Posts Tagged ‘2020 Lenten Lists

11
Apr
20

4.11.20 … “I believe we still have opportunities to meet the Divine (whatever you believe that to be), because in the wilderness, we connect with That Which Is Greater Than Ourselves (one of my favorite names for God), and we are embraced by sense of belonging, of oneness, and of peace.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (42/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Sardis Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

Today is that weird day in the Triduum…my new word.

And of course I researched what the Presbyterians have to say about the Triduum …

Notes for Explaining the Triduum / Three Days

There should be a sense of continuity uniting the services of Holy Week, from Passion / Palm Sunday to the Resurrection of the Lord. The services of the Triduum (or Three Days) in particular — Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Resurrection of the Lord — are really intended to be one whole event that stretches across three days. These brief explanatory notes are offered to bridge the gaps between the services, helping to give the sense that the event is ongoing. These notes might printed in the beginnings of the orders of worship, as indicated.

Maundy Thursday

On Passion/Palm Sunday we celebrated the triumphant entry of Jesus into Jerusalem … and then turned with him to face the cross, where he gave his life for us and our salvation. Tonight we keep the feast that Jesus shared with his disciples on the night of his arrest, and we remember his new commandment to love one another even as he has loved us.

Good Friday

On Maundy Thursday we kept the feast that Jesus shared with his disciples on the night of his arrest, and we remembered his new commandment: to love one another even as he has loved us. This afternoon we turn to the cross, where Jesus gave his life for us and our salvation.

Easter Sunday / Easter Vigil

On Good Friday we witnessed the tragedy of Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross, where he gave his life for us and our salvation. Today, on the first day of the week, [or Tonight at the Easter Vigil] we gather at the tomb … only to discover that the stone is rolled away, and the grave is empty. Today [Tonight] we celebrate the good news of the gospel: Jesus Christ is risen!

Office of Theology and Worship, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 1

https://www.presbyterianmission.org/wp-content/uploads/notes_for_explaining_the_triduum.pdf

So there is really nothing for me to do on Holy Saturday, but rest … so I tried to rest. But I did walk.

As I pulled into Sardis Baptist, a couple of moms and kids with bikes were there … I asked them if they were using the labyrinth, and they said no, that they lived nearby, and they were just using the parking lot to ride bikes… Just trying to “stay sane” …

I noticed the other day when I was here that no one was preparing the grounds for Easter. Well, today someone had clearly power washed the labyrinth. So it was clean and pollen free. It was refreshing.

And I walked, i was soothed by the absolutely gorgeous blue sky, the fully developed tree canopy and the bright pink azaleas that were beginning to bloom. The daffodils that have charmed me during my Lenten walks were completely gone.

I thought about several passages from Rabbi Korngold’s God in the Wilderness:

“But I believe we still have opportunities to meet the Divine (whatever you believe that to be), because in the wilderness, we connect with That Which Is Greater Than Ourselves (one of my favorite names for God), and we are embraced by sense of belonging, of oneness, and of peace.

I know that it’s not always possible (or even desirable) to relocate to the middle of the desert for a month. For people who live in the city, the closest you might get to the wilderness is an urban park. But even there you can cultivate the patience to see burning bushes and open yourself to spiritual opportunity. One of my favorite “tools” for slowing down, taking notice, and being fully present is a short sensory meditation that can be done anywhere.

As we hiked, I asked the group to try to consciously slow down their minds and shift into their “Sabbath souls,” to allow themselves to experience the calmness and grace that surrounded us.”

– God in the Wilderness: Rediscovering the Spirituality of the Great Outdoors with the Adventure Rabbi by Rabbi Jamie S. Korngold

My Lenten Labyrinth Walks definitely help me to rest, to slow down my mind and to shift into my Sabbath Soul; they allow me to experience the calmness and grace that surrounds me.

Blessings …

4.11.20

10
Apr
20

4.10.20 … “more a day for silent gazing and pondering than it is for discursive thought.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (45 & 46/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, St. Stephen United Methodist Church – Charlotte NC:

To be sure, it feels wintry enough still: but often in the very early spring it feels like that. Two thousand years are only a day or two by this scale. A man really ought to say, “The Resurrection happened two thousand years ago” in the same spirit in which he says, “I saw a crocus yesterday.” – CS Lewis

Absolutely gorgeous day with a light wind and 57°. It is Good Friday and this day is significant to me because my first child who turns 30 next week was born on Easter Sunday. And I worked on Good Friday trying to finish up all that needed to be done as well as getting my taxes filed. He ended up being born two days later. on Easter Morning.

I arrived at St. Stephen and immediately heard the birds calling. And right before I walked, John’s mom called. We had a great chat, so this was a walk and talk. There were some things that I thought about as I finished. One is the view of the cross that overlooks the picnic area and columbarium that I see by peaking through the bushes. And that may lead me to think about burial practices. And this is a real problem in the pandemic period. There have been articles about it. People are not allowed to gather and celebrate someone’s life as we historically have done and the bodies cannot be processed as are required or as customary in some cultures.

“For centuries, Hindus gathered to burn corpses on funeral pyres along the Ganges River. Jews received condolences at home during a seven-day mourning period. Muslims huddled together to wash the corpses of loved ones in Iraq and across the Arab world.

But global burial rituals are being dramatically changed by the coronavirus pandemic.

The World Health Organization in its March 24 guidance on burials of COVID-19 victims says dead bodies are generally not infectious. But its recommendations that relatives not touch or kiss the body and government rules on social distancing to prevent the spread of disease have upended important funeral and death rituals in virtually all of the world’s faiths.

Just as the United States now restricts gatherings for funerals, so do countries and religious authorities around the world.”

Source: The Coronavirus Is Changing How The World Buries — And Mourns — Its Loved Ones : Goats and Soda : NPR, https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/04/07/828317535/coronavirus-is-changing-the-rituals-of-death-for-many-religions

And that made me think about Jesus being placed in a tomb. So is that why historically Christians have been buried in tombs? I’ll have to think about that a little bit.

My second walk was a virtual finger labyrinth walk with over 300 people all over the world. It was led by Lauren Artress on Zoom. I joined the global labyrinth community for this online Finger Labyrinth Walk and Meditation. Lauren introduced some of the other facilitators and then provided 10 minutes of music to listen as we walked. We talked about the need for “practices” in this time. A friend recommended that I not only “walk” with my non-dominant hand, but that I do it with my eyes closed. Very interesting meditative experience … It was heartwarming. There will be another virtual walk next Friday and they plan to post the audio. Here is the audio from the first virtual walk. https://youtu.be/TXJVKVeWrw8. It was a nice way to spend late afternoon on Good Friday.

And then I listened to this video reflection for Good Friday, with a meditation on Michaelangelo’s Pieta, from Gary Jones at St. Stephen’s Episcopal in Richmond, Good Friday reflection on Vimeo, https://vimeo.com/406299426

Happy Sibling Day … and Blessings on this Good Friday, “more a day for silent gazing and pondering than it is for discursive thought.”

4.10.20

2020 Lenten Lists

New Words Today;

1. Triduum

07
Apr
20

4.7.20 … “Here the primary language is unlearning, letting go, surrendering, serving others, and not the language of self development—which often lurks behind our popular notions of “salvation.” We must be honest about this. Unless we’re careful, we will again make Jesus’s descending religion into a new form of climbing religion, as we have done so often before.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (42/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Sardis Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

Today, during my TMBS class via Zoom, I talked about the spiritual practice of walking labyrinths. Once again, I realized that I need to draft my “elevator talk.”

But in the course of the conversation we discussed ascending/climbing versus descending religions.

“It is not insignificant that Christians chose the cross or crucifix as their central symbol. At least unconsciously, we recognized that Jesus talked a lot about “losing your life.” Perhaps Ken Wilber’s distinction between “climbing religions” and “descending religions” is helpful here. He and I both trust the descending form of religion much more, and I think Jesus did too. Here the primary language is unlearning, letting go, surrendering, serving others, and not the language of self development—which often lurks behind our popular notions of “salvation.” We must be honest about this. Unless we’re careful, we will again make Jesus’s descending religion into a new form of climbing religion, as we have done so often before.”

““Blessed are the poor in Spirit” are Jesus’s first words in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5: 3). And although Jesus made this quite clear throughout his life, we still largely turned Christianity into a religion where the operative agenda was some personal moral perfection, our attaining some kind of salvation, “going to heaven,” converting others rather than ourselves, and acquiring more health, wealth, and success in this world. In that pursuit, we ended up largely aligning with empires, wars, and colonization of the planet, instead of with Jesus or the powerless. All climbing and little descending, and it has all caught up with us in the twenty-first century.”

— The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe by Richard Rohr

https://a.co/71m3OLR

We talked about practices that we do that help us achieve certain states, prayerful states, meditative states, contemplative states, and it was in this context that I mentioned labyrinths. And as I have thought about it this afternoon, I realized that each labyrinth walk is unique and different. Although an early goal would be to be comfortable using the practice, there is no other goal. It is to be at one in that moment with whatever the world offers. I am descending … unlearning, letting go, surrendering …

It was about 4:30 PM in the afternoon when I headed out to walk. It was heavily overcast and in the low 80s. In the south, we are playing with that space between spring and summer. And it is only early April.

The first thing that I noticed when I pulled up at Sardis Baptist was that the daffodils have finally died, and it changes the whole tenor of the garden. And because of the coronavirus and the cancellation of all worship services, there is no sprucing up for this Sunday’s Easter celebration. It is like spring came and left.

Once on the labyrinth, I noticed that there was a heavy coating of pollen on the labyrinth. However, the trees were fully leafed out and the birds were singing to me. There was a little more traffic today than I expected, and thus, there was a little more traffic noise.

After yesterday’s walk, I downloaded a plant identification app, and, yes, it worked. It identified the Lenten Rose correctly. I downloaded a book called identification app, but the download was too slow for me to use it today… i will use it tomorrow.

I found this poem a while back …

AFTER CHARTRES

The labyrinth is a well of spirit.

Here, magic is ordinary

and everything ordinary

is magic. There is joy,

and sometimes pain,

at every turn.

Around, around:

I listen for divine whispers.

I thirst for waters of emptiness.

My heart is alternately broken

by the spiraling pattern, then forged

again, by a brave, uncertain majesty within.

Alone I walk, and now, with strangers.

This temporary bliss, yet bliss the same.

I join faceless pilgrims

robes coarse, feet bare

on cold stone slick as mirror.

This path is old and twisted, and bends uphill.

Through the floaty peril of dreams I stride,

secretly afraid I’ll never arrive, while with

each blessed footfall saying: I’m here,

I’m here, I’m here…

We wander together on this journey,

You and I. Homebound, toward the light,

toward tomorrow

always toward a new, unpromised day.

~Ulrica Hume

4.7.20

2020 Lenten Lists-

Bird call identification apps:

1. Bird Genie

2. Super Birds

3. Bird Scholar

4. Bird Calls

05
Apr
20

4.5.20 … “The inspiration you seek is already within you. Be silent and listen.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (40/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, finger labyrinth @ home:

The inspiration you seek is already within you. Be silent and listen.

~ Rumi

4.5.20

04
Apr
20

4.4.20 … “I always get to where I’m going by walking away from where I’ve been.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (39/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Wedgewood Church-Charlotte NC:

I headed out to run errands … actually in search of TP … so I thought … McCrorey Y, no … Myers Park Baptist, no … Avondale, no … Sardis, no … Wedgewood … Yes!

I’ve been indecisive today. I’m not really sure why, but I’ve had what John’s family calls a “personal day.” I have been sleeping under a weighted blanket, and that weighted blanket can lure me back in very easily. And before I knew it it was late morning. So I have just frittered my day away …

And now in the age of quarantine, I ventured out to find a labyrinth, to run a quick errand in a store, and then to go home and make a supper I enjoy, shrimp in marinara sauce with zucchini noodles.

So here I was … crunch, crunch, crunch … lots of birds chirping and people out walking on this late Saturday afternoon at 4:45 PM. I also heard the sounds of yard crews working nearby. This church sits on the corner of a very busy street, Tyvola, and rarely is there no traffic. But today because of the quarantine, there were moments of no traffic, no car noises … very quiet.

The labyrinth was almost fully in the shadows of the adjacent trees today.

As I already mentioned, this is the crunch, crunch, crunch labyrinth. I often walk on the barriers like they are balance beams. But today, I was trying to rush, and I realized that I don’t need a fall given the status of my arm, and I can’t rush in the pebble paths. So I was forced to walk slowly and intentionally, very deliberate with where I placed my feet. Maybe that made me enjoy my walk more.

“I always get to where I’m going by walking away from where I’ve been.” – A. A. Milne

And yes, my friends have crowned me the Queen of TP. I am honored.

4.4.20

Today’s list –

Why is Lent 40 days?

1. Moses fasted and prayed for 40 days. During this time God gave him the code of law known as the Ten Commandments. Exodus 34:27- 28

2. Elijah fled for his life through the wilderness, fasting 40 days and nights until he came to Mt Horeb. There God appeared and instructed him on how to overcome his enemies. 1 Kings 19:1-18.

3. After baptism, Jesus with Drew to the desert to fast and pray for 40 days before beginning his public ministry. Matthew 4:1-2; Luke 4:1-2

03
Apr
20

4.3.20 … “And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it … all of it is completely worth it.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (38/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Myers Park Baptist Church – Charlotte NC:

It was beautiful today in Charlotte. I walked around 4 PM and jump from one phone call to the next as I walked. Sometimes it’s OK to let the outside world interfere. I talked with my good friend Allison, and I talked with my daughter Molly.

So, I probably didn’t notice as much as I normally do. No birds, no debris, no noises, no flowers …

“And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it … all of it is completely worth it.”

-Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People

By Nadia Bolz-Weber

4.3.20

2020 Lenten Lists-

Unpopular Opinion Game!

Name things I DONT like that most people do in no particular order.

1. sweet tea

02
Apr
20

4.2.20 … “Take time for the quiet moments as God whispers and the world is loud.”

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2020 Lenten Labyrinth Walks (38/40), 2020 Lenten Lists, Morning Star Lutheran Chapel – Matthews NC:

I’m doing that Goldilocks thing again… It was 63° sunny with a slight breeze… A perfect spring day.

As I looked into the graveyard, I saw multiple birds flitting around and the fountain running. The trees were a wonderful shade of green and provided shade to the graveyard and the labyrinth.

There were some lovely yellow flowering ground cover, as well as some purple flowers. I did not know what either was. Hopefully some of my gardener friends will let me know…

As I walked, there were hundreds of gumballs on the labyrinth path. I tried to kick them out of the way. Gum balls are definitely a nuisance on a labyrinth.

At the center, instead of receiving, I filled the star with the gumballs that were on the center. I think this will definitely be my gumball rally walk…

As a test on the way out, I checked how many I still needed to kick. It was a more peaceful walk.

I think I will charge up the battery to my portable leaf blower and stick it in the back of my car. I noticed the other day at another labyrinth that it was was heavily covered in sticks and other debris. Maybe it’ll be my public service job to blow them off before I walk. What do you think?

Another question, does anybody really like gumball trees? If so, why, and what are its purposes? A research project for me… Facts About the Gumball Tree, https://www.gardenguides.com/123474-gumball-tree.html

And I liked this quote today:

“Take time for the quiet moments as God whispers and the world is loud.”

4.2.20

Today’s list –

Elementary School Teachers at E.Rivers:

Miss Embry

Miss Johnson

Miss Clay

Miss Valentine

Mrs. Hinson

Miss Erwin

Mrs. Jarden




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

May 2020
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31