22
Feb
14

2.22.14 … “Puett tells his students that being calculating and rationally deciding on plans is precisely the wrong way to make any sort of important life decision. The Chinese philosophers they are reading would say that this strategy makes it harder to remain open to other possibilities that don’t fit into that plan. Students who do this “are not paying enough attention to the daily things that actually invigorate and inspire them, out of which could come a really fulfilling, exciting life” …

Why Are Hundreds of Harvard Students Studying Ancient Chinese Philosophy?,  The Atlantic: My nephew posted this article.  I am very proud to have been given both  an education and  a trade.  I use my education everyday, my trade, not so much.

Why are so many undergraduates spending a semester poring over abstruse Chinese philosophy by scholars who lived thousands of years ago? For one thing, the class fulfills one of Harvard’s more challenging core requirements, Ethical Reasoning. It’s clear, though, that students are also lured in by Puett’s bold promise: “This course will change your life.”

His students tell me it is true: that Puett uses Chinese philosophy as a way to give undergraduates concrete, counter-intuitive, and even revolutionary ideas, which teach them how to live a better life.  Elizabeth Malkin, a student in the course last year, says, “The class absolutely changed my perspective of myself, my peers, and of the way I view the world.” Puett puts a fresh spin on the questions that Chinese scholars grappled with centuries ago. He requires his students to closely read original texts (in translation) such as Confucius’s Analects, the Mencius, and the Daodejing and then actively put the teachings into practice in their daily lives. His lectures use Chinese thought in the context of contemporary American life to help 18- and 19-year-olds who are struggling to find their place in the world figure out how to be good human beings; how to create a good society; how to have a flourishing life.

Puett began offering his course to introduce his students not just to a completely different cultural worldview but also to a different set of tools. He told me he is seeing more students who are “feeling pushed onto a very specific path towards very concrete career goals” than he did when he began teaching nearly 20 years ago.  A recent report shows a steep decline over the last decade in the number of Harvard students who are choosing to major in the humanities, a trend roughly seen across the nation’s liberal arts schools. Finance remains the most popular career for Harvard graduates. Puett sees students who orient all their courses and even their extracurricular activities towards practical, predetermined career goals and plans.

Puett tells his students that being calculating and rationally deciding on plans is precisely the wrong way to make any sort of important life decision. The Chinese philosophers they are reading would say that this strategy makes it harder to remain open to other possibilities that don’t fit into that plan. Students who do this “are not paying enough attention to the daily things that actually invigorate and inspire them, out of which could come a really fulfilling, exciting life,” he explains. If what excites a student is not the same as what he has decided is best for him, he becomes trapped on a misguided path, slated to begin an unfulfilling career. Puett aims to open his students’ eyes to a different way to approach everything from relationships to career decisions. He teaches them that …

via Why Are Hundreds of Harvard Students Studying Ancient Chinese Philosophy? – Christine Gross-Loh – The Atlantic.

The Reluctant Tweeter: Joyce Carol Oates, Re/code:  I have wondered why some authors tweet and whether they enjoy it.  So I loved this interview with Joyce Carol Oates.  Very insightful …

“I don’t consider that I really said anything that I don’t feel and I think that sometimes the crowd is not necessarily correct. You know, Kierkegaard said, “The crowd is a lie.” The sort of lynch mob mentality among some people on Twitter and they rush after somebody — they rush in this direction; they rush over here; they’re kind of rushing around the landscape of the news — and this goes on a lot on Twitter. Not necessarily that I’m watching, but I know it goes on elsewhere. When I first started there was a lot in the news about gun control so I was tweeting about that and I got these amazing tweets from these complete strangers who just hated me and what do I know about guns, that I know nothing. I’m this liberal person. And really some of these things I was really astonished. But then I just stopped reading them because I still feel there should be gun control. I don’t care if a million people think I’m wrong. I just think there should be gun control. So basically you react by withdrawing. Many people on Twitter who I follow, like Bill Maher, who is very outspoken. So I imagine he just doesn’t read all the negative tweets. He must care.”

via The Reluctant Tweeter: Joyce Carol Oates | Re/code.

 

 

Haunting Photos of the Abandoned 1984 Winter Olympics Facilities, 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympics:

 

While these photos offer a stunning glimpse of the decayed grounds from the 1984 Winter Olympics, it’s  important to also remember how devastating the 1990s war was for the region. The Siege of Sarajevo was the longest siege of a capital city in the history of modern warfare. The sports complex built for the 1984 Winter Olympics was utilized as a graveyard due to high casualties. The story of the 1984 Olympics doesn’t have the happiest ending, but it’s definitely a story worth knowing.

via Haunting Photos of the Abandoned 1984 Winter Olympics Facilities.

 16 Things Only People With Unique Names Will Understand, lists: Yep, nailed it!

1. You have a mild panic attack when a restaurant hostess asks for your name.

6. When giving your name, you just automatically spell it out of habit.

via 16 Things Only People With Unique Names Will Understand.

Can Google Fiber turn Charlotte into a tech hub?, CharlotteObserver.com:  I hope we get Google Fiber and loved the connection to traditional transportation hubs.  Lets speed up the information highway!

In generations past, communities rose or fell if the path of the next major horse trail, railroad or interstate highway landed within their borders. In the digital age, will the same be true for high-speed Internet access?

In generations past, communities rose or fell if the path of the next major horse trail, railroad or interstate highway landed within their borders. In the digital age, will the same be true for high-speed Internet access?

Can’t say I know for sure, but it’s increasingly looking that way. So it was big news last week when Google announced that Charlotte is one of the nine metro areas where it would like to build its super-fast Google Fiber network, with access speeds up to 100 times faster than today’s broadband service.

For one thing, it makes Google the latest deep-pocketed national company to have concluded Charlotte looks like a good bet for the future.

For another, it could put Charlotte on the front lines of whatever’s coming next in the digital revolution.

To be sure, we’ve never been known for our thriving tech industry. In North Carolina, that distinction goes to the Raleigh-Durham area and its Research Triangle Park. But who knows? If Google decides to greenlight construction of its 1 gigabit-per-second broadband service in Charlotte late this year, perhaps it will accelerate the growth of our emerging tech sector.

Geoff Ables thinks so. He’s managing partner of C5 Insight, a business consulting and Internet technology services firm based at UNC Charlotte’s PORTAL business incubation center.

Its roots stretch back only to 2002, but C5 is growing fast, with 23 employees and a network of contractors that brings its team up to about 75. C5 made Inc. magazine’s list of America’s 5,000 fastest-growing private companies for 2013, boasting 2012 revenues of $2.6 million. That was up from 2009 revenues of $772,000.

Ables says Google Fiber would be a plum asset for his business, which often involves teleconferencing and application sharing with clients across the U.S. as well as in the Netherlands, Germany and Japan.

via Can Google Fiber turn Charlotte into a tech hub? | CharlotteObserver.com.


0 Responses to “2.22.14 … “Puett tells his students that being calculating and rationally deciding on plans is precisely the wrong way to make any sort of important life decision. The Chinese philosophers they are reading would say that this strategy makes it harder to remain open to other possibilities that don’t fit into that plan. Students who do this “are not paying enough attention to the daily things that actually invigorate and inspire them, out of which could come a really fulfilling, exciting life” …”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 630 other followers

February 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jan   Mar »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
232425262728  

%d bloggers like this: