buenos Aires, Bahía and the Bronx.

Thanks to research that continues to be done by historians and curators such as Ms Spicer, we now know that some of these freed Africans became bakers and gondoliers, mattress makers and courtiers. A few more have been named. However, much still remains to be discovered. Research into the lives of Africans in Renaissance Europe is not finished; in fact, it is only just beginning.

via Africans in the Renaissance: Hue were they? | The Economist.

01
Mar
13

2.28.13 … No matter our age, it seems we are all a little bit scared of the dark …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks,  Avondale Presbyterian Church:

First, I was scared that the labyrinth would not be well lit. It was well lit. What a relief.
Second, I worried it would be too cold.  It was 42 degrees, a perfect temp.
Third, as I drove up the side street,  the view of downtown was phenomenal.  So i walked to the top of the garden hill (with the cross) and snapped a few shots … I don’t think a picture will capture it,  but here it is …
IMG_6165
I heard the water in the fountain rushing and the chimes ringing.
IMG_6161 IMG_6181 IMG_6179
My shadow was very long.
IMG_6174
Even though I had no reason to be fearful, I  was because it was dark and I was alone.   I found my heart was racing just a little bit and I walked much faster than I usually walk when I walk a labyrinth.
IMG_6178 IMG_6182
My feet were sweating in my garden clogs!!
IMG_6167
Beautiful walk in the shadows of the night.

    IMG_6192   IMG_6172

And as I walked, my thoughts went to the Barbara Brown Taylor lecture I attended last winter … Darkness …

No matter our age, it seems we are all a little bit scared of the dark.

Taylor pointed out, though, that in the original story of creation, it was darkness that provided the backdrop for God’s creation of the light…the story says that darkness covered the face of the deep as God stepped up with God’s divine paintbrush to paint the first stroke; darkness was there as a canvas when God began.

And, recounting stories of a smoky underground jazz club where she worked nights while putting herself through seminary, Taylor pointed out that there is a whole other world that happens after dark, a world that many of us never get to see.

She said we need darkness, not only for the life-giving REM cycles that happen in the dark, but for walking outside under a blanket of stars, far enough away from the big city that we can see clearly the Little Dipper and Cassiopeia and Orion, and in seeing the stars clearly through the darkness can, from time to time, see our own lives with a clarity we were missing before.

We need the darkness, she says.  Without it, we can’t hope to see the light.

via 12 | November | 2012 | Talk With the Preacher.

Peace and grace …

Henri Nouwen:  Loved this one today …

We are afraid of emptiness. Spinoza speaks about our “horror vacui,” our horrendous fear of vacancy. We like to occupy-fill up-every empty time and space. We want to be occupied. And if we are not occupied we easily become preoccupied; that is, we fill the empty spaces before we have even reached them. We fill them with our worries, saying, “But what if …”

It is very hard to allow emptiness to exist in our lives. Emptiness requires a willingness not to be in control, a willingness to let something new and unexpected happen. It requires trust, surrender, and openness to guidance. God wants to dwell in our emptiness. But as long as we are afraid of God and God’s actions in our lives, it is unlikely that we will offer our emptiness to God. Let’s pray that we can let go of our fear of God and embrace God as the source of all love.

via Daily Meditation: Letting Go of Our Fear of God.

Southern art, Romantic Spirits Exhibition, Garden and Gun:

Romantic Spirits, a companion exhibit to the book by the same name, will run from March 7 through May 26 at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. From there, it will travel to the Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina and the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia.

via Romantic Spirits Exhibition | Garden and Gun.

Jennifer Lawrence,  Oscars Interview,  Jack Nicholson , ABC News:  So what does Jack Nicholson have to  do with anything … I’ll be waiting …

Lawrence had just described her big win: “I feel like I can’t even remember. It’s kind of an insane moment and it was just really exciting. It was really just shocking.  It was the first time I’ve ever felt, like, actual shock.”

Out of nowhere, Nicholson, 75, walked into the interview and said to Lawrence, “You did such a beautiful job. I didn’t mean to cross into your interview but I had to congratulate you.”

“You’re being really rude,” Lawrence, 22, joked after thanking him.

They gushed over each others’ movies and said goodbye.

He exited and the actress shouted, “Oh my God,” putting her hands in her face. “Is he still there?”

“I’ll be waiting,” said Nicholson, who popped his head back into the interview as a surprise.

via Jennifer Lawrence’s Oscars Interview Interrupted by Jack Nicholson – ABC News.

Pope Benedict XVI, Twitter, WSJ.com: Tweets Gone, But Not Forgotten …

Along with his papal authority, Pope Benedict XVI relinquishes his twitter handle. WSJ’s Jason Bellini has the story of his not-infallible tweeting career.

via Video – Pope Benedict XVI’s Tweets Gone, But Not Forgotten – WSJ.com.

NBA records, Davidson College,  Stephen Curry, kudos:  Kudos, Steph!

NEW YORK — Stephen Curry rose for another jumper, and by then even the Knicks probably figured it would go in.

Curry had hardly missed in a scintillating second half of the NBA’s most electric performance this season, the crowd cheering even before the ball left his hands.

Felton’s blocked shot led to J.R. Smith’s tiebreaking basket with 1:10 left, and the Knicks overcame Curry’s NBA season-high 54 points to beat the Golden State Warriors 109-105 on Wednesday night.

Curry was 18 of 28 from the field, finishing one 3-pointer shy of the NBA record with 11 in 13 attempts, in a performance that had the crowd hanging on his every shot. But the Knicks and Felton finally stopped him with 1:28 to play and the score tied at 105.

“My main thing is to keep playing. Like I said, once a guy gets it going like that, there’s nothing I can really do. I’ve still got to stay in my mindset, still play my game, and I was still able to come up with some big plays at the end,” Felton said. “We all came up with some big plays to get that win.”

via Golden State Warriors vs. New York Knicks – Recap – February 27, 2013 – ESPN.

Lasso, slippers,  Gaspard Tiné-Berès & Ruben Valensi, Kickstarter:  They are so cute!

Each Lasso slipper is made from a single piece of felt, with a leather sole. The flat pattern is shaped simply by sewing the provided lace through the corresponding precut holes. They are delivered flat-packed with laces of your choice and only take a few minutes to assemble.

So we started to look for a manufacturer and found the Sellerie Parisienne, at Villeneuve-Saint-Georges in the Parisian suburbs, a social enterprise that provides work opportunities for people with special needs. It offered all the skills needed to manufacture, package and ship Lasso to the customer. The die was cast! It took a lot more discussions, coffees, pints, sewing and sweat to establish Lasso: a young, social and responsible brand.

Nike must be smacking their corporate heads that they didn’t think of this first. The Lasso Slipper is essentially the simplest concept of a shoe, with sturdy material and a laces holding it all together — much like a pre-sole version of Nike’s Footscape.

via Lasso Slipper: A Flat-Pack Wool-Felt Slipper You Can Assemble Yourself | The Crosby Press – BETA.

Pope Benedict, resignation

BBC News (UK) @BBCNews

Pope on resignation: “I took this step in full awareness of its gravity” but “with profound serenity of spirit”. LIVE

bbc.in/YYiuP6

Chiditarod,  Shopping Cart Race, Chicago’s Urban Iditarod & Epic Food Drive:  Fun …

Dress Up. Cause Chaos. DO GOOD.

Chiditarod Shopping Cart Race

Chiditarod (think Iditarod) is Chicago’s Epic Urban Iditarod. A charity food drive, beauty pageant, costumed shopping cart race, talent show, fundraiser and chaos generator all in one. And probably the world’s largest mobile food drive, benefitting the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

via Chiditarod Shopping Cart Race | Chicago’s Urban Iditarod & Epic Food Drive.

TEDTalks, food:  have I mentioned how much I enjoy TED …

Five of the conference’s most palatable PowerPoints

via TED’s Most Gluttonous – Drink – Thrillist Nation.

Sir Ravi The Juggler, Stanford Student,  Rubik’s Cube, juggling, NPR,  YouTube, random:  very random …

 

Sir Ravi The Juggler – YouTube.

Bowles-Simpson II. The Sequester , Forbes:  We shall see …

Simpson and Bowles, who chaired a 2010 White House deficit reduction panel, presented a broad framework aimed at reducing the debt to “below” 70 percent of Gross Domestic Product in 10 years. The debt/GDP ratio has become a favorite new target for both Democrats and Republicans though, naturally, they disagree on what it should be.

Many Democrats and some progressives want to aim for about 73 percent of GDP, which is what it is today. Many Republicans and other deficit hawks are shooting for about 60 percent, which was the upper bound of member state deficits set by the creators of the Eurozone (not that it’s done them much good). For context, the Congressional Budget Office figures that under the most likely fiscal scenario, th

via Bowles-Simpson II: A New Plan To Avoid The Sequester – Forbes.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

March 2013
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31