07
Aug
13

8.7.13 … The Opt-Out Generation … me, me, me … So who was the first to cite twitter in an academic paper? … a little research on Churchill and Lawrence … Kudos to ‘NewsHour’ … Banksy and unintended consequences … Twyla’s 50-state labyrinth journey … Henrietta Lacks: I hope this privacy agreement brings closure to the family … heartbreaker: Two-Year-Old Best Man

The Opt-Out Generation,  NYTimes.com: That’s me, that’s me … Article is worth reading.

“I really thought it was what I had to do to save my marriage,” she said. But the tensions in her marriage didn’t improve. The couple’s long-term issues of anger, jealousy and control got worse as O’Donnel’s dependency grew and a sense of personal dislocation set in. Without a salary or an independent work identity, her self-confidence plummeted. “I felt like such a loser,” she said. “I poured myself into the kids and soccer. I didn’t know how to deal with the downtime. I did all the volunteering, ran the auctions. It was my way of coping.” Five years after leaving her Oracle job, O’Donnel began volunteering for Girls on the Run, a nonprofit group devoted to girls’ emotional empowerment and physical well-being, and was eventually hired part time, at low pay. She loved the work. The organization’s message, about respecting yourself and surrounding yourself with people who appreciate you, resonated with her. “I started feeling very devalued when I was with him,” O’Donnel said of her husband, “but when I was doing all this nonprofit stuff, I felt great.” … The culture of motherhood, post-recession, had altered considerably, too. The women of the opt-out revolution left the work force at a time when the prevailing ideas about motherhood idealized full-time, round-the-clock, child-centered devotion. In 2000, for example, with the economy strong and books like “Surrendering to Motherhood,” a memoir about the “liberation” of giving up work to stay home, setting the tone for the aspirational mothering style of the day, almost 40 percent of respondents to the General Social Survey told researchers they believed a mother’s working was harmful to her children (an increase of eight percentage points since 1994). But by 2010, with recovery from the “mancession” slow and a record 40 percent of mothers functioning as family breadwinners, fully 75 percent of Americans agreed with the statement that “a working mother can establish just as warm and secure a relationship with her children as a mother who does not work.” And after decades of well-publicized academic inquiry into the effects of maternal separation and the dangers of day care, a new generation of social scientists was publishing research on the negative effects of excessive mothering: more depression and worse general health among mothers, according to the American Psychological Association. I wondered if these changes affected the women who opted out years ago. Had they found the “escape hatch” from the rat race that one of Belkin’s interviewees said she was after? Were they able, as a vast majority said they had planned, to transition back into the work force? Or had they, as the author Leslie Bennetts predicted in her 2007 book, “The Feminine Mistake,” come to see that, by making themselves financially dependent upon their men — particularly at a time when no man could depend upon his job — they had made a colossal error? The 22 women I interviewed, for the most part, told me that the perils of leaving the work force were counterbalanced by the pleasures of being able to experience motherhood on their own terms. A certain number of these women — the superelite, you might say, the most well-off, with the highest-value name-brand educational credentials and powerful and well-connected social networks — found jobs easily after extended periods at home. These jobs generally paid less than their previous careers and were less prestigious. But the women found the work more interesting, socially conscious and family-friendly than their old high-powered positions. via The Opt-Out Generation Wants Back In – NYTimes.com.

Twitter, MLA , citations: So who was the first to cite twitter in an academic paper?

meghugs meghugs 3 Aug English major nerd alert: MLA has officially devised a standard way to cite a tweet in an academic paper. pic.twitter.com/BWZfKDXSY7 via Twitter / meghugs: English major nerd alert: MLA ….

TE Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia, Winston Churchill:  Thanks, Bob … I had to divert myself to do a little research on Churchill and Lawrence.  🙂

Bob:  Upon Lawrence’s death in 1935, Winston Churchill said “I fear whatever our need, we shall never see his like again”. Sunday at 8:01pm · Unlike · 1

Born into a privileged British family, Churchill had a colorful career as a soldier and war correspondent before he entered politics as a member of parliament. When Lawrence publicly refused to accept his gallantry medals Churchill realized the deep discontent among Arabs. Churchill first encountered T.E. Lawrence after World War I when, as Colonial Secretary, he was charged with making a new and more just settlement in the Middle East. He determined to assemble the best and brightest of Britain’s Middle East experts. Despite Lawrence’s maverick reputation Churchill could not overlook his vast knowledge of the Arabs and their needs. Churchill persuaded Lawrence back into public service in 1921 with a special post in the Colonial office. Lawrence had enormous respect for Churchill and genuinely believed they could repair the injury done to the Arabs at the Paris Peace Conference, stabilize the region and remove British armed forces. The Cairo Conference set out to achieve this end and resulted in Feisal being given a Kingdom in Iraq and his brother the throne of neighboring Transjordan. Lawrence later wrote: “In Winston’s 1922 settlement of the Middle East the Arabs obtained all that in my opinion they had been promised by Great Britain, in any sphere in which we were free to act”. The pair remained in contact until Lawrence’s death in 1935 when Churchill headed the list of notable mourners. He said of Lawrence: “I fear whatever our need we shall never see his like again.” Churchill went on to lead his country through the darkest hours of World War II as both Prime Minister and Minister of Defense between 1940-1945. He returned for a second term in 1951, was knighted in 1953 and resigned as Prime Minister in 1955. Churchill remained in politics until 1964, dying a few short months later at the grand old age of 90. via Lawrence of Arabia . Winston Churchill | PBS.

‘NewsHour’,  First Female Anchor Team, kudos, NYTimes.com:  Kudos to ‘NewsHour’ not so much because it has appointed two women but because it has appointed two excellent women.

The PBS “NewsHour,” which was co-anchored for decades by the two men who created it, will soon be co-anchored by two women. PBS announced on Tuesday that Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff would take over the nightly newscast in September, putting an end to the rotating anchor format that has been in effect for several years. Ms. Ifill and Ms. Woodruff will also share the managing-editor responsibilities for the program. via ‘NewsHour’ Appoints First Female Anchor Team – NYTimes.com.

Banksy, kudos, unintended consequences, ARTINFO:  I like it that Banksy took responsibility for his unintended consequences.

In 2011, while in Los Angeles promoting his documentary “Exit Through the Gift Shop,” the shadowy British street artist Banksy tagged a vaguely elephantine water tank near the Pacific Coast Highway with the sentence “This Looks a Bit Like an Elephant.” Unbeknown to him, the abandoned tank had been serving as a makeshift home for Tachowa Covington, and the attention brought by the famous artist’s stencil forced him to abandon his home of seven years.

2013-08-06-banksyelephanthomeless.jpeg

via Capturing Banksy

“I watched it for a month or so,” Covington told the Independent, recounting his discovery of the tank after it was abandoned in 2004. “Eventually, I climbed inside and saw that it was empty. I thought, ‘Wow. This would be a cool place to make a house.’ I picked it as a sanctuary, a place to kick back, to be close to God and to the ocean.” A choreographer and dancer, and a former escort and Michael Jackson impersonator originally from Sacramento, Covington became friendly with the local police, who didn’t bother him, and even had his mail delivered to the tank. “People left me alone because they thought it was an empty tank and I was just climbing up there with a sleeping bag,” he told the Independent. “But I was building inside the whole time.” By the time February 21, 2011 rolled around, he had installed a generator and security cameras, and was lobbying to secure squatter rights to the tank. That’s the night he heard to people moving around outside his home. “I looked out of the hatch, and there were two guys there,” he told the Independent. “I asked what they were doing, and one of them said, ‘We’re just making a joke’. I climbed down the ladder, looked at the writing, and I said, ‘Hey, that looks pretty cool!’ I introduced myself, and the English dude told me his name was Banksy. I didn’t know who he was, so I didn’t think twice about it.” Less than two weeks later, after buying the tank directly from the city of Los Angeles, the owners of the design firm Mint Currency had it removed by crane and trucked away, leaving Covington just 16 hours to gather his possessions and vacate his home of seven years. That’s when Banksy stepped in to help the man he’d inadvertently left homeless, giving him enough money to find an apartment and pay his bills for a full year. “He helped me so fast, I didn’t have to spend a single day more on the streets. It was like a miracle,” Covington said. “There ain’t no better man than Banksy… He was an angel to me. He helped me more than anybody helped me in my life.” Recently, the artist’s money ran out, and Covington was forced to move back to the hillside where his water tank home once stood while he waits for state-supported housing to become available. In the meantime, his story has inspired a new play, “Banksy: The Room in the Elephant” — which debuts at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this week — and a forthcoming documentary. via Banksy Gave a Man Whose Home He Tagged Enough Money To Live for a Year | ARTINFO.

labyrinth, journeys, 

New York City Reflections: Join My Journey:

Godspeed on your walks!

My journey began on May 18, 2012. My goal is to complete it by April 30, 2014. As with any journey, but particularly this one, it began with a single step.  A step into a labyrinth. Anne Hornstein’s labyrinth on Miramar Beach, Florida.  It was the first state of 50 that I will visit.  All outdoor labyrinths, grounded in the earth.  All created by women. Since Florida, I have visited a labyrinth in 20 states.  Nineteen built in yards. One on a beach.  Each with a story.  I have walked each labyrinth except the one in New Jersey, made unwalkable by Hurricane Irene. (Bianca Franchi has since rebuilt it.)  I have listened to each woman’s story. The idea came from, well, who knows where.  That mysterious Voice that sneaks up on you from “out of the blue,” or as a needling nudge that elbows you at 2:00 am and won’t go back to sleep. “You love to write.  You love labyrinths.  Write about labyrinths, one in every state.” An ambitious Voice to be sure! For those of you unfamiliar with the labyrinth, it is an ancient design consisting of one path that leads from an entrance on the outer edge, in a circuitous way, to the center and back out.

Not a maze

No confusion

One way in

One way out

“It is a walking meditation.  A tool to quiet the mind, reduce stress, open the heart.” (Lauren Artress) via New York City Reflections: Join My Journey.

Welcome! Thank you for reading my blog about our first (now second) year in New York City! In addition to my NYC experiences, I’m in the process of making a 50-state labyrinth journey, which will end in April 2014. I invite you to share these exciting adventures and everything in between! All the best, Twylla via New York City Reflections: Join My Journey.

NIH,  privacy agreement,  Henrietta Lacks’ family, The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksThe Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a classic.  I hope this privacy agreement brings closure to the family.

“The main issue was the privacy concern,” says Lacks’ grandson, David Lacks Jr. “Right now we are in the early stages of genomic science or genomic medicine and we don’t know what is going to come down the road in the future.” The new agreement requires NIH-funded researchers to use a “controlled-access” database of the HeLA cell genome, governed by a panel that contains Lacks family members, still living today in Baltimore. The agency is also asking biomedical researchers not funded by NIH to abide by the agreement as a matter of scientific ethics. Noting that he has used HeLa cells in his own lab, Collins stated that more steps need to be taken to protect privacy rights of genetic sample donors in the future — even those not made famous by a best-selling book. “Frankly the science has moved faster than the consent process, and maybe it is time to catch up,” Collins said in a telephone briefing on the agreement Wednesday. A related study in the journal, led by Andrew Adey of the University of Washington in Seattle, reports on the identification and location of the human papilloma virus genes inserted into the HeLA cell gene map that caused them to become cancerous. Collins called the study an important step in understanding what made the HeLa cancer cells so deadly to Lacks — and also made the cells so resilient in the lab. Collins drove up to Baltimore to talk the agreement over with members of the Lacks family. “That wasn’t lost on the family,” says author Skloot, who helped set up the meetings with the NIH and family members, and listened to the discussions. “This was the first time in history that scientists really took this kind of time with the family in a really open and transparent way.” via NIH makes privacy agreement with Henrietta Lacks’ family.

Two-Year-Old Best Man Dies Two Days After His Parents Marry, TIME.com:  This one is a heartbreaker.

A toddler who served as the best man at his parents’ wedding over the weekend, died Monday due to complications associated with Fanconi anemia, a rare blood disorder, the Today Show reports. Logan Stevenson had been suffering from leukemia and malignant tumors on his kidneys since December 2011. When doctors recently told his parents, Christine Swidorsky and Sean Stevenson, that their son only had a few weeks to live, the couple decided to get married this past Saturday instead of next July, as they had planned, so that their son could be there. During a backyard wedding at the family’s home in Jeannette, Pennsylvania, east of Pittsburgh, the terminally-ill boy, dressed in a tan, pinstripe suit and orange shirt, held his favorite teddy bear while his mother carried him down the aisle before passing him off to his grandmother. Being all together as a family was “a dream come true,” Swidorsky told NBC’s WPXI. via Two-Year-Old Best Man Dies Two Days After His Parents Marry | TIME.com.


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