Archive for March 2nd, 2020

02
Mar
20

3.2.20 … “These religious trappings are pressed, sometimes awkwardly, into the service of L’Engle’s idiosyncratic brand of spirituality, which is layered with science and secular humanism and incorporates many personal quirks, including her use of the Hebrew-derived “El” as a name for God.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (6/40), 2020 Labyrinth Walks, MorningStar Lutheran Chapel-Mint Hill NC, 2020 Lenten Lists:

Today I will discuss Madeleine L’Engle.

Several years ago in a class, the leader asked people to list chronologically their images of God, beginning with their very first image as a child. This was my list:

Images of God

  1. Senior pastor at my childhood Presbyterian Church, Dr. Vernon Boyles
  2. A mysterious concept of time and time warped which I think I got from Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time
  3. Love.
  4. Love in Motion and Relationship over eternity

As I entered the chapel’s grounds, I stopped and took a picture of the front of the chapel. I often miss the front because I circle around to the parking area on the other side. But today I just wanted to say hello to the lovely little chapel. I then parked and entered the graveyard where I saw and heard the chimes.

I spied the labyrinth, and it was kind of sad because it was gray and brown looking. There’s a good bit of moss in the boundaries but that moss has not turned bright green like some of the other labyrinths in Charlotte. I found that strange. One thing about the labyrinth here is that the graveyard always has flowers, seasonal fake flowers, but they make me smile. I hope that the families come visit frequently. It really is a lovely old graveyard.

There is a new Prayer Meditation Garden, and there there were several camellias blooming. And someone has put in a wind feature.

One of my favorite things about this labyrinth is the center area. It is large enough to force you to spend a little time there, and I like the etched morning star at the very middle. Today someone has moved one of the painted rocks from the side area to the center.

And as for number 2 above … God as revealed to me as an 8 year old through Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, a friend in my class sent me the article referenced below.

Source: Madeleine L’Engle’s Christianity | by Ruth Franklin | The New York Review of Books, ‪https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2020/03/12/madeleine-lengle-cosmic-catechism/‬

These religious trappings are pressed, sometimes awkwardly, into the service of L’Engle’s idiosyncratic brand of spirituality, which is layered with science and secular humanism and incorporates many personal quirks, including her use of the Hebrew-derived “El” as a name for God. At the root of all her writing is her vision of Christianity as a religion of love. Her God is not the fearsome (in her interpretation) God of the Old Testament but the forgiving, welcoming Jesus. “What I believe is so magnificent, so glorious, that it is beyond finite comprehension,” she writes in Penguins and Golden Calves, a book inspired by her journey, at age seventy-four, to Antarctica, where the purity of the landscape leads her to fulminate against the degradations she perceives in American culture—casual sex, pornography—and to reassert her credo:
To believe that the universe was created by a purposeful, benign Creator is one thing. To believe that this Creator took on human vesture, accepted death and mortality, was tempted, betrayed, broken, and all for love of us, defies reason. It is so wild that it terrifies some Christians who try to dogmatize their fear by lashing out at other Christians, because a tidy Christianity with all answers given is easier than one which reaches out to the wild wonder of God’s love, a love we don’t even have to earn.
It is through harnessing her own power to love that Meg must fight evil: love of her father (which needs only the slightest shift to be read as love of the Father) and love of her brother Charles Wallace, who is named for L’Engle’s own father, Charles Wadsworth Camp, and her father-in-law, Wallace Collin Franklin, to whom Wrinkle is jointly dedicated. The book is, essentially, a paean to fathers and children.

I guess I’m not the only one.

Blessings to all who tesser…
3.2.20




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