Posts Tagged ‘Baby Boomers

09
Mar
15

3.9.15 … More and more I realize that our ability to communicate, to talk, to people in our community is the only way to break generational cycles. What will I think about tomorrow as I walk this unicursal path of 11 concentric circles? …

“Solvitur Ambulando”  – It is solved by walking, 2015 Labyrinth Walks (18/40), Wedgewood Church – Charlotte NC:
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Crunch, crunch, crunch …
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So it is the second day of daylight savings time. You know I really don’t get enough benefit out of it. I hate waking up in the dark. I realize I should not complain, because I have the luxury of waking up whenever I want. But if I didn’t, I would really, really, hate shifting from waking at dawn to waking in the dark.

I am here because, I want to like every labyrinth. But I picked the wrong time. It’s 5 o’clock and Wedgwood is on a busy street.  So there is heavy traffic,  5 o’clock traffic.
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As I walk I am thinking of Penn’s sermon yesterday at First Presbyterian Church Charlotte. He talked about the “Plurals.”  My children are Millennials (Millennial Generation (1977-1996), the first generation of increasing power in the Twenty-First Century, was the result of a second baby boom during a time of unparalleled focus on the health and well-being of children). Children who were born 1997 or after are considered Plurals.

The research has recognized the demographic patterns, parenting styles and societal factors shaping the next generation.

  • The continual erosion of dominant media
  • The rapid emergence of fragmented and niche-based voices
  • The power of ground-up consensus building
  • The bold contrast of Gen X and Baby Boomer parenting styles
  • The growing conflicts surrounding demographic changes
  • The second-longest economic decline in U.S. history

Now, says the report, this newly named generation, the Plurals, are the most ethnically diverse generation to-date. Currently only 55% of Plurals are Caucasian, compared to 72% among Baby Boomers. The proportion of Caucasians in America will continue to diminish, creating a pluralistic society, one in which there isn’t a majority ethnicity or race. In 2019, live births in America will be less than 50% Caucasian, making the Pluralist Generation the last generation with a Caucasian majority.  In 2042, the entire population will be less than 50% Caucasian and America will literally become a pluralistic society. via Plurals: America’s Last Generation With Caucasian Majority

Back to what Penn discussed … A plural  is someone who grows up during the first time period where there is no majority in the United States. Historically, that majority has been white and Christian and probably what we refer to as WASP.  As a result, our children and  grandchildren will relate to people very differently.
As I walked I thought about what will be the common experience of many of this next generation, I consider my generation, the Baby Boomers. During  the Baby Boomer generation, a common experience was going to school and attending Sunday school every  Sunday. That’s just what everyone did. With our children, the Millennials, and this next generation, the Plurals, the common  experience is more likely to be playing soccer. They won’t even be playing football or baseball or basketball. It’s definitely playing soccer. Almost every child plays soccer.
So I began to wonder how I can make my experiences at 55 more common, more universal. Something that I can share with many  people, with a person regardless of their race, gender, sexuality, socio-economic background, religion…
So even though it is an extremely odd hobby or spiritual practice, it is a very interesting way for me to connect with people. (As well as to connect with myself and my God.)
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Crunch, crunch, crunch …
And on my way home, I listen to a very interesting NPR program on adverse childhood experiences ACE scores that I referenced  the other day. If  adults talk about their events, it might  prevent the generational cycles.  Absolutely fascinating.

Wade is working on his own screening tool, a short list of questions that would give every young patient at the clinic an “adversity score.” The list will include indicators of abuse and neglect (which pediatricians already are on the lookout for) and also check for signs of poverty, racial discrimination or bullying. Dr. Roy Wade, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, says asking about tough experiences his patients have faced gives him a way in — a way to be a doctor to the whole family. Wade wants to take action because research suggests that the stress of a tough childhood can raise the risk for later disease, mental illness and addiction. The American Academy of Pediatrics put out a call in 2011 to doctors to address what the Academy characterizes as “toxic stress” among young patients. Of course, not every kid with a rough childhood will suffer long-term effects. But asking every patient (or their parents) about adversity in their lives, Wade says, could help identify the kids who are at higher risk. If a patient has a high adversity score, Wade says, he’s likely to track the child’s development more closely. “That’ll be the kid where I’ll say, ‘Come back to me in three months, or two months,’ ” he says. ” ‘Let’s see how you’re doing. Let’s check in.’ ” … The survey’s 10 questions cover things like physical and sexual abuse, neglect, death of a parent, and alcohol or drug use in the home; each participant winds up with an ACE score of between 0 and 10. Research suggests that an ACE score of 4 is the threshold where health risks start to climb. In one prenatal group at 11th Street, everyone scored between 3 and 5. A few years ago, researchers screened a larger sample of 11th Street patients and found that 49 percent had an ACE score of 4 or higher, says Patty Gerrity, founder and director of the center, which is affiliated with Drexel University. “We knew that we were working with a very traumatized population,” Gerrity says, “but we were sort of astounded at the numbers.” The hope is that talking in the prenatal group about childhood will help break generational cycles of trauma and abuse. via To Head Off Trauma’s Legacy, Start Young : Shots – Health News : NPR.

More and more I realize that our ability to communicate, to talk, to people in our community is the only way to break the generational cycles. I hope our children are up  to the task. What will I think about tomorrow as I walk this unicursal path of 11 concentric circles? …

Blessings …
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10
Aug
13

8.10.13 … cool, hip, whatever … The Bee’s Knees … Herb Alpert: “Keep Your Eyes On Me” … Caillebotte: Rainy Day (1877) …

Baby Boomers,  Hipster Neighborhoods, Williamsburg section of Brooklyn , WSJ.com:

Jennifer Williams says she often feels like the oldest person on her block. When the 52-year-old corporate communications executive sets off for work in a suit, carrying a briefcase, with her hair in a bun, she is usually surrounded by young people with tattoos and rainbow crocheted skull caps. “It’s like mom is coming in for a visit,” she says.

Nerou Cheng, 63, spent $1.03 million on an apartment in the Edge, a condo building in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, where many of the building’s younger residents like to sunbathe outside.

That doesn’t bother Ms. Williams. In fact, such diversity is exactly what she was looking for when she bought a condo in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn two years ago, after living in what she calls the “dead zone” of the Upper East Side of Manhattan. “I find it endlessly fascinating and interesting. I wanted to be somewhere with energy and life.”

Hip urban neighborhoods are aging, as a growing chunk of adults in their 50s and 60s and older give up their longtime homes and head for trendy condos. The invasion of older, moneyed buyers has “created a gold rush” in some of these areas, says Dean Jones of Realogics Sotheby’s International Realty in Seattle. Mr. Jones’s firm sold 34 condominium penthouses and luxury town homes for more than $1 million in downtown Seattle neighborhoods between March and October of 2012—a large percentage to baby boomers. It was a 40% increase over the same period a year earlier.

via Why Baby Boomers Are Moving to Hipster Neighborhoods – WSJ.com.

sayings, “Bee’s Knees”, origins,  TIME.com:

The Bee’s Knees

In the late 18th century, this slang term for something stylish and excellent actually referred to something small, weak or insignificant, such as the joint in a bee’s little leg. Flappers likely repurposed the phrase in the 1920s, when animalistic phrases for groovy stuff–like the “cat’s whiskers,” the “snake’s hips” and the “flea’s eyebrows”—were all the rage.

via Behind the Bee’s Knees: The Origins of Nine Bee-Inspired Sayings | TIME.com.

The Birds and the Bees

There is no better known euphemism for sex education than “the birds and the bees,” which dates back to at least the late 1800s. In a 1928 ditty, Cole Porter helped immortalize the connection between those animals and making sweet music: “Birds do it, bees do it,” he sang. “Even educated fleas do it. Let’s do it, let’s fall in love.” In their 1962 dictionary of  phrase origins, William and Mary Morris link this idiom to lines by Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge: “All nature seems at work … The bees are stirring–birds are on wing … I the while, the sole unbusy thing, nor honey make, nor pair, nor build, nor sing.”

via Behind the Bee’s Knees: The Origins of Nine Bee-Inspired Sayings | TIME.com.

Herb Alpert,  “Keep Your Eyes On Me”, “Puttin On The Ritz”, YouTube: I feel cool just listening …

via ▶ Herb Alpert’s “Keep Your Eyes On Me” – YouTube.

This was Herb Alpert’s last platinum album. Four of the songs were produced by the hit producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. “Diamonds” features Janet Jackson’s vocals. “Making Love In The Rain” also features Janet along with Lisa Keith. Herb’s wife – Lani Hall – sings a duet with Herb on the beautiful “Pillow”. The other tunes were produced by Herb and friends. Herb does some hot trumpet playing on “Traffic Jam” (evoking memories of Miles Davis), “Cat Man Do”, and the gorgeous “Our Song”. Contemporary music from a contemporary artist! Good stuff! – Review By W. J. Bernardi

via ▶ Herb Alpert’s “Keep Your Eyes On Me” – YouTube.

Herb Alperts Puttin On The Ritz – Music Video122,780 views 3 weeks ago”From out of the blue I found myself humming this great standard song, Puttin On The Ritz by Irving Berlin, and wanted to find a way to record it like it hadnt been heard before.. Working with my nephew Randy Badazz Alpert we put it in an unusual dance type setting, that I feel gives it international appeal..Ive always felt that if a song is fun to play it will be fun to listen to…and it was fun to play.” – Herb Alpert

via Herb Alpert – YouTube.

The Best,  Breaking Bad-Themed Food, BA Daily: Bon Appétit:  I love themes … Breaking Bad food … cool

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This Sunday, AMC’s Breaking Bad comes back for the second half of its fifth and final season, sending the Internet into a frenzy of theories (will Walt die? will Hank commit suicide? what will Walt Jr. eat for breakfast?) and a metaphorical meth hole. But some people have taken their fandom to a new, delicious level with creations like “Blue Sky” crystal candy “meth,” buckets of Los Pollos Hermanos fry batter, and even “Heisenberg’s Dark” craft beer. We rounded up some of our favorites from across the web–we’re thinking they might serve as inspiration for your season premiere party.

via The Best Breaking Bad-Themed Food, from Beer and Cocktails to Cookies and Cakes: BA Daily: Bon Appétit.

Video Postcard, Paris Street Rainy Day (1877), Caillebotte, ArtInstituteChicago:

Gloria Groom, curator of the exhibition Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity, takes you on a tour of one of the Caillebotte’s masterpieces.

via ▶ Video Postcard: Paris Street; Rainy Day (1877) – YouTube.

23
Jun
11

‎6.23.2011 … Final day/night for MAD at camp as JC … I don’t think she will ever wash another dish. :)

music, kith/kin:  From Bob … “There are some voices that are simply meant to sing together. When these three sing together, it far exceeds any of them individually. I could listen to this song for hours.” YouTube – Crosby Stills Nash – Southern Cross.

Harry Potter, JK Rowling, Pottermore, media, followup:  I hope she can keep another generation enthralled (and I define that to mean a 7 year-old will persevere through a 700 page book!) … YouTube – JKRowlingAnnounces’s Channel ‏.

natural disasters, tornadoes, Louisville, kith/kin, prayers:  Why am I so touched when animals are involved …

At least five barns were damaged and horses were running loose Wednesday at Churchill Downs, home of the Kentucky Derby, after a powerful storm that spawned tornadoes blew through Louisville.

Officials have no immediate reports of injuries to humans or horses.

The National Weather Service says a tornado touched down near the famed track and the University of Louisville campus about 8:10 p.m. EDT. Though no races are run on Wednesdays, there was simulcasting of races elsewhere, so people were there, said track President Kevin Flanery.

via Tornado hits Louisville near Churchill Downs – Sports- NBC Sports.

Paris, Hotel de Nice, hotels:  I just loved the opening image for this small modest hotel …

 Accueil.

education, history:  I enjoyed this article and found that I agree … learning history “today involves the retention of decontextualized historical facts.” I learn best and my children learn best when we experience history and share those experiences.

We make much of bad test results and idiotic answers to civics questions from the young Americans Jay Leno stops on Los Angeles street corners. It’s fun, but it is also misleading. We are promoting what Paxton calls “the false notion that the biggest problem facing history students today involves the retention of decontextualized historical facts.”

He and Wineburg, both education professors, say we should decide what history is worth knowing and teach it well. “The thousand-page behemoths that we call textbooks violate every principle of human memory that we know of,” Wineburg said.

Emphasizing reading and devoting more school hours to comprehension of the language no matter what the topic might give us the skills to develop an interest in public affairs. Many critics say the subject of history has suffered because schools are giving more time to reading and math. Why then, asks Wineburg, were the students who were most improved on the NAEP history test in fourth grade, where the concentration on reading and math has been greatest?

Even if we haven’t remembered our country’s history so well in the last century, we have learned to appreciate it, and act accordingly. This July 4, that’s worth celebrating.

via Is knowing history so important? – Class Struggle – The Washington Post.

writing, blogging, social media, Jeff Elder:  A class … I am actually thinking about taking it …

OMG! Writing for social media??? LOL. Actually, there are many opportunities developing for writers to develop their craft on Facebook, blogs, even Twitter. The best part? You have a captive audience that is immediately engaged. As companies, nonprofits, small business and other groups launch web sites and social media sites, content is desperately needed.

via WRITING FOR SOCIAL MEDIA.

culture, kindness, Gretchen Rubin, blog posts of note:  Just the other day, I excerpted an article about what not to say to a person who is ill … and today I find this post from Gretchen Rubin about what to say/not to say to a person divorcing.  I think we all have problems with this and we are detached from our teachers … our families, our churches and we no longer learn how to handle being kind.  Isn’t that really what it is all about.

A while back, I read a New York magazine article by Katie Roiphe, The Great Escape, in which Roiphe discusses her friends’ reaction to the news of her divorce. Bottom line: she’s annoyed that they’re acting as though she’s going through some terrible tragedy, when in fact, she feels fine — if anything, she feels freed and relieved.

It’s an interesting article on many levels, but the thing that struck me was – zoikes! If I were her friend, I’m sure I’d be saying all the wrong things, too.

So what’s the right thing to say?

via The Happiness Project: Tips for talking to someone about an impending divorce: dos and don’ts.

cities, psychology, mental health:  I love big cities … maybe I am crazy!

This may come as no surprise to residents of New York City and other big urban centers: Living there can be bad for your mental health.

Now researchers have found a possible reason why. Imaging scans show that in city dwellers or people who grew up in urban areas, certain areas of the brain react more vigorously to stress. That may help explain how city life can boost the risks of schizophrenia and other mental disorders, researchers said.

Previous research has found that growing up in a big city raises the risk of schizophrenia. And there’s some evidence that city dwellers are at heightened risk for mood and anxiety disorders, although the evidence is mixed.

In any case, the volunteers scanned in the new study were healthy, and experts said that while the city-rural differences in brain activity were intriguing, the results fall short of establishing a firm tie to mental illness.

via Big city got you down? Stress study may show why  | ajc.com.

gender issues, Great Recession, workforce:  I think this is very interesting.  I wonder how this shift in workforce gender balance compares to WWII.

In part, labor experts pin this trend on a recession that disproportionately affected male-centered industries such as manufacturing and construction, but this tells only some of the story. Throughout the first decade of the new millennium, men moved toward being the minority in a number of professions they had long dominated.

This was particularly prevalent in professions requiring advanced degrees. Medical scientists, for example, who typically need a Ph.D. to work in labs or at pharmaceutical companies, experienced one of the biggest changes in gender makeup of any profession. In 2000, the majority of those who worked in the profession (54%) were men, but by last year just 46% of medical scientists were men.

Likewise, the percentage of male veterinarians declined from nearly 70% in 2000 to about 44% last year, making this the profession with the single greatest shift in the proportion of men to women, according to an analysis of the BLS data.

Much of the changing gender balance, experts argue, can be traced to the early 1970s, when more women began pursuing college degrees and full-time careers.

“Young women in elementary and middle school began to look around and realize that they were going to be in the labor force for a substantial part of their lifetimes and therefore needed to concentrate more on professions that were better investments,” said Claudia Goldin, a professor of economics at Harvard University.

via Behind the Rise of Women in the Work Force – TheStreet.

cities, lifestyles, culture, Baby Boomers, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta, Wilmette, Chicago, small house movement:  I loved growing up in a neighborhood where our home was no more than 2500 sq feet and the neighborhood was our yard.  My children’s favorite of their 3 homes is the smallest, our Wilmette home.  I think my generation, the Baby Boomers, have really gone awry on the big house status symbol.  A house does not make a home.  My daughter says she never wants a “big house.”

Places like Hilton Head, with water adjacency and nice climates, are in high demand, and land values are insane. In the case of Hilton Head, which was developed in 1970 on what had been a mosquito- and alligator-infested swampy barrier island, land value has leaped from nearly zero to now unaffordable. The first batch of houses built here might have been normal-sized, but in the ten years that I’ve been coming here on occasion, I’ve seen them replaced by new ones that are enormous. About five years ago, we rented a house right on the beach that was arena-sized. We loved being right on the ocean, so we asked the owner if we could reserve time for the next year. No, he said, it wouldn’t be possible; he was tearing the house down. Why? To build a bigger one on the same lot. We saw the finished product a few years later: it looked like a house with severe edema, swollen to bursting, built to the very edge of the property line.

My husband and I built our house in New York about five years ago, and right before we began, I fell under the spell of the small-house movement; I had dozens of Post-Its in my copy of “The Not-So-Big House” marking author Sarah Susanka’s recommendations for designing a house that was efficient and inviting without being pointlessly gigantic. It’s not really such a new idea. A few weeks ago, I stayed for a night in the Penfield House, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s an amazing place, with a jazzy sort of geometry. It’s also quite small (even though, as it happens, the owner, Louis Penfield, was six foot eight, and had actually wondered whether Wright could make a house that would work for a person his size). But the house is big enough. Everything is ingeniously designed to make use of all available space, and the floor-to-ceiling living room windows make it feel like there is only a thin skin between you and the outdoors, which gives the illusion of spaciousness. It’s a great house—that is, in the sense of the word “great” meaning an impressive accomplishment, rather than “large.”

Oversized houses, like oversized cars, seem to be a particularly American fixation. In many other countries, the land available is so limited and the cost of building so high that most people wouldn’t even consider building a Hilton Head-style jumbo. And the expense—in economic and environmental terms—of heating and cooling these places is vast. What’s funny is that these mega-mansions are so often located somewhere people go because they want to enjoy the natural environment. The house we had wanted to rent again had very little land around it when we rented it. Now, in its bulked-up state, the outdoor space is a narrow margin of sand and grass, not even wide enough to walk on.

via Free Range: The Too-Big House : The New Yorker.

reading, education, St. John’s College, Great Books Program, kith/kin:  St. John’s is a wonderful place.  My kith daughter is there and thrives.  Interesting is that she always loved to read (in contrast to this student) … but I think it is the type of education that suits a very gifted and creative mind.

As long as nobody had assigned the book, I could stick with it. I didn’t know what I was reading. I didn’t really know how to read. Reading messed with my brain in an unaccountable way. It made me happy; or something. I copied out the first paragraph of Annie Dillard’s “An American Childhood” on my bedroom’s dormer wall. The book was a present from an ace teacher, a literary evangelist in classy shoes, who also flunked me, of course, with good reason. Even to myself I was a lost cause.

Early senior year, a girl in homeroom passed me a brochure that a college had sent her. The college’s curriculum was an outrage. No electives. Not a single book in the seminar list by a living author. However, no tests. No grades, unless you asked to see them. No textbooks—I was confused. In place of an astronomy manual, you would read Copernicus. No books about Aristotle, just Aristotle. Like, you would read book-books. The Great Books, so called, though I had never heard of most of them. It was akin to taking holy orders, but the school—St. John’s College—had been secular for three hundred years. In place of praying, you read. My loneliness was toxic; the future was coleslaw, mop water; the college stood on a desert mountain slope in Santa Fe, New Mexico, fifteen hundred miles from home; I could never get into such a school; my parents couldn’t pay a dollar. And I loved this whole perverse and beautiful idea. I would scrap everything (or so I usefully believed) and go to that place and ask them to let me in. It felt like a vocation. It was a vocation.

In retrospect, I was a sad little boy and a standard-issue, shiftless, egotistical, dejected teen-ager. Everything was going to hell, and then these strangers let me come to their school and showed me how to read. All things considered, every year since has been a more intense and enigmatic joy. ♦

via Salvatore Scibona: “Where I Learned to Read” : The New Yorker.

Camp Illahee, kith/kin, end of an era:  As MAD  is ending her session as a JC, I am sad.  Nine years at Illahee have been a wonderful experience for her and something she will always cherish.  If you want a recommendation for an all girls camp, please contact me.  It has truly been a “heavenly world.”

In the Cherokee language, Illahee means “heavenly world.” This idea expresses the very best of what campers, counselors and staff create for a remarkable few weeks every summer.

For ninety years, Camp Illahee has given girls the opportunity to explore their interests, seek new adventures and forge friendships and memories that will last a lifetime.

via Camp Illahee | A Summer Camp for Girls in Brevard, North Carolina.

01
Jun
11

6.1.2011 … remembering the good times …

RIP, William Gresham, obituary: Rest in peace, Moonshot Willie. Prayers for your beautiful daughters, Dean and her sons, your parents, your sisters and their families, Kathy and many, many friends. You are such a part of our family’s OBX memories. You will always be missed and loved. You will never be forgotten.

William enjoyed sitting by the ocean, fishing, golf, and was a huge WWII history buff. He also loved anything having to do with the Civil War and was an active member of the Southport Civil War Round Table.

via John William Gresham Jr. Obituary: View John Gresham’s Obituary by Wilmington Star-News.

 

Apple, changes, iCloud:

Apple said on Tuesday that it would announce new versions of the software that powers its computers and cellphones, as well as a new Internet service that could connect these devices.

The company gave few details about the service, which it calls iCloud, but analysts think it would allow people to gain access to music, photos and videos over the Internet on multiple Apple devices, without needing to sync those devices. An Internet-based version of iTunes with those features has long been expected, and iCloud comes on the heels of deals between Apple and major recording labels that would allow such a service to go forward.

The announcement is to be made next week by Steven P. Jobs, the chief executive, at Apple’s annual developers conference in San Francisco. Mr. Jobs has been on medical leave since January, though he made a surprise appearance in March to introduce a new iPad.

via In Unusual Move, Apple Previews New Software Plans – NYTimes.com.

bees, Davidson:  OK, bees swarming my house would freak me out.

The Alexander home has had other swarms in recent years as well. Mr. Stewart estimated there were 15,000 to 20,000 bees in the wall this time around. Under the watchful eyes of Mr. Stewart and Mr. Flanagan, the beekeepers removed them, and Mr. Cheshire took them to a hive at his Davidson home.

Bees in a bucket after removal from the Concord Road home. The colony is then transferred to a hive, where it will survive if the queen is collected, too. (David Boraks/DavidsonNews.net)

Local bee-removal experts have been busy lately. Mr. Cheshire said he and fellow beekeepers removed a swarm of bees from Davidson’s McConnell neighborhood in April.  The Concord Road removal was in early in May, and about a week later, he and Mr. Goode captured a swarm of bees near some lakeside condos off Jetton Street.

via When bees swarm a home, the experts follow | DavidsonNews.net.

Commencement speeches, Davidson College, spring convocation:  OK, I enjoyed this one … but honestly, who remembers their commencement speaker.  I went to Davidson and we have none … the day is for the graduates.  But we do have a spring convocation and a speaker at that event.  I don’t remember who spoke or what he said.  Sorry.

This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little

parable-ish stories. The story [“thing”] turns out to be one of the better, less bullshitty

conventions of the genre, but if you’re worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise,

older fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don’t be. I am not the wise old

fish. The point of the fish story is merely that the most obvious, important realities are often the

ones that are hardest to see and talk about. Stated as an English sentence, of course, this is just a

banal platitude, but the fact is that in the day to day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes

can have a life or death importance, or so I wish to suggest to you on this dry and lovely

morning.

via Dfw Commencement.

blogging, authors, self-promotion, advertising, media:  Although this has no bearing on me, I thought it very interesting.

Nearly all writers launch some sort of blog, Twitter feed, Facebook page and/or Tumblr blog to promote their book online. But most of them have no idea how to get people to actually read these sites.

Over at Splitsider, author and Tumblr blogger Jill Morris (pictured, via) explained How to Become a Published Author in 237 Simple Steps–a useful and funny guide to online promotion.  Below, we’ve highlighted a few tools we never knew existed.

via Tools To Promote Your Author Blog – GalleyCat.

culture, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, The Lost Generation, history:  Found this article interesting on multiple levels.  It’s amazing how history repeats itself.  Like the historical link back to the Lost Generation (“the listless generation of young people disillusioned by World War I and memorialized in “The Sun Also Rises.”).

Musical theater dorks like myself will also recall that the 1960 production of “Bye Bye Birdie” had an entire song devoted adults’ frustrations with the slacker youth of their day:

Kids!

I don’t know what’s wrong with these kids today!

Kids!

Who can understand anything they say?

Kids!

They are disobedient, disrespectful oafs!

Noisy, crazy, dirty, lazy, loafers!

And while we’re on the subject:

Kids!

You can talk and talk till your face is blue!

Kids!

But they still just do what they want to do!

Why can’t they be like we were,

Perfect in every way?

What’s the matter with kids today?

Before these whippersnappers came the “Lost Generation,” the listless generation of young people disillusioned by World War I and memorialized in “The Sun Also Rises.” And so on.

When the economy is bad, older Americans are often quick to blame young people when they can’t find jobs. Somehow when the economy is good, however, young people don’t seem to get nearly the same degree of credit for their professional successes.

via The Laziest Generation(s) – NYTimes.com.

fashion, t-shirts, Apple:  25 years of Apple … in t-shirts … I like this one.

Apparel, T-shirt: 25 Years of Mac

Apparel, T-shirt: 25 Years of Mac – FastMac.

WWDC, Apple, Steve Jobs, new products:  WWDC is always more fun when Steve Jobs speaks … can’t wait to find out what is next from Apple.

Apple(APPL) has announced that CEO Steve Jobs, currently on his second medical leave of absence, will headline the company’s Worldwide Developers’ Conference (WWDC) next week, adding a touch of tech glamour to the software-focused event.

In a statement released on Monday before market open, Apple confirmed that Steve Jobs and a team of Apple executives will “kick off” the event at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center with a keynote address on Monday, June 6 at 10 a.m. PST.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs will headline next week’s WWDC event.

According to Apple, Jobs and co. will unveil the eighth major release of Mac OS X, dubbed Lion. As widely anticipated, Apple will also take the wraps off iOS 5, the latest version of its mobile operating system, as well as iCloud, its forthcoming cloud services offering.

Apple did not reveal specific details of iCloud, although the service is expected to involve a cloud-based version of iTunes, and, potentially, a streaming media platform for devices running its iOS operating system.

via Article Page | TheStreet.

culture, vulnerability:  I personally hate feeling vulnerable …

Sometimes the toughest part of embracing vulnerability is recognizing vulnerability. There are so many secondary emotions that spring to the surface and grab our focus. I wrote this in my journal this morning as a little reminder to look deeper, be mindful, and practice self-compassion. I don’t want to shut myself off from vulnerability because I don’t want to miss out on what it brings to my life: love, creativity, joy, authenticity, courage, and hope (just to name a few).

It’s always so helpful to be reminded of the many ways that vulnerability shows up in our lives. Leave a comment telling us how you fill in the blanks (on one or both) and three folks will get a copy of The Gifts of Imperfection. I’ll announce the names on Friday.

Vulnerability is __________________.

Vulnerability feels like ___________________.

Have a great week!

via vulnerability is ___________. – my blog – Ordinary Courage.

culture, motivation:  maybe I need to rethink my parenting.

Make no mistake: I’m all for paying people what they’re worth. And I’m opposed to schemes that compensate people the same regardless of their performance.  But whether you’re at a bank in Bogota or a school in Schenectady, relying on “if-then” rewards to encourage great work is like guzzling six cups of coffee and downing three Snickers bars for lunch. It’ll give you a burst of energy – but the effects won’t last. For the long-term, human beings need a very different kind of nourishment.

via Carrots and sticks: Procrastination fix? | Daniel Pink.

technology, tablets:  I have picked my tablet … I’m an iPad user.. Everything You Need to Know About Tablets in 15 Simple Charts – Atlantic Mobile.

protest, flash mob, Jefferson Memorial, court rulings, Washington DC:  Flash mobs are interesting to me … but I want to research the court ruling … “Regardless of your thoughts on the protest or those behind it, there’s little doubt that a collection of over a thousand people could put a real crimp into the “atmosphere of calm, tranquility, and reverence” inside the Jefferson that the Court suggested dancing would compromise.”

2011_0531_jefferson.jpg

Adam Kokesh and several others — a handful of whom were arrested by U.S. Park Police over the weekend during a demonstration in protest of a U.S. Court of Appeals ruling barring dancing inside the Jefferson — have posted a Facebook invitation to a “DANCE PARTY @ TJ’S!!!”, scheduled to take place at noon this Saturday.

“Come dance with us! You don’t have to risk arrest, you can dance on the steps outside in support or join us in civil disobedience in the memorial!” reads the invitation, which also proclaims that “THIS IS NOT A PROTEST! I AM NOT ORGANIZING ANYTHING!” despite being arranged by several individuals. Regardless of your thoughts on the protest or those behind it, there’s little doubt that a collection of over a thousand people could put a real crimp into the “atmosphere of calm, tranquility, and reverence” inside the Jefferson that the Court suggested dancing would compromise.

Based on the video of the arrests and the ensuing media coverage, the U.S. Park Police have launched an “all-encompassing inquiry” into the arrests.

via Over 1,800 RSVP For Next Jefferson Memorial “Dance Party”: DCist.

Afghanistan, US involvement:  Again, interesting perspective expressed here in a no win situation.

We don’t want Karzai telling our soldiers what to do, because they are our soldiers and we don’t trust him, but we don’t want to do things he doesn’t want us to do, because it is his country and we don’t want to be occupiers. There is a fundamental illogic there, enough to make HAL the computer explode—or, perhaps, to persuade us to get out of Afghanistan. Karzai said in his press conference that he was warning us “for the last time” to change our ways. Maybe we should, if not quite in the way he’d like.

via Close Read: What Karzai Wants : The New Yorker.

twitter social networking:

Twitter users who are not household names tend to start by following loved ones, colleagues, favourite writers, etc. Replying to those you do not know personally is no faux pas, whether or not they are extremely well known. And if a popular tweeter retweets you—ie, redistributes the tweet to his followers—that can do wonders to your tally.

What should Babbage’s friend make of all this? She is a writer, filmmaker and former television presenter, yet Twitter makes her strangely shy. Your correspondent’s advice: the only way to go is to take the plunge and start talking, loudly and often. Well, not too often.

via Social networking: Rules of engagement | The Economist.

online self-help, education, technology:  The list of courses is fascinating … Bill Gates is a backer.  I think I may take a few lessons and see what I think.  Anybody tried it?

Watch. Practice. Learn almost anything—for free.

What started out as Sal making a few algebra videos for his cousins has grown to over 2,100 videos and 100 self-paced exercises and assessments covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history.

via Khan Academy.

26
Feb
11

2.26.2011 … I have a friend who posts her musings on the bus … I just couldn’t let this one go … Middle aged man with woman in too-tight t-shirt, too-short shorts and the trampiest red short boots with heavy metal zipper … in elevator at Ritz Carlton … Pretty Woman?

movies, baby boomers: Never the two shall meet?

Hollywood, slower than almost any other industry to market to baby boomers, may be getting a glimpse of its graying future. While the percentage of moviegoers in the older population remains relatively small, the actual number of older moviegoers is growing explosively — up 67 percent since 1995, according to GfK MRI, a media research firm.

via Older Audience Makes Its Presence Known at the Movies – NYTimes.com.

random, fast food, Louisville KY, Orlando FL, superlatives: Not  a superlative to be proud of …

According to numbers crunched by AggData for the Daily Beast, you’d have the best luck in Orlando, Fla., the U.S. city with the highest concentration of Burger King, Taco Bell and KFC restaurants per capita.

Other fast-food meccas: Louisville, Ky., with the most McDonald’s, Dairy Queen, Papa John’s and Applebee’s locations per 100,000 residents, and Richmond, Va., which claimed the most Olive Garden, Chick-fil-A and Hardee’s outposts per capita.

via Which U.S. City Has the Most Starbucks, McDonald’s, Olive Garden, IHOP or Jack in the Box Locations Per Capita? – TIME Healthland.

Middle East Unrest/Awakening, Jordan: Turning back the clock to 1952 …

Thousands of people demonstrated peacefully for political reform in Amman, the capital, and in other Jordanian towns on Friday, with opposition forces drawing the largest crowds since the weekly Friday protests began eight weeks ago. The opposition also expanded its demands.

The police estimated the number of protesters in the capital as 6,000, but organizers said that more than 10,000 people had turned out.

Activists from the Muslim Brotherhood and other opposition groups said that the large turnout was a reaction to the violence that erupted last week, when government supporters clashed with a relatively small group of several hundred demonstrators who were calling for political change, injuring eight people. The protesters described being attacked by “thugs” wielding wooden clubs and iron bars.

At the rallies on Friday, Jordanians were calling, among other things, for an end to corruption, more democracy and for a return to the original formulation of the country’s 1952 constitution, without its numerous amendments — a step that would translate into less power for the king.

Naher Hattar, a political activist from Jayeen, a new coalition of leftists, unionists and retired generals who organized the first protest on Jan. 7, said, “The main demand now was to go back to the 1952 constitution. This would be a step forward.”

via Jordan Protesters Push for Reform – NYTimes.com.

The President, Constitutional Law, DOMA:  I am not sure where this one is going …

The Obama Justice Department’s announcement yesterday that it would no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in court was perhaps inevitable—not only because President Obama himself has been signalling the evolution of his views on same-sex marriage, but also because the argument the Administration had been left with for DOMA wasn’t one you’d want to stake a lot on.

The fact is that DOMA was getting harder to uphold even under less stringent tests than the one the Obama Administration now proposes. (See Jeffrey Toobin’s post for a discussion of what “heightened scrutiny” means.) That was the take-away from the ruling issued by a District Court Judge in Massachusetts, who last summer found in favor of a group of same-sex couples challenging DOMA. The couples had been married in Massachusetts, where same-sex marriage is legal, but, under Section 3 of DOMA, had been denied benefits accorded to married couples by the federal government—Social Security benefits for spouses, health benefits for federal employees’ spouses, and so on. Gay and Lesbian Legal Advocates and Defenders (GLAD) had filed suit in 2009, charging that Section 3 of DOMA violated the equal-protection clause of the Constitution.

The Obama Administration, in other words, had been left with one argument—an argument that undermined states’ rights and asserted federal dominion in order to shore up a position that it didn’t want to defend on substantive grounds. And this was at a time when, perhaps, it would rather not be seen as upholding the federal government’s right to flout state laws. No wonder it was ready to cut DOMA loose.

via News Desk: Obama, DOMA, and States’ Rights : The New Yorker.

Warren Buffet, business, impressions:  The Oracle of Omaha lives “in the same humble Omaha house that he bought for $31,500.” His presumptive heir just bought a $15 million  NYC apartment which he intends to combine with an $8 million ap

Warren Buffett has lived for decades in the same humble Omaha house that he bought for $31,500, but a leading contender to succeed him as head of Berkshire Hathaway can’t resist a little Manhattan glitz.

A potential successor to Warren Buffett acquires an adjoining apartment in one of Manhattan’s prestigious buildings, whose celebrity neighbors include Jack Welch and Beyonce. WSJ’s Craig Karmin tells Kelsey Hubbard about Ajit Jain’s $14.65 million purchase.

Ajit Jain, who runs Berkshire’s highly profitable specialty reinsurance business, last week bought a 34th-floor four-bedroom apartment at One Beacon Court for $14.65 million, according to people familiar with the matter. It was listed at $16.5 million.

Mr. Jain already owned a neighboring apartment in the East 58th Street building, which he purchased at auction in 2009 for $8.3 million, public property records show. Close to 50 bidders vied for that unit in a bankruptcy auction but he still got it for less than the $10.4 million the previous owner paid in 2007.

That previous owner of the apartment in the 2009 deal was Marc Dreier, a New York attorney who was sentenced to 20 years in prison after running a Ponzi scheme. Mr. Dreier spent some time under house arrest in that Beacon Court apartment.

Brokers now expect Mr. Jain to combine the two apartments, which would create a residence of nearly 6,000 square feet. Both units boast large outdoor terraces that, combined, would be the biggest private outdoor space at One Beacon Court, brokers say. Beyonce, Jack Welch and Brian Williams also own apartments in the building.

via Berkshire Exec Buys $15M Pad – WSJ.com.

road food, gas station food, food trends, bucket list, TX:  Another to add to my list … I am already a diner fan … and have a favorite gas station/diner … This seems more like a gas station/food cart.

Taco trucks have gotten so popular they’re already practically passé. But there’s another way of linking motor vehicles and Mexican food: taquerias in gas stations. If you’ve never heard of such a thing, you’re not from Texas, where it’s an oft-repeated notion that some of the best tacos are sold where you buy fuel.

Some restaurateurs like the architecture of gas stations, which evoke the squat, cinderblock structures seen in small towns across Mexico. Less romantic is the advantage that former filling stations often have: grease traps, which can be expensive to build from scratch.

FILL ‘ER UP: There’s no fueling at Norma’s Taco’s, a new gas station-turned-taqueria in Pasadena, Calif. The pumps are now decorative.

In some cases, drivers can gas up while chowing down on carne asada or al pastor tacos. In others, the pump is dry, but some of the service-station vibe remains

via Gas Station Taquerias, a New Food Trend – WSJ.com.

 

31
Jan
11

1.31.2011 … 51 isn’t so bad …

food, trends:  Flights of pie, oh my!

Pie is turning up all over the US, having reinvented itself from a dowdy church supper ware to a stylish dessert served in ‘flights’ in some places. Each region has a specialty based on local ingredients and culture. If you filled your plate motoring across the country – made an American pie flight, so to speak – it’d look like this…

Nutty South & Tart West

Down south, everyone’s gramma has her own recipe for pecan pie, where secret ingredients swirl in the bowl with the nuts and corn syrup. Royer’s Round Top Cafe (105 Main St, Round Top), in middle of nowhere Texas, has earned a swooning crowd for its version. It’s so traditional you’re charged 50 cents extra for not getting the ice cream on top. The chef also whips up southern-style buttermilk and coconut chess pies. Can’t decide? They offer a pie flight!

via American pie: slicing across the country – travel tips and articles – Lonely Planet.

FaceBook, social networking, culture:  More social, hummm?

Were you creeped out by the ominous trailer for “The Social Network” (“I want you to notice, when I’m not around …”) and what it may say about you? Does logging on to Facebook for the fourth time today make you feel like a soulless shut-in?

If so, fear not: According to a cheery report out of the University of Texas, Austin, Facebook actually makes us more sociable. Surveying 900 current and recent college graduates nationwide, Craig Watkins and Erin Lee of the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas examined the impact of Facebook on users’ social lives, concluding that “social media afford opportunities for new expressions of friendship, intimacy and community.”

via Studied – Does Facebook Make You More Social Offline? – NYTimes.com.

art, pop art, Roy Lichtenstein:  Loved this … “So shocking that in 1964 Life Magazine wondered if the artist who created them, Roy Lichtenstein, was quite possibly the worst artist in the U.S.”

Whimsical paintings based on cartoons … witty sculptures … prints that remind us of famous paintings, with a commercial twist.

Images so familiar to us today it’s nearly impossible to believe that they were once considered quite shocking.

So shocking that in 1964 Life Magazine wondered if the artist who created them, Roy Lichtenstein, was quite possibly the worst artist in the U.S.

That’s not a question anymore.

When the dust settled at Christies’ auction house last November, one of Lichtenstein’s pieces named “Ohhh…Alright…”did more than “all right”: It sold for nearly $43 million.

A record, beating out even Warhol’s Campbell’s soup can.

Lichtenstein himself would find that shocking.

“He used to say that he was amazed that people would actually pay for what he called ‘used canvases,'” said Mitchell Lichtenstein, Roy’s youngest son.

But, in fact, Roy Lichtenstein may be more popular today than ever, says his youngest son, Mitchell, who walked us through the sculpture garden on the roof of his father’s old N.Y. studio, pointing to one piece Mitchell’s mother had called “her giant Chia Pet.”

“I think people appreciate his humor,” Mitchell said, “and I think they see more in it as time goes by.”

via Roy Lichtenstein: Pop Art’s Most Popular – CBS Sunday Morning – CBS News.

travel, historical journeys, bucket lists:  So where would you go … I would like to follow Lewis & Clark or Paul.

Part one: Go around the world in 80 days with Jules Verne, rampage across Mongolia with Genghis Khan and trek the Muslim world with Ibn Battutah.

Part two: Take the ‘Voyage of the Beagle’ with Charles Darwin, decide whether Alexander the Great should be Alexander the Grotesque and see if you think Marco Polo was a fibber.

Part three: Get satirical with Evelyn Waugh, explore the Wild West with Lewis & Clark, and trek across the Australia with Burke and Wills.

via Greatest historical journeys – travel tips and articles – Lonely Planet.

health, globalization: Go for it! I did not know that only one disease has been eradicated.

ONLY one disease has ever been eradicated—smallpox—but Davos Man thinks a second is possible. In a packed congress hall today full of world leaders and celebrities, David Cameron and Bill Gates announced a bold campaigh to wipe out polio over the next few years.

via Davos diary: A plan to eradicate polio | The Economist.

Baby Boomers, health, healthcare:  I think we are going to be a pain in the ass!

The MIT Enterprise Forum Northwest held Boomers, Technology & Health: Consumers Taking Charge in Seattle, Washington on January 19, 2011. The event examined the role of baby boomers in future technology innovation with a special focus on health.  The organizers did more than an excellent job framing the event with speakers representing health providers, industry, technology developers and venture capital they prepared a research report based upon interviews with 50 industry and thought leaders to understand the barriers as well as opportunities for boomer-driven innovation. The report is one of the best summaries of the evolving role of baby boomers in driving innovation in health and wellness and well worth the read.

The report presents five key findings:

1. Baby Boomers Will Play a Key Role in the Adoption of Personal Connected Health

Why will baby boomers make a difference? Simply put, the baby boomers have more money, greater expectations and personal health as well as caregiving needs that will drive demand for health and wellness innovations.

2. Personal Connected Health is a Component and Enabler of a Paradigm Shift to Patient-centric Approach

The baby boomers are the leading edge and passionately vocal movement of consumers demanding patient-centric care. With 67% of the boomers having one or more chronic diseases they will seek technologies and services to manage and monitor their health – on their terms as consumers with demands, not simply as patients in need.

3. The Imminent Explosion of Personal Health Data Will Create Opportunities for Entrepreneurial Problem-solvers

Consumer demand is only one part of innovation. Technology serves as inspiration and catalyst. The report observes that the ready availability of new wireless, mobile and ubiquitous smart everything present an endless possibility of health devices and services.

4. Lasting Behavioral Change Requires Incentives and Social Support Mechanisms

As noted in other posts on disruptivedemographics.com, social media is not just for kids any more. The report authors aptly observe that Web 2.0 will be key in developing the social support necessary for healthy and lasting behaviors.

5. The Northwest has the Ingredients for the Creation of Personal Connected Health Business Ecosystem

via Disruptive Demographics: Global Aging, Technology & Innovation: Translating Global Trends into Regional Economic Opportunity: The Pacific Northwest Looks at Older Baby Boomers, Health & Technological Innovation.

Egypt Uprising, titles/headlines, Davidson, prayers:  Updates for today … have to laugh at the Huffington Post title … “A Complete Guide to the 2011 Uprising.”  Davidson has two students in Egypt this semester.  One with a Middlebury Program and he is coming home.  One in Cairo who has family in Cairo and he is staying  Prayers for all in Egypt.

As his people desert him, so do Mr Mubarak’s foreign backers. Shortly after he spoke, so did Barack Obama. He called on the Egyptian president to “give meaning” to his promises to improve the lot of the Egyptian people. For much of the crisis, the American administration has been trying hard to avoid making a choice: Mubarak is our ally but we deplore violence and are on the side of “reform”, goes the line.

Hillary Clinton has called for restraint on all sides and for the restoration of communications. She said America supported the universal rights of the Egyptians, and called for urgent political, economic and social reforms. But sitting on the fence becomes increasingly uncomfortable as events unfold, and the vibes from Washington have become distinctly colder over the past 24 hours. The private talk, increasingly, is no longer about whether Mr Mubarak should go, but who might be able to take his place if he does.

via Unrest in Egypt: Not appeased | The Economist.

-and-

Having trouble digesting all the news in Egypt? Not sure what’s going on and why it matters? Want to brush up on the key players and latest developments? Or just curious to learn more about Egypt in general?

You’ve come to the right place. The Huffington Post is aggregating our comprehensive coverage into easily-digestible nuggets below to help those who feel overwhelmed. This page is 100% human-curated. It will be fluid and changing as major developments happen, so please keep checking back. And please share it with your friends, family and colleagues.

via EGYPT: A Complete Guide To The 2011 Revolution.

-and-

What’s happening today?

A.

Today’s biggest event was a battle at the Interior Ministry. The police have sort of made it their last stand. The building is surrounded by several hundred to a thousand police. Some of the protesters were a few blocks away, surrounding some army tanks, having afternoon prayers. The soldiers had been just sitting atop their tanks, being friendly with the crowd.

The prayers were punctuated by the sounds of gunfire. When they heard the gunfire, the protesters were all begging the Army to get involved. The soldiers drove four army vehicles to the Interior Ministry to protect the protesters who were fighting the police. The protesters hid behind the army vehicles as the police fired. It was amazing.

Q.

How is it for you as a resident of Cairo?

A.

I have lived here for 10 years. When I’m covering Baghdad, I expect to hear gunfire at night. I never expected to hear it in Cairo. There was never much news in Cairo and I liked it that way. My favorite thing about Cairo, coming back from Iraq or Afghanistan, was how warm and funny the Egyptian people are.

My neighbors are deeply concerned about what’s going to happen. There are roadblocks on almost every corner, with neighborhood militias — really just six to 10 men with sticks — protecting their homes from looters. People are very nervous about security.

I love Cairo. It’s hard to see the downtown area trashed, but for the first time in 30 years, people are excited. Professionally, there’s the thrill of covering such a big story and watching a revolution. But everyone is worried about what’s going to happen next.

via Cairo Photographer Sees Hope in Turmoil: Scott Nelson Tells What It’s Like – NYTimes.com.

Apps, games:  relaxing?

iPad owners in search of a relaxing, story-based puzzler should enjoy the game play packed into Treasure Seekers 2: The Enchanted Canvases HD, the sequel to a game that ranked among the Top 10 highest-grossing games in 43 countries.

Based on a nearly 2-year-old PC game of the same name, Treasure Seekers 2 challenges you to find well-hidden objects in busy environments (think Where’s Waldo?), and use items in your inventory (or in the environment) to solve the task at hand.

via Treasure Seekers 2: Graphics impressive; adventure on the short side – USATODAY.com.

challengeShow Us Your City: A User-Generated Video Project with a Local Point of View – NYTimes.com.

art, sculpture, exhibits, London:  Another reason to go to LOndon. 🙂

England has produced some of the greatest sculptors of the last 100 years, so it is only fitting that one of London’s most prominent galleries, the Royal Academy of Arts (Burlington House, Piccadilly; 44-207-300-8000; http://www.royalacademy.org.uk), should hold one of the first comprehensive exhibition of their work. Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Jacob Epstein and Anthony Caro are just a few of the major artists whose sculptures will be on display through April 7.

via In London, a Century of British Sculpture – NYTimes.com.

fashion:  I will continue to let medium ash brown work for me.

From salt-and-pepper locks to a white mane, gray hair isn’t just for men in their 50s and 60s anymore. Film stars, athletes, television personalities, even President Obama, are all rocking gray hair–and some are welcoming it.

“I think it’s the measure of maturing and growing,” said Andy Cohen the host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live.” The 42-year-old first noticed his transition from dark black to slate in his late 20s, when a few silver hairs started appearing around his temples. He never had the urge to dye it, and suggests that graying men regardless of their age should wear it with confidence.

via How to Make Gray Hair Work For You – Speakeasy – WSJ.

random: Click and watch this gorilla walk … kinda creepy.

Meet Ambam, a 485-pound Western lowland gorilla who strolls around the Port Lympne Wild Animal Park in England like he owns the place. According to Phil Ridges, the park’s gorilla keeper, Ambam might walk upright to get a height advantage to look over the wall to watch for feeding time. Either that, or he’s just a shrewd self-promoter: Videos of Ambam walking have captured YouTube’s attention, with more than 1 million views.

via Viral Weekend: Watch a Gorilla Walk Like a Human – TIME NewsFeed.




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