06
Oct
13

10.6.13 … A while back I told you about the “menurkey”, today I found a Thanksgivukkah FAQ and menu!

A while back I told you about the “menurkey” (8.30.13 … I am not Jewish, but I may have to order a Menurkey ….), today I found a Thanksgivukkah FAQ and menu!

 

As many of you know by now, November 28, 2013, will be both (American) Thanksgiving and the 1st day of Chanukah! The possibilities are endless: deep-fried turkey; latkes with cranberry sauce and gravy; pumpkin sufganiot; I’m sure you have more in mind. This week an article by Jonathan Mizrahi on this calendar issue has been making the rounds. It has some excellent graphs illustrating both the rarity of Thanksgivukkah in our present era and the long-term drift of the calendar that will make Thanksgivukkah impossible in the future, but it somewhat overstates its primary claim that Chanukah and Thanksgiving are “a once in eternity overlap”. This FAQ answers some questions that this article has inspired in various other forums, and corrects a few nuances.

via Thanksgivukkah FAQ | Jewschool.

With nine original recipes that combine the best foods from both holidays.

Coming up with Thanksgivukkah recipes meant BuzzFeed Food editors asked themselves some important questions, such as: How do you make pumpkin pie Jewish? (Answer: Add rye flour and caraway seeds to the crust, then teach it a Torah portion.) How much sweet potato do you need to add to a noodle kugel to make it taste like Thanksgiving? (A lot, and then some bourbon too.) Does challah make a good turkey stuffing? (OH MY GOODNESS, YES.)

After testing, retesting, and then asking other BuzzFeed writers with less cooking experience to test them again, we are ecstatic with the results.

We know that cooking this entire menu might be unappealing to sane people; it’s just for fun, and the idea is that you can pick and choose the dishes that appeal to you. Feel free to email the BuzzFeed Food editors with any questions.

 

Some traditional rugelach recipes already call for pecans. But it’s the light corn syrup that sets these apart. They taste exactly like pecan pie — only bite-sized. Recipe and step-by-step photos here.

via How To Celebrate Thanksgivukkah, The Best Holiday Of All Time.

 

Plus fun DIY decoration ideas.

Some traditional rugelach recipes already call for pecans. But it’s the light corn syrup that sets these apart. They taste exactly like pecan pie — only bite-sized. Recipe and step-by-step photos here.

via How To Celebrate Thanksgivukkah, The Best Holiday Of All Time.

 

 


0 Responses to “10.6.13 … A while back I told you about the “menurkey”, today I found a Thanksgivukkah FAQ and menu!”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 629 other followers

October 2013
S M T W T F S
« Sep   Nov »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

%d bloggers like this: