Posts Tagged ‘art

07
Mar
14

3.7.14 … @HistoryInPics … “I’m not sure I’d recommend that a young person go into law … When I was starting out, it was more of a profession, and your worth was determined by the service you provided. Now it’s become more of a business, and your worth is determined by the fee you’re able to collect.” …

 @HistoryInPics, Atlantic Mobile:  I love their stuff.  And their story is really interesting …

There is a new ubiquitous media brand on Twitter.

No, I’m not talking about Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media or BuzzFeed or The Verge, or any other investor-backed startup.

I’m talking about @HistoryInPics, which, as I discovered, is run by two teenagers: Xavier Di Petta, 17, who lives in a small Australian town two hours north of Melbourne, and Kyle Cameron, 19, a student in Hawaii.

They met hustling on YouTube when they were 13 and 15, respectively, and they’ve been doing social media things together (off and on) since. They’ve built YouTube accounts, making money off advertising. They created Facebook pages such as “Long romantic walks to the fridge,” which garnered more than 10 million Likes, and sold them off. More recently, Di Petta’s company, Swift Fox Labs, has hired a dozen employees, and can bring in, according to an Australian news story, 50,000 Australian dollars a month (or roughly 43,800 USD at current exchange rates).

But @HistoryInPics may be the duo’s biggest creation. In the last three months, this account, which tweets photographs of the past with one-line descriptions, has added more than 500,000 followers to bring their total to 890,000 followers. (The account was only established in July of 2013.) If the trend line continues, they’ll hit a million followers next month.

The new account has gained this massive following without the official help of Twitter, which often sticks celebrity and media accounts on its recommended-follow list, inflating their numbers.

As impressively, my analysis of 100 tweets from the account this week found that, on average, a @HistoryInPics tweet gets retweeted more than 1,600 times and favorited 1,800 times.

For comparison, Vanity Fair’s Twitter account—with 1.3 million followers—tends to get a dozen or two retweets and favorites on any given tweet.

I’ve got about 140,000 followers and I’ve tweeted more than 30,000 times. I can’t remember ever having a single tweet get retweeted or favorited as much as the average @HistoryInPics tweet.

via The 2 Teenagers Who Run the Wildly Popular Twitter Feed @HistoryInPics – Atlantic Mobile.

@HistoryInPics, Atlantic Mobile, copyright, media: I’m clipping this article twice.  Interesting legal issues and analysis.

The audiences that Di Petta and Cameron have built are created with the work of photographers who they don’t pay or even credit. They don’t provide sources for the photographs or the captions that accompany them. Sometimes they get stuff wrong and/or post copyrighted photographs.

They are playing by rules that “old media” and most new media do not. To one way of thinking, they are cheating at the media game, and that’s why they’re winning. (Which they are.)

I interviewed Di Petta on Skype and got him to walk me through the details of building this little empire of Twitter accounts. As he openly talked through how he and Cameron had built the accounts, I asked him how he felt about criticism that they didn’t source or pay for images.

“The majority of the images are public domain haha,” he responded.

So I said, great, let’s look through the last five together. And not all of them were in the public domain. So, I said, “How do you think about the use of these images?”

“Photographers are welcome to file a complaint with Twitter, as long as they provide proof. Twitter contacts me and I’d be happy to remove it,” he said. “I’m sure the majority of photographers would be glad to have their work seen by the massives.”

I pressed him on this point. Shouldn’t the onus be on him and Cameron to get those rights from the photographers they assume would be grateful?

“It would not be practical,” he said. “The majority of the photographers are deceased. Or hard to find who took the images.”

Then he said, “Look at Buzzfeed. Their business model is more or less using copyright images.”

I said most people in the media don’t appreciate Buzzfeed’s interpretation of the fair use exemption from copyright law. “The photographers I know would want me to ask you if you see anything wrong with profiting from their work?” I asked him.

“That’s an interesting point,” Di Petta responded. “I feel like we’re monetizing our traffic, but they would see it as we’re monetizing their images.”

“They would say, ‘Without our images, you have no traffic,'” I said.

“They do have a point,” he conceded. “But whether we use images X or Y, there will be traffic to the site. But I can see their point of view.”

In this logic, Di Petta echoes the logic of all social media networks.

Facebook, Twitter, and (especially) Pinterest all benefit from people sharing copyrighted images. Visual content—none of which the companies create themselves—drive almost all social media sites. And they pay for none of it.

via The 2 Teenagers Who Run the Wildly Popular Twitter Feed @HistoryInPics – Atlantic Mobile.

Humans of New York, lawyers, profession v. business:

“I’m not sure I’d recommend that a young person go into law.”

“Why’s that?”

“When I was starting out, it was more of a profession, and your worth was determined by the service you provided. Now it’s become more of a business, and your worth is determined by the fee you’re able to collect.”

via Humans of New York.

Maira Kalman, What I choose to illustrate and why, YouTube, Inktalks.com: Ok, so I love Maira Kalman …

via ▶ Maira Kalman: What I choose to illustrate and why – YouTube.

Published on Feb 6, 2014

http://inktalks.com Celebrated illustrator and author Maira Kalman believes that everything that delights you needs to be documented. Sharing images from a range of her projects, Kalman talks about her curiosities and inspirations. Exploring the themes that matter to her the most — time, work, and love — Kalman fascinates us with her wisdom, whimsical illustrations, and her clever trick to slow down time.

via ▶ Maira Kalman: What I choose to illustrate and why – YouTube.

“What protects you in this world from sadness and from the loss of an ability to do something? … Work and love.”

Maira Kalman is one of the most beloved illustrators working today and one of my greatest heroes, a singular spirit living at the intersection of art and philosophy. In this fantastic talk from India’s INK Conference, Kalman takes us on a journey into her wonderfully idiosyncratic mind and expansive soul, revealing along the way the poetic and profound universalities of our human triumphs and tribulations.

via Maira Kalman | Brain Pickings.

polar vortex 2014, frozen Chicago:  One of my favorite places seen from a different perspective.

Weatherist.com

Like This Page · March 3

Great shot of frozen Chicago!

via Weatherist.com.

MASTERPIECE | Downton Abbey Season 4, Unsung Heroes of Downton, Isis, PBS, YouTube: Isis! “The bitch gives you nothing!”

via MASTERPIECE | Downton Abbey, Season 4: Unsung Heroes of Downton – Isis | PBS – YouTube.

Which Rory Gilmore Are You, Buzzfeed:

Which Rory Gilmore Are You?

You got: In Puppy Love Rory

WB / Via homeofthenutty.com

You’re young and in love! Nothing can stop you! Keep that feel-good attitude going for as long as you can. Everyone around you must be pretty happy for you, too.

via Which Rory Gilmore Are You.

Time Magazine, New Look, Cool New Ad Format, Re/code: I mentioned Time yesterday and its humble beginnings as a clipping service.  I love that it is still evolving.

Time magazine is going to have a new corporate home soon, when its parent company, Time Inc., spins out from Time Warner. And today it has a new digital look: Time’s website has been overhauled, and you should be able to see some of the changes tonight and the rest tomorrow morning.

As always, it makes more sense for you to go look at the site than for me to describe it to you — in particular, so you can see a mind-bending interactive photo taken from the spire at the top of One World Trade Center and an accompanying video and story (those should all be up by Thursday morning).

via Time Magazine Has a New Look, and a Cool New Ad Format | Re/code.

art, classic paintings, world cities,  Google Street View, in pictures | Cities | theguardian.com:  Absolutely loved this!

Classic paintings of world cities meet Google Street View – in pictures

Following on from his amazing series last week, here are Halley Docherty’s latest collages for us – well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world, from Istanbul to Saint Petersburg and Tokyo to New York, superimposed on to Google Street View

via Classic paintings of world cities meet Google Street View – in pictures | Cities | theguardian.com.

NC General Assembly Moral Monday protesters, NewsObserver.com, Institute for Southern Studies:

Institute for Southern Studies

“The Raleigh attorney argued that no witness called by Wake County Assistant District Attorney Lawrence Cameron touched on a key element for trespass crimes — the owner of the property. ‘In this case, Judge, you have to be told this is the property of another,’ McWilliam argued. ‘This is not the property of another. This is the very property of the very people who were on the property that day.'”

via Facebook.

RALEIGH: 7 NC General Assembly Moral Monday protesters acquitted | State Politics | NewsObserver.com.

startups,  Tuft & Needle,  Amazon’s No. 1 Mattress, Re/code:  I love a good startup story!

When Daehee Park and JT Marino left the tech startup they worked for to strike out on their own, they looked for a different pace, perhaps something in an “old-fashioned industry” ripe for change.

They landed in mattresses.

The industry, dominated by the big S companies – Simmons, Serta and Sealy — was an unlikely target for two digital entrepreneurs. But Park and Marino, the founders of Tuft & Needle, borrowed a concept familiar to the tech world they fled: That it’s possible to make money producing a better, more affordable product by cutting out the middlemen and controlling prices.

On that foundation, their mattresses, which are sold directly to consumers from their website and on Amazon and come with high-touch customer service, have soared to the top ranks on Amazon.com. The company’s products are not only the highest-rated mattresses sold on Amazon, but also the highest-rated product in the online retailer’s giant furniture category overall. Tuft & Needle mattresses have received 188 five-star reviews out of 212 in total.

It is paying off as well. After generating $1 million in sales in 2013, the company’s first full year in business, Tuft & Needle’s revenue hit $500,000 in January and February of this year alone, and it is on pace to clear $5 million in sales by the end of 2014. It’s a drop in the bucket in the $7 billion dollar U.S. mattress sector, but it is a category that rarely sees five-times growth.

The company is also profitable, the founders said in an interview.

via How Bootstrapped Startup Tuft & Needle Created Amazon’s No. 1 Mattress | Re/code.

21
Jan
14

1.21.14 … verbal sparring, elite parents and embroidered photos …

Richard Sherman , NFL football:  It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

So now, America, let’s talk about Richard Sherman in the NFL. Let’s talk about the Stanford graduate from Compton who has never been arrested, never cursed in a post-game interview, never been accused of being a dirty player, started his own charitable non-profit, and won an appeal in the only thing close to a smudge on his record.

via What Richard Sherman Taught Us About America | Isaac Saul.

2013 Target security breach:  I had no idea how they would use the stolen data …

McALLEN, Texas (AP) — A South Texas police chief said Monday that two Mexican citizens who were arrested at the border used account information stolen during the Target security breach to buy tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of merchandise. But a federal official said later there currently was no connection between the arrests and the retailer’s credit card data theft.

McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez said Mary Carmen Garcia, 27, and Daniel Guardiola Dominguez, 28, both of Monterrey, Mexico, had used cards containing the account information of South Texas residents. Rodriguez said they were used to purchase numerous items at national retailers in the area including Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us.

“They’re obviously selling the data sets by region,” Rodriguez said.

On Sunday morning, federal officials alerted police the two were at the Anzalduas International Bridge trying to re-enter the U.S. They were carrying 96 fraudulent cards, Rodriguez said.

Investigators believe the two were involved in both the acquisition of the fraudulent account data and the production of the cards.

Rodriguez said investigators suspect Garcia and Guardiola were singling out Sundays for their shopping sprees hoping that the banks would not be as quick to detect the fraud.

He said he expected Garcia and Guardiola to eventually face federal charges.

The Target security breach is believed to have involved 40 million credit and debit card accounts and the personal information of 70 million customers.

via 2 nabbed at Texas border in credit card fraud case.

elitism,  volunteers, children, public school, level playing field,  NYTimes.com:  I had some negative experiences in boys’ sports at both public middle and high school in Charlotte NC.  I also had a situation at middle school that I thought petty. In both situations the parents who were not wealthy were made to feel that their contributions were not wanted or worthy.  Several friends disagreed strongly with me.  I will admit that my most negative experiences in this area were in boys’ sports, and in particular football.  But my friends were correct, most endeavored through the PTAs to provide for all on an equal basis; there was no sushi or spring rolls.  It was a conversation worth having …

One long-ago day my mother took cupcakes to school wearing a pale yellow coat — not warm enough for the winter day, but she wanted to look nice. A classmate admired her. I was a little proud. I hoped to impress this classmate, or anyone. My dad was an alcoholic. A friend with a similar childhood calls it “impoverished.” I lacked currency: cash or social sway.

The problem is bigger than that. It’s an inescapable fact that extracurricular activities, which increase student investment in school, are planned by parents who have ample time and money, who sometimes lack insight into the lives of students whose parents don’t. I tried to advocate for these students. My empathy is tangible. Where exactly do you live again? a volunteer asked when I said pizza, not sushi.

I felt the condescension behind the question. I smiled while clenching my teeth — overruled, because parents who would agree with me can’t leave work.

Volunteering meant parties, I discovered. It meant “let them eat chocolate-mousse cake.”

No one actually said that. But one volunteer insisted on chocolate-mousse cake for Valentine’s Day, even as another argued it was too unfamiliar for third-graders. At the celebration, a boy who lived in a rundown house a few miles from me said he had been excited all week about cake. His face fell when he tasted it. “Gunk in the middle,” he said.

Another volunteer set the price for a Christmas gift exchange at $25. Too high, I said. She said to spend what I could. “I can afford $25,” I said, “but some people can’t.” She smiled. “No one but you is objecting.” On the day of the party, she was gone. A widow raising a grandchild had worried that some kids would show up without gifts and feel bad, so she had bought eight spares. They were necessary, and we remaining volunteers ponied up.

via When Elite Parents Dominate Volunteers, Children Lose – NYTimes.com.

Lost-Wallet Syndrome, The Happiness Project:

But my bliss at getting my laptop back is staying with me, I must say. I felt so lost without it…my laptop is my work and my play; my encyclopedia and my phone; my teddy bear and my to-do list.

When I thought it was lost forever, the analogy that kept popping into my mind came from Harry Potter. I felt as though I’d accidentally created a horcrux, and a piece of my soul had lodged into a physical object and was lost in the world.

via Why I Didn’t Post Last Week, or, Lost-Wallet Syndrome. « The Happiness Project.

Sausage escarole and bean soup, recipes:  Here is the link to the recipe.

As I have tinkered with adding different combinations of ingredients to the pot, I’ve become enamored with the combination of Italian sausage with escarole. Escarole is a leafy lettuce, a member of the endive family, that in the past I have used only for salads. However, it turns out that, unlike most lettuce varieties, it holds up well to cooking and I’ve been adding it to my soup pot. Escarole is not quite as bold as kale or chard and won’t wilt as much as spinach. When you pick up a head of escarole next to the romaine at the grocery store, you might question the logic of adding it to the pot, but misgivings will disappear when you see that it performs beautifully.

via Sausage, escarole, and bean soup | Food and Dining.

verbal tee-ups, insincerity, WSJ.com, guilty:

Some phrases like “to be perfectly honest” and “don’t take this the wrong way” can make you seem insincere. How certain expressions hinder conversations: http://on.wsj.com/1e9WYNG

Which phrases would you add to this list?

Photo: Some phrases like "to be perfectly honest" and "don't take this the wrong way" can make you seem insincere. How certain expressions hinder conversations: http://on.wsj.com/1e9WYNG</p><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Which phrases would you add to this list?

A friend of mine recently started a conversation with these words: “Don’t take this the wrong way…”

I wish I could tell you what she said next. But I wasn’t listening—my brain had stalled. I was bracing for the sentence that would follow that phrase, which experience has taught me probably wouldn’t be good.

Many people use verbal “tee-up” phrases like “to tell you the truth…”. Elizabeth Bernstein discusses when they’re useful and when they’re a bad idea, and guest Betsy Schow shares her personal experience of being on the wrong side of a tee-up. Photo: Getty.

Certain phrases just seem to creep into our daily speech. We hear them a few times and suddenly we find ourselves using them. We like the way they sound, and we may find they are useful. They may make it easier to say something difficult or buy us a few extra seconds to collect our next thought.

Yet for the listener, these phrases are confusing. They make it fairly impossible to understand, or even accurately hear, what the speaker is trying to say.

via Why Verbal Tee-Ups Like ‘To Be Honest’ Are a Signal of Insincerity – WSJ.com.

art, embroidered photographs, Observatory: Design Observer:  An interesting art technique.

I happen to own several actual photographic postcards from the turn of the last century that have been embroidered. These paper cards are embellished with decorative embroidered stitching that were created for tourists, and most of these seem to have come from Spain, Portugal, Germany and other European countries. More recently, an Italian born artist by the name of Maurizio Anzeri has found great success with his embroidered photographs, obviously inspiring a few other artists to take the needle and thread to photographic images. Anzeri\’s work is gorgeous, bringing with it elements of extraordinary design and such masterful perfection it makes me feel as if it were created by computer — not that I find that detracting. If it is done by hand, one stitch at a time, that’s great. If he uses a computer program to create his stitching — that\’s fine too. It\’s ingenious work.

While I enjoy the work of Anzeri, who is the first person I know of to reinvent and bring new art to a centuries old craft, it is Dutch artist Hinke Schreuders whose embroidery on photographs excites me now. Her work feels more “statement orientated” in the images I present here. Additionally, her work with thread is very intuitive and raw, different than the work of Mr. Anzeri.

via The Renewed Art of Embroidered Photographs: Observatory: Design Observer.

21
Oct
13

10.21.13 … So what do Downton Abbey’s Bates and Shaft have in common … and a moonwalking marching band …

Downton Abbey/ Season 4, lists,  Masterpiece, PBS:  So what do Downton Abbey’s Bates and Shaft have in common? You’ll have to watch the clip… and of course it’s 5 of 5.  🙂  Downton Abbey, Season 4: 5 Things You Don’t Know | Watch Online | Masterpiece | PBS.

art, classical sculptures,  Today I Learned Something New:

Classical sculptures dressed as hipsters look contemporary and totally badass | Today I Learned Something New.

graffiti, reverse, graffiti:

Via Sustainable Living — with Raghvendra Singh Parihar and 7 others.

 Harry Potter,  Honest Trailers, YouTube: 🙂

Since you guys REALLY asked for this one – We sat and watched all eight movies (20 HOURS of Harry Potter!) so you could relive the moment or two you liked.

via Honest Trailers – Harry Potter – YouTube.

Gravity, films:  I few thoughts on Gravity:

I had some feminist issues with GRAVITY. Behold my roar:

If a female scientist is intelligent and tough enough to qualify to spend months on a mission with NASA, she should not need a male scientist to tell her EVERY SINGLE THING SHE HAS TO DO.

Including HOW TO BREATHE.

To the extent that she GIVES UP and SETTLES DOWN TO DIE until he COMES BACK FROM THE DEAD to tell her this one piece of information that she needs to get back to the earth.

Seriously. He COMES BACK FROM THE DEAD with this info, because DEAD MEN apparently have more knowledge and common sense than living women, even living scientist women. And Ryan Stone, Sandra Bullock\’s character, is so EMOTIONAL and FEARFUL and in need of a MAN to direct her that she would never survive without Mental Ghost Matt Kowalski.

via Brooklyn Arden: The Feminist Thing that Irritated the Hell Out of Me about GRAVITY.

 

Against all odds, “Gravity” is defying it.

The film has broken box office records by appealing to young and old, men and women, art-movie fans, sci-fi geeks and evangelical Christian reviewers.

Now heading into its third weekend, “Gravity” is an increasingly rare phenomenon: a movie that draws audiences in droves, yet also wins joyous praise from critics. Exhibitors are thrilled that word is out the film should be seen not at home but in theaters, on a big screen, with high-quality sound. Comedian Albert Brooks slyly underscored the rewards of the immersive big-screen experience, tweeting “Just watched Gravity on an iPhone. Not that impressed.”

Older people are acting like teens. “They’re calling the theater asking how 3-D works,” says Ted Mundorff, chief executive of Landmark Theatres, which operates 50 cinemas in 21 U.S. markets. “We’re getting people out of the house who haven’t been to a movie for 10 years or more.”

If current trends continue, “Gravity” is likely to end up grossing more than $500 million world-wide, territory rarely seen by movies that aren\’t based on a comic book or toy and released in summertime or holiday season. It is unlikely to approach the world-wide grosses of movies like this year’s No. 1 hit, “Iron Man 3,” which sold more than $1.2 billion in tickets around the world.

via Why the World is Watching ‘Gravity’ – WSJ.com.

But the truth is, most of this doesn’t matter. Cuarón has given us a glimpse of the awe that is the universe beyond our atmosphere. And physics aside, he does it remarkably well.

My only hope is that we continue our exploration of space in real life, too. The majority of NASA employees have been furloughed as a result of the government shutdown. If Sandra Bullock’s Dr. Ryan were a real person, she’d still be waiting on the beach somewhere on planet Earth.

So, do me a favor. After you see “Gravity,” tell your member of Congress. Perhaps it will inspire them to put NASA employees back to work.

via Mark Kelly gives an astronaut’s view of ‘Gravity’ – The Washington Post.

‘Ravenswood’, Twitter, WSJ.com:  There is something circular about this ….

ABC Family has about 1.9 million reasons to be confident that \”Pretty Little Liars\” is ripe for a spinoff series, the channel\’s first. That was the number of messages about the hit show that flooded Twitter during a season finale in August, which set a standing record for the top-tweeted episode of any series on television.

The online gusto that propelled ratings of \”Pretty Little Liars,\” a feisty mystery series aimed at girls, also contributed to its creators\’ choice of which heartthrob character to feature on a spinoff—and when to introduce it. Starting with Tuesday\’s premiere of \”Ravenswood,\” a creepier story set in a different town, producers will monitor online reaction as they shape new story lines and characters.

\”We\’ll have access to the biggest focus group there is\” when the conversation about \”Ravenswood\” kicks in, says I. Marlene King, an executive producer of both shows.

Indeed, like the stars of \”PLL\” who have up to 3.2 million Twitter followers each, most of the show\’s writers and producers are in dialogue with fans. Last Saturday, as she finished writing a finale episode for next spring, Ms. King, who has 290,000 followers, tweeted quotes from the script and invited fans to guess which characters say them.

via ‘Ravenswood’ Inspired by Twitter – WSJ.com.

Male/ With a Job in Finance or Economics/“Wilderness Experience” TV Show, casting,  Finance-Savvy Males, kith/kin:  John, maybe?

Casting Finance-Savvy Males for Enter The Wild TV Series.Are You Male, With a Job in Finance or Economics, and Want to Get on a “Wilderness Experience” TV Show?

via Freakonomics » Are You Male, With a Job in Finance or Economics, and Want to Get on a “Wilderness Experience” TV Show? Casting Finance-Savvy Males for Enter The Wild TV Series.

Landfill Harmonic Orchestra, YouTube:  How could you not love this one. 😉

via ▶ the Landfill Harmonic Orchestra – YouTube.

crosswalk signals, art:

You see them every day, but when was the last time you really stopped to look at them? http://on.wsj.com/19K0Qly

Artist Maya Barkai’s “Walking Men Worldwide” project, currently on display in Sydney, invites pedestrians to do just that.

What do pedestrian traffic icons look like where you live? Do they say anything about the culture around you?

via Facebook.

Daniel Radcliffe, Dane DeHaan,  fake Kickstarter project:  🙂

http://www.mtv.com/videos/movies/965043/daniel-radcliffe-pitches-a-hardcore-sex-movie.jhtml#id=1644133

Requesting only four thousand-hundred million dollars from their fanbase, Radcliffe and DeHaan promise to deliver a scriptless movie with questionable acting talent and virtually no plot. “This is going to be an entirely improvised film,” emphasized Radcliffe. “All the best films are improvised: ‘Chronicles of Riddick,’ ‘Pitch Black,’ ‘Riddick…’”

The “concept art” movie takes place in Brooklyn, because Brooklyn “is like crazy hot right now” and focuses on the lives of Joey (Radcliffe) and his childhood friend, Captain Animal (DeHaan). Joey has an accent. There is lots of hardcore sex (actual, authentic sex). There is singing. And, as if that’s not enticing enough — for donations of $50 or more, droll “Harry Potter” star Alan Rickman will watch TV with you for entire evening.

via Daniel Radcliffe and Dane DeHaan’s fake Kickstarter project sounds amazing – Salon.com.

collecting:

Still, collections collect collectors. I can see that you understand. Isn’t it a miraculous scandal, how short our lives are? But my nuggets of Roman glass have not aged a day.

Our collections continually teach and form us. They teach us to upgrade, to refine, to jettison what is commonplace for something a bit more scarce. Without cohabiting alongside Ursula these 35 years, I could not have understood the very concept of sainthood, and could not have found “Saints Have Mothers,” a novella in my new book, “Local Souls.”

I have invested in these treasures and, perhaps more selflessly, seen to their weekly dusting. They are what I have instead of an invisible God or too many cats. True, no museum has ever begged for anything in here. But each masterwork matters to me. How did I afford them? They were bought with funds others blow on alimony, cocaine, boarding school tuition, orthodontics and veterinary bills.

A collection can warm up history. It can console you, a form of rosary-bead love. My diverse holdings signal to me that I am finally home; they give my still-gluttonous eyes unending hamster-wheel sprints. Familiar, beautiful, hand-chosen across a long life, these treasures are ivory-smoothed by an admiration spanning decades. They help me gather myself.

via When the Saint Came Marching In – NYTimes.com.

Ohio State band,  moonwalks giant Michael Jackson formation:  Pretty impressive!

via ▶ Ohio State Marching Band “Michael Jackson Tribute” – Halftime vs. Iowa: 10-19-13 – YouTube.

24
Jul
13

7.24.13 … Love this Long legged Frenchman! …

art, Video Postcard, James Tissot’s Frederick Gustavus Burnaby (1870), YouTube: Sometimes the history of a piece of art is as interesting as the art itself.  Love this Long legged Frenchman!

Gloria Groom, curator of the exhibition Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity, takes you on a tour of one of James Tissot’s masterpieces.

via Video Postcard: Frederick Gustavus Burnaby (1870) – YouTube.

 

 

 

09
Jun
13

6.9.13 … Minimalist Infographic Biographies – Who do you recognize? …

art, famous painters, graphics, minimalist infographic biographies, Brain Pickings:  Some are easy, but some I don’t see.  I guess I don’t know my art as well as I thought.

The artists include Jackson Pollock (whose meditation on art and life is a must-read and who had a pretty amazing dad), Salvador Dalí (whose little-known Alice in Wonderland illustrations never cease to delight), Gustav Klimt (who was a key figure in sparking the cross-pollination of art and science that shaped modern culture), Henri Matisse (who, unbeknownst to many, once illustrated Joyce’s Ulysses) and Piet Mondrian (who has even inspired artisanal cake), and each painter is represented by a cleverly designed pictogram reflective of his signature style:

via The Lives of 10 Famous Painters, Visualized as Minimalist Infographic Biographies | Brain Pickings.

19
May
13

5.19.13 Pentecost In Art … “Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit” …

Pentecost, art, paintings, stained glass, frescoes:

When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. (Acts 2:1-4)

via Pentecost In Art: Paintings, Stained Glass Windows, Frescoes And More (PHOTOS).

Pentecost, YouTube: 

13
Apr
13

4.13.13 … bloody big ship …

art, SkyFall,  JMW Turner’s  The Fighting Temeraire, Lord Tennyson’s Ulysses, Bond Lifestyle, Roger Ebert:  Watching Skyfall for the second time … noticing some details.

.

The Fighting Temeraire in SkyFall James Bond

This oil painting painting is one of the most famous works by Turner. It depicts one of the last second-rate ships of the line which played a distinguished role in the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, the 98-gun ship HMS Temeraire, being towed towards its final berth in Rotherhithe south east London in 1838 to be broken up for scrap.

In 2005, The Fighting Temeraire was voted the greatest painting in a British art gallery. The painting gets some great screentime in SkyFall, so if you’re looking for an art print of this painting for your collection, check out cards, posters and canvas prints in all shapes and sizes of The Figthing Temeraire on the National Gallery’s website, Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

The painting hangs in Room 34 the National Gallery in London and that’s exactly where James Bond (Daniel Craig) is looking at it while waiting for Q (Ben Whishaw). Q, after sitting down next to Bond, talks about the painting:

Q: It always makes me feel a little melancholy. Grand old war ship, being ignominiously hauled away to scrap… The inevitability of time, don’t you think? What do you see?

James Bond: A bloody big ship.

Another artwork in SkyFall that clearly references to the issue of the relevance of MI6 and Bond, is the excerpt from the poem, read by M (Judi Dench) to the Minister during her hearing. The part read out loud is the last 5 lines of the poem Ulysses, by Lord Tennyson, written in 1842.

We are not now that strength which in old days

Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are—

One equal temper of heroic hearts,

Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will

To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

M admits to dislike poetry, but these lines are very much in line with Old vs. New theme in the movie. SkyFall has proven that the real world James Bond franchise is clearly not ready to yield, but seems stronger than ever.

via Art in SkyFall | Bond Lifestyle.

I will miss Ebert’s reviews …

In this 50th year of the James Bond series, with the dismal “Quantum of Solace” (2008) still in our minds, “Skyfall” triumphantly reinvents 007 in one of the best Bonds ever. This is a full-blooded, joyous, intelligent celebration of a beloved cultural icon, with Daniel Craig taking full possession of a role he earlier played well in “Casino Royale,” not so well in “Quantum” — although it may not have been entirely his fault. Or is it just that he’s growing on me? I don’t know what I expected. I don’t know what I expected in Bond No. 23, but certainly not an experience this invigorating.

via Skyfall Movie Review & Film Summary (2012) | Roger Ebert.




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