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3.4.14 … Enjoy Mardi Gras (pre-Lent bacchanalian festival), Y’all … We humans are strange folk … And so what indulgence shall i give up … I have 4 unopened boxes of girl scout cookies; anyone care to join me? … Anybody want to walk the Beltline with me and view Gregor’s work?

Mardi Gras 2014, Carnival 2014 Around the World, In Focus – The Atlantic, pre-Lent bacchanalian festival:  We humans are strange folk …

Carnival season 2014 is well underway across Europe and the Americas. These pre-Lent bacchanalian festivals have been taking place for nearly a month, ushering out the winter and welcoming in spring. The largest and most famous of all–the Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil–took place this weekend. The city’s 6 million residents, along with more than 900,000 tourists, crowded the streets for days of rowdy, joyous parades and extravagant processions by the city’s best samba schools. Gathered here are recent images of carnivals around the world.

via Carnival 2014 Around the World – In Focus – The Atlantic.

Make Lent a timeout from self-indulgence, DavidsonNews.net:  “lost in the business of our day-to-day lives, lost in the constant noise of social media and virtual connectedness, that we forget to stop and listen to that still small voice … we’ve turned down the volume on our self-awareness and our inner conscience. … You don’t have to be a Christian, religious or even purposefully “seeking” to adopt the practice of Lent. You could choose to give up an indulgence, luxury or habit in an effort to gain more self-awareness or others-awareness. You could do it in order to practice mindfulness about yourself and the world around you. Or, maybe, you could use the practice of sacrifice to keep your mind open to things that you can’t see or don’t believe.”

We are a self-indulgent society. Self-denial doesn’t come easily to us. We are only barely and vaguely aware of the concept.

We are bingeing all the time. Depending on our age or interests, we binge on beer at keg parties, binge on entire seasons of TV series in a weekend, or binge on boxes of cookies or bags of potato chips.

We are no longer restricted or limited by the clock. Any hour of the day we can indulge ourselves — we can shop online, watch the news, stalk our Facebook friends, or join a chat room 24 hours a day.

When do we ever purposefully restrict ourselves or show some discipline? When do we make personal sacrifices that aren’t forced on us by our jobs, responsibilities, or children? When do we ever deny ourselves a craving?

That’s one of the things I appreciate about Lent. It forces me to think about what I’m doing with my time, putting in my body, or feeding to my soul. I choose during the 40 days of Lent to restrict myself from something or require myself to do something else or, sometimes, both.

During that month plus, I make a determined effort to exercise discipline. During those 40 days, I make a promise or a commitment that I strive to keep, while in other situations and other times I will make a promise or commitment and then back out.

This year, I am anticipating Lent. I checked the calendar and discovered it is unusually late. I’ve got a few things in mind for the Lenten Season. I don’t intend to wait until Ash Wednesday for some of them. I know, without checking the calendar, that it is time to start a few good habits now — to condition myself, if you will, for the marathon of discipline between Fat Tuesday and Easter morning. It is time to strengthen my spiritual resolve so I can better plan what I’ll actually do — or not do — during Lent.

Some of the promises are specifically designed to draw me closer to God. Some are intended to test my will and willingness. All of them will develop awareness, accountability, and strength.

I appreciated that my body and soul were tuned in last year while my mind was calendar-clueless. Sometimes a still small voice inside us gives us insight or warning. It tells us something our minds haven’t understood or our brains missed. It pays to listen to that voice, to pay attention to our instinct.

We can get so lost in the business of our day-to-day lives, lost in the constant noise of social media and virtual connectedness, that we forget to stop and listen to that still small voice. We blast the knob on the TV, laptop, iPhone and iPods. Meanwhile, we’ve turned down the volume on our self-awareness and our inner conscience.

You don’t have to be a Christian, religious or even purposefully “seeking” to adopt the practice of Lent. You could choose to give up an indulgence, luxury or habit in an effort to gain more self-awareness or others-awareness. You could do it in order to practice mindfulness about yourself and the world around you. Or, maybe, you could use the practice of sacrifice to keep your mind open to things that you can’t see or don’t believe.

via Make Lent a timeout from self-indulgence | DavidsonNews.net.

Third installment of Apparitions, Atlanta BeltLine, William Sherman’s eyes,  public art,  Gregor Turk: Anybody want to walk the Beltline with me and view Gregor’s work?

Photo: Third installment of Apparitions is up on the BeltLine, 1/4 mile north of Park Tavern (Monroe Dr. & 10th St.)  This installation features William Sherman's eyes on 5 inwardly facing billboards.

Third installment of Apparitions is up on the BeltLine, 1/4 mile north of Park Tavern (Monroe Dr. & 10th St.) This installation features William Sherman’s eyes on 5 inwardly facing billboards.

via Gregor Turk.

art censorship, artist Ruth Stanford , Kennesaw State University, Sally Hansell, MoveOn Petitions – Reinstate Artwork Censored by Kennesaw State University President, Daniel Papp, Bernard A. Zuckerman Museum of Art:  Worth reading and considering. This is another example of art that makes us comfortable.

Kennesaw State University president Daniel Papp ignited a firestorm in Atlanta’s art world on Thursday when he demanded that an artist’s work be removed from the inaugural exhibition of the university’s new Bernard A. Zuckerman Museum of Art.

During a walk-through two days before the museum’s grand opening, Papp threatened to cancel the opening if an installation by artist Ruth Stanford remained on view. Part of Stanford’s installation addressed the white supremacist writings of author Corra Mae Harris, whose north Georgia homestead was acquired by the university in 2009.

The reason for the censorship? According to a statement issued by the university, Stanford’s work “did not align with the celebratory atmosphere of the museum’s opening.” Really? The censored installation was replaced by a sculptural piece by Casey McGuire that addresses the housing crisis.

Many suspect that the university is trying to whitewash its connection to Harris, a prolific writer whose career has been tarnished by her turn-of-the-century essay laced with venomous racial stereotypes.

via Art Censorship at Kennesaw State University | Sally Hansell.

And here is the petition and a link:

Dear President Daniel Papp,

As members of the metro Atlanta art community, we are dismayed and disappointed by the decision of Kennesaw State University President Daniel Papp to remove a commissioned artwork by Ruth Stanford from the inaugural exhibition of the university’s new Zuckerman Museum of Art, opening this evening, March 1 (VIP reception at 5:00 p.m., public opening at 6:30).

KSU is a state public institution with an educational mission that should promote dialogue about history and difficult subjects, not squelch First Amendment rights and artistic expression.

Stanford’s work eloquently and tactfully addresses a contentious time in Georgia’s history and KSU’s controversial acquisition of property once owned by author and lynching apologist Corra Harris. In her installation, Stanford explores the complexity of Harris’s views and literary works, which are both “poetic and beautiful,” as Stanford says, and a reflection of the time in which she lived.

The “celebratory” opening that President Papp purports to be protecting has already been ruined by his very action, which undermines the autonomy and curatorial integrity of the museum staff.

We respectfully request that the Zuckerman Museum be allowed to reinstall Stanford’s artwork and that President Papp issue an apology to the artist and art community.

via MoveOn Petitions – Reinstate Artwork Censored by Kennesaw State University President.

Oscar dresses,  best actress academy award winners,  infographic, Red Carpet – ShortList Magazine:  I loved this … some  even made their own!

Last night saw Cate Blanchett follow through on bookie predictions by scooping the prestigious best actress Oscar for her performance in Woody Allen drama Blue Jasmine.

And now the Armani Prive sleeveless nude gown she wore to last night’s ceremony has been added to the infographic hall of fame.

We’re talking, of course, about the incredible guide some kind folks over at MediaRunDigital put together, which illustrates all the Oscars dresses ever worn by a best actress winner since the film awards began in 1929.

From Audrey Hepburn in Hubert de Givenchy to Grace Kelly in Edith Head and Gwyneth Paltrow in Ralph Lauren, the best actress dress infographic includes some of the finest designs in red carpet history.

via Every Oscar dress worn by every best actress winner infographic – Red Carpet – ShortList Magazine.

Why Young Adults Are Failing at Being Adults, TheStreet, failure to thrive syndrome, college education: Parenting young adults in this era is difficult, but transformative, for them and for me.

Skirbekk and the two other researchers who worked on the study, Warren Sanderson and Marcin Stonawski, dub this “Young Adult Failure to Thrive Syndrome” in the study, which appeared last month in the Finnish Yearbook of Population Research.

They blame global economic and demographic shifts that began in the 1980s, with failure to thrive likely tied to a more globalized labor force and more women entering the workforce. The current generation of young adults is also more educated than their predecessors, putting a glut of workers qualified for more skilled positions into an increasingly tighter labor market.

At the same time, technological advances have opened up opportunities for new positions but rendered many others obsolete, creating a trend toward fewer industrial jobs and more service-sector jobs that are often lower paying and part time.

“Even as economic conditions have improved for some in the population, young people are worse off today than they were 20 years ago,” says study co-author Warren Sanderson, an IIASA scholar and professor of economics and history at SUNY Stony Brook.

Failure to thrive syndrome “is most prevalent among those with the least education,” says the study, while noting that a college education also doesn’t ensure immunity from the syndrome.

via Why Young Adults Are Failing at Being Adults – TheStreet.

Adult humor 18+, LOL:

via Adult humor 18+.

Governor’s Square Neighborhood, alert, home:  This is my community.  It hurts that life can’t be uncomplicated.  Bt so glad that they are safe. .

ALERT: Two neighborhood twins were attacked on the bike path between Governors Square and Fairview close to the tunnel that goes to our swim club.

They were lucky that they got away. They were each punched in the head and neck.

A white male in his 20’s (?), approximately 5’10 and wearing black long shorts, a grey or light blue hoodie, black tennis shoes, and a grey knit hat with some green on it was riding a black bicycle. He punched each of them and they went into defensive mode and grabbed a stick and didn’t let him get any closer to them and they got away. They ran to the shopping center.

This happened at 2 pm last Friday, Feb. 28. The police were called and got the full report.

Two hours later, their mother was in her car and they saw him with his bike on the sidewalk of Valencia near the shopping center. They could not get any closer to him as he went toward Fairview and got lost with traffic.

via Governor’s Square Neighborhood.

Shakespeare’s deaths, infographic: Tragic!

An infographic that keeps track of all of Shakespeare’s deaths for you

Cam Magee and Caitlin S. Griffin created a infographic that crosses Shakespeare with the people from bathroom signs. It shows every death from the tragedies, plus one of the most famous stage directions ever, from The Winter’s Tale: “Exit, pursued by a bear.”

via An infographic that keeps track of all of Shakespeare’s deaths for you.

100-year-old piano player, S.C. nursing home residents, CBS News:  Since I visit a retirement community, it is nice to realize that many still have gifts to share if you only pause for a moment.

At a Columbia, S.C., nursing home, a 100-year-old woman has been putting on impromptu piano shows for the residents living there.

You wouldn’t know it to look at her, and you couldn’t tell by hearing her play. But Rosalind Gardner is 100 years and 8 months young.

“In a nutshell, yes, she is one tough cookie,” her daughter, Rosalind Funk, told CBS Affiliate WLTX correspondent Dakarai Turner.

Gardner has been captivating audiences with her music skills since she was 7, and is still doing so.

Funk enjoys listening to her mother play the piano, as does Gardner’s grandson, Charles Funk. “First of all, it’s amazing that she remembers music to be so familiar in her age.”

The draw of her music attracts many of the residents and staff at Columbia’s Life Care Center, where she lives.

via 100-year-old piano player captivates S.C. nursing home residents – CBS News.

Southern Foodways Alliance, Mission, food culture, American South:

The Southern Foodways Alliance documents, studies, and celebrates the diverse food cultures of the changing American South. We set a common table where black and white, rich and poor — all who gather — may consider our history and our future in a spirit of reconciliation.

A member-supported non-profit, based at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture, we stage symposia, produce documentary films, collect oral histories, sponsor scholarship, mentor students, and publish great writing. Donations from generous individuals, foundations, and companies fund our good work.

via About Us | Southern Foodways Alliance.

illuminated “Ice Castles”, exhibit,  Lincoln NH,  Breckenridge CO:  

These illuminated “Ice Castles” are still on exhibit in Lincoln, N.H., and Breckenridge, Colo., through March 10 and 15, respectively, weather depending.

via Photos: Brilliant Ice Castles – WSJ.com.

Apple, Volvo, CarPlay, Bloomberg: Interesting … Would I wait to get a car with this?

March 3 (Bloomberg) — Volvo’s Thomas Muller, IDC’s Crawford Del Prete and Bloomberg’s Cory Johnson discuss Apple’s CarPlay iPhone integration with cars. They speak on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg West.” (Source: Bloomberg)

via Why Apple Is Working With Volvo on CarPlay: Video – Bloomberg.


0 Responses to “3.4.14 … Enjoy Mardi Gras (pre-Lent bacchanalian festival), Y’all … We humans are strange folk … And so what indulgence shall i give up … I have 4 unopened boxes of girl scout cookies; anyone care to join me? … Anybody want to walk the Beltline with me and view Gregor’s work?”



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