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Jul
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7.12.13 … Corn Chowder Salad: I must be hungry … driverless cars: “What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself”… Another of those great Lindsey family debates (second only to the value of the electoral college): boil them or grill them? … The Met has reached into its bottomless duffel bag of curiosities to present an exhibition of early and extremely rare baseball cards … Can you see Hugh Grant as The Doctor?

Corn Chowder Salad:  I must be hungry … I had some corn today…not very good.  I have a bowl of corn for a higher purpose.

original

This is a fun twist on a corn chowder recipe that I love from my native New England.  I have been living in the heartland (Chicago) for over a year and as I look at all of this fresh corn,   it makes me wonder – is it tooo hot for corn chowder?  Maybe, but I wonder – how about a corn chowder SALAD?   It absolutely works and its gives you that homey feeling when you eat it.

via Corn Chowder Salad.

driverless cars, cities, NYTimes.com: “What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself.”

Imagine a city where you don’t drive in loops looking for a parking spot because your car drops you off and scoots off to some location to wait, sort of like taxi holding pens at airports. Or maybe it’s picked up by a robotic minder and carted off with other vehicles, like a row of shopping carts.

A test of Google’s self-driving car.

Inner-city parking lots could become parks. Traffic lights could be less common because hidden sensors in cars and streets coordinate traffic. And, yes, parking tickets could become a rarity since cars will be smart enough to know where they are not supposed to be.

As scientists and car companies forge ahead — many expect self-driving cars to become commonplace in the next decade — researchers, city planners and engineers are contemplating how city spaces could change if our cars start doing the driving for us. There are risks, of course: People might be more open to a longer daily commute, leading to even more urban sprawl.

That city of the future could have narrower streets because parking spots would no longer be necessary. And the air would be cleaner because people would drive less. According to the the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 30 percent of driving in business districts is wasted in a hunt for a parking spot. The agency estimates that almost one billion miles of driving is wasted every year as people search for parking.

“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself,” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law, who specializes in robotics and drones.

via Disruptions: How Driverless Cars Could Reshape Cities – NYTimes.com.

Hot Dogs, Sous Vide, Electrocution, BA Daily, Bon Appétit, kith/kin:  Another of those great Lindsey family debates (second only to the value of the electoral college): Do you boil your hot dogs? Grill them?

According to this article … Mere child’s play! Check out these 10 weird cooking methods, from sous vide to solar power to (gulp!) electrocution …

Photo: Do you boil your hot dogs? Grill them? Mere child's play! Check out these 10 weird cooking methods, from sous vide to solar power to (gulp!) electrocution >> http://bonapp.it/178ZIch

COOKING TIPS

10 Weird Ways to Cook Hot Dogs, from Sous Vide to Electrocution

It doesn’t get much easier than throwing a hot dog on the grill. But it does get harder–if you so choose. We rounded up 10 alternative ways to cook a hot dog, then checked in to see what the Bon Appetit Test Kitchen had to say about them.

via 10 Weird Ways to Cook Hot Dogs, from Sous Vide to Electrocution: BA Daily: Bon Appétit.

Metropolitan Museum,  baseball cards, NYTimes.com:  Add this exhibit to the list … loved baseball cards, especially the famous Honus Wagner card.  Why you ask?  I loved reading this book to my son Edward … Honus and Me: A Baseball Card Adventure: Dan Gutman.

Tinker to Evers to Chance. Tinker to Evers to Chance. I don’t care that much about the All-Star Game, but Tinker to Evers to Chance.

Please don’t misunderstand. In my boyhood my life was so defined by baseball that I often conflated the Yankees starting lineup with the Twelve Apostles (batting leadoff and playing second base, Horace Clarke; batting second and playing center field, Simon who is called Peter). But the use of performance-enhancing drugs — by the players, not me — and the related corruption of once-sacrosanct statistics have cooled my enthusiasm. Not for baseball so much as for the baseball of today.

I prefer a more innocent time. A time when the same ball might last the entire game, and fielders wore gloves not much larger than their hands, and batters strived to hit ’em where they ain’t. A time when ballplayers brawled with fans, and tobacco companies used baseball cards to entice the young, and a small group of corrupt baseball heroes from Chicago could throw the World Series, and …

In truth, the dead-ball era was about as innocent as the gyrations of Little Egypt, the Dita Von Teese of the day. But this distant time — a two-decade period between the close of the 19th century and the ascent of a true game changer, the home run hitter Babe Ruth — was far more colorful, helping to cement baseball’s claim as the national pastime.

Now, as if to please wayward fans, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has reached into its bottomless duffel bag of curiosities to present an exhibition of early and extremely rare baseball cards. Rows and rows of long-dead ballplayers stare out from the past like the mug-shot denizens of the New York Police Department’s once-famous Rogues Gallery.

via Metropolitan Museum Opens Huge Show of Baseball Cards – NYTimes.com.

and yes, the Honus Wagner card is part of the exhibit …

And while it may not be a masterpiece from the Northern Renaissance, Ms. Spira also has a rare T206 Honus Wagner card, the size of a matchbox and valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions. Its worth derives partly from the supposed back story: that Wagner, a shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates and perhaps the greatest all-around player in history, blocked continued production of the card because he did not want to help promote cigarettes to children.

Beyond that, the card is striking for the rugged nobility conveyed in the face of its subject. He was the awkward son of hardscrabble immigrants, big-chested, bowlegged and with shovel-like hands that threw rocks and dirt to first base along with the ball. But he was baseball royalty, and his expression on this card says he knew it.

via Metropolitan Museum Opens Huge Show of Baseball Cards – NYTimes.com.

The Periodic Table of the Muppets, Mike BaBoon Design: fun …

A comprehensive depiction of many memorable Muppet characters from throughout the years (and some not-so-memorable ones as well).

Each square represents a different character and indicates the primary Muppeteer(s) for that character, as well as the year and production in which the character made its debut. Borders align with hair/hat colour, background aligns with skin/fur colour, and colour of the abbreviated name represents nose colour (for characters with noses that is).

The separate sections are based on the show the characters were either created for or most often associated with. The icons within each section are then organized by year of creation.

via Mike BaBoon Design: The Periodic Table of the Muppets.

 Hugh Grant, Almost,  The Doctor,  Mental Floss:  Can you see Hugh Grant as The Doctor?

Romantic comedy lead Hugh Grant now seems an unlikely choice for a sci-fi hero, but he was one of the first actors approached when casting a Ninth Doctor for the 2005 series revival. Grant turned the part down due to skepticism about the show’s potential to succeed, but he later got a second chance of sorts when playing one of the Doctor’s regenerations in a 1999 spoof production for charity which also featured fellow would-be Doctor Joanna Lumley. With trademark self-deprecation, the actor notes that while he regrets his choice, it might have done the show some good, as he’d “probably make a mess of it” anyway.

via 11 People Who Almost Played The Doctor | Mental Floss.


0 Responses to “7.12.13 … Corn Chowder Salad: I must be hungry … driverless cars: “What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself“What automation is going to allow is repurposing, both of spaces in cities, and of the car itself”… Another of those great Lindsey family debates (second only to the value of the electoral college): boil them or grill them? … The Met has reached into its bottomless duffel bag of curiosities to present an exhibition of early and extremely rare baseball cards … Can you see Hugh Grant as The Doctor?”



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