28
Apr
14

4.28.14 … the profound lifelong bond between brothers and sisters … a childhood memory … paradigm cases …

What Makes Siblings Bond?, NPR:  Lucky to have great siblings … definitely experienced the profound lifelong bond.

via ▶ TEDxAsheville – Jeff Kluger – The hidden power of siblings – YouTube.

Writer Jeff Kluger explores the profound lifelong bond between brothers and sisters, and the influence of birth order, favoritism and sibling rivalry.

About Jeff Kluger

Jeff Kluger is the senior editor of science and technology reporting at Time magazine. He’s the co-author of Lost Moon: The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13. He’s also the author of Splendid Solution, Simplexity: Why Simple Things Become Complex (and How Complex Things Can Be Made Simple), and The Sibling Effect.

via What Makes Siblings Bond? : NPR.

Evans-Cucich House, 308 Peachtree Battle Avenue,  E. Rivers friends, kith/kin:  E. Rivers friends … Did Charlotte S. grow up in this house? Oddly, I know she grew up in an art deco house on Peachtree Battle, and I think this is the only one, and one of a few in Atlanta.   Another E. Rivers friend says, yes! After looking at the blogpost, I swear I remember the refrigerators in the pictures.  Charlotte  lived in Charlotte NC for a while. I saw her 6-7 years ago at a book signing for Elizabeth Musser and then soon thereafter at the Varsity. I would love to ask her what is was like to grow up in this house. Another E. Rivers friend noted that she was “always afraid to go over there!”  Look at the pics .  It was definitely a different kind of house, even without the KKK history.

 

 

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There is one house in Atlanta that I have coveted ever since I was a child. Located on Peachtree Battle Avenue, the Evans-Cucich house is one of the very few Art Deco houses in Atlanta. Before I even knew what Art Deco was, I could tell that this house was unique. It certainly didn’t look like the other the 1920s and 30s-era homes in my neighborhood. Built in 1935 and designed by Atlanta architect A.F.N. Everett, the limestone house has a rather dark past. The original owner of the home, Hiram Evans, was an Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Many of us who are native Atlantans grew up hearing rumors that a tunnel was built underneath Peachtree Battle connecting the Evans house to a fellow Klansman’s house across the street. Then, sometime in the 1980s, I believe, the house was purchased by a man by the name of Cucich. I remember driving by the house in the 1980s and 90s and thinking “Someday, that house will be mine.”

The kitchen’s original refrigerator.

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via The Peak of Chic®: Evans-Cucich House, Peachtree Battle Avenue.

#SFStyle, Penelope Finnie, style, Westminster classmates, SFGate:  Another blast from the past … Doesn’t Penny look great?  She was always timeless and eclectic!

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Penelope Finnie, a painter who lives in Berkeley, also owns three Bittersweet chocolate cafes. She wears a Two Ten Ten Five coat, Faliero Sarti scarf and Mayer Peace Collection pants. Photo: Russell Yip, The Chronicle | Buy this photo

via #SFStyle: Penelope Finnie’s eclectic, timeless look – SFGate.

N.T. Wright’s  Simply Jesus: A New Vision of Who He Was_What He Did _and Why He Matters, work of the kingdom, William Wilberforce, Desmond Tutu, Cicely Saunders, The Beatitudes:  I’ve enjoyed this book, not because it is well written and not because I agree with him, but because I like to evaluate how I got to where I am, whether it be intellectually or spiritually. In his concluding chapter, he mentioned “paradigm cases,” one being Cicely Saunders.  I have never heard of her, but certainly am aware of the rise of hospice care.  So I was interested to research her.

The work of the kingdom, in fact, is summed up pretty well in those Beatitudes. When God wants to change the world, he doesn’t send in the tanks. He sends in the meek, the mourners, those who are hungry and thirsty for God’s justice, the peacemakers, and so on. Just as God’s whole style, his chosen way of operating, reflects his generous love, sharing his rule with his human creatures, so the way in which those humans then have to behave if they are to be agents of Jesus’s lordship reflects in its turn the same sense of vulnerable, gentle, but powerful self-giving love. It is because of this that the world has been changed by people like William Wilberforce, campaigning tirelessly to abolish slavery; by Desmond Tutu, working and praying not just to end apartheid, but to end it in such a way as to produce a reconciled, forgiving South Africa; by Cicely Saunders, starting a hospice for terminally ill patients ignored by the medical profession and launching a movement that has, within a generation, spread right around the globe.

These are paradigm cases. Jesus rules the world today not just through his people “behaving themselves,” keeping a code of ethics, and engaging in certain spiritual practices, important though those are. The Beatitudes are much more than a “new rule of life,” as though one could practice them in private, away from the world. Jesus rules the world through those who launch new initiatives that radically challenge the accepted ways of doing things: jubilee projects to remit ridiculous and unpayable debt, housing trusts that provide accommodation for low-income families or homeless people, local and sustainable agricultural projects that care for creation instead of destroying it in the hope of quick profit, and so on. We have domesticated the Christian idea of “good works,” so that it has simply become “the keeping of ethical commands.” In the New Testament, “good works” are what Christians are supposed to be doing in and for the wider community. That is how the sovereignty of Jesus is put into effect.

Wright, N. T. (2011-10-25). Simply Jesus: A New Vision of Who He Was, What He Did, and Why He Matters (pp. 218-219). HarperCollins. Kindle Edition.

Cicely Saunders:

Saunders originally set out in 1938 to study politics, philosophy, and economics at St Anne’s College, Oxford. In 1940, she set out to become a student nurse at the Nightingale Training School of London’s St. Thomas’s Hospital (King’s College London). Returning to St Anne’s College after a back injury in 1944, she took a BA in 1945, qualifying as a medical social worker in 1947, and becoming a lady almoner at St Thomas’s hospital.[citation needed]

Relationships[edit]

In 1948 she fell in love with a patient, David Tasma, a Polish-Jewish refugee who, having escaped from the Warsaw ghetto, worked as a waiter; he was dying of cancer. He bequeathed her £500 (equivalent to £13,106 in 2013)[1] to be “a window in your home”.[clarification needed] This donation, which helped germinate the idea which would become St Christopher’s, is memorialized with a plain sheet of glass at the hospice’s entrance. While training for social work, she holidayed with some Christians, and went through a conversion experience. In the late 1940s, Saunders began working part-time at St Luke’s Home for the Dying Poor in Bayswater, and it was partly this which, in 1951, led her to begin study at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School to become a physician. She qualified MBBS in 1957.

Hospice[edit]

A year later, she began working at St Joseph’s Hospice, a Catholic establishment, in Hackney, East London, where she would remain for seven years, researching pain control. There she met a second Pole, Antoni Michniewicz, a patient with whom she fell in love. His death, in 1960, coincided with the death of Saunders’s father, and another friend, and put her into what she later called a state of “pathological grieving”. But she had already decided to set up her own hospice, focused on cancer patients, and said that Michniewicz’s death had shown her that “as the body becomes weaker, so the spirit becomes stronger”.[citation needed]

Saunders claimed that after 11 years of thinking about the project, she had drawn up a comprehensive blueprint and sought finance after reading Psalm 37: “Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass.” She succeeded in engaging the support of Albertine Winner, the deputy chief medical officer at the Ministry of Health at the time. Later, Dame Albertine Winner served as Chairwoman of St. Christopher’s. In 1965, Cicely Saunders was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire.

In 1967, St Christopher’s Hospice, the world’s first purpose-built hospice, was established. The hospice was founded on the principles of combining teaching and clinical research, expert pain and symptom relief with holistic care to meet the physical, social, psychological and spiritual needs of its patients and those of their family and friends. It was a place where patients could garden, write, talk – and get their hair done. There was always, Saunders would emphasize, so much more to be done, and she did it, as its medical director from 1967, and then, from 1985, as its chairman, a post she occupied until 2000, when she became president.[citation needed]

via Cicely Saunders – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

If Jesus Never Called Himself God_How Did He Become One?, NPR: And to contrast Wright, I saw this on NPR’s website … On why he’s interested in studying Jesus’ transformation

If Jesus had not been declared God by his followers, his followers would’ve remained a sect within Judaism — a small Jewish sect, and if that was the case it would not have attracted a large number of gentiles. If they hadn’t attracted a large number of gentiles, there wouldn’t have been this steady rate of conversion over the first three centuries to Christianity; it would’ve been a small Jewish sect.

If Christianity had not become a sizable minority in the empire, the Roman emperor Constantine almost certainly would not have converted, but then there wouldn’t have been the masses of conversions after Constantine, and Christianity would not have become the state religion of Rome. If that hadn’t happened, it would never have become the dominant religious, cultural, political, social, economic force that it became so that we wouldn’t have even had the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation or modernity as we know it. … It all hinges on this claim the early Christians had that Jesus was God.

via If Jesus Never Called Himself God, How Did He Become One? : NPR.

El Camino gear:  So researching the best gear for a walk, a long walk …

So the first thing you need to know is that I’m a bit… insane about things we buy. I have a sometimes-paralyzing disease that makes me research the crap out of anything I’m going to buy. I have to get “the best” of whatever it is and I have a particular knack for digging through reviews and research to find the right stuff.

Being a software developer that normally translates to technology and electronics… who knew it would also apply to hiking gear?

via Packing for El Camino de Santiago – From the Way.

 …

Smith first noted the connection between business and philanthropy in college when he met his idol, millionaire philanthropist Steven Gibson. According to Gibson, the best thing Smith could do if he wanted to be a successful philanthropist was to become an entrepreneur and develop organizational and management skills. Only then should he return to philanthropy. Ten years and two successful startups later, Smith started Cotopaxi.

There’s a clear narrative showing how your purchase helps when you buy from Cotopaxi. “If you buy the India water bottle, you are actually helping someone in India,” Smith said. A key part of this narrative is transparency. “We’ll give you geographic coordinates to the well that’s being drilled. You’ll be able to see images of the villages being helped—you’ll know that you are giving around six months of clean water to someone in need,” Smith said.

via What Gear Companies Do the Most Good for the Planet? | Gear Guy | OutsideOnline.com.


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