Posts Tagged ‘Argo

27
Feb
13

2.26.13 … paper or plastic? …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks, Myers Park Baptist Church:

IMG_6117 IMG_6120

IMG_6129

IMG_6125  IMG_6131   IMG_6123

I almost did not walk today …  but decided there would be days when I definitely  could not walk,  so at 10:10 PM,  I walked. It was  42° and foggy. It’s nice that the labyrinth at Myers Park Baptist is lighted.
As i walked I thought about the TMBS  Proverbs lesson  from earlier today  at First  Presbyterian Church. I loved Kirk’s use of advertising to demonstrate our folly!
Paper or plastic? I learned something new …
Blessings!

Ben Affleck, Argo, Rolling Stone, CIA,  Fake Sci-Fi Flick, Wired Magazine: Two interesting  articles …

QA: Ben Affleck on Directing ‘Argo’ and Surviving Hollywood | Movies News | Rolling Stone

How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans From Tehran | Wired Magazine | Wired.com.

Kickstarter, Oscars, shoutouts:

The begging and scraping that goes into getting a film financed is rarely mentioned among the glamour and triumph of the Academy Awards.

Not so with the short documentary “Inocente,” which became the first Kickstarter-funded film to win an Oscar.

Co-directors Andrea Nix and Sean Fine praised the crowd-funding website to reporters backstage. They said it helped them generate community involvement as well as dollars.

Nearly 300 people donated $52,000 through the site to fund the documentary chronicling the life of a homeless teenager in San Diego.

“It’s a great new outlet for films, and especially for documentary films,” Fine said.

via KICKSTARTER GETS OSCAR SHOUTOUT.

Waltz, Hathaway, Supporting Oscars, WSJ.com: What did you think?

The Oscars got under way with edgy humor and a surprise win on Sunday.

Host Seth MacFarlane, the creator of the animated series “Family Guy” and last summer’s hit movie “Ted,” sought to tread a careful line between respect and comedy as he opened the show with his trademark brand of bawdy humor.

He enlisted William Shatner, playing Captain Kirk from “Star Trek,” to show a series of offensive skits Mr. MacFarlane performed in an alternate future. In them, he made fun of famous actresses for their frequent nudity, re-enacted the alcohol- and drug-filled movie “Flight” with sock puppets, and propositioned Sally Field, nominated for her role in “Lincoln.”

The star-filled audience, which initially reacted hesitantly to jokes about Mel Gibson and Chris Brown, seemed to warm to Mr. MacFarlane as he mixed his “fake” skits with musical numbers more in the tradition of past hosts like Billy Crystal.

via Waltz, Hathaway Win Supporting Oscars – WSJ.com.

FiveThirtyEight, Oscar ballot:

Batting .500

FiveThirtyEight’s Oscar ballot — after getting off to a fairly inglorious start by choosing “Lincoln”‘s Tommy Lee Jones instead of “Django Unchained”‘s Christoph Waltz for Best Supporting Actor — got back on track with Anne Hathaway’s win for Best Supporting Actress.

via Live Coverage of the 2013 Oscars – NYTimes.com.

Nora Ephron, Oscars 2013:  Miss Nora Ephron … When Harry Met Sally | Nora Ephron’s Best Film Moments | NewsFeed | TIME.com.

 Searching for Sugarman, Oscars 2013:  Congratulations to Searching for Sugarman on winning the Oscar tonight for Best Documentary!

This true story epitomizes the multifaceted and wonderful relationship between South Africa and the USA! Have you seen it yet? What did you think?

via Facebook.

favorites, Twitter, oscars 2013:  And this was my favorite tweet from last night …

Richard Dreyfuss @RichardDreyfuss

I always dreamed that the score of one of my films would be used to play people off at the Oscars. We did it, Steven! #oscars2013

9:15 PM Feb 24th

ChristCare, Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lived, Beethoven Missa Solemnis – Agnus Dei, YouTube:  I loved starting a new study with my Christ Care group …

Agnus Dei – Beethoven Missa Solemnis – YouTube.

Biography of Malcolm Muggeridge – Christian Classics Ethereal Library.

24
Feb
13

2.24.13 … feasting on facebook …

Lent, organic smoothies, feast days:  On my feasting day, i saw this … maybe I should try it for a week and then see if I want to go back on …

Here’s a POWERFUL Healing Tonic to help reduce inflammation:

source:Jay Kordich Organic ALKALINE Powerhouse! (makes over 1 quart/ 32
ounces) 1 large (unwaxed) Cucumber (English) 2 Limes peeled 1 cup
Spinach 1 cup Parsley 1 Green Apple 6 ribs Celery 1 inch Fresh
Ginger Root If you drink a tonic like this DAILY, in 30 days you
will notice a big difference in your skin, in your daily challenges
with swollen fingers, hands and your digestion will improve. 90
days of juicing this way, the chronic inflammation you may be
experiencing WILL significantly decrease. Granted, you need to also
mirror your food habits by eating Alkalizing foods as well.
via Facebook.

history, historical films,  Argo, NYTimes.com: Since seeing Argo , I’ve wondered how
much was true.

This awards season, though, some
of the Dream Factory’s highest-profile contenders — “Lincoln,”
“Argo,” “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Django Unchained” — have been
subjected to unusually insistent fact-checking from journalists,
politicians and op-ed pontificators. Among the accusations:
Connecticut congressmen did not vote against the 13th amendment in
1865, as shown in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” Iranian
Revolutionary Guards did not chase a plane carrying six American
Embassy workers down a Tehran airport runway in 1980, as they do in
the climax of Ben Affleck’s “Argo.” And a freed slave in 1858 did
not lay waste to a Mississippi plantation called Candyland to free
his German-speaking wife, as in Quentin Tarantino’s brazenly
fantastical “Django Unchained.” Arguments over these movies raise
familiar questions about art and its uses: Is art supposed to make
us better people, give us moral instruction, work toward the social
good or exist merely for our personal pleasure? Above all, does it
have to be true? When it comes to this recent crop of historically
informed movies, these eternal conundrums have been intensified by
an acute contemporary anxiety about the truth that has less to do
with how rightly or wrongly “Argo,” for instance, gets its facts
than with the crumbling monopolies on the truth held by
institutions like the government and the press. … Movies tend to
tell more than one story. “Argo” isn’t just about a thrilling
rescue: it is also about two powerful institutions — the American
movie industry and the Central Intelligence Agency — that are
masters of dissembling. … Given some of the stories that
politicians themselves have peddled to the public, including the
existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, such concern is
understandable. It can often seem as if everyone is making
stuff up all the time and in such a climate of suspicion and
well-earned skepticism — punctuated by “gotcha” moments of scandal
and embarrassment — movies are hardly immune. But invention remains
one of the prerogatives of art and it is, after all, the job of
writers, directors and actors to invent counterfeit realities. It
is unfair to blame filmmakers if we sometimes confuse the real
world with its representations. The truth is that we love movies
partly because of their lies, beautiful and not. It’s journalists
and politicians who owe us the truth. via The
History in ‘Lincoln,’ ‘Argo’ and ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ –
NYTimes.com
.

Argo, BBC News:

The central element of the story sounds
incredible but is in fact true. The CIA cooked up a plan to spirit
the six out of the country on a scheduled flight from Tehrans
Mehrabad airport, masquerading as Canadians working on a
non-existent science-fiction film. via BBC
News – Argo: The true story behind Ben Afflecks Globe-winning
film

snark v. sweetness, Harvard Business Review: interesting …

Sweetness has a couple of faces. It expresses an openness to the world, a wish to be useful, an
innocence, a goodness, a guilelessness, a disinclination to insist
on your own interests. If there is a poster girl, it is Jess (Zooey
Deschanel), the female lead in New Girl, the new show from Fox. New
Girl turns out to be a veritable shrine to sweetness, as four
roommates rescue one another from the stream of misadventures with
madcap enthusiasm and a touching generosity.

Why sweetness? Well, we are coming out of an era of some darkness. We
seemed almost to celebrate skepticism and snark. We dwelt upon the
grimmest aspects of the human experience. TV and movie making were
increasingly ghoulish, with new standards of viscera and depravity.
Shows like CSI and NCIS dwell lovingly on the crime victim. Bright
lights and strategically placed towels protect our sexual
sensitivities, but everything else on the autopsy table is
enthusiastically examined. Once the standard bearer of
heartlessness, The Silence of the Lambs (1991) now looks a little
quaint. Since its release, we have seen a succession of werewolves,
vampires, serial killers, and human monsters of every kind. If you
are 40 or under, you’ve grown up on a steady diet of heartlessness.
via The Decline of Snark and the Return of Sweetness – Grant McCracken –
Harvard Business Review
.

Evolution Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama), YouTube, LOL:

Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

In honor of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” campaign, and to
encourage parents everywhere to get up and get moving with their
kids, Jimmy Fallon and Michelle Obama present the “Evolution of Mom
Dancing.” via Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

Smart Ass Cripple, twitter, Roger Ebert:  A tweet I just had to follow up …

Roger Ebert
(@ebertchicago)

2/23/13, 11:15 AM Smart Ass Cripple
gets the last laubit.ly/121KLdB

I’ve found a new way to
amuse myself, which, after all, is what life is all about.One Last
Laugh First, I picture some anthropologists about a thousand years
from now discovering my crippled skeleton. That makes me chuckle.
My skeleton will be a keeper for them because they’ll know right
away it belonged to a cripple.  It bears the ravages of
sitting on my ass all day. It’s twisted and bent. It’s contracted
up fetal. The bones are soupy soft. Sitting takes a toll. If God
intended for humans to sit on our asses all day, she would have
made us all Congressmen. But my body either sits in a wheelchair
(or on a crapper) or lies in bed. Every day I abuse my body by
making it get out of bed.

via Smart Ass Cripple: One Last Laugh.

history, literature, novels:  I feel stupid … I have not read any and have not even heard of all of them.  😦

According to the
novel’s liveliest, undisciplined, and most raucous traditions (and
to the word “novel”‘s etymology), the purpose of fiction is to
bring readers “news” of the real state of things as experienced and
expressed in everyday speech. The novel’s job is to reflect the
truth of our lives in common in a way that official and respectable
languages—whether these be Latin, law, economics, public policy,
cybernetics, or professional humanism (the list goes on and
on)—can’t. History is one of those respectable languages by which
we expect to be instructed in navigating the present by placing
that present within a story of grand human development headed
toward some benign purpose.

via 10 Books That Rewrite History.

Banksy, public art, ownership, Bloomberg:  Who owns it?  good question.

BBC News – ‘Banksy’ boy worker image on Poundland shop wall.The stencilled image depicts a poor child making Union Jack flags on a sewing machine and was located on the wall of a Poundland discount shop in the Wood Green area of north London. The work was later removed and was to be auctioned in Miami. It was withdrawn
moments before the auction. Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

via Bloomberg.

Michelle Obama’s Bangs, midlife crisis: .Michelle Obamas Bangs

Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview

via Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview.

Paul McIlhenny,  Tabasco,  RIP, NOLA.com:  RIP, Mr. McIlhenny.

Paul McIlhenny, an ebullient executive who for 14
years led the family-owned company that makes Tabasco sauce and who
reigned as Rex in 2006, died Saturday at his New Orleans home,
apparently of a heart attack. He was 68. Mr. McIlhenny, whom The
New York Times once called “The Scion of Spice,” became the
company’s president in 1998 — the sixth family member to hold that
title — and chief executive officer two years later. At his death,
he still held the latter position and also was chairman of the
board of directors, but a cousin, Anthony “Tony” Simmons, was named
president last year. The company, which was founded by Edmund
McIlhenny in 1868 on Avery Island, near New Iberia, sells Tabasco
sauce in about 165 countries and has 11 websites outside the United
States, in North and South America and Europe. During Mr.
McIlhenny’s years at the helm of the McIlhenny Co., he worked
aggressively to expand the number of items to which the familiar
Tabasco logo could be affixed. They include T-shirts, aprons,
neckties, teddy bears and computer screensavers, as well as seven
varieties of hot sauce. via Paul
McIlhenny, CEO of the company that makes Tabasco sauce, dies at 68
| NOLA.com
.

stress, health:

Roughly 25
percent of people say stress gives them an upset stomach or
indigestion, according to a survey by the American Psychological
Association. Here’s why: Prolonged anxiety slows digestion as your
nervous system directs its energy toward the organs and muscles
most critical to survival. This, in turn, can cause nausea,
constipation, cramping, and bloating.

via Side
Effects Of Stress: How Stressing Out Hurts Your
Body
.

Downton Abbey, Jane Austen, Journal of Victorian Culture Online:
Two of my favorites … linked …

But the connections between Downton Abbey and the
nineteenth-century novel (and Jane Austen’s novels in particular)
go far beyond the American penchant for indulging in the love
stories of “our betters” that come to pass while drinking high tea
in corseted costuming. Even a cursory glance at film adaptations of
Austen’s novels staring Downton Abbey actors reveals the
similarities between the events at Downton and the plots of
Austen’s novels. via Downton
Abbey & Jane Austen; Or, in Praise of Lady Mary | Journal
of Victorian Culture Online
.

The Pope, Twitter:  No surprise …

The Pope Is
Quitting Twitter

The Pope is giving up Twitter
when he leaves his office later this month. via The
Pope Is Quitting Twitter
.

House of Cards, NYTimes.com:  On my list to watch …

The Washington
that majestically unfurls in the credits for “House of Cards” is
recognizable to anybody who has spent time there. But even though
it can be a monumental kingdom filled with portent, it can also be
a fairly quotidian and sometimes ugly small town — but that’s not
the kind of place you make a huge, expensive television show
about.

An original series picked up and distributed by
Netflix, “House of Cards” is a great looking, lavishly made
13-episode series based on a BBC mini-series. It was developed and
produced by Beau Willimon, a guy steeped in politics as an aide to
Charles Schumer, Howard Dean and Hillary Clinton and who also wrote
“The Ides of March,” a film directed by George Clooney that got
high marks from politicos for its verisimilitude. “House of Cards”
revolves around Frank Underwood (played with lizard-like glory by
Kevin Spacey), a Democrat and House majority whip, who, when passed
over for a promotion to secretary of state wreaks revenge on all
who would lay him low. His willing partner is Zoe Barnes (played by
Kate Mara), a reporter/blogger at The Washington Herald, a
fictional establishment newspaper in the capital. via “House
of Cards”: Two reporters talk deconstruct the deck. –
NYTimes.com
.

apps ,
iPhone, Android , Digits – WSJ
:  I am such an iPhone loyalist … but I have friends that love their android …

When it comes to developing apps, the iPhone is
usually the first option. Look at apps like Instagram, which was
exclusive to the iPhone for an extended period of time before
landing on Android. But there are plenty of reasons to want to go
with an Android phone.

via Apps That Might Make You Want to Switch to Android – Digits -WSJ.

Danica Patrick, Daytona 500, firsts, kudos:  Congrats …

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods

Congratulations to Danica Patrick for becoming the first woman in history to win the Daytona 500 pole on Sunday.

via (1) Facebook.

23
Feb
13

2.23.13 … If we wanted applause, we would have joined the circus …

Lent, kith/kin, Cat – kitchen kitsch,
Rev. Pen Peery, First Presbyterian-Charlotte,  liturgical
stoles, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks
:

photo

When my in-laws sold their beach home
a few years back, one of the “things” I wanted was this silly
statue which was on the entrance hall table next to the guest book.
 It served as a great place to park keys … for a week … A
few years ago, I moved him from my entrance hall table to the
kitchen island and started seasonally decorating him.  Since I
am learning about celebrating  Lent, I took a stab at him for
Lent.  Pen Peery wrote an article in my church’s newsletter
about the meaning of the stoles worn by the ministers … et voila!
 And yes he is holding a finger labyrinth … Cat supports my
Lenten “practice.” I hope no one takes offense …

    Argo (2012),
quotes
:  The Oscars are this weekend and I have
now seen two nominated films: Argo and Beasts of the Southern Wild.
 I liked both.  But my guess is that Argo will win …
universal appeal.

 O’Donnell: If we wanted
applause, we would have joined the circus. via Argo (2012) –
Memorable quotes
.

Argo,
Oscar predictions, Nate Silver, Five Thirty Eight,
NYTimes.com
:  And Nate Silver agrees …

“Argo” has won the top awards given out by
Hollywood directors, producers, actors, writers and editors, all of
whom will also vote for the Oscars. It also won the Bafta (British
Academy of Film and Television Arts) award for Best Picture, whose
membership has significant overlap with the Academy. “Zero Dark
Thirty” may have won slightly more critical acclaim, but the
critics do not vote for the Oscars; the insiders do. And there has
been absolute consensus for “Argo” among the insiders. It would be
an enormous upset if it were to lose. (“Lincoln,” once considered
the front-runner, has been nominated for almost every best picture
award but won none of them. Counting on a comeback would be a bit
like expecting Rudolph W. Giuliani to have resurrected his campaign
in Florida in 2008 after finishing in sixth place everywhere else.)
via Oscar
Predictions, Election-Style –
NYTimes.com
.

Oscars,
MarketWatch
:  Interesting …

A Best Picture win at the Academy Awards is
practically the best advertising a movie can get, experts say,
especially if the studio’s pre-ceremony marketing push is taken
into account. In fact, even a nomination can be worth its weight in
gold. The average winning movie was made on a $17 million budget
and earned $82.5 million at the box office, according to market
research company IBISWorld, and more than half of the winners’ box
office sales occurred after the Best Picture nomination. (The Oscar
statuette itself is gold-plated and worth about $500, according to
Go Banking Rates, a financial services website.) via 10
things the Oscars won’t say –
MarketWatch
.

Becoming
Odyssa, Jennifer Pharr Davis,  the Appalachian
Trail:
 What a treat … could I have done this
at 21 … could i do it now?

With every step she takes, Jennifer
transitions from an over-confident college graduate to a student of
the trail, braving situations she never imagined before her
thru-hike. The trail is full of unexpected kindness, generosity,
and humor. And when tragedy strikes, she learns that she can depend
on other people to help her in times of need.

via Becoming
Odyssa: Epic Adventures on the Appalachian Trail: Jennifer Pharr
Davis: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
.

 
  shrimp and Grits, bacon,  Garden
and Gun,  The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen
:
Shrimp and grits + bacon … a marriage made in heaven.

4 oz. slab bacon, cut into large dice
via Shrimp
and Grits Recipe | Garden and Gun
.

Between
digressions on such subjects as the shrimping industry, the 1950
cookbook Charleston Receipts, and even foraging on the streets of
downtown Charleston, the brothers present recipes inspired by Holy
City culinarians past and present. Dishes range from clever
inventions (Frogmore Soup, a chowdery take on the iconic
seafood-and-vegetable boil) to venerable standbys (Hoppin’ John).
And they tackle shrimp and grits with tomato-and-bacon gusto. Their
version of the Lowcountry breakfast staple blends the fortified old
with the best of the streamlined new for a rich stew of ingredients
that still showcases the delicate flavor of fresh shrimp.
via email :
Webview : A Fresh Take on Shrimp and
Grits
.

Chicago,
southern, Garden and Gun
: when  moved to
Chicago in 1999, I was overwhelmed by the hospitality of my
neighbors in Wilmette.  I said numerous times that Southerners
needed to take lessons on “southern hospitality” from Chicagoans.

“You can adopt the city and it doesn’t mind,”
says my friend Jack Davis, a part-time resident who was once the
metropolitan editor of the Chicago Tribune. I know what he
means—for all the tony clubs and the highfalutin landmarks (the Art
Institute, the University of Chicago, the tallest building in the
Western world), there’s an openness and accessibility about the
place that mirrors the plan laid out by Daniel Burnham in 1909.
Burnham gave the city glorious parks and wide boulevards; he
imagined Michigan Avenue as the Champs-Elysées of the Midwest and
he succeeded. He also made it possible to see everything without
craning upward. The skyscraper was invented in Chicago, but it’s
not a remotely vertical place. Not only is Chicago arguably the
most architecturally significant city in America, it’s also the
most architecturally literate. The average citizen knows who Frank
Lloyd Wright and Louis Kahn and Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe were; he
or she might run into Helmut Jahn at Blackbird. Two of the most
important architectural prizes in the world originate in Chicago,
the Pritzker prize (for modernism) and the Richard H. Driehaus
Prize (for classicism). The citizens are proud of their buildings,
they love their theater troupes and companies (Second City,
Steppenwolf, Lookingglass), they hang out at Millennium Park and
the twenty-four public beaches along the shores of Lake Michigan.
They dine in some of the finest restaurants in the world (including
nineteen with Michelin stars), but they’ve also canonized the
Chicago Dog with its sui generis (and seriously delicious) toppings
including sport peppers and an electric-green relish. … If Nora
introduced me to Chicago, I got to know it with Frances. She took
me to lunch at the Women’s Athletic Club, a Beaux Arts landmark
that’s the oldest club of its kind in the country, and arranged a
book signing at another of her clubs, the Casino, housed in a
one-story art-deco building just behind the John Hancock building,
the air rights to which must be worth a fortune. We ate at her
neighborhood Gibsons steakhouse, went to Gene & Georgetti’s
on festive occasions, and lunched—a lot—at her favorite, RL. Over
the years, I grew to love the city’s overlapping neighborhoods and
its uniquely American glamour (one of the sexiest nights of my life
involved not much more than speeding down Lake Shore Drive in a
fast car) almost as much as she did. There is a hole now in the
landscape where Frances used to be, but Chicago will forever remain
my kind of town. via Chicago’s
Southern Soul | Garden and Gun
.

college, Harvard, nap rooms, CU,  Siesta, power
naps, psychiatry, problem-solving skills
:

Harvard’s own research shows the benefits of
power naps. Robert Stickgold, associate professor of psychiatry,
said in the Harvard Health Letter that napping can improve people’s
problem-solving skills. A November 2009 issue of the Harvard Health
Letter recommended 20- to 30-minute naps and endorsed the idea of
having an ideal spot to rest: “You don’t want to waste a lot of
time getting to sleep. Reducing light and noise helps most people
nod off faster. Cool temperatures are helpful, too.” The University
of Colorado-Boulder started its own nap center in 2009 called
“Siesta,” the Daily Camera reported. Some students say they notice
that libraries are doubling as mega nap rooms. “I see, every so
often, people fall asleep in the library, and it’s sort of
inconvenient,” Harvard senior Sam Singer told NBC Boston affiliate
WHDH on Thursday. “And if you live far away from the yard you live
far away from places where your classes might be to go back in the
middle of the day. I know people often talk about taking a nap.”
The University of Texas and the University of California-Davis both
created their own nap maps to plot the best spots to snooze on
campus. Hou told the Globe she plans to create her own nap map
until a siesta center is set up on campus. We can’t say we disagree
with Hou’s idea. We have nap rooms here at The Huffington Post, and
they’re often overbooked. via Harvard
Nap Room Under Consideration After Student’s Petition Finds
Support
.

grilled-cheese
cheesewich, BA Daily, bonappetit.com
: all cheese …

all-grilled-cheese-body2.jpgKOOKERY

Cheese Cheese Cheese Cheese
Cheese Cheese via A
Grilled-Cheese Cheesewich, But With Cheese Instead of Bread: BA
Daily: bonappetit.com
.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

May 2020
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31