Archive for March 5th, 2020

05
Mar
20

3.5.20 … “An eschatological history lesson is being taught.  Christ suffered on earth (the nave) and then descended into Hell (the labyrinth), but he defeated death and ascended into heaven, where one day he will judge all of mankind. Accordingly, the labyrinth points to the moment that the “new God” saved humanity, but when connected with the rose window, it represents a call for repentance.”

Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (10/40), 2020 Labyrinth Walks, 2020 Lenten Lists:

Today is a labyrinth research day. I was talking with a friend at TMBS on Tuesday and she told me about a book by a professor of hers. She is a musicologist, so this may be way over my head!. I’ve ordered it and look forward to its arrival.

A tourist visiting the famous cathedral at Chartres might be surprised to discover an enormous labyrinth embedded in the thirteenth-century floor. Why is it there? In this fascinating book Craig Wright explores the complex symbolism of the labyrinth in architecture, religious thought, music, and dance from the Middle Ages to the present.

The mazes incorporated into church floors and illustrating religious books were symbolic of an epic journey through this sinful world to salvation. A savior figure typically led the way along this harrowing spiritual path. Wright looks at other meanings of the maze as well, from religious dancing on church labyrinths to pagan maze rituals outside the church. He demonstrates that the theme inherent in spiritual mazes is also present in medieval song, in the Armed Man Masses of the Renaissance, and in compositions of the Enlightenment, including the works of J. S. Bach. But the thread that binds the maze to the church, to music, and to dance also ties it to the therapeutic labyrinth that proliferates today. For as this richly interdisciplinary history reveals, the maze of the “new age” spiritualists also traces its lineage to the ancient myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. While the hero of the maze may change from one culture to the next, the symbol endures.

Source: The Maze and the Warrior: Symbols in Architecture, Theology, and Music – Craig Wright – Google Books

https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Maze_and_the_Warrior.html?id=LanWAAAAMAAJ

And researching the book, I found this:

Whether a central plaque existed or not, the labyrinth’s center is surrounded by a six lobed rosette, which was an ancient symbol from the east and was used to portray the nature of God in Sumerian, Babylonian, Jewish, and even Roman art.[10]  Craig Wright argues that this depiction is being used to point towards the “new God,” in this case Christ.[11]  If, as Wright argues, that the labyrinth is connected to Christ’s Harrowing in Hell, its placement within the nave creates a stunning visualization which pulls together numerous beliefs and fuses them into one. The cathedral itself is a celebration of geometry, and taking the celestial implications made by both its location and its central rosette, one can expand the symbolism of the labyrinth further, tying it in with Chartres’ great rose window that depicts the Final Judgment.  An eschatological history lesson is being taught.  Christ suffered on earth (the nave) and then descended into Hell (the labyrinth), but he defeated death and ascended into heaven, where one day he will judge all of mankind. Accordingly, the labyrinth points to the moment that the “new God” saved humanity, but when connected with the rose window, it represents a call for repentance.

Source: Labyrinth of Chartres: Medieval Studies: Loyola University Chicago, 

https://www.luc.edu/medieval/labyrinths/chartres.shtml

And this was fun. https://youtu.be/_fpncj4IIU0

You’d think I’d know the pattern by heart, but my mind doesen2t work that way. Each walk is new to me …

3.5.20

Here is today’s list:

Labyrinths within 25 miles of my house

1. Saint Mark’s United Methodist Church -Belmont NC

2. The Haden Institute

3. Presbyterian Hospital

4. Myers Park Baptist Church

5. Myers Park United Methodist Church

6. Avondale Presbyterian Church

7. Wedgewood Church

8. The Grove Presbyterian Church

9. Almetto Howey Alexander Labyrinth Foundation at McCrorey Family YMCA

10. Sardis Baptist Church

11. Saint Stephen United Methodist Church

12. Private labyrinth of Catherine Anderson

13. All Saints Episcopal Church – Gastonia NC

14. Levine & Dixon Hospice House – Huntersville NC

15. Morning Star Lutheran Chapel – Matthews NC

16. Greeman Farm – Mint Hill NC

17. The Oratory – Rock Hill SC




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