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3.1.13 … the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again …

high school classics, YA literature, entertainment, The Atlantic Wire:  Rereading books from my YA era is something I’ve always found to be insightful.  While studying for the bar at 25,  I reread Madeleine L’Engle’s trilogy centered on A Wrinkle in Time, which at that time had become a quartet (and I read the 4th book).  When I read them to my children, the quartet had become a quintet …

If the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again, the classics that we read in high school offer endless possibilities for rediscovery, for looking at ourselves then and now. That’s part of what makes Kevin Smokler’s new book, Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread 50 Books You Haven’t Touched Since High School, so much fun. His homages to 50 titles, including Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, The Bluest Eye, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, and even The Scarlet Letter (he writes, “I don’t like it either,” but argues for rereading it nonetheless), offers a truly enjoyable trip down one’s personal memory lane of books. It’s also a love letter to the act of reading, to continual learning, and to making an effort to slow down and savor the good books in life.

Not all of the works Smokler writes about fall into the category of Y.A., or, for that matter, are even books (and his book, of course, is intended for grownups). There are William Shakespeare plays and Emily Dickinson poems and even the fantastic David Foster Wallace essay, “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again.” Many of the books he reconsiders, for instance, To Kill a Mockingbird and The Catcher in the Rye, while not explicitly intended for teens by their authors, have been huge hits among that readership. The Phantom Tollbooth is widely considered a book for younger readers, and A Separate Peace and The Bell Jar—the latter of which a friend told him, “is for teenage girls what On the Road is for teenage boys”—are surely read most by people under 20. But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Y.A. for Grownups, Kevin Smokler, Books, Publishing, Y.A. Fiction/literature: How had I missed this column …

But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus, rereading, ChristCare:  My ChristCare group is indulging me by reading/studying a book I read in high school, Malcolm Muggeridge’s Jesus … the group is journeying with me.  🙂

Tim Cook, Apple, AAPL: 😦

On Wednesday afternoon, Apple CEO Tim Cook addressed investors and the media at the company’s annual shareholders meeting. It was the sixth time in the last five months that Cook has made something like a public appearance; and it is also the sixth time in the past five months that Apple’s stock (AAPL) has closed down after Cook appeared.

Consider this: The last six times that Cook has put himself out there, Apple’s stock declined afterwards. It’s a streak that dates back to October 2012, when Cook introduced the iPad mini, and it is a trend that has gone unbroken for about five months now: When Cook appears, AAPL goes down

via The Last 6 Times Tim Cook Has Talked, Apple’s Stock Has Dropped.

Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader, historic handshake, iconic images, picture is worth a thousand words:  OK, again  I saved this during my sabbatical from blogging … but this is a very significant picture …

June 27, 2012

In a meeting symbolizing the end of years of enmity between British rule and Northern Ireland republicans, Queen Elizabeth shook hands Wednesday with a former Irish Republican Army commander.

Martin McGuinness, now a deputy first minister of Northern Ireland and a member of the pro-republican Sinn Fein party, was a senior IRA member in the years of sectarian violence. During that time, the group was responsible for blowing up the yacht of Lord Louis Mountbatten, the queen’s cousin, killing him and three others while they vacationed off the coast of Northern Ireland in 1979.

The once unthinkable handshake took place away from media eyes — apart from one camera crew — behind closed doors at a charity arts event in Belfast, witnessed by the queen’s husband, Prince Philip, and leading politicians including Irish President Michael Higgins and Northern Ireland’s first minister, Peter Robinson.

The seemingly mundane greeting was widely heralded as a turning point. Peter Sheridan, host of the event, told reporters, “It’s a huge act of reconciliation, you cannot underestimate how important this is.”

via Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader share historic handshake – latimes.com.

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0 Responses to “3.1.13 … the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again …”



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