Archive for November 3rd, 2013

03
Nov
13

11.3.13 … I did not grow up with All Saints’ Day, or Día de Muertos either, but I enjoy embracing new ways to celebrate my faith and my family …

“For those we have known and loved, who by their faithful obedience and steadfast hope have shown the same mind that was in Christ Jesus, who have finished their race and are now at rest with you, we give you thanks, O God. Keep us grateful for their witness and eager to follow in the way of Christ. Then at the last, bring us with them to share in the inheritance of the saints in light.” http://bit.ly/19YaTH8

via Fourth Presbyterian Church.

03
Nov
13

11.3.13 … “People’s circadian rhythm — the body’s internal clock — follows the sun and changes depending on where you live. It actually changes in four-minute intervals, exactly the time it takes for the sun to cross one line of longitude, Roenneberg explained. ‘The circadian clock does not change to the social change.'” …

The transition from or to DST is much easier with clocks that automatically reset.  I really don’t think I have much trouble transitioning … but others do.

Changing to daylight saving time may give people an hour more of sunlight, but it appears that their internal body clocks never really adjusts to the change, German researchers report.

In fact, daylight saving time can cause a significant seasonal disruption that might have other effects on our bodies, according to the report in the Oct. 24 online edition of Current Biology.

“When you change clocks to daylight saving time, you don’t change anything related to sun time,” explained lead researcher Till Roenneberg of Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. “This is one of those human arrogances — that we can do whatever we want as long as we are disciplined. We forget that there is a biological clock that is as old as living organisms, a clock that cannot be fooled. The pure social change of time cannot fool the clock.”

People’s circadian rhythm — the body’s internal clock — follows the sun and changes depending on where you live. It actually changes in four-minute intervals, exactly the time it takes for the sun to cross one line of longitude, Roenneberg explained.

“The circadian clock does not change to the social change,” Roenneberg said. “During the winter, there is a beautiful tracking of dawn in human sleep behavior, which is completely and immediately interrupted when daylight saving time is introduced in March,” he said. It returns to normal this year when standard time returns on Nov. 4, he added.

Daylight saving time may be one cause of what Roenneberg called our lack of seasonality. By seasonality, he means that our internal clock is in tune with the natural change in light throughout the year. “This could have long-term effects,” he said.

In the study, Roenneberg’s group collected data on the sleep patterns of 55,000 people in Central Europe. The researchers found that sleep time on days off work when daylight saving time took effect followed the seasonal progression of dawn under standard time, but not under daylight saving time.

In a another study, Roenneberg’s group looked at the timing of sleep and activity for eight weeks during the change to daylight saving time in 50 people, taking into account each person’s natural clock preferences, or “chronotypes,” which range from morning larks to night owls.

For both morning larks and night owls, their timing for sleep and peak activity easily adjusted when daylight saving time ended in the fall. However, it never adjusted to the return to daylight saving time in spring. This was especially true for night owls — those who stay up late and sleep late.

“If we didn’t change to daylight saving time, people would adjust to dawn during the summer and again to dawn in the autumn,” Roenneberg. “But this natural adjustment is interrupted by daylight saving time,” he said.

One expert believes daylight saving time is only one of the ways we try to fool our biological clock.

“It is not surprising that when you change our time to respond to something other than the sun and daylight that different chronotypes are going to have a difficult time,” said Dr. Louis Ptacek, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the John C. Coleman Distinguished Professorship in Neurodegenerative Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco

via Body’s Clock Never Adjusts to Daylight Saving Time – ABC News.

03
Nov
13

11.3.13 … :) …

Edith Head Talks, Audrey Hepburn, Google Doodles:


Edith Head: Google Doodle honors Hollywood legend (+video) – CSMonitor.com.

via ▶ Edith Head Talks about Audrey Hepburn – YouTube.

Norman Rockwell,  ’Coinoisseur’ 1962 ,  Jackson Pollock:

The third painting is by illustrator Norman Rockwell (b 1894 – 1978 New York USA)  ’Coinoisseur’ 1962 – a tribute to Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock (b. 1912 – 1966 USA).  Whilst the painting is sometimes interpreted as a compliment to Pollock – it is also interesting to note the comparison between Rockwell’s illustrative art and the new Modern art of Pollock who was big news in the art scene of 1962.

via The Art of Progress | Echostains Blog.

 

Original \”USS Enterprise reacts to MTV\’s Video Music Awards.\”

via ▶ Captain Kirk watches Miley Cyrus performance – YouTube.

Wallace’s ‘Big Fish’,  Broadway:

“Big Fish” is making a new splash — on Broadway.

Fifteen years ago, Daniel Wallace published his first novel, “Big Fish,” and 10 years ago, the Tim Burton version of the movie by the same title came out. This month the musical, also “Big Fish,” premiered on Broadway.

“I started writing about my father, stories that are drawn from the man my father was, and I mixed it up with the other thing that I was interested in, which is Greek myths,” Wallace said.

Wallace is currently a UNC professor and the director of the creative writing program, and he has written several books since “Big Fish.”

Like the movie and the novel, the musical tells the story of Edward Bloom, a man from a small town in Alabama with a knack for storytelling. The story is one of reconciliation between the dying father, Edward, and his son, Will.

Wallace said the same people who worked on and wrote the musical also worked on and wrote the movie.

“I thought it was a thing that would never, ever happen, so I never took it seriously,” Wallace said.

“The fact that it happened still, it’s stunning to me.”

via The Daily Tar Heel :: Wallace’s ‘Big Fish’ premieres on Broadway this month.

man’s best friend:

holidays:




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