19
Apr
14

4.19.14 … I found myself thinking of all the sources of light I have at my disposal: street lights, car headlights, even high beams to my headlights, the lampposts at the labyrinth, decorative lights on each corner of the labyrinth, and even my iPhone flashlight. Wouldn’t Jesus have loved to have had all these lights when he arose in that dark damp tomb …

“Solvitur  Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2014 Lenten Labyrinth Walks,   Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte (39/40): 

I had been planning my 39th of 40 walks for quite some time. It was meant to be a Holy Saturday walk in the dark on a warm spring evening under the near full moon. I bought candles the other day, I had secured small holders for the candles and matches and a flashlight.
But God  thwarted my plans and brought heavy rain tonight. So l walked in the pouring rain with my red umbrella.
I reread an article on the Huffington Post site by Barbara Brown Taylor. She recently came out with a new book, Learning to Walk in the Dark, and this article highlights that book. In the article she talks about Holy Saturday.

Holy Saturday reminds me that one has to learn how to be Christian. When I first came to Christian faith, the day meant nothing to me. It was the blank day between the high dramas of Good Friday and Easter, the day when nothing happened. Jesus was dead and buried.

via Learning to Wait In the Dark: A Holy Saturday Reflection | Barbara Brown Taylor.

To be honest, I have nothing in my faith tradition on Holy Saturday.  I don’t know that I even knew it had a name until recent years.  It was often the Masters Weekend, so it was a day in Augusta, or at least a day watching Augusta on tv.  And later when my children were little,  it was Spring Break, and we were at the beach with my husband’s family for the first beach weekend of the year, watching golf  or if it was early basketball.
But back to BBT …  she talks about members of her congregation coming to her as a priest on Holy Saturday. She would conclude with these words:

“Now there is rejoicing in heaven; for you were lost, and are found; you were dead, and are now alive in Christ Jesus our Lord. Go in peace. The Lord has put away all your sins.”

via Learning to Wait In the Dark: A Holy Saturday Reflection | Barbara Brown Taylor.

The the  article takes an interesting turn. It concludes with this:

Though Christians speak of “witnesses to the resurrection,” there were no witnesses. Everyone who saw Jesus alive again saw him after. As many years as I have been listening to Easter sermons, I have never heard anyone talk about that part. Resurrection is always announced with Easter lilies, the sound of trumpets, bright streaming light. But it did not happen that way. Whatever happened to Jesus between Saturday and Sunday, it happened in the dark, with the smell of damp stone and dug earth in the air. It happened where no one but him could talk about it later, and he did not talk about it — at least not so anyone could explain it to anyone else.

That is what Holy Saturday has taught me about being Christian. Between the great dramas of life, there is almost always a time of empty waiting — with nothing to do and no church service to help — a time when it is necessary to come up with your own words and see how they sound with no other sounds to cover them up. If you are willing to rest in this Sabbath, where you cannot see your hand in front of your face and none of your self-protective labors can do you one bit of good, then you may come as close to the Christ as you will ever get — there in that quiet cave where you wait to see how the Maker of All Life will choose to come to you in the dark.

via Learning to Wait In the Dark: A Holy Saturday Reflection | Barbara Brown Taylor.

So with these thoughts, I got out and walked.
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It was  very difficult thing.  I thought my thoughts would be much more about things I had just contemplated in the  Barbara Brown Taylor article. But instead I was just making sure my feet stayed on the barely visible path.  Maybe God was laughing at me for planning my perfect walk in the dark.  I focused on the rain and realized that the raindrops danced in the soft light on the labyrinth.
Back to the darkness idea.  I found myself thinking of all the sources of light I have at my disposal on a dark and stormy night like tonight: street lights, car headlights, even high beams to my headlights,  the lampposts at the labyrinth, the decorative lights on each corner of the labyrinth, and even my iPhone flashlight. Wouldn’t Jesus have loved to have had all these lights when he arose in that dark damp tomb.
As I walked, the storm quickened.  The wind picked up and lifted my umbrella in my hand.  God’s telling me to get out of this storm … silly rabbit …
It is my plan to walk my last 2014 Lenten Labyrinth Walk tomorrow morning after the sunrise service at Avondale. We’ll see how that works out.
Go in peace.

 


0 Responses to “4.19.14 … I found myself thinking of all the sources of light I have at my disposal: street lights, car headlights, even high beams to my headlights, the lampposts at the labyrinth, decorative lights on each corner of the labyrinth, and even my iPhone flashlight. Wouldn’t Jesus have loved to have had all these lights when he arose in that dark damp tomb …”



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