06
May
13

5.6.13 … back at it …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking,  Sharon Baptist Church – Charlotte NC: I call this my Walmart labyrinth. I call it my Walmart labyrinth because I’m not particularly fond of it, but it is on my route to the super Walmart. So here I am  today enjoying this very odd cool May day, the second such day in a row. And I’ll make an attempt at solving. Blessings.

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Colbert Busch, Mark Sanford,  Nate Silver, SC 1st Congressional District, NYTimes.com:  Really enjoy Nate Silver’s analysis.  So from his analysis, it seems the only reason for a Republican to vote for via Colbert Busch is to punish Sanford.

… even if Ms. Colbert Busch does win on Tuesday, how long might she be able to hold on to such a solidly Republican seat?If recent history is any guide, not that long.Since 1997 which is as far back as records of special elections go on history.house.gov, candidates who won a special election in a district carried by the opposing political party in the preceding presidential election have had fleeting tenures in Congress.There have been 59 special elections since 1997, and just 14 candidates have carried districts that leaned away from their political party a Republican representing a Democratic-leaning seat or vice versa. Of those 14, 13 no longer hold those seats.1 The lone exception is Representative Ron Barber, who won a full term in Arizona’s Eighth Congressional District in 2012 after winning a special election to replace former Representative Gabrielle Giffords.Most of those 14 special election upsets occurred in districts that are less partisan than South Carolina’s first district.

via Colbert Busch Might Win, but Could She Last? – NYTimes.com.

Niall Ferguson, John Maynard Keynes:  Rewriting history, giant leaps …

Harvard historian Niall Ferguson has apologized after suggesting that John Maynard Keynes’ economic theories were influenced by the fact that he was gay and childless, and therefore was unconcerned with the welfare of future generations. He wrote, “First, it is obvious that people who do not have children also care about future generations. Second, I had forgotten that Keynes’s wife Lydia miscarried.” Ferguson tends to court controversy — his 2012 book Civilization:The West and the Rest was widely seen as an apology for Western colonialism.

via Book News: Harper Lee Says Literary Agent Exploited Her Health : The Two-Way : NPR.

Thin Places,  TMBS, FPC-Charlotte, NYTimes.com:  A friend shared this on FB and I thought it worth mentioning again.

 So what exactly makes a place thin? It’s easier to say what a thin place is not. A thin place is not necessarily a tranquil place, or a fun one, or even a beautiful one, though it may be all of those things too. Disney World is not a thin place. Nor is Cancún. Thin places relax us, yes, but they also transform us — or, more accurately, unmask us. In thin places, we become our more essential selves.

via Thin Places, Where We Are Jolted Out of Old Ways of Seeing the World – NYTimes.com.

We used the concept of “thin places” to anchor a week of a FPC bible study I attend and included this article.  Here is the outline of our discussion:

“Thin Places” Feb. 5: This Tuesday we will wrap up our Epiphany study with a look at the Transfiguration (Luke 9:28-36). In Barbara Brown Taylor’s sermon about the Transfiguration, she refers “thin places”.

This term, originating in Celtic spirituality, refers to a place in which the boundary between the holy and the ordinary becomes very thin. It has come to describe both sacred and secular spaces as shown in the following two articles.

Thin Places of Faith Dr. Karyn L.Wiseman – Huffington Post Where Heaven and Earth Come Closer Eric Weiner – NYT

Think about when and where those places have occurred in your life and how you might re-create these spaces day to day. Moving from Discovering Christ to Practicing the Discipleship of Christ, these encounters with the holy can help deepen our Lenten experiences. As noted in a sermon by Rev. Nicholas Lang, “Christian practices—what we do here in this sacred space—have as their central purpose to provide the possibility for us to encounter a thin place where our hearts are opened.” We’ll spend some time on Tuesday discussing these glimpses through the “cracked doors… where God is a palpable presence” (Taylor p. 58).

The Rustbelt Almanac, Louisville:  I am very interested in the Rust Belt and its people, so I will take a look at The Rustbelt Almanac—A New Quarterly About Industrious People,  Louisville is this odd, but charming, mixture of The South and the Rust Belt.

WHY THE RUST BELT?

America’s Rust Belt is the sprawling region stretching from the Northeast across the Midwest, and into parts of the Upper South – most notably characterized by a vast void left by manufacturing industries that once dominated the economic landscape, but have long since gone by the wayside. While industry may have moved elsewhere, the work-ethic has not. The region is home to countless industrious people; artists, craftsman, laborers, entrepreneurs – Makers. That same void left by industry is the reason the region has such unimaginable potential for growth: there is room for the folks who want to take risks and start something new.

via About — Rustbelt Almanac.


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