26
Mar
13

3.26.13 … a little of this … a little of that …

water fountain, evolution,  WSJ.com:

The basic drinking fountain—requiring you to bend over, press a button and slurp—was a steady seller for decades. Then, nearly 10 years ago, executives of Elkay Manufacturing Co. started noticing what they call “the airport dance.”

More people were toting plastic water bottles. Rather than drinking from the fountain, they wanted to refill those jugs. It wasn’t working.

“We were really changing what a water cooler was,” says Rod Magnuson, a product director at Elkay.

Water is more popular as Americans reduce consumption of high-calorie soft drinks. Tap and bottled water accounted for around 30% of the typical American’s liquid intake last year, up from 16% two decades before, according to Beverage Marketing Corp., a consulting firm. Nearly half of that water came from taps, including drinking fountains.

But Americans are picky. Many consider fountains unsanitary. Though Elkay added antimicrobial agents to the mouth guards, fear of germs lingered.

One of the most inspired features is a digital counter, showing how many bottles have been filled. “I thought that was a dumb idea,” says Jack Krecek, who spearheaded the EZH2O project before leaving Elkay to run another company. But the counter ended up helping “make this thing go viral,” he says. College students liked showing how green they were by tracking how many plastic bottles had been kept out of landfills. Some held intra-campus competitions to see who could reuse the most bottles.

Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa., began buying Elkay fountains after students campaigned against what they saw as plastic-bottle waste. The college has installed 49 of the devices and says more than 1.4 million plastic bottles have been refilled by them over the past two years. Incoming freshmen receive a free stainless-steel water bottle. David Rabold, capital projects manager at Muhlenberg, says sales of bottled water on campus have fallen 90% since EZH2O fountains were installed.

via With Bottle-Fillers in Mind, the Water Fountain Evolves – WSJ.com.

Justice Antonin Scalia, Andy Borowitz, LOL,  The New Yorker:  Andy Borowitz is a hoot …

SCALIA SAYS MARRIAGE VIEWS NOT AFFECTED BY LIFELONG FEAR OF GAYS

POSTED BY ANDY BOROWITZ

via Scalia Says Marriage Views Not Affected by Lifelong Fear of Gays : The New Yorker.

Plainsong:  Since I didn’t know exactly what it was, I thought you might be interested.

History

A sample of the Kýrie Eléison (Orbis Factor) from the Liber Usualis, in neume notation. Listen to it interpreted.

Plainchant is believed to originate from the 3rd century A.D. Gregorian chant is a variety of plainsong named after Pope Gregory I (6th century A.D.), although Gregory himself did not invent the chant. The tradition linking Gregory I to the development of the chant seems to rest on a possibly mistaken identification of a certain “Gregorius”, probably Pope Gregory II, with his more famous predecessor.

For several centuries, different plainchant styles existed concurrently. Standardization on Gregorian chant was not completed, even in Italy, until the 12th century. Plainchant represents the first revival of musical notation after knowledge of the ancient Greek system was lost. Plainsong notation differs from the modern system in having only four lines to the staff and a system of note shapes called neumes.

In the late 9th century, plainsong began to evolve into organum, which led to the development of polyphony.

There was a significant plainsong revival in the 19th century, when much work was done to restore the correct notation and performance-style of the old plainsong collections, notably by the monks of Solesmes Abbey, in northern France. After the Second Vatican Council and the introduction of the New Rite Mass, use of plainsong in the Catholic Church declined and was mostly confined to the monastic orders[1] and to ecclesiastical societies celebrating the traditional Latin Mass (also called Tridentine Mass). But, since Pope Benedict XVI’s motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum, use of the Tridentine rite has increased; this, along with other papal comments on the use of appropriate liturgical music, is promoting a new plainsong revival.[verification needed]

Interest in plainsong picked up in 1950s Britain, particularly in the left-wing religious and musical groups associated with Gustav Holst and the writer George B. Chambers. In the late 1980s, plainchant achieved a certain vogue as music for relaxation, and several recordings of plainchant became “classical-chart hits”.

[edit]

via Plainsong – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

design, history, childhood, Brain Pickings:

“Children help us to mediate between the ideal and the real.”

“Every child is an artist,” Picasso famously proclaimed. “Every child is a scientist,” Neil deGrasse Tyson reformulated. But, as it turns out, every child is also a designer — so argues Century of the Child: Growing by Design 1900-2000 (public library), the impressive companion book to the MoMA exhibition of the same title, which explores “children as design activists in their own right, pushing against imaginative and physical limitations and constantly re-creating the world as they see it, using whatever equipment they happen to have at hand.”

via A Design History of Childhood | Brain Pickings.

Rome, museums, travel, serendipity, Fodor’s Travel Guides:  Definitely into the off the beaten path!

Whether it’s your first trip or your fifth, there are plenty of good reasons to stray from the beaten path a bit in Rome. Yes, see the Spanish Steps, but then check out the Keats Shelley Memorial House. Sure, tour the Vatican, but add a trip to the Museo Ebraico before the day’s done. And between that mouthwatering lunch and your wine-soaked dinner, pack in a trip to the Doria Pamphilj Gallery, which will make for some solid dinner conversation.

via Rome’s Off-the-Beaten-Path Museums | Travel News from Fodor’s Travel Guides.


0 Responses to “3.26.13 … a little of this … a little of that …”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 630 other followers

March 2013
S M T W T F S
« Feb   Apr »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

%d bloggers like this: