10
Feb
16

2.10.16 … “We are back in the garden, where our desire was birthed, where our need was born. Our need for a savior …”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Labyrinth Walks (Walk 1/40), Avondale Presbyterian Church – Charlotte, Ash Wednesday, Lent history:

for the fifth year, I walk for Lent  I’m always amazed where it takes me …

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It is a cold, crisp wintry day. The birds are chirping the sun is shining fountain water is flowing.

 

And this is my first 2016 Lenten Walk …

In the information box there is a poem which I read as I walked

A new beginning the flight has been wiped clean,
A new beginning

We are back in the garden, where our desire was birthed, where our need was born. Our need for a savior …

My mind wanders … Why 40 days when actually 46?

If Lent is 40 days, why are there 46 days between Ash Wednesday and Easter? | USCatholic.org
“The 40 days of Lent” has always been more of a metaphor than a literal count. Over the course of history the season of preparation for Easter Sunday has ranged from one day (in the first century) to 44 (today in the Roman church). Officially since 1970, Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends at sunset on Holy Thursday.

Already at the Council of Nicea in 325 the bishops spoke of the quadragesima paschae (Latin for “40 days before Easter”) as the well-established custom. At that time Lent began on the sixth Sunday before Easter and ended at dusk on Holy Thursday—40 days. But the council also forbade fasting, kneeling, and any other acts of sorrow and penance on Sundays, even in Lent. So only 34 of the 40 days were for fasting.

Since Jesus fasted and prayed for 40 days after his Baptism, Christians in the fifth century wanted literally 40 days of penance before Easter. The first step was to add Good Friday and Holy Saturday, the “paschal fast,” to make 36 fasting days.

The second step occurred over the course of the next few centuries in Rome. In addition to baptizing new Christians at Easter, the practice of welcoming back on Holy Thursday those who were baptized but who had committed serious sins became popular. Just as those to be baptized entered into final and intense preparation during Lent, those to be reconciled were expected to do likewise. But the first day of Lent—a Sunday—was already full, with Eucharist, a penitential procession through the city, and the rite of election for those to be baptized.

So those to be reconciled on Holy Thursday gathered on the Wednesday before the first Sunday of Lent. Wednesday (along with Friday) was already a day of fasting throughout the year, so it was appropriate to gather the penitents on that day. Borrowing a sacred sign from the scriptures, the bishop sprinkled ashes on the heads of the penitents, which they wore (without washing) until Holy Thursday as a sign of their sorrow.

This sacred sign was so attractive that even those who were not in a state of serious sin began to ask for ashes on the Wednesday before Lent. By the 11th century the pope recommended to all the bishops that ashes be distributed to anyone who sought them on that day, which became, of course, Ash Wednesday.

Here then, were four more days of fasting and penance: Ash Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday before the first Sunday of Lent, bringing the total to 40. So today, while the season of Lent (Ash Wednesday to Holy Thursday) is technically 44 days, the number of days for penance and fasting before Easter is still 40: 44 days minus 6 Sundays equals 38, plus Good Friday and Holy Saturday equals 40.

Flickr image cc by DennisSylvesterHurd

– See more at: http://www.uscatholic.org/node/425#.dpuf

And as I leave the garden, I notice the effects of the winter on the rhododendrons …

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… and I realize how much I love walking daily at this time of year because I get to see CREATION come alive.

AND I have found a Little Free Library to gift some of my books!! image

Ashes to Ashes, Christian History, Ash Wednesday Evening Service, Selwyn Presbyterian Church: I attended my 4th Ash Wednesday Evening Service at Selwyn where I see my dear friend Mary. Of course I posted just to have it show up to remind me and then the service was about praying, giving, attending to get the attention of others when God knows your heart.  Dust to dust …

 

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“No,” I said, “it’s a church thing.” And so it is. The origins of our modern Lenten practices go back to the earliest days of the church, when potential converts first underwent a fast of 40 hours before their baptisms at the Easter Vigil—soon extended to a period of prayer, fasting, and contemplation lasting 40 days. (Biblical models for this included Noah’s time on the Ark and Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness, as well as Israel’s wandering in the wilderness for 40 years.) Sometime around the ninth or tenth century, this 40-day Lenten discipline merged with another service the church had developed several hundred years earlier to help sinners embody their repentance. (The first mention of Ash Wednesday by name is in a seventh-century service book, the Gelasian Sacramentary.) Those who had fallen into what the early church considered serious sin—everything from committing adultery to serving in the military to performing magic and occult practices—after confessing that sin were enrolled in an “order of penitents” until they had made restitution. In many ways, they were treated similarly to converts preparing for baptism, as they sat separately from the rest of the congregation, sometimes dressed in special clothing, and did not participate in the celebration of the Eucharist. Also, they wore ashes on their heads, drawing from the biblical precedent and imagery of verses such as Numbers 19:9,17; Hebrews 9:13; Jeremiah 6: 26; Daniel 9:3; Jonah 3:6; Matthew 11:21, and Luke 10:13.

Source: Ashes to Ashes | Christian History

And i can’t forget to save this A Presbyterian Guide to Ashes:

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I love this Lenten practice:

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‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, Broadway: I saw a really well done play of this in Annapolis MD in 2012 with Joni and  Alex. I’d like to see what Sorkin does with it.

The producer Scott Rudin has acquired stage rights for Harper Lee’s novel and has hired Aaron Sorkin to adapt the story. Bartlett Sher will direct.

“Mr. Rudin isn’t the first producer to bring the story of Atticus and Scout to the stage. The playwright Christopher Sergel’s adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird” has been staged countless times in schools and regional theaters across the country. It was staged in London in 2013, in a production starring Robert Sean Leonard as Atticus.

It is especially beloved in Ms. Lee’s hometown, Monroeville, Ala., where volunteers have put on the play every spring for the last 26 years. Ms. Lee and her lawyer, Tonja B. Carter, have taken a more active role in the stage production recently, and created a nonprofit, the Mockingbird Company, to produce the play in Monroeville.

But according to her literary agent, Andrew Nurnberg, Ms. Lee has long been reluctant to sell the professional stage rights, despite entreaties by playwrights and producers.”

“While Nelle had always had misgivings about anyone who might want to bring ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ to Broadway — and there have been many approaches over the years — she finally decided that Scott would be the right person to embrace this,” Mr. Nurnberg said in an email, using the name Ms. Lee goes by among family and friends.

Source: ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Is Headed to Broadway – The New York Times


0 Responses to “2.10.16 … “We are back in the garden, where our desire was birthed, where our need was born. Our need for a savior …””



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