Archive for March 1st, 2020

01
Mar
20

3.1.20 … “The symbols that surround the labyrinth are called adinka, and they are commonly used on mud cloth fabric. They tell a story. The adinka symbols on this labyrinth express the traditional wisdom of Africa, in this case God, Commuity and Love. They also tell a variety of stories about other aspects of African life.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (5/40), 2020 Labyrinth Walks, Almetto Howey Alexander Labyrinth @ McCrorey YMCA – Charlotte NC, 2020 Lenten Lists, St. Augustine, Katherine Johnson:

This is considered the First Sunday of Lent. It was announced in church. And it is announced in most of the Episcopalian and Catholic resources that I peruse during the Lenten season.

I went to my own church today, First Presbyterian Church of Charlotte.

I walked in late… That is a habit, that and other bad habits, are subjects to be considered, one by one, in my Lenten musings

And I got there in time for the sermon. Pen Peery, the senior pastor, was introducing his Lenten series utilizing Saint Augustine. My takeaways are this:

  1. I need to research St Augustine.
  1. Katherine Johnson is fascinating. (I had to find a spot to save this great cartoon celebrating her life)

  1. Knowledge, truth, power.

Afterwards, I attended to Sunday school with the newest minister where we are going to study the Trinity for the next four weeks. And the congregation as a group will read Richard Rohr’s The Divine Dance. Today’s session was on the Godhead. These are my takeaways. Also, our April sermons will be on St. Sugustine. And TMBS will study this resource: On the Road with St. Augustine: A Real-World Spirituality for Restless Hearts.

1. I need to understand doctrine and heresy.

2. The BBC produced a religion series with this on the Trinity-

The doctrine of the Trinity is one of the most difficult ideas in Christianity, but it’s fundamental to Christians because it:
  • states what Christians believe God is like and who he is

  • plays a central part in Christians’ worship of an “unobjectifiable and incomprehensible God”

  • emphasises that God is very different from human beings

  • reflects the ways Christians believe God encounters them

  • is a central element of Christian identity

  • teaches Christians vital truths about relationship and community

  • reveals that God can be seen only as a spiritual experience whose mystery inspires awe and cannot be understood logically

Source: BBC – Religions – Christianity: The Trinity, https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/beliefs/trinity_1.shtml#h1

Afterwards, I talked with a few friends and then headed out to walk my labyrinth.

Today I walked the McCrorey YMCA on the north side of Charlotte. The mission of this YMCA is “Founded in 1936, the McCrorey Family YMCA has been a cornerstone of western Charlotte for decades and works tirelessly to build a transformative future. We are known in the community for a legacy of offering quality-driven programming, a commitment to diversity and a heart for inclusivity and accessibility.”

This is one of my favorite Labyrinth because of its history. There’s an excellent sign board which tells you about this labyrinth and the woman who brought it into being. Her name is Almetto Howey Alexander. The signboard closes with this: “it is my hope that walking this labyrinth will give direction to those who feel lost, hope to those who feel hopeless and peace to those in turmoil.”

I always enjoy the African-American symbolism of the labyrinth and surrounding the labyrinth. Today I choose what looks like an apple and a jack.

The Labyrinth has noticeably weathered this winter and is in desperate need of a repainting. I have to wonder why. I hope it is not because of faltering of interest after Ms. Alexander’s death. She died in 2017 (Almetto Alexander Obituary – Charlotte, North Carolina | Legacy.com, https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/name/almetto-alexander-obituary?pid=185916420).

Almetto organized a committee which became a faithful and committed group, later evolving into the Almetto Howey Alexander Labyrinth Foundation, Inc. which created, developed and implemented her dream of presenting a walkable labyrinth in the Northwest corridor of Charlotte which in 2011 unveiled the Almetto Howey Alexander Labyrinth in partnership with the McCrorey Branch YMCA.

Today’s weather was absolutely gorgeous at 11:30 AM. It was 50° and very sunny with a few wispy clouds in the sky, but otherwise a beautiful shade of blue. One of the things most noticeable about the wearing of the labyrinth is that the blue paths are almost gone. This labyrinth is unique because of its Afrocentric theme on a classic Chartres 11-circuit labyrinth.

At church we mentioned Saint Augustine and so this week I will research him. It seems that he is very significant in our reformed formulation of the Trinity.

I was almost at the center and I was about to go up what I consider the Parcheesi board stairs. Is it supposed to be Jacob’s ladder? I do really love the center here with it mosaic of clear glass pieces in shades of blue and white. I want to understand the symbolism.

After walking, I closed my time here and re-entered chronos time by walking the outer edge of the labyrinth in a clockwise direction.

And then I went to see if there was something on the information board. It told me about the symbols and I found this. “The symbols that surround the labyrinth are called adinka, and they are commonly used on mud cloth fabric. They tell a story. The adinka symbols on this labyrinth express the traditional wisdom of Africa, in this case God, Commuity and Love. They also tell a variety of stories about other aspects of African life.”

And then I read the quotation that welcomed me to the labyrinth… “With patience persistence and prayer, a God-filled spirit can bring a seed to fruit” – Almetto Howey Alexander 2011

3.1.20




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