Posts Tagged ‘Apple iPhone

27
Oct
10

10.27.2010 ….“I have always seen a great similarity in the turn of our minds. We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the éclat of a proverb.” Elizabeth Bennet

quotes:  Since I had nothing amazing or profound to say … I thought of Elizabeth Bennet today …

“I have always seen a great similarity in the turn of our minds. We are

each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we

expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed

down to posterity with all the éclat of a proverb.” Elizabeth Bennet

architecture, for sale, Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago: A FLW is up for sale … the B&W listing is fun — Riverside, IL 60546 $2,890,000 Bedrooms: 5 Full Bath: 5 | Baird & Warner.

The architectural genius, Frank Lloyd Wright, built the Coonley House from 1908 to 1912, and after a few owners and many restorations, the 6,000 square foot house is now for sale.

Wright called the Riverside, Ill. home his “best house” in his 1932 autobiography.

This five bedroom, five bathroom, prairie style home is listed for $2.89 million. It sits on more than one acre of land and has a reflection pool outside. There’s also a 50-foot mural in the living room. Despite the restorations in the home, the home’s historic details have been kept intact.

via Frank Lloyd Wright’s Coonley House For Sale (PHOTOS).

Riverside, IL 60546 $2,890,000 Bedrooms: 5 Full Bath: 5 | Baird & Warner.

constitutional law, Amazon, NC: I am so glad that there is a connection between money and free speech … so I don’t have to pay taxes on all my dirty movies and books …

Lists that identify the books, music and movies individual customers bought from online retailer Amazon.com are protected from North Carolina tax collectors, a federal judge has ruled.

Amazon said in a lawsuit it filed in April in its hometown of Seattle that disclosing the names, addresses and purchases of its customers as requested by the North Carolina Revenue Department would harm anyone who may have bought controversial books or movies.

U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman ruled late Monday that the First Amendment protects a buyer from the government demanding to know the books, music, and audiovisual products they’ve bought.

Amazon and the American Civil Liberties Union, which later joined the case, “have established that the First Amendment protects the disclosure of individual’s reading, listening, and viewing habits,” Pechman wrote.

At stake are potentially millions of dollars in taxes that North Carolina contends Amazon was responsible for collecting for years before a state law was changed last summer.

via Judge: Free speech protects Amazon buyers’ data – USATODAY.com.

Apple iPhone: What is it with the white one???

The elusive white iPhone has been delayed yet again.

Apple said Tuesday that the device, which was slated to go on sale before the end of the year, will not be available until spring. The company did not give an explanation for the new delay.

“We are sorry to disappoint customers who ware waiting for the white iPhone yet again,” said Trudy Muller, an Apple spokeswoman. “We’ve decided to delay its release until spring.”

via White iPhone Delayed Again – NYTimes.com.

media:  books v. ebooks v. apps v. multimedia

“Some books are undeservedly forgotten; none are undeservedly remembered,” wrote the poet W.H. Auden in his 1962 essay on “Reading.” Quite right, apart from the exceptionally undeserving ones, which risk being remembered for the wrong reasons.

A folded page of “The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman,” published by Visual Editions and designed by A Practice for Everyday Life.

“Alice for the iPad,” an application created by Atomic Antelope, an Anglo-American design duo.

A data visualization created by Ben Fry in 2003 to illustrate variations in the human genome data of 100 people, published in “Form + Code.”

Auden was referring to books in terms of their literary merit — what they say, and how the writer said it. When it comes to the type of books that are likely to appeal to design nuts, some score highly on that basis, and others are memorable because of how they look. Then there are the books that will be remembered because their designers turned them into something dazzlingly new or different. The launch of the Apple iPad and other digital readers has created perfect platforms for such innovations.

Here is my personal pick of the current crop of books that seem likeliest to be remembered for their design credentials — for old reasons, and new ones.

via The Invincible Book Keeps Reinventing Itself – NYTimes.com.

____

“As an author, I want you to have the best experience,” he said. “People want to talk about the books they are reading with other people. Why, with everything we know, wouldn’t you include a chat room with your e-book?”

Once readers buy the app, he says, they are beginning a relationship with him and other readers; they can leave comments and read responses and updates from the author. They may even be told down the line that he has a new book for sale and then be able to buy it through the app.

via ‘Adderall Diaries’ Blurs Books-Apps Line – NYTimes.com.

gLee, media: I think they went too far … but I don’t have to buy the magazine.

It’s no surprise that the Parents Television Council was outraged by a GQ photo spread featuring the actors of Glee (for an issue going on sale October 25). The PTC has been outraged by Glee for a long, long time. The group’s objections this time around center around the fact that actresses Lea Michele and Dianna Agron play high school students, which means, it says, that the shoot “borders on pedophilia.”

via GQ’s Gross ‘Glee’ Photos: The Objections Are Right For The Wrong Reasons : Monkey See : NPR.

random, news, education: I hope it works … more power to Millinocket for trying.

Never mind that Millinocket is an hour’s drive from the nearest mall or movie theater, or that it gets an average 93 inches of snow a year. Kenneth Smith, the schools superintendent, is so certain that Chinese students will eventually arrive by the dozen — paying $27,000 a year in tuition, room and board — that he is scouting vacant properties to convert to dormitories.

via Millinocket, Me., High School Recruits in China – NYTimes.com.

bucket list, travel: better get there fast …

Pictures: 12 Ancient Landmarks on Verge of Vanishing.

South Africa: So much potential.

South Africa is a vibrant, multiethnic democracy striving, with mixed success, to fulfill its promise.

via Mandela’s Children – Photo Gallery – National Geographic Magazine.

Apartheid is gone, but the slow process of reconciliation continues. In this issue, photographer James Nachtwey shows us contemporary South Africa, while writer Alexandra Fuller tells about a town, a victim of a hate crime, and the prisoner responsible. It’s a tale of forgiveness and redemption—a story, one South African minister says, about how a nation prepares for the future.

via NGM Blog Central – Editor’s Note: Moving Forward in South Africa – National Geographic Magazine – NGM.com.

green, UNC-CH, places, kudos:  This was my first home away from home … it was not new in 1978 … So to me it is even more impressive what the school and the students did.  Kudos, UNC-CH and Morrison Dormitory!

Ultimately, the University of North Carolina Tar Heels prevailed over rival North Carolina State Wolfpack—as well as trouncing Sears, J.C. Penney and Sheraton.

The playing field: a national competition sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency to see which commercial building could trim its energy use the most over 12 months. The EPA will report Tuesday that ranking first was a dorm at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dean Carovillano/Blink Eye Production

Morrison Residence Hall at UNC-Chapel Hill installed solar panels to cut utility costs.

The strategy at UNC’s Morrison Residence Hall wasn’t as sexy as a winning three-point shot at the buzzer—but tweaks to its heating and cooling equipment, an expanded solar-powered hot water system, lighting upgrades and persistent coaxing of students to dial down hot water usage in the laundry room helped the dorm cut its energy consumption by almost 36% and shave more than $250,000 off its bills. Similar moves are being implemented campus-wide.

via N.C. Dorm Wins Energy Contest – WSJ.com.

news, Great Recession, journalism: I hate to admit it but I wasn’t sure what a 99-er was (made a good guess) … still a journalist posting on a news site should define the term.  Very sad statistic.

What struck me was Pelley’s line that many of the 99-ers are “too young to retire and too old to rehire.” Simply hearing that makes anyone who is north of a certain age (say, 40) cringe.

5 Lessons from the 99-ers:

Don’t ever take a job granted: Keep adding value and every now and then, remind your boss of your contribution to the bottom line

Upgrade and expand your skills along the way

Pay down consumer debt as quickly as possible

Establish an emergency reserve fund of at least one year of household expenses (two years, if you are in a high-risk job)

Save, save, save: if you don’t like the stock market, select lower risk options, but do it!

via The 99ers: 5 Sobering Lessons – CBS MoneyWatch.com.

Who are the 99ers?

“99ers” is a term for the group of unemployed workers who have been out of work for over 99 weeks and thus are no longer eligible to receive federal unemployment benefits. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of June approximately 1.4 million Americans fell into the “99ers” category, which accounts for 9.2 percent of all unemployed workers. This means that in the past three years, the number of 99ers has multiplied sixfold from roughly 221,000 in June 2007.

via Unemployment Extension FAQ: Who are the 99ers and what is Tier 5?.

media:  Is this big?

Time Warner Cable and ESPN plan to make programming available online behind a paywall, starting with “Monday Night Football.” Meanwhile, sports leagues are distributing video content on their own digital platforms, and are looking to devices like tablets. Peter Kafka and Lauren Goode discuss.

via Video – ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” Live on the Web – WSJ.com.

Apple Apps:  I think I will like this one … when I get a new phone … 🙂

PhoneQi allows users to clip, save and share any text from newspapers, magazines, books, even text displayed on computer screens. Utilizing the iPhone’s camera and in-phone OCR to capture a short sequence of rendered text, Exbiblio’s Qi® technology will search through Google’s index to find a printed document’s digital counterpart. Using quoted-phrase searches, only 6 words are needed, on average, to identify a document among the billions of documents indexed by Google. In effect, every line of text in every printed document is unique / a barcode / a URL. This enables Exbiblio to deliver rich digital interactivity to the printed documents we encounter in our day-to-day activities. The PhoneQi app is just a small, first piece of an ecosystem that connects the physical, print world to the digital world.

via Exbiblio PhoneQi for iPhone is Now available through the Apple App Store. – DailyFinance.

literature, India: With Bollywood movies as they are, it does not surprise me that India has a mass pulp fiction industry.

Tamil has always been the language of high culture in India. Its literature is 2000 years old, its poetry exquisite.

But some of the most widely read stories in Tamil have titles like Sweetheart, Please Die.

You see these books everywhere in India. The covers are lurid, mustachioed men menacing women in tight nurse’s uniforms, knives dripping blood, and lots of cleavage. Rakesh Khanna, a Californian living in India, wanted to find out more about the stories. So he hired a translator. Now, they have put together Volume II of The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fiction.

Indian pulps have been around since the early 20th century. They borrowed freely from American dime novels and British penny dreadfuls. But because this is India, there are also kings, ghosts and mythological serpents.

via ‘Tamil Pulp’: Sexy, Gory Fiction, Now In English : NPR.

mung-bean, food/drink: hedonistic epistemological dilemma??

It is a hedonistic epistemological dilemma: when one believes something tastes different, does that mean it actually tastes different? I suspect Hume would say yes, Descartes would say no. But at a wine tasting at the Winery, a beautiful North London wine shop, neither philosopher could weigh in. I take the glass offered by the shop’s owner, David Motion. “How does it taste?” he asks. “Different?” I sip. I pause. “Um…” I don’t know.

I rarely mix wine with philosophy (a favoured pastime for some). But I am not often in the position of sipping the same wine twice in an afternoon, in order to observe the effect of the moon’s passage on its flavour. The Winery specialises in wines produced according to biodynamic principles, which hold that a wine’s taste is altered dramatically by the phases of the moon. I am here to sample such changes myself.

The theory has its origins in the biodynamic movement, which Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian philosopher, began in the early 20th century. The ideas are simple, albeit eccentric. Biodynamic wine is created from grapes grown in harmony with nature. This means that the wine is not only organic, but also crafted with a heightened awareness of stars and planets—that is, the forces of cosmic energy. Because such wine growers view the vineyard as a living organism, they presume the grapes are affected by the moon, like other living things. Similarly, consumers should be mindful of when they drink such wine, as the phases of the moon affect the taste of the vintage.

Motion admits this belief “does sound a bit mung-bean”.

via COSMIC SIPPING | More Intelligent Life.

travel:  Hmmm … I am not sure about this one.

If you’re flying from Los Angeles to New Zealand, you could soon be traveling much more comfortably.

Air New Zealand will offer customers the chance to purchase seats that can turn into couches or beds.

According to Air New Zealand’s website, these new seats, called “Skycouches,” will be perfect for couples who want some extra room, or families with small children.

via Air New Zealand to Offer “Cuddle Class” on Auckland-LA Flights | NBC Los Angeles.

health, fitness: This sounds like fun to me.  A Trampoline Becomes a Launchpad to Fitness – WSJ.com.

Halloween, holidays: What will they think of next.

Since it often appears as though the cast of”Jersey Shore” are in costume, it comes as little surprise that some of the most popular outfits this Halloween are based on Snooki, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino and DJ Pauly D. As the Wall Street Journal’s Elizabeth Holmes reports, the costumes are licensed by MTV and the cast members, which adds another revenue stream for the popular show. Watch the video.

via Halloween’s Top Costumes? Snooki and the ‘Jersey Shore’ Cast – Speakeasy – WSJ.

Davidson, art: Art Opening?

It was an early Christmas morning Monday for members of the Davidson College art department. Alumnus Jim Pepper ’65, of Miami, Fla., boxed and shipped to the college 34 pieces of art from his collection.

But Pepper did not send an inventory listing ahead, preferring that members of the department be surprised with each piece as the bubble-wrap was removed.

Surprised and delighted they were: The donations included works by Wassily Kandinsky, Hans Hofmann, Robert Mapplethorpe, a meso-American textile piece, an ancient Hellenistic amphora, and more.

via Art ‘opening’: Alumnus surprises college with gift of art | DavidsonNews.net.

Wal-Mart, business models, South Africa: One of the things I liked about SA was that its retail  still seemed “local” once you got out of the really big cities.  I hope Wal-Mart sticks to the big cities …

Similar scenes across South Africa help to explain why Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is considering making a 32 billion rand ($4.63 billion) bid for Massmart, which operates warehouse-sized stores that sell goods ranging from food and liquor to clothing, gym equipment and home furnishings.

Wal-Mart is now in its fifth week of conducting due diligence on Massmart. Executives are inspecting each of Massmart’s 288 stores, which are located in 14 African countries, though mostly in South Africa.

via Wal-Mart Checks Out a New Continent – WSJ.com.

random, Laura Bush: She has a good head on her shoulders!

“As for me, it’s come to this,” Mrs. Bush said of her life after eight years in the White House, placing the doll on the glass plate. “This is the Laura Bush bobble head doll. I got this from a friend of mine who found it in the gift shop in the constitutional center a few weeks after the election. It was on the clearance shelf. He said he couldn’t resist sending it to me, I told him he could have tried a little harder. But I’m kinda glad to have it.”

She joked about the surreal nature of living at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

“When you live in the White House and are a bobble head inside a bubble, reality can get a little warped,” Mrs. Bush smiled and said coyly. “Sometimes you have to work hard just to recognize yourself.”

via Former first lady Laura Bush to President Bush: ‘pick up your socks’ – CNN Political Ticker – CNN.com Blogs.

libraries, careers, bookshelf: What fun to be the research librarian for All Things Considered.

Thank goodness for librarian Kee Malesky — who, for 20 years, has been saving NPR’s hosts and reporters from themselves. Malesky is the organization’s longest-serving librarian, and Simon says he suspects that she is actually the source of all human knowledge.

In her new book, All Facts Considered: The Essential Library of Inessential Knowledge, Malesky catalogs some of the facts that she has researched so dutifully over the years.

Odd Queries From NPR Staff

During her two decades of service in the NPR reference library, reporters have asked Malesky to look up some fairly obscure, though fascinating pieces of information.

The first non-Native American to set foot in what is now Chicago?

That would be an African man from Haiti by the name of Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, whose trading post was the first permanent dwelling there. Chicago has since named a high school after him that few residents can properly pronounce.

via ‘All Facts Considered’ By NPR’s Longtime Librarian : NPR.

14
Jul
10

‎7.14.2010 … talked to the molls … guess what they dont have, but love in South Africa … RANCH DRESSING!

friends, relationships, followup:  What do you think? Are best friends bad for kids?  Who are your friends?

We talked about categories — family, chosen family, neighbors, close male friends, collective friends (i.e. whole groups, some members of which we are closer to than others but generally considering the whole group friends), friends with common experiences (contingency friends, perhaps… from “the kids’ soccer team” or “the PTA,” relationships which sometimes fade when the context does), neighbor friends (people whom we can call to check on the dogs or make sure we turned off the stove).

via Friends for the Journey, or Parts thereof « Holy Vernacular.

green, environment: 7 square miles???

Seven-square miles of a Greenland glacier broke up on July 6 and 7, moving the edge of the glacier a mile inland in one day, the furthest inland it has ever been observed. While such calving of glaciers isn’t rare, seeing it happen at high resolution by satellite in almost real time is.

via Big chunk of Greenland glacier breaks off – Science Fair: Science and Space News – USATODAY.com.

food, garden, travel, vocabulary:  When we were in China in ’07, at one point we were starving for western junk food, and our guides ordered french fries … 5 huge orders … and then asked if we would like tomato jam with that … when we realized they were asking if we wanted ketchup, we broke out laughing.

Tonight with our bountiful tomato harvest, we will make our first batch of tomato jam! Recipe – Tomato Jam – Recipe – NYTimes.com.

culture, families:  They ask hard questions some times.

Doctors, and the parents who look to them for advice, need a way to integrate their standards of honesty with what we know about preventing substance abuse — and with new research that makes it clear we know a lot more today than anyone did when we were young. (Which may help explain some of the dumb decisions made by so many of us, including me.)

In particular, scientists understand much more about the neurobiology of the teenage brain and the risks of experimenting with drugs and alcohol during adolescence. While we used to think the brain was relatively mature by 16 or 18, in fact it is still developing into the mid-20s.

“If the way it’s presented is, ‘This is risky, and I hope that you don’t have to touch the hot stove to find out you get burned,’ they don’t have to take the same chance.”

And finally, after all the cautions and the anxieties, it’s essential to come back to the positives — “always remembering to notice the good about your child,” Dr. Williams said.

After all, the most important message a parent can give is not about the mistakes that can derail a child, but about the joys of finding your way.

Tell your child, in Dr. Simkin’s words, that “I would prefer you to work on finding your passion, finding what in life you want to do” — and celebrate that potential.

And for that very reason, Dr. Williams said, “I would like them to have every brain cell they can have.”

The Press:  I think this goes too far.

We have entered a momentous period in the history of the American press. The invention of new communications technologies—especially the Internet—is transforming the human capacity to speak, perhaps as monumentally as the invention of the printing press in the 15th century. This is facilitating the largest and fastest expansion of global economic growth in human history. Free speech and a free press are essential to a dynamic economy.

This system needs to be revised and its resources consolidated and augmented with those of NPR and PBS to create an American World Service that can compete with the BBC and other global broadcasters. The goal would be an American broadcasting system with full journalistic independence that can provide the news we need. Let’s demonstrate great journalism’s essential role in a free and dynamic society.

via Lee Bollinger: Journalism Needs Government Help – WSJ.com.

culture, families:  Toxic children … even the name is unsettling.

“The central pitch of any child psychiatrist now is that the illness is often in the child and that the family responses may aggravate the scene but not wholly create it,” said my colleague Dr. Theodore Shapiro, a child psychiatrist at Weill Cornell Medical College. “The era of ‘there are no bad children, only bad parents’ is gone.”

I recall one patient who told me that she had given up trying to have a relationship with her 24-year-old daughter, whose relentless criticism she could no longer bear. “I still love and miss her,” she said sadly. “But I really don’t like her.”

For better or worse, parents have limited power to influence their children. That is why they should not be so fast to take all the blame — or credit — for everything that their children become.

via Mind – Accepting That Good Parents May Plant Bad Seeds – NYTimes.com.

education, culture:

“I have to assume that in every class, someone will do it,” he said. “It doesn’t stop them if you say, ‘This is plagiarism. I won’t accept it.’ I have to tell them that it is a failing offense and could lead me to file a complaint with the university, which could lead to them being put on probation or being asked to leave.”

Not everyone who gets caught knows enough about what they did to be remorseful. Recently, for example, a student who plagiarized a sizable chunk of a paper essentially told my friend to keep his shirt on, that what he’d done was no big deal. Beyond that, the student said, he would be ashamed to go home to the family with an F.

As my friend sees it: “This represents a shift away from the view of education as the process of intellectual engagement through which we learn to think critically and toward the view of education as mere training. In training, you are trying to find the right answer at any cost, not trying to improve your mind.”

This habit of mind is already pervasive in the culture and will be difficult to roll back. But parents, teachers and policy makers need to understand that this is not just a matter of personal style or generational expression. It’s a question of whether we can preserve the methods through which education at its best teaches people to think critically and originally.

via Editorial Observer – Cutting and Pasting – A Senior Thesis by (Insert Name) – NYTimes.com.

fashion, technology:

But savvy competitors grasped how significant the Web would be for trend spotting and grabbed market share. Worth Global Style Network, known as WGSN, was founded in 1998 and now boasts 36,000 unique users. It sped up fashion forecasting with “up-to-the-minute information with no time delay” from a network of 200 trendspotters around the world, says Sally Lohan, the company’s West Coast content director.

Another rival, Stylesight, founded in 2004, has image banks and customizable trend analyses available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese and Turkish.

Fashion bloggers, who spot local trends around the world and post new photos constantly, also help retail buyers, and they do it free of charge. “It is very easy to find out what’s going on in Shanghai and Tokyo with a click of a mouse,” says Bloomingdale’s fashion director Stephanie Solomon, who says she looks to Tobe not for ideas, but rather for confirmation of her own fashion hunches. For example, she says she placed big bets for spring 2010 on nautical stripes long before Tobe weighed in on the trend (and she was relieved to see that Tobe confirmed her instincts).

via Trend Forecaster Tobe Report Gets Trendy Again – WSJ.com.

Apple iPhone: Up until the iPhone 4 flap, buying Apple was a no-brainer.

That’s just astounding. The folks at Nokia, RIM, etc., should hang their heads in shame.

via You Can’t Appreciate How Completely Apple Has Humiliated The Cellphone Industry Until You See These Charts.

technology, business, Great Recession:

That is the hope of an increasing number of investors who are turning to the science of artificial intelligence to make investment decisions.

With artificial intelligence, programmers don’t just set up computers to make decisions in response to certain inputs. They attempt to enable the systems to learn from decisions, and adapt. Most investors trying the approach are using “machine learning,” a branch of artificial intelligence in which a computer program analyzes huge chunks of data and makes predictions about the future. It is used by tech companies such as Google Inc. to match Web searches with results and NetFlix Inc. to predict which movies users are likely to rent.

via ‘Artificial Intelligence’ Gains Fans Among Investors – WSJ.com.

Davidson, education internships:  Davidson is supporting 20 research projects this summer.  What a great thing! And what a great internship!

Allison’s research project aims to answer the question: Can a business corporation, as an entity that is distinct from the employees, shareholders, and other members that compose it, be held morally responsible for its actions? More specifically, she is addressing the role of corporate structure (e.g. its written policies, unwritten corporate culture, etc.) in defining the corporation’s moral status.

via » Research at Davidson: Allison Drutchas.

Two days later I was sporting an official badge, revising policy manuals, performing employee housing inspections, and passing Ambassador Thorne on the compound. I have made courtesy calls to the head of each embassy section, and enjoyed meetings with the ambassadors of the Tri-Mission (because Rome is the home to an unusual case of three independent US Embassies: Italy, the Holy See, and the UN).

I have had the unique pleasure of exploring Villa Taverna, the home of the U.S. Ambassador to Italy, and I have gone days speaking only Italian because all but two officers in my section are locally-employed Italians. This weekend I will have the opportunity to assist in the visit of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, and on Monday I will have a private tour of the French Embassy, which contains many Michelangelo works.

There appears to be no end for me to the surprises at the Ambasciata Americana! For the first time in my life, I am seriously considering a career with the US Foreign Service. Ciao a tutti e tanti abbracci!

via Good Call! |.

health, alternative medicine:

But for those who can take the heat and cope with the pollen, spending more time in nature might have some surprising health benefits. In a series of studies, scientists found that when people swap their concrete confines for a few hours in more natural surroundings — forests, parks and other places with plenty of trees — they experience increased immune function.

Stress reduction is one factor. But scientists also chalk it up to phytoncides, the airborne chemicals that plants emit to protect them from rotting and insects and which also seem to benefit humans.

via Really? – The Claim – Exposure to Plants and Parks Can Boost Immunity – Question – NYTimes.com.

food, random:

Would I recommend it? Reservedly, yes, but mostly because afterward you can honestly say you’ve eaten a burger made out of bacon, and not many people can say that. If you don’t care about the “honor” of it, I suggest sharing it with at least one other person, because it’s not likely you’ll actually want to eat more than half. I suggest uncured bacon so the salt doesn’t make your blood pressure spike. Cook it the way I did unless you want it to bathe in its own fat as it cooks. Oh, yes, and wash it down with something with a bite to it, because otherwise the taste of the bacon fat will likely overwhelm your palate.

via The Great Bacon Odyssey: Bacon, the Other Crispy Brown Meat | GeekDad | Wired.com.

13
Jul
10

7.13.2010 … et will be off in a bit and then it’s just us … I will have no excuses for not doing all the things on my list …

history, Atlanta, oral history:  This is one of my “stories.”  The Atlanta History Center posted this today — “On this day in 1980, Atlanta temperatures reached a record 105° F.” I remember being out with Eleanor one summer night and at 11 pm it was 90 degrees. I bet it was during that heat wave.

icons, places, Pineview:  Clan Morgan of Pineview had a reunion and Lyn Kirksey posted some great pictures of Pineview GA.  These brought back a flood of memories.  I  consider the Pineview GA watertower an icon of my childhood.  Others here are the corner store, the McLeod’s Peanut facility,  and my mother’s cuzzin’s barn … where in the 80s, at Thanksgiving,  we joked we didn’t have an open bar, we had an open barn!  Thank you Lyn for these great pictures!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

music, South Africa:  Maxwell reminded me of a few South African artists … enjoy!

YouTube – lucky dube-together as one.

FIFA World Cup 2010, random:  Whoever thought to ask an octopus???

Call now for your underwater psychic reading.

Whether it’s his affinity for the red and yellow, or just plain genius, sports bettors have found their underwater messiah for future big-ticket games.

With Spain’s 1-0 victory over the Netherlands on Sunday, Paul the octopus showed his ability to perform in the clutch, correctly predicting the World Cup victor.

As for the third-place call? Paul went with Germany — another correct pick — partially to avoid being paella by the end of the tournament.

via Paul the Octopus: The Greatest Underwater Psychic Ever? – TIME NewsFeed.

FIFA World Cup 2010: I agree, SA impressed the world.

South Africa defended itself against criticism about violent crime, disruptive labor strikes and lackluster organization ahead of the 2010 World Cup. Now the country is winning widespread praise after a successful tournament, boosting its ambitions to host other major sporting events.

via South Africa Has Big Goals After Cup Success – WSJ.com.

technology, travel:  interesting

The mobile phone and laptop are not just tools to stay in touch with the office or home anymore. As Mr. Jarvis can attest, a growing number of frequent fliers are using their mobile devices to create an informal travelers’ community in airports and aloft.

via Itineraries – Social Networking Takes Flight – NYTimes.com.

Apple iPhone, icons:  Another icon for our lives … at some point doesn’t “icon/iconic” lose meaning?

On Monday, Consumer Reports, America’s trusted source of product reviews, said it would not recommend the iPhone 4 because of a hardware flaw with its antenna that sometimes resulted in dropped calls. The independent consumer magazine also cast doubt on Apple’s recent explanation that a software bug had caused the widely reported problem. Apple did not return requests for comment.

“It’s iconic, it’s cool, it’s the ‘it’ device and people want it,” said A. M. Sacconaghi Jr., an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein & Company.

Still Mr. Sacconaghi and other analysts said Apple could eventually suffer from the bad publicity it had received over the antenna problems and for its seemingly contradictory responses.

Apple has promoted the iPhone 4’s innovative design, including its antenna, which is built into a steel band that encases the phone.

via Consumer Reports Says iPhone 4 Has Design Flaw – NYTimes.com.

23
Jun
10

6.23.2010 … REALLY hot … Happy birthday, Hollis! … say a prayer for ET’s front tooth today … Go USA! … Am lucky to have had an army of BFFs in my life, thank you.

places, good eats, Wilmette, (our) children:  Thank you Wilmette friends for introducing us to Irvings.  It is a fun part of our family story.

A Wilmette hot dog stand is celebrating its 35th anniversary by giving out free T-shirts with every order of $10 or more.

Irving’s for Red Hot Lovers, 3207 Lake Ave., opened in 1975. It’s still owned by the same family.

via Hot dog! Irving’s celebrates 35 years :: News :: PIONEER PRESS :: Wilmette Life.

culture, BFFs:  I have been blessed with “best” friends from every stage of my life … and at 50 I know these people because when I see them again … sometimes after 10 years … I immediately know that I am with a trusted friend.  I hope the psychologists do not overthink this one and destroy these relationships for children (and adults).

Still, school officials admit they watch close friendships carefully for adverse effects. “When two children discover a special bond between them, we honor that bond, provided that neither child overtly or covertly excludes or rejects others,” said Jan Mooney, a psychologist at the Town School, a nursery through eighth grade private school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. “However, the bottom line is that if we find a best friend pairing to be destructive to either child, or to others in the classroom, we will not hesitate to separate children and to work with the children and their parents to ensure healthier relationships in the future.”

via The End of the Best Friend – NYTimes.com.

I am also on the BFF bandwagon, and cannot imagine my life without the grace of girlfriends plus – “heart friends” in the phrase favored by my bestie Mary Monnat, the first person I met our freshman year at Notre Dame, and the one who held my hand and made me laugh as they wheeled me in for my mastectomy. (OK, the drugs might also have had something to do with that.) When I saw Mary a couple of weeks ago at our college reunion, I was reminded that 30 years on, a stroll with her is still the emotional equivalent of about 1,000 hours of yoga. There are half a dozen other women I consider sisters – some of whom I might seem to have little in common with, because friendships on that level are as mysterious and spiritual as any romantic connection, and yes, often a lot more durable.

via In Defense of Best Friends.

summerPoison Ivy: Complaints and Treatments – WSJ.com.

music, culture, Athens (GA):  I lived for three years in DAWG Town and really enjoyed its music life with my law school friends.  While there, I never realized that it was special….I thought every college town had a REM!

It was the epicenter for bands like Pylon, Love Tractor, Guadalcanal Diary (okay, they were technically from Marietta). In devouring every article I could find in Rolling Stone, it seemed all the groups got along and everyone was welcoming and friendly—a collage of arty types who had an air of being courtly Southern gentlemen and women. R.E.M. was on their way to becoming one of the biggest bands in the world, but instead of talking trash about them, most of the community was thrilled. When I finally made it to Athens for the first time in April of 1990, my visit coincided with the legendary 40 Watt Club’s opening in their current home in a former Furniture Mart building on West Washington Street. “If the 40 Watt ever closes,” says Patterson Hood, the Drive-By Truckers frontman and unofficial Athens musical mayor, “I’ll put a for-sale sign in my yard.” I couldn’t get into the Pylon show, but after begging and pleading (and flashing my Minnesota driver’s license), I was let in to see the garage rockers Flat Duo Jets. The club was heaving with

via Dawg Town.

economy, culture, Chicago:  Another article that shows our culture’s indices of success is conspicuous consumption.  I have to admit, I don’t want to see Payless Shoes on the Magnificent Mile.

Those statistics, even if they fell during the economic downturn, are enough to entice big chains to the Mag Mile with showcase stores. And the chains that are expanding these days are more often off-price outlets and discount retailers.

The world’s most prominent shopping streets reflect how consumers shop, according to WSL’s Corlett. And given that the economic downturn took a toll on luxury retailers, it is no surprise that discount chains such as Forever 21 and Payless ShoeSource are as at home on North Michigan Avenue as Tiffany, Louis Vuitton and Chanel.

Indeed, one out of three affluent consumers say that while they have money to spend, they don’t want to spend as much as they used to, according to WSL Strategic Retail’s 2010 report on how Americans shop.

“What we’re seeing is part of a national movement,” Corlett said. “This is a post-recession cultural shift. Income doesn’t really matter so much anymore in terms of your attitude toward spending.

“The affluent are as conscious of frivolous spending as middle- and lower-income shoppers.”

via Mag mile vacancy rates: Mag Mile on the mend – chicagotribune.com.

economy, culture:  I hope that the indicator of economic recover is not conspicuous consumption.   And i like caviar …

To be sure, lavish, conspicuous consumption is still mostly out of style, replaced by in-home, smaller soirees, said Mark Maynard-Parisi, managing director of operations for Union Square Events.

Does that mean that serving champagne and caviar still seems gauche?

Not quite. For an upcoming party it “will be the first time we’ve served caviar in a year,” said Mr. Maynard-Parisi. “I hope it’s a harbinger for things to come.”

via Small Servings in Style – WSJ.com.

culture, feel good story, immigration:  As we tighten immigration, I hope we don’t forget social justice issues.   Sometimes, you have to do what is right.

Mr. Gutierrez had gotten to the other side of slavery, climbing a ladder of second chances.

More than a decade ago, he was part of the nameless, unseen cast of a horror story. Lured from Mexico on promises of prosperity, he and 56 other people lived as prisoners in two row houses in Queens. By day, they sold key chains and miniature screwdriver kits in the subways, at airports, on roadsides. At night, they turned over every penny to the bosses of the houses.

via About New York – Descent Into Slavery, and a Ladder to Another Life – NYTimes.com.

politics, the Supreme Court, Justice Sotomayor, Kagan Nomination:

Supreme Court Justices are known by the company they keep, and yesterday’s decisions provided a valuable window into the kind of jurisprudence President Obama favors in his nominees. In an unusual hat trick, the Justices overturned three rulings by the notoriously liberal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals—and in each case Sonia Sotomayor was among the dissenters.

Implication: A Supreme Court crafted in Justice Sotomayor’s image would transform the Ninth Circuit’s oft-overturned jurisprudence into the law of the land. That’s worth pondering as Senators head into next week’s confirmation hearings on Mr. Obama’s second nominee, Elena Kagan.

via The Sotomayor Precedent – WSJ.com.

media, The President:

There are a couple of reasons for this lack of proportion, none of which is particularly new, but which bear noting. One is a supply-and-demand problem. Cable television and the Internet create an endless demand for commentary and analysis, but there is a necessarily limited supply of interesting things to say or write. Another is related: because there is so much out there, the instant-analysis genre favors self-assurance and sometimes hyperbole. I know of what I speak: in the magazine and on television and radio, I have occasionally offered quick, ill-formed opinions that I regret. Having the courage to say you do not know the answer to a question is perhaps the beginning of wisdom.

Criticism is a crucial thing (the lifeblood of democracy, the fuel of freedom—choose your noble phrase), but the problem is that there are many more carpers than critics. The fact that anybody can say anything does not mean that anything anybody says is worth hearing. Is this an elitist view? Probably, but I am not arguing for even the remotest limitation on what people can say. The beauty of democracy and the wonder of the digital public square is that more people can express themselves more freely to more eyes and ears than at any other time in history. Such liberation is to be celebrated and honored and defended. With power, though, comes responsibility, for all of us. We can learn, I think, from Maddow—sigh when you think you should sigh, but then have the courage to be constructive.

via Criticism in an Age of Disproportion – Newsweek.

law, law school, economy: Not all law schools are equal … so grades alone cannot be a benchmark … This grade inflation makes grades mean virtually nothing.  A recruiter must do his/her homework to understand what the grades mean.

In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have deliberately changed their grading systems to make them more lenient. These include law schools like New York University and Georgetown, as well as Golden Gate University and Tulane University, which just announced the change this month. Some recruiters at law firms keep track of these changes and consider them when interviewing, and some do not.

Law schools seem to view higher grades as one way to rescue their students from the tough economic climate — and perhaps more to the point, to protect their own reputations and rankings. Once able to practically guarantee gainful employment to thousands of students every year, the schools are now fielding complaints from more and more unemployed graduates, frequently drowning in student debt.

via In Law Schools, Grades Go Up, Just Like That – NYTimes.com.

technology, archeology, icons, religion: amazing what they can find in the catacombs.

Twenty-first century laser technology has opened a window into the early days of the Catholic Church, guiding researchers through the dank, musty catacombs beneath Rome to a startling find: the first known icons of the apostles Peter and Paul.

Vatican officials unveiled the paintings Tuesday, discovered along with the earliest known images of the apostles John and Andrew in an underground burial chamber beneath an office building on a busy street in a working-class Rome neighborhood.

via Lasers uncover first icons of Saints Peter and Paul – CharlotteObserver.com.

Apple iPhone: OK … maybe I want a new one … sorry, first generation … but the 2 cameras seems really cool … New iPhone Keeps Apple Top of Class – WSJ.com.

faith:  Sometimes I just need a reminder …

Words That Become Flesh

Words are important. Without them our actions lose meaning. And without meaning we cannot live. Words can offer perspective, insight, understanding, and vision. Words can bring consolation, comfort, encouragement and hope. Words can take away fear, isolation, shame, and guilt. Words can reconcile, unite, forgive, and heal. Words can bring peace and joy, inner freedom and deep gratitude. Words, in short, can carry love on their wings. A word of love can be the greatest act of love. That is because when our words become flesh in our own lives and the lives of others, we can change the world.

Jesus is the word made flesh. In him speaking and acting were one.

via June 22, 2010 – Words That Become Flesh.

colleges, Davidson: No surprise!  Next year … No. 1!

Perhaps the best assessment of a college is by the quality of its teachers. College-rankings mecca U.S. News and World Report scored schools solely on the strength of their instructors and came up with several lists, two of which we’ve highlighted here — the best national universities for undergraduate teaching and the best liberal arts schools for undergraduate teaching.

via Colleges With The BEST Teachers (PHOTOS).

Davidson College isn’t only about college basketball and Stephen Curry. It’s also the third-highest ranked liberal arts school for teaching.

via Colleges With The BEST Teachers (PHOTOS).

LOL, texting: Maybe I should send one a day to my kids … who can remember all ten?

Here in text shorthand are the 10 commandments as they may appear on modern Moses’ cellphone.

via If God Had Texted the Ten Commandments | Funny Stuff | Reader’s Digest.

Supreme Court, Kagan Nomination:  I don’t mind snarky, brassy … but foul language is a sign of immaturity, insecurity, lack of control  and lack of respect.  Thumbs down for Kagan on this one.

Maybe e-mails are the window into a Supreme Court nominee’s soul. On Friday, the Clinton Presidential Library released the contents of Elena Kagan’s inbox from 1995 to 1999, when she was working in the Clinton administration. A team of NEWSWEEK reporters sifted through tens of thousands of pages. Our verdict? The U.S. solicitor general comes across as humorous, hardworking, opinionated, and astute, alternately demanding of her colleagues and fulsome with her praise. She is also prescient: on separate occasions, she predicts a coming “gay/lesbian firestorm” and warns of mutinies from “Nader types.” Nor is she afraid to use the F word..

via Elena Kagan’s White House Inbox – Newsweek.

technology, culture, kids:  No surprise here …

Text messaging has far eclipsed e-mail and instant messaging as college students’ favored way of staying in touch, according to a new study that finds that 97 percent of students now send and receive text messages, while only about a quarter of them use e-mail or instant messaging.

Ball State journalism professor Michael Hanley, who surveyed 5,500 students for the study, also found that smart phones now account for 49 percent of mobile communication devices on college campuses. That’s up more than 10 percent since just October.

Hanley says that, except for studying, students are quickly leaving computers and e-mail behind. He says college students’ hectic lifestyles are behind their embrace of smart phones and texting. AP

via Survey: College kids are text-crazed :: CHICAGO SUN-TIMES :: Technology.

tv, people, twitter: Didn’t realize Booth’s dad on Bones was played by Pa Walton!

Happy birthday to Ralph Waite! The former Pa Walton & current Hank Booth is 82 years young today. @HartHanson @squarechicken

via Twitter / Mickey Boggs: Happy birthday to Ralph Wa ….

twitter, glee, movies: Never heard of Election???   But laughed at “Reese Witherfork” … maybe I can find it on netflix.

Watching the movie Election with Reese Witherfork for the first time to see why #Glee has been getting compared to this.

via Twitter / Glee Podcast: Watching the movie Electio ….

media, family, iPad apps: I associate Gourmet with my dad … so now I will enjoy it and think of him in a new medium.

Can a shuttered magazine find a new life on the iPad?

Gourmet Live, a free iPad app, will include both archival and new content.

That’s what Conde Nast is hoping. On Tuesday, the company announced it would resurrect Gourmet magazine, the celebrated food and travel publication the company discontinued in October, as an iPad application called Gourmet Live.

“We closed the magazine last fall but we did not close the brand,” said Robert Sauerberg, president of consumer marketing at Conde Nast, at a media event in New York on Tuesday.

Gourmet Live, which the company said would be made available free, is slated to be released in the fourth quarter of this year. The application will largely draw from the magazine’s staggering collection of recipes, food essays and photographs but will also include some new content.

via Gourmet Magazine Revived for the iPad – Bits Blog – NYTimes.com.

facebook, tv, people, good headline/title:  I vote Julia!  And now the new Cooking Network will rebroadcast her classics … do you think this would have happened with out Powell’s Julie and Julia, which was generally panned.

Facebook fans, we love you! We asked you which chef, real or fictional, alive or dead, you’d most like to set a place for at your dinner table. More than 3,000 of you wrote back!

Lots of you chose butter-loving French food maven Julia Child, like fan Jessica Conaway, who writes: “Julia Child hands down…She never called herself a chef, but she was still a pioneer.” Her hypothetical datebook may be full up, but you can hang in the kitchen with Julia every weekday on our brand-new sister station, Cooking Channel.

via The FN Dish » Archive » Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?.

America’s favorite chef and cooking teacher shares her ageless techniques and recipes in the classic series The French Chef and Julia Child & Company. Tune in to these well-loved series and rediscover why Julia is and always will be the Grand Dame of the Kitchen

via Julia Child : Julia Child : Cooking Channel.

15
Jun
10

6.15.2010 … on the road again … lovely lunch with my sister and mom in Greenville overlooking the Falls … home again … JB is venturing over the BIG Pond today …

Apple iPhone:

The fourth-generation iPhone, which features a higher-resolution display, longer battery life and a front-facing camera for video chat, appears to be in high demand. So high, in fact, that when Apple and its partners started taking pre-orders on Tuesday, many anxious customers were unable to reserve one. The phone will be released next Thursday.

via IPhone 4 Orders Swamp AT&T and Apple Sites – Bits Blog – NYTimes.com.

World Cup 2010, culture:  As EWM said … “‘ think i’m the only one who doesn’t mind the vuvuzelas (careful spelling that word)….the noise reminds me of the engine sounds at Formula One races…” … I think she is the ONLY one that doesn’t mind the vuvuzelas!

This year’s World Cup got off to an exciting start, at least for my native USA (we totally didn’t lose!). But all the fun of watching a Cup match is tempered by that grating, stab-your-ears-with-a-pencil drone of the vuvuzela, that giant red plastic horn. The vuvuzela’s drone seems stronger this year than ever before, and there have been a few offered fixes to the problem.

via World Cup Hack: A Simple Fix to Eliminate That Annoying Vuvuzela Drone | Fast Company.

BP Oil Spill, The President:

British families of 9/11 victims described Barack Obama as ‘cruel’ yesterday for comparing the terrorist outrage to the BP oil spill.

The U.S. president said there were ‘echoes’ between the Gulf of Mexico disaster and the Al Qaeda suicide attacks which killed 2,995 people, including 67 Britons.

He said that just as the events of September 11, 2001, had profoundly shaped ‘our view of our vulnerabilities and our foreign policy’, so the oil disaster would shape thinking on the environment and energy for years to come.

via BP OIL SPILL: Fury as Obama compares Gulf leak to 9/11 attacks | Mail Online.

22
May
10

“An activist court is a court that makes a decision you don’t like” – U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy … Week ending 5.22.2010

May 16-22, 2010 Continue reading ‘“An activist court is a court that makes a decision you don’t like” – U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy … Week ending 5.22.2010’




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

May 2020
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31