Archive for March, 2018

28
Mar
18

3.28.18 … “Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. And however difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. It matters that you don’t just give up.” – Stephen Hawking

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (41/40), private labyrinth – Charlotte NC:

I had a two-fer in multiple ways. I walked with Toni Robinson, and there are now two labyrinths at the location of one of my favorite private labyrinths. Both Toni and I have walked here before, and neither of us could figure out where Catherine’s second labyrinth, “in the woods,” was located. I thought maybe Toni had misunderstood Catherine and that Catherine was referring to a labyrinth in the woods at a retreat center she frequents near the Virginia line in North Carolina. But when we entered her backyard and peeked around the small garden house, we saw the new labyrinth “in the woods.”

Catherine’s second labyrinth is a 7 circuit, rock labyrinth, situated on an uneven piece of property. It has a very rustic feel, a Stonehenge-esq feel. This compares with her original labyrinth which is in the grassy area and is a very classic outdoor Chartres.

Toni and I chose to walk the new labyrinth first. We felt like we are feeding our souls.

It was a beautiful seasonal transition day, still cool, but sunny. The birds in the woods were happy.

There was an old window laying to the side. I wondered if Catherine who is an artist plans to incorporate it into her garden.

Both Toni and I noticed the uneven surface, the roots, the narrow path … and the gumballs.

After we finished walking the new labyrinth, we talked about our walks and then we walked the second, a Chartres 11-circuit grass labyrinth that is slowly becoming a moss labyrinth. It is fine, no, delicate, in contrast to the rough and tumble new labyrinth.

As we walked, Toni all of a sudden realized that she had become off track. We laughed. We had just talked about how we had to concentrate on the new labyrinth, yet, here, where she knows the path well, she had become disoriented.

As Toni is planning a labyrinth, she used this time to get her measuring tools. This labyrinth has a diameter of 34’, with 15” paths and a Center diameter of 5’2”.

I keep thinking about this quote from Stephen Hawking who died several weeks ago:

“Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. And however difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. It matters that you don’t just give up.” – Stephen Hawking

Sometimes I learn a lot by looking down at my feet.

Today, I celebrate the yin and yang and not giving up.

3.28.18

27
Mar
18

3.27.18 … So here is to prayer and showing love …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (40/40), Avondale Presbyterian Church – Charlotte NC:

Yesterday, I omitted my walk because I want my last walks to be glorious, Holy Week and all that. I wanted the weather to be perfect.

But Mother Nature is not cooperating. It is currently 44° and overcast, and in my opinion, downright wintry. Easter is early this year and this is the last week of my walks. And spring is definitely not here in this garden today. It is amazing how each year is different.

As I entered the garden, the wind chimes were ringing and the birds were singing. And I thought to myself, I need a coat.

But maybe Mother Nature is cooperating … she has forced my mind to accept the dark side of this and to search for a way out.

And I love James Howell’s email devotional. Here is the one from today:

On Tuesday of Holy Week, Jesus – the day after leaving the authorities raging mad and plotting to rid themselves of his criticisms – walked right back into the teeth of danger and taught. All day long, it seems. Matthew 21:18 through 25:46 shares with us some of what Jesus had to say to various people who stopped by. He had to have fielded questions, and explained some things more fully. His last teaching session, his last sermon really. Pretty important.

Holy Tuesday is a day Jesus calls us to the form of prayer that is our work, our love of and friendship to people – not just those we like but also the people Jesus surely likes – and sharing and receiving the kind of love Jesus showed up in his life and in his death.

James

Source: Prayer: Holy Tuesday, http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Prayer–Holy-Tuesday.html?soid=1104220709083&aid=Tn_MhratoY4

So here is to prayer and showing love.

3.27.18

PS – Albert says hello … he’s been our faithful companion for a year!

24
Mar
18

3.24.18 … I love the idea that my footsteps have followed in someone else’s and knowing that other people are going to follow on as well so that we are in that shared story. Buen Camino and cheers to shared stories.

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (39/40), pondering labyrinths as pilgrimages @ home – Charlotte NC:

At a luncheon yesterday the host described the gathering as “a feast of sharing and wisdom and preparation for this [Holy Week/]week and beyond! Spiritual friends are a special gift!!” One of the spiritual friends described her experience with the host on El Camino de Santiago. I, too, have done a short pilgrimage in August 2014 with my daughter and husband. I have often read that walking a medieval labyrinth could substitute for a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Rome or Santiago. I sometimes I think about this when I walk my Lenten labyrinths.

So today’s walk is a substitute …

Labyrinths and Imaginary Pilgrimages

During the Middle Ages, undertaking a pilgrimage to one, if not more, of the holy sites throughout Christendom was a goal that every person, regardless of social standing, sought to fulfill. Amazingly, many achieved this dream. In fact, there are surviving accounts of women from England, for example, who made multiple trips to Rome, Santiago de Compostela, and even Jerusalem during their lifetimes which helps to illustrate how seriously the call to pilgrimage was taken. So what does this have to do with labyrinths? According to Daniel K. Connolly, pilgrimages have everything to do with labyrinths. The earliest construction of a pavement labyrinth in France occurred between 1215 and 1221 at Chartres. The cathedral itself was begun in 1194, and Connolly argues that its construction was profoundly influenced by the then recent loss of Jerusalem to Muslim forces in 1187.[1] Because of the political turmoil in Palestine, it was no longer possible for European Christians to travel to Jerusalem, and as a result, many began seeking alternative ways to make this journey, even if they couldn’t physically accomplish it. The labyrinth was the solution. Suddenly these symbols became gigantic with diameters of 10+ meters, enabling the pilgrim to walk through its paths.[2]

If one is following this, the next question that needs to be asked is how any of the above information could possibly prove a connection between labyrinths and Jerusalem. To answer this, Connolly suggests there is a connection between French pavement labyrinths and Situs Hierusalem maps. These maps often portrayed an idealized, circular Jerusalem in which the inner organization was divided into quadrants based off of the intersection of the cardo maximus and the decumanus maximus.[3]

Historically, Roman towns were built up off of these two main roads, and this theme would have been carried over into Jerusalem when Constantine the Great began remodeling the city in the fourth century.[7] As was discussed in the section dealing with Labyrinthine Evolution, a French monk in the 900s developed the Chartres-type labyrinth by dividing his subject into quarters, and whether intentional or not, the labyrinth can now be seen as a depiction of an idealized Jerusalem.[8] So, while Christians had lost the right to visit Jerusalem, they still maintained the ability to make pilgrimages to this holy city via the labyrinths in the various cathedrals and churches around France.[9]

More often than not however, historians have traditionally emphasized that labyrinths were used mostly for the Easter mystery plays which, they argue, were meant to demonstrate Christ’s Harrowing of Hell.[10] Furthermore, there are few primary sources which can adequately support the claims of Imagined Pilgrimage, but it is peculiar that such large objects would only serve a purpose once every year, and it is for that reason that the theme of Imagined Pilgrimage has been included in the possible meanings behind the great French church labyrinths.

Source: Labyrinths and Imaginary Pilgrimages: Medieval Studies: Loyola University Chicago, http://www.luc.edu/medieval/labyrinths/imaginary_pilgrimage.shtml

And to correspond to this El Camino pilgrimage there is a “reality tv” show that started on BBC2 earlier this month. I have enclosed a review of the show and a link to episode 1 on YouTube at the end of my post.

As Kate walked around the perimeter of an ancient church, Church of Saint Mary of Eunate, I think, she made this observation.

“It’s not about superstition for me, it’s about what people do when they come here, and this is what other people have done for centuries. And I love the idea that my footsteps have followed in someone else’s. You know that is kinda the point of a pilgrimage for me, following in other’s footsteps and then knowing that other people are going to follow on as well so that we are in that shared story.”

Upon entering, Neil Morrissey stated, “ Power of the building gives sanctuary and also creates awe.” And Heather Small stated, “Walking into the church, there wasn’t me here. There wasn’t anything that looks like me, and I look at the altar and there’s an icon that bears no significance to myself. This makes me feel like an outsider … those same icons have been used against me. And so I’ve had to find my Christianity and my religious identity through a lot of racism.”

I watched this show with my husband, he was at best a reluctant pilgrim. So I could see in him all of the reluctant pilgrims in the show.

But the comments of the participants reminded me of this recent article in Pathos:

There is a twilight zone in our own hearts that we ourselves cannot see. Even when we know quite a lot about ourselves – our gifts and weaknesses, our ambitions and aspirations, our motives and drives – large parts of ourselves remain in the shadow of consciousness.

This is a very good thing. We always will remain partially hidden to ourselves. Other people, especially those who love us, can often see our twilight zones better than we ourselves can. The way we are seen and understood by others is different from the way we see and understand ourselves. We will never fully know the significance of our presence in the lives of our friends. That’s a grace, a grace that calls us not only to humility but also to a deep trust in those who love us. It is in the twilight zones of our hearts where true friendships are born.

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Friendship in the Twilight Zones of Our Heart – Henri Nouwen Society, http://henrinouwen.org/meditation/friendship-twilight-zones-heart/

I, too, love the idea that my footsteps have followed in someone else’s and knowing that other people are going to follow on as well so that we are in that shared story.

Buen Camino and cheers to shared stories. You are my brothers and sisters on this walk.

3.24.18

Here is some info about the BBC2 show Pilgrimage: The Road to Santiago (and here is a YouTube link — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPlXtkJHPUs.

Celebrities have been shut up in houses, dumped in the jungle and made to eat animal genitals, marooned on desert islands … You’d think they’d be running out of ways to humiliate them for the entertainment and amusement of the rest of us. But no, here’s another: send a bunch of them on a gruelling 800km hike across the mountains and plains of France and Spain. Yes, I think that works. Because they will also be exploring their spiritual sides as well as contemplating the existence of God as they trudge. No problem for Kate Bottley, the Gogglebox priest, though sometimes her godliness deserts her. “Are we going up that bastard?” she asks Badly Behaving Man Neil Morrissey, pointing at a hill ahead. Turns out they’re not going up that bastard, a beautiful bastard, created by God. Lovely scenery by the way.

Comedian Ed Byrne doesn’t believe. “The moment of realisation was when I saw them installing a lightning conductor on my local church,” he says. “You’re not showing any faith, why should I?”

Heather Small, once of M People, says: “All my life I’ve searched for…” THE HERO INSIDE YOURSELF, shouts everyone who remembers the 90s. Wrong, the correct answer is “a place to be a spiritual home”. Still she should bellow out Search for a Hero, to keep them all going, and thinking positive. Moving On Up maybe on ascent of bastards.

Investigative journalist Raphael Rowe doesn’t like the single bunks and the slatted windows in the lodges along the way; it gives him flashbacks to the 12 years he spent in prison. Debbie McGee agrees. “Cell Block H comes to mind,” she says. Debbie has a meaningful encounter with a man who’s finding it even tougher getting over the death of his father than she is getting over the death of Paul Daniels.

The fact that they’re seeking answers to a few of life’s big questions as they go lifts Pilgrimage a little above other celebrity humiliation shows. It’s still reality/survival television, but a slightly classier, BBC2 variety of it. Quite good fun and you needn’t feel embarrassed watching it.

“They have only 15 days to cover nearly 800 kilometres,” says narrator Lee Ingleby. “So they’ll walk some of the route in sections.” Er, hang on, I think he means they’re cheating, doesn’t he? Well then, never mind Santiago de Compostela, they’re all going to hell.

Source: Pilgrimage: The Road to Santiago review – stars put their best feet forward | Television & radio | The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/mar/16/pilgrimage-the-road-to-santiago-review-stars-put-their-best-feet-forward

23
Mar
18

3.23.18 … “To acknowledge the truth of ourselves is to claim the sacredness of our being, without fully understanding it. Our deepest being escapes our own mental or emotional grasp. But when we trust that our souls are embraced by a loving God, we can befriend ourselves and reach out to others in loving relationships. [end quote]

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (38/40), Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

The sun is shining and the world is beautiful today (but it is still cool). The labyrinth is bathed in sunshine and shadows. The tree behind the labyrinth has flowered. It looks like spring, but doesn’t quite feel like spring, at least not in my part of the world.

Today, I love what I hear. I love the bells from the bell tower at Queens University across the street. And I love the birds that chirp as I walk.

I attended a luncheon hosted by a special friend, “Mother Mary.” I have known Mary for almost 40 years. Mary always brings friends together and when we are together we experience community and fellowship. Today we shared about our lives focusing on “passion,” “compassion” and Lent. In my next life, I want to be the person who brings people together in community and fellowship.

I saw this recently:

Are we friends with ourselves? Do we love who we are? These are important questions because we cannot develop good friendships with others unless we have befriended ourselves.

How then do we befriend ourselves? We have to start by acknowledging the truth of ourselves. We are beautiful but also limited, rich but also poor, generous but also worried about our security. Yet beyond all that we are people with souls, sparks of the divine. To acknowledge the truth of ourselves is to claim the sacredness of our being, without fully understanding it. Our deepest being escapes our own mental or emotional grasp. But when we trust that our souls are embraced by a loving God, we can befriend ourselves and reach out to others in loving relationships.

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | Claiming the Sacredness of Our Being – Henri Nouwen Society, http://henrinouwen.org/meditation/claiming-the-sacredness-of-our-being/

I feel blessed today. Mary has a gift of sharing herself with me. And she shares her friends. My world is bigger because of her capacity to recognize herself, me and each of us who gathered today at her house.

I am ready to enjoy Holy Week.

3.23.18

22
Mar
18

3.22.18 … “Do not be dismayed by the brokenness of the world. All things break. And all things can be mended. Not with time, as they say, but with intention. So go. Love intentionally, extravagantly, unconditionally. The broken world waits in darkness for the light that is you.” – L.R. Knost

Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (37/40), South Tryon Community Church (a United Methodist Church) – Charlotte NC:

Without even checking the world wide labyrinth locator, I decided I would go to South Tryon Community Church today. It has been a while since I have been here. I started coming here the first year that I walked labyrinths during Lent. For several years, I always ran into me church maintenance man who went by the nickname of “Rabbit.” I was later told he also ran the Church’s program for the homeless. Rabbit always apologized for the labyrinth; he told me that the children did not understand what it was for and that it was going to be redone. And it did appear someone was working on it. But then one year, I came back and the bricks were all stacked up. Now some of the bricks have been re-layed as a walkway to the cross, but there is no other evidence of the labyrinth, unless you know that it was here.

But there are other changes. The very poor community that I could always see immediately behind the labyrinth has been torn down. And someone has hit the fence at the front. There’s a very nice church bus. And the church’s front doors have been painted purple.

So what did I do at the labyrinth? I made an attempt to walk it from memory …

And when I got home, I found this quote:

“Do not be dismayed by the brokenness of the world. All things break. And all things can be mended. Not with time, as they say, but with intention. So go. Love intentionally, extravagantly, unconditionally. The broken world waits in darkness for the light that is you.”

– L.R. Knost, award-winning author and independent child development researcher

And researching L.R. Knost, I found this …

“I rise.

Again. And again.

Not as the morning bird

whose song springs

to sudden glorious life

at the dawning of the light,

but as the sun

who touches the horizon

with tender fingertips

before reaching open arms

across the sky

to embrace another day

to weather the storms

to stand tall and breathe fire

and then to descend into rest

until it’s time to rise again.

And again

I rise.”

L.R.Knost

http://www.LRKnost.com

I see the brokenness of the world, even in labyrinths, but I rise. Again. And again.

I love this time of year. And today is the 26th birthday of my second son. happy birthday, ET!

3.22.18

21
Mar
18

3.21.18 … “The nicest thing about the rain is that it always stops, eventually” – A. Eeyore/Winnie The Pooh

Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (36/40), Avondale Presbyterian Church – Charlotte NC, Winnie the Pooh, Thisness:

Today, I am enjoying a special treat, a walk in the rain with Toni, a friend and a lover of labyrinths. First stop is a cup of coffee at Amelie’s.

At the labyrinth, I note before we walk that I feel like Christopher Robin and Pooh. Why? Because Christopher Robin couldn’t do without his Wellies, and we are both wearing ours. And we both have our umbrellas, too. And Toni notes that somewhere in her house is a copy of Winnie the Pooh in Latin.

“Christopher Robin was sitting outside his door, putting on his Big Boots. As soon as he saw the Big Boots, Pooh knew that an Adventure was going to happen, and he brushed the honey off his nose with the back of his paw and spruced himself up as well as he could, so as to look Ready for Anything.”

I am inundated with sounds … the train horn from the train running along South Boulevard, Park Road traffic, the birds, and the sound of the rain on my umbrella. In addition, there is the sound I hear when my umbrella scrapes against the overhanging trees on both sides of the labyrinth. Actually my umbrella gets caught in the overhanging trees!

I ask Toni if sound carries louder/farther in the rain, and she confirms. So I found this …

[quote]

Noise circulation is a complex phenomenon that can be influenced by wind, temperature, cloud cover, fog, topography, and man-made barriers such as homes and other buildings.

Noise is essentially a sound wave distributed in equal directions away from the source. Generally, noise levels decrease as the distance increases between the source and the receiver. However, the direction in which the sound waves travel can be altered by weather conditions, which may result in varying noise levels at the same location at different times. For example, during Tampa’s afternoon thunderstorms, cloud cover tends to bend sound waves downward toward the ground and that can increase the sound heard by a receiver. Inversions, which occur when the air temperature increases as altitude increases, have the same effect on noise as does cloud cover. These types of weather conditions slow the atmospheric absorption of the noise waves and may cause jet aircraft noise to sound louder. [end quote]

Source: http://www.tampaairport.com/effects-weather-noise

Before and after our walk we discussed the particulars of labyrinths; lighting, size (total, path width, boundary width), accessibility concerns and surface.

We also talk about the mystery of memorizing the pattern. I’m amazed that I still cannot draw it from memory. Today, I wondered how many 180° turns. I checked: in the full Chartres, there are a total of 28 180° turns (seven in each quadrant).

From my daily reading …

[quote]

The doctrine of haecceity is saying that we come to universal meaning deeply and rightly through the unique and ordinary, not the other way around, which is the great danger of all the ideologies (overarching and universal explanations) that have plagued our world in the last century. Everything in the universe is a holon and a fractal, where the part replicates the whole. Go deep in any one place and we will meet all places where the divine image is present.

When we start with big universal ideas, at the level of concepts and -isms, we too-often stay there and argue about theory and generalizations. At that level, the mind is totally in charge. It is then easy to love humanity, but not any one person in particular. We defend principles of justice, but would not put ourselves out to live justly.

This takes different forms on the Left and on the Right, to put it in political terms. Liberals are often devoted to political correctness and get authoritarian about process and semantics. Conservatives can be overly loyal to their validating group for its own sake and become authoritarian about its symbols, defining and defending the rules and rights of membership in that group. Both sides risk becoming “word police” and “symbol protectors” instead of actually changing the world—or themselves—by offering the healing energy of love.

Sometimes neither group ever gets to concrete acts of charity, mercy, liberation, or service. We just argue about theory and proper definitions. I have done this myself. Duns Scotus offered us a meaningful and practical way to live compassionately by focusing on the now, the particular, the concrete, the individual. His entire philosophy makes love, and the will to love in a particular way, more important than intellect, understanding, or any theories about love or justice. As we say, the rubber must hit the road.

Start with loving one situation or one person all the way through. That is the best—and maybe the only—first school for universal love.

[quote]

Source: Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditation, From the Center for Action and Contemplation, Week Twelve, Thisness, Go Deep in One Place, Wednesday, March 21, 2018, http://email.cac.org/t/ViewEmail/d/392F5D14886BA16F2540EF23F30FEDED/1DC1AEAE5E535C1F0B3A73003FEB3522

“The nicest thing about the rain is that it always stops, eventually” – A. Eeyore/Winnie The Pooh

We were Ready for Anything, or at least we looked that way …

3.21.18

20
Mar
18

3.20.18 … be still, brother and sister saints. and blessings on this first day of spring …

Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2018 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (35/40), The Jack Matney Memorial Labyrinth Courtyard/Novant Presbyterian Hospital – Charlotte NC, Vernal Equinox 2018, Rev. Wes Barry, Karen Wright Marsh’s Vintage Saints and Sinners, Psalm 46:10:

As I walked into Novant’s Presbyterian Main Hospital, I saw a sign that read “Naming Opportunities.” Hmmm …

I always look around when I begin my walk. The first thing I noticed here today was the large quotation on the wall which begins, “AND YET: BE STILL.”

I have walked this labyrinth many times, and never before have my legs been brushed by the bushes on the left side of the labyrinth at the outermost outside circuit. Since it is the first day of spring, I wondered if this is new spring growth.

As I was on the return, I had a really powerful sneeze. And my thoughts immediately went to the discussion of Balaam’s blessings which I had just had at my Tuesday Morning Bible class. I laughed at myself because whenever I hear a sneeze, even mine, I say, “God bless you.” Does anyone else say “God bless you” to themselves?

At this point, I remembered that there is a prayer wall incorporated within the garden that contains the labyrinth. It sits below the quotation that reads, “AND YET: BE STILL FOR HEALING MOST LIKELY WHISPERS.” And for the first time I noticed multiple pieces of paper stuffed into the niches of the prayer wall. So I think I will take my “God bless you” for myself and instead say it to those that have asked for prayers. God bless you.

I have searched for the source of the quote “AND YET: BE STILL FOR HEALING MOST LIKELY WHISPERS.” But I cannot find one. It always takes me to my favorite Old Testament verse, Psalm 46:10: “Be still and know that I am God.” I realize that I am not alone in claiming this verse as my favorite. As a matter of fact, The Henri Nouwen Society sent out this daily meditation today:

“Be still and acknowledge that I am God” (Psalm 46:10). These are words to take with us in our busy lives. We may think about stillness in contrast to our noisy world. But perhaps we can go further and keep an inner stillness even while we carry on business, teach, work in construction, make music, or organise meetings.

It is important to keep a still place in the “marketplace.” This still place is where God can dwell and speak to us. It also is the place from where we can speak in a healing way to all the people we meet in our busy days. Without that still space we start spinning. We become driven people, running all over the place without much direction. But with that stillness God can be our gentle guide in everything we think, say, or do.

Source: Henri Nouwen Society | A Still Place in the Market – Henri Nouwen Society, http://henrinouwen.org/meditation/still-place-market/

As for naming opportunities, I have struggled with how I name myself. “Christian” is too cumbersome and has negative connotations. I like this recent blog post from Wes Barry, a minister here in Charlotte (pastor at Waypoint Community Church and former Associate Pastor at First Presbyterian Church of Charlotte and a Davidson grad, too):

Fun fact–the followers of Christ never describe themselves as “Christian” in the Bible. The term originated by the Gentiles in Antioch (Acts 11:26), was used by King Agrippa (Acts 26:28) while Paul was on trial, and referenced by Peter (1 Peter 4:16) as a derogatory term used by the surrounding culture.

Why does that really matter? Because the terms that were used by the followers of Jesus to link them together were familial and missional terminology.

They were “brothers and sisters” or “Disciples” (followers) or “Apostles” (sent ones) or “saints” (holy…set apart ones). The call of Christ followers is to be forming a familial bond with each other. Our connection is as adopted heirs into the family of Jesus who has invited us to come and see (Disciples) so we can go and be (Apostles).

Instead of calling each other by a label, the followers of Jesus chose to call each other by their relational status or their missional purpose.

Source: Devotion: Why I Don’t Call Myself a Christian – Wes Barry, https://wbbarry.com/2018/03/19/devotion-why-i-dont-call-myself-a-christian/

So I have a naming opportunity everyday. I realize that naming opportunities in the hospital refers to giving large amounts so my name will be on a bench, a room, a facility or even a labyrinth. But what name do I want to be on me.

And that thought leads me back to my Tuesday Morning Bible Study. I will lead the study in April and the book I will use is Karen Wright Marsh’s Vintage Saints and Sinners. I met Karen as a teenager when she moved to Atlanta. I’m excited about leading a discussion of her book and went to a recent book signing in Atlanta. She signed my book, “To Dennard, a sister saint … A long the way! Blessings, Karen Wright Marsh” Sister saint, I like that.

be still, brother and sister saints. and blessings on this first day of spring.

3.20.18




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