17
Feb
16

2.17.16 … Warning! never Consider the Labyrinth Either As a Game or as a Selfish Exercise. Walk It Sensibly, Slowly, Without Stopping, And With Awareness of Others …

“Solvitur  Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2016 Labyrinth Walks (Walk 8/40), Chartres Silk Scarf “Finger Labyrinth” @ Home – Charlotte:

IMG_0235

IMG_0175

IMG_0202

IMG_0196

An interesting “walk”  … I saw my scarf from Chartres Cathedral  which I wear every once in a while, and I thought it might be fun.  So I got out my pictures from Chartres Cathedral. Included in my pictures is a short video I took while walking at Chartres.  It was very interesting because I could hear my footsteps in the cathedral.

As I retraced my Chartres walks, I reread the prayer I read as I walked two years ago.

IMG_0491

I also read the information signs that I saw at the Cathedral.  This one was  especially interesting.  IMG_0433

A few pictures from August 2014 …

IMG_0375

IMG_0447   IMG_0394

IMG_0498

DLT

2.17.16

Justice Antonin Scalia, Foundation for Reformed Theology, Dr. James C. Goodloe, funerals: It will be interesting to learn what is said at Justice Scalia’s funeral in light of this letter. Thanks, Bill Wood for sharing.

Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the following about the funeral of Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr., and even more about the importance of preaching–especially at a funeral!–preaching the Resurrection of Jesus Christ and the eternal life which follows from that. ————————————————————————————–

 

Supreme Court of the United States Washington, D. C. 20543

CHAMBERS OF JUSTICE ANTONIN SCALIA

September 1, 1998

Dr. James C. Goodloe

Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church

1627 Monument Avenue

Richmond, Virginia 23220-2925

Dear Dr. Goodloe:

I looked for you unsuccessfully at the luncheon following the funeral yesterday. I wanted to tell you how reverent and inspiring I found the service that you conducted. In my aging years, I have attended so many funerals of prominent people that I consider myself a connoisseur of the genre. When the deceased and his family are nonbelievers, of course, there is not much to be said except praise for the departed who is no more. But even in Christian services conducted for deceased Christians , I am surprised at how often eulogy is the centerpiece of the service, rather than (as it was in your church) the Resurrection of Christ, and the eternal life which follows from that. I am told that, in Roman Catholic canon law, encomiums at funeral Masses are not permitted—though if that is the rule, I have never seen it observed except in the breach. I have always thought there is much to be said for such a prohibition, not only because it spares from embarrassment or dissembling those of us about whom little good can truthfully be said, but also because, even when the deceased was an admirable person—indeed, especially when the deceased was an admirable person—praise for his virtues can cause us to forget that we are praying for, and giving thanks for, God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner. (My goodness, that seems more like a Presbyterian thought than a Catholic one!)

Perhaps the clergymen who conduct relatively secular services are moved by a desire not to offend the nonbelievers in attendance—whose numbers tend to increase in proportion to the prominence of the deceased. What a great mistake. Weddings and funerals (but especially funerals) are the principal occasions left in modern America when you can preach the Good News not just to the faithful, but to those who have never really heard it.

Many thanks, Dr. Goodloe, for a service that did honor to Lewis and homage to God. It was a privilege to sit with your congregation. Best regards.

Sincerely, Antonin Scalia

Source: Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the following about… – Foundation for Reformed Theology

Alexander Hamilton,  the looming high court battle:  Excellent article.

Of course, anyone familiar with Hamilton’s personal life might find it odd to invoke him as the standard for extracting extreme partisanship from the political process. His temper was legendary, as were his many long-standing political battles. He clashed with political enemies and often with allies, including George Washington, who made him the first secretary of the treasury. He once nearly came to duel James Monroe. And after a lifetime of petty political disagreements, Hamilton squared off with Aaron Burr in New Jersey in 1804 (Hamilton, in the musical, quips: “Everything is legal in New Jersey). Burr’s shot struck Hamilton between the ribs and the bullet lodged in his spine. He died, excruciatingly, over the next 24 hours. But even the hotheaded Hamilton seemed to understand the nobility to which the republic’s structure, the Constitution he helped write, calls public servants in particular. And there seems no way he would countenance bald, preemptive usurpation of the president’s appointive power. Maybe he’d even borrow, with a twist, from an admonishment Washington’s character offers him in the musical: Obstructing is easy, senators. Governing is harder.

Source: Alexander Hamilton and the looming high court battle

Who Are We?, The New York Times: Very, very well said …

I find this election bizarre for many reasons but none more than this: If I were given a blank sheet of paper and told to write down America’s three greatest sources of strength, they would be “a culture of entrepreneurship,” “an ethic of pluralism” and the “quality of our governing institutions.” And yet I look at the campaign so far and I hear leading candidates trashing all of them.

America didn’t become the richest country in the world by practicing socialism, or the strongest country by denigrating its governing institutions, or the most talent-filled country by stoking fear of immigrants. It got here via the motto “E Pluribus Unum” — Out of Many, One.

Source: Who Are We? – The New York Times

Vulture, Hamilton, Grammys: Can’t wait to see this … Just don’t know when.

[http://youtu.be/2t2jM0Vavh8]

 

Watch the Hamilton the Musical performance at The GRAMMYs, because this will be the closest most of us will ever get to actually seeing the show.

Source: Vulture – Watch the Hamilton Performance At the Grammys, Because…

Doodles Using GPS and a Bicycle, Mental Floss:

Canadian artist Stephen Lund has found a way to stay active and create delightful illustrations at the same time. In order to make maps that form specific shapes and pictures, the athletic doodler rides his bicycle through the streets of Canada, choosing specific routes. Using the Strava app, he records his travels so you can see what he’s created. The results illustrate everything from pop culture characters to animals. Last year, the intrepid artist traveled 22,300 kilometers (13,857 miles). You can see more maps from those journeys on his website, GPS Doodles.

Source: Artist Creates Doodles Using GPS and a Bicycle | Mental Floss

Atlanta, Restaurants, Culinary Greats, The New York Times: A whole list of restaurants for me to try on my visits home. Anyone care to join me?

Getting traction as a great restaurant city has been harder. It has been tough to compete with neighbors like Charleston, S.C., New Orleans or that sexy food upstart, Nashville. As a national food contender, Atlanta never had the culinary firepower or customer base of New York, Los Angeles or Chicago. Diners made do with a parade of meals at local or national chains, punctuated by the occasional steak in a pretty room. But now, as the nation’s infatuation with Southern food matures and Atlanta’s recession-battered economy recovers, a city that often looked over its shoulder for culinary validation and inspiration is coming into its own. Continue reading the main story RELATED COVERAGE Where to Eat in AtlantaFEB. 16, 2016 Cookbooks: ‘Root to Leaf,’ a Field Guide to VegetablesMARCH 30, 2015 The Chef: Anne Quatrano: Grandma Burned the Beans: A Lucky BreakJULY 12, 2006 Travel Guide: Atlanta for KidsAPRIL 29, 2015 Over the last couple of years, a record number of new and independent restaurants have opened. Especially in the urban core — what people here call intown Atlanta — veteran chefs and newcomers alike have taken advantage of cheap rents and a growing cadre of good line cooks who don’t feel the need to prove themselves in bigger ponds.

Source: Atlanta Pulls a Chair to the Table for Culinary Greats – The New York Times

Hymns Mash-Up, “How Great Thou Art”/”It Is Well”/ “Great Is Thy Faithfulness”,  Christian Music Video:

How Great Thou Art” “It Is Well” “Great Is Thy Faithfulness”

Source: Hymns Mash-Up “HoAw Great Thou Art” “It Is Well” “Great Is Thy Faithfulness” – Christian Music Video

Stephen Curry Halfcourt Shot, NBA 2016 All Star Game:

Source: NBA on TNT – Stephen Curry Halfcourt Shot

Neil Reid, 14 Atlanta architects you should know about,  www.myajc.com: I did not know a friend’s childhood home was a Neil Reid! So many fun memories there.

Neel Reid (1885-1926): Reid was the first name in residential architecture in the early 20th century. His early career took him many places, including stints in Atlanta and Europe. After settling in Atlanta in 1909, his firm quickly found its niche in designing mansions in a variety of styles – often taking inspiration from places Reid saw in Europe. His name is practically a brand in Buckhead. Check out: the Shelton-Walden House (pictured); the Muse’s Building; Butler Street YMCA. (Special to the AJC)

Source: 14 Atlanta architects you should know about | www.myajc.com

A Picture Of Language: The Fading Art Of Diagramming Sentences, grammar, childhood memories,  NPR Ed : NPR:  I loved doing this in elementary school.

When you think about a sentence, you usually think about words — not lines. But sentence diagramming brings geometry into grammar. If you weren’t taught to diagram a sentence, this might sound a little zany. But the practice has a long — and controversial — history in U.S. schools. And while it was once commonplace, many people today don’t even know what it is. So let’s start with the basics. “It’s a fairly simple idea,” says Kitty Burns Florey, the author of Sister Bernadette’s Barking Dog: The Quirky History and Lost Art of Diagramming Sentences. “I like to call it a picture of language. It really does draw a picture of what language looks like.”

Source: A Picture Of Language: The Fading Art Of Diagramming Sentences : NPR Ed : NPR

 


0 Responses to “2.17.16 … Warning! never Consider the Labyrinth Either As a Game or as a Selfish Exercise. Walk It Sensibly, Slowly, Without Stopping, And With Awareness of Others …”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 630 other followers

February 2016
S M T W T F S
« Jan   Mar »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829  

%d bloggers like this: