27
Apr
14

4.27.14 … In our era, it was just what you did …

Best Graduation Rates: Colleges,  Bloomberg Best (and Worst), Davidson College: #6 … I think Davidson can do better. Actually, #6 is quite good. These are the schools that came out on top: Williams, Yale Notre Dame, Princeton and Carleton. I have three children, and the 4 year graduation rate intrigues me.  Of their friends, those that graduated in 4 years are in the minority unless they went to a private college or a smaller flagship university (i.e., UVA, UNC).  The larger universities make getting credits and completing majors extremely difficult, so that 1 or 2 extra semesters is not unusual and certainly not looked down upon.  In our era, it was just what you did.

Overview

Bloomberg ranked U.S. colleges and universities based on the four-year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate at or above 80% for full-time first-time students.

Methodology

Six-year and eight-year graduation rates were provided for comparison. Included were 1,941 public and private not-for-profit schools of four years or more that offer broad curricula; specialty schools were omitted such as military academies, seminaries and schools with religious focus, music and art schools, engineering schools, nursing schools and medical training schools. Data were for 2010 to 2011, the most recently available school year.

4-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate 6-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate 8-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate

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via Best Graduation Rates: Colleges – Bloomberg Best (and Worst).

Vincent Van Gogh, Discovery Place/Charlotte:

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He probably didn’t cut off his whole ear, just a lobe. He died a failure, having sold only one painting. He created most of his famous works in the last two years of his troubled life.

Vincent Van Gogh also painted on small canvases, but his larger-than-life multimedia exhibition opening Friday at Discovery Place won’t be contained. Van Gogh’s works will be cast as giants across a gallery accompanied by a soundtrack from Bach, Handel and other classical composers.

More than 3,000 images of Van Gogh’s paintings, sketches and letters will be splashed digitally from wall to floor, immersing visitors in his work through 40 high-definition projectors.

“Van Gogh Alive,” which comes to Charlotte from Moscow and moves on in 40 days to Philadelphia, is designed to intensify the emotional experience of the artist’s labors. It also provides the rare microscopic view of his highly-textured brush strokes, unusual for his era.

“Guests may have had previous opportunities to see a few authentic paintings in a gallery, but ‘Van Gogh Alive’ brings thousands of Van Gogh’s images under one roof in a stunning audio-visual format,” says Catherine Wilson Horne, Discovery Place’s president.

Van Gogh is a departure for Discovery Place, which tends to showcase scientific exhibits. But the immersive Sensory 4 technology, used in the recent the “101 Inventions That Changed the World,” drew the museum to the show, said Kaitlin Rogers, Discovery Place’s marketing manager.

In one corner, for example, guests’ silhouettes are digitally painted with Van Gogh’s style of color and light in an experience created by artist Ivan Toth Depena in collaboration with the McColl Center for Visual Art.

Another local touch for the Charlotte visit of the exhibition is the presence of actors who interpret Van Gogh’s life. Greeting visitors in character will be Van Gogh; his brother Theo; his artistic contemporary Paul Gauguin; or his model, Adeline Raxous.

Running concurrently with the exhibit, sponsored by Wells Fargo, is the IMAX movie “Van Gogh: Brush with Genius.”

via CharlotteObserver.com – News, sports & weather for Charlotte, NC.

Who Can Write About Performance Art?,  e-flux, Judson Memorial Church:  This caught my attention because, one, it is about art and two, it is being hosted by Judson Memorial Church in NYC.   And of course it sent me searching.  I took a Big Onion Tour of Greenwich Village in january 2013 and Judson Memorial was of course highlighted, both as a politically active faith community and as a significant sponsor of the arts.    There is a great Hopper painting of Judson Memorial … http://www.walkingoffthebigapple.com/2009/02/light-in-edward-hopper-sunny-side-of.html

“Why Dance in the Art World?,” presented by The Performa Institute and NYU Steinhardt at Judson Memorial Church on September 17, 2012. Photo © Paula Court.

“Who Can Write About Performance Art?”

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 6:30pm

Judson Memorial Church

55 Washington Square South

New York City

http://www.performa-arts.org

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How many histories do you need to know in order to write exciting criticism about art at the axis of dance and visual art, theater and performance, and every iteration in between?

Performa is pleased to announce “Who Can Write About Performance Art?,” a lively informative panel discussion and forthcoming series of instructional workshops investigating the myriad knowledge and skills necessary to write thoughtful and insightful art criticism at the axis of dance and visual art, theater and performance, and every iteration in between. Panelists Claire Bishop, RoseLee Goldberg, Adrian Heathfield, John Rockwell, Hrag Vartanian, and David Velasco will contribute their own expertise in writing about performance in an evening that specifically focuses on the ways and means that writers approach their writing, to be as flexible in crossing these various borders as are the artists who create multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary works. Specifically, panelists will discuss their backgrounds and interest in performance—do they come from art history, theater history, or literature?—share how they first came to write about performance, and express their ideas about the responsibilities of writing about work that demands a knowledge of several disciplines at once. Participants’ contributions are informed by their diverse perspectives and experiences in art criticism, ranging from publishing texts in international monthly art magazines, daily newspapers, and websites, to extensive, book-length scholarly publications.

via Who Can Write About Performance Art? | e-flux.

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Edward Hopper achieved fame relatively late in life, with his art career gaining momentum during the early years of the Great Depression. After years as a working artist, the Met, MoMA, and the Whitney started acquiring his paintings. Hopper turned 50 on July 22, 1932.

That year Hopper and his wife Jo moved toward the front of the building at 3 Washington Square North into a sunnier spot on the fourth floor that afforded a view overlooking the park. Inspired by the new point of view he started painting November, Washington Square, a landscape that showed the buildings on the north side of the park, prominently Judson Memorial Church. He set the unfinished painting aside for about twenty-seven years, coming back to it in 1959 and filling in the missing sky. Hopper shows Washington Square to be completely empty, not surprising for a painter known to remove people from his compositions. The painting shows a sleepy village, and with the earth tones and blue sky it looks like it could be a village in northern New Mexico.

Previous to the move to the sunny side, he painted an oil and a few watercolors of the views of the roofs from the back of the building, ones that show the chimney vents and such. City Roofs (1932) features the looming presence of 1 Fifth Avenue, the Art Deco skyscraper that upset the Villagers when it was erected. Interestingly, Hopper ignored many of the famous buildings of the era such as the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, and Rockefeller Center and stuck mainly to pedestrian subjects. This strikes me as a wise move.

via The Light in Edward Hopper: The Sunny Side of the Great Depression, and A Walk | Walking Off the Big Apple.

Sponsorship of the arts[edit]

Beginning in the 1950s, the church supports a radical arts ministry, first led by associate pastor Bernard Scott and subsequently by associate pastor Al Carmines. The church made space available to artists for art exhibitions, rehearsals, and performances. The church also assured that this space was to be a place where these artists could have the freedom to experiment in their work without fear of censorship. In 1957, the church offered gallery space to Claes Oldenburg, Jim Dine and Robert Rauschenberg, who were then unknown artists. In 1959, the Judson Gallery showed work by pop artists, Tom Wesselmann, Daniel Spoerri, and Red Grooms. Yoko Ono also had her work exhibited at the gallery.

The Judson Dance Theater, which began in 1962, provided a venue for dancers and choreographers including Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Steve Paxton, David Gordon and Yvonne Rainer to create and show their work. Among others, these dancers and choreographers shaped dance history by creating postmodern dance, the first avant-garde movement in dance theater since the modern dance of the 1930s and 1940s. For the past several decades, Movement Research has presented concerts of experimental dance at the church on Monday evenings during the academic year.

In the 1970s, the church hosted various art shows and multimedia events. Most notable among these multimedia events was the People’s Flag Show in November 1970, a six-day exhibition of painting and sculpture on the theme of the American flag. The exhibit and the accompanying symposium, featuring speeches by Abbie Hoffman and Kate Millet, attracted widespread attention from the public, the press and the police. During the final days of the exhibit, three of the contributing artists were arrested, both pastors (Moody and Carmines) were issued summons (not followed up), and the District Attorney closed the exhibit on charges of desecration of the American flag.

The Judson Poets’ Theatre started in November 1961 – with a play by poet Joel Oppenheimer – as one of three off-off-Broadway venues (the others were Caffe Cino and La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club). Experimental plays and musicals by later-famous authors and directors, including Sam Shepherd, Lanford Wilson and Tom O’Horgan, were presented in the church’s main Meeting Room. Starting in the late 1960s, Carmines began writing and producing his own musicals, and later, “oratorios” that used large volunteer choruses. Especially notable were several shows using texts by Gertrude Stein, music by Carmines, with direction by the Judson Poets Theatre director Lawrence Kornfeld.

In the 1980s, the church sponsored various political-theater performances, such as those by the Vermont-based Bread and Puppet Theater. These performances included Insurrection Opera and Oratario, performed in February and March 1984. In this performance, the Bread and Puppet Theater, under the direction of its founder, Peter Schumann, used opera and the company’s now signature oversized puppets to convey an anti-nuclear message. The church has recently become the home of the West Village Chorale, directed by Michael Conley. The Chorale’s former home was St. Luke’s in the Fields on Hudson Street.

The church celebrated its centennial in 1990 with performances and symposia involving many of the artists who had been involved with the arts ministry in the 1960s and 1970s. It continues both its support of the arts and its social outreach to the community.

via Judson Memorial Church – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Spitbank Fort, Solent Forts – The Most Unique Collection of Venues:

Spitabank_home-1

Our three AmaZing historic sea forts have been, or are in the process of being, transformed into the ultimate private island experience. Perfect for Private Parties, Fort Breaks, Weddings and Lunch Experiences, our venues offer something unique.

via Solent Forts: Amazing Venues.

Erev Yom HaShoah, Holocaust:

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Alex Levin, Art Levin Studio. http://www.ArtLevin.com

April 27

Tonight, on Erev Yom HaShoah-jews come together to remember the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

NEVER AGAIN!

Please SHARE picture on your Wall!!!

via Alex Levin, Art Levin Studio. www.ArtLevin.com.


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