Posts Tagged ‘Bahrain

24
Apr
11

4.24.2011 … “Sing and Rejoice” … “Jesus Christ is Risen Today” … “Awake the Trumpet’s Lofty Sound” … “Alleluia, Alleluia! Give Thanks” … “In Christ there is no east or west, in Him no south or north; but one great fellowship of love throughout the whole wide earth.” … “The Day of Resurrection” … “Christ is Alive” … Hallelujah” … Again, Happy Easter!

Easter, faith and spirituality, worship, worship music, FPC:  The service was beautiful … I loved the music and feel blessed for the music ministry at our church … “Sing and Rejoice” … “Jesus Christ is Risen Today” … “Awake the Trumpet’s Lofty Sound” … “Alleluia, Alleluia! Give Thanks” … “In Christ there is no east or west, in Him no south or north; but one great fellowship of love throughout the whole wide earth.” … “The Day of Resurrection” … “Christ is Alive” … hallelujah” …
Easter, history, cultural history:

In The Mood for Easter

Long before the birth of 50-foot blow-up bunnies and AstroTurf egg hunts, people still gathered with the folks they loved most and celebrated Easter. Here, a look back.

via Easter: The Early Days – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Easter, Bones, LOL, quotes, twitter:  From Hart Hanson, the producer of Bones:

Happy Easter. To quote Seeley Booth: “Jesus is not a zombie. I should not have to tell you that.” Temperance Brennan does not agree.

via (4) Twitter / Home.

Easter, cultural Easter, lists:

Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Easter

From dressing up as witches to burning effigies of politicians, the world holds many more Easter traditions than just dyeing eggs.

via Sweden’s Easter Witches – Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Easter – TIME.

Easter, cultural Easter, Easter baskets/candy, chocolate Easter bunny:  I think I start with the tail … be right back I’ll check!

Adults may be sneaking goodies from kids’ Easter baskets because they appear very knowledgeable about the best way to eat chocolate bunnies. Eating bunnies’ ears first won hands down. “Apparently, this is the most appropriate way to enjoy a chocolate bunny,” said Graham, who admits to eating bunnies’ ears first, himself. Of 1,000 adults surveyed, 76 percent said they start with the ears when they munch a chocolate bunny. Eating bunnies’ feet first (five percent) and tail first (four percent) were not popular choices.

via Taking a Bite Out of the Bunny: Ears Munched First According to Easter Survey – Press Relases – News & Hot Topics – NCA.

Easter, cultural Easter, Easter baskets/candy, Peeps:  This one is funny …

If bragging rights are more valuable than time and money, then Racheal Jones and Ramona Wesely, both of Dallas, and Kathleen Canedo of Oakton, Va., and Hillary Berman of Bethesda, Md., are on Easy Street.

The Texas duo made a mad dash from the Lone Star State to Chicago (arrived Thursday, back home Friday) to deliver their diorama, “Satine the Sparkling Peep from Moulin Peep,” in time for our judges’ panel to deem it their hands-down favorite.

Canedo and Berman made a more leisurely trip from the East Coast, blogging about and posting photos of their journey with their “Larry Peep Live on PNN” diorama in tow. The judges’ panel, comprising movie critic Michael Phillips, visual arts reporter Lauren Viera and theater critic Chris Jones, awarded Canedo and Berman No. 2 honors, once they stopped marveling at the detail of “Larry Peep’s” glasses and little suspenders.

via Peeps contest, Easter, Peeps diorama, – chicagotribune.com.

health, substance abuse, danger:  Alcohol wins … no big honor …

You may want to think twice before going to happy hour tonight.

Alcohol is more dangerous than heroin, crack cocaine, and methamphetamines, at least according to a new study published in The Lancet, a British medical journal.

The study, which was conducted on behalf of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs, evaluated the dangers that various drugs pose to the user’s mental and physical health, as well as the harm it may cause the community, in terms of crime and health care costs.

The researchers found that heroin and crack cocaine were the most harmful drugs to the person using them, but alcohol was the most harmful to the community, and overall, when all the factors were added up, alcohol ranked as the most dangerous drug with a score of 72. By comparison, heroin, the next highest, had a score of 55, and other drugs like tobacco, cannabis and LSD scored just a fraction of that.

via Alcohol: The Most Dangerous Drug | Food & Drink | Lifestyle | Mainstreet.

Notre Dame Cathedral, history, places, Paris, France, quotes:

… walk in as tourists, walk out as pilgrims …

The history of France’s Notre Dame Cathedral – CBS News Video.

4/20, Boulder, followup:  Didn’t find the Teague boys in the pictures … Whew.  4/20 in photos | CU Independent.

places, tourist attractions, Charlotte, 2012 DNC: If this is the best we can do, we are gong to have some bored dems.

This week’s Charlotte Business Journal features two Top 25 lists: the Area’s Top Tourist Attractions and North Carolina State Parks.

via Top of the List: Tourist Attractions, State Parks | Charlotte Business Journal.

Middle East awakening, Bahrain, Royal Wedding:  Verygracious of the prince … probably best for his monarchy, too.

Bahrain’s crown prince on Sunday declined an invitation to attend Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding, saying he did not want the Gulf nation’s unrest to tarnish the celebration.

Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa sent his regrets to Prince Charles after questions emerged over the British monarchy’s decision to invite a member of Bahrain’s Sunni ruling family, which has waged a wide-ranging crackdown against Shiite protesters calling for more freedoms.

Bahrain’s rulers have imposed martial law and are backed by a Saudi-led military force to try to quell the uprising. At least 30 people have died in Bahrain since mid-February, including four who died while in official custody, and many well-known activists and lawyers have been imprisoned.

The news helped to avoid a potentially awkward situation during the April 29 wedding. Campaigners in Britain complained when palace officials said Saturday that the prince was attending the nuptials, and some petitioned Foreign Secretary William Hague to revoke the invitation.

via Bahrain Crown Prince Declines Royal Wedding Invite – NYTimes.com.

random acts of violence, follow-up, Robert  Barber, FPC, obituary:  Mr. Barber was a member of FPC.  I did not know him or his wife, but his absence was felt at Easter worship today.

He and Barber were both retired colonels – a “couple of old military guys,” he said.

“We’d walk down the hallway, and I’d say, ‘You know, Bob, we’re in step,'” he said, laughing. “Old habits die hard.”

Brown and Barber were both members of the Rotary Club of Charlotte, where Brown said Barber took minutes and compiled newsletters.

“This man had not missed a Rotary meeting in 15 years,” Brown said.

He said Barber was devoted to his church, First Presbyterian in uptown, his profession and his family.

At work, Barber had a reputation as a skilled professional who could easily connect with his co-workers.

“He would work 80 hours a week if it meant turning around a community hospital,” Brown said.

Outside of work, Barber had many interests, including muscle cars, motorcycles and genealogy, Brown said.

“I think I’ve only known a couple of people in my life I’d consider Renaissance men,” Brown said. “Bob was one of them.”

via Witness heard victim’s lament after shooting | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

 art, graphic art, Maira Kalman:  Maira’s take on the British war poster …

Keep Calm And Carry On | anything goes.

Maira Kalman, art, TED videosMaira Kalman | Profile on TED.com.

art, graphic art, Maira Kalman, interview: I just like this woman …

Are there places or things you avoid because they sap your creativity?

I avoid malls. They are deadly.

via Inspiration Boards: Maira Kalman.

computer art, math, Davidson College, Tim Chartier, random:

Tim Chartier at Davidson College has discovered that if you make things out of candy there’s no lack of volunteers to help you clean up. He takes images and transforms them mathematically into arrays of candy pieces. Here you can see President Obama, as rounded to the set of m&m color values. Mathematically, the algorithm picks the available color which is closest in red-green-blue-space to the average of the pixels it replaces.

via Make: Online | Math Monday: Candy Images.

Also see Math Movement – Sugar-coated CoM&Mander-in-Chief.

06
Mar
11

3.6.2011 … my mac and cheese comfort food maker is now in need of comfort food … what can a one-armed bandit make???

news, identity theft, David Koch, kudos: Can you imagine having your identity stolen for political purposes?  Kudos to Mr. Koch for his philanthropic work.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — More than a thousand miles from the labor tumult in Wisconsin — where his name shows up on the signs of protesters and a liberal blogger impersonating him got through to the governor on the phone and said “gotta crush that union!” — the real David H. Koch was greeted rather more warmly here Friday when he officially opened a new cancer research institute bearing his name.

Mr. Koch and his brother Charles, both No. 5 in Forbes’s list of the richest Americans, are targets of liberal activists.

Mr. Koch, a billionaire who is perhaps best known for his family’s contributions to conservative causes, got a standing ovation from scientists, Nobel laureates and politicians of various political stripes as he opened the new David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which he gave $100 million to help build. And in a brief, and rare, interview, Mr. Koch, 70, spoke of his hopes for the new center, his prostate cancer and the prank call heard around the world.

“It’s a case of identity theft,” Mr. Koch said of the call in which the liberal blogger got through to Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin, drew him out about his plans to weaken unions and posted a recording of the call on the Internet, making news and embarrassing the governor. Mr. Koch, whose company, Koch Industries, had given major campaign support to Governor Walker, among other conservative candidates and causes, added, “I didn’t even know his name before this brouhaha erupted.”

via Cancer Research Before Activism, Koch Brother Says – NYTimes.com.

Middle East Unrest/Awakening, Bahrain, US position:

Protesters here say their dreams of democracy are being thwarted by the United States’ desire to protect a large naval base in Bahrain, by the perception that Shiites reflexively side with Iran, and by the influence of neighboring Saudi Arabia, which analysts say would probably not accept a Shiite-led Bahrain.

Justin Gengler, a former Fulbright scholar in Bahrain, said he did not expect the United States to abandon its support for the Khalifa family, which has run this country for more than two centuries.

“As soon as it looks like the U.S. is not supporting royal families in the gulf region, it starts to raise eyebrows everywhere — in Qatar, in Saudi Arabia, in Kuwait, in Oman,” Mr. Gengler said. “The U.S. can’t turn its back on the Bahraini royal family without implicitly abandoning the idea of monarchies in the gulf.”

Opposition politicians here are seeking to convince Washington that a constitutional monarchy in Bahrain would not be a threat to regional stability. An elected government would be inherently more stable, said Matar Ebrahim Ali Matar, a Shiite member of Parliament who resigned after the government crackdown.

“The United States should support this wave of democracy — it’s coming,” Mr. Matar said. “If it doesn’t happen this year, it will come in the coming years.”

Under the current political system the lower house of Parliament is elected, but its lawmaking powers are curtailed by an upper house, whose members are appointed by the king, who also has wide-ranging powers to pass decrees.

via Bahrain Protesters Fear Lack of U.S. Support – NYTimes.com.

NYC, random:  interesting take …

New York is a vibrant city, teeming with people at all hours. Enjoy the restaurants and the sights, but be wary of its brutal winters

via Doing business in New York: An abundance of activity | The Economist.

Middle East Unrest/Awakening, Egypt Uprising, pop ups, culture: Pop up kindergarten int the middle of Tahir Square?  Really interesting story …

Did You Know There Was a Pop-Up Kindergarten in Tahrir Square?

Editor’s note: This story of children in Tahrir Square during the Egyptian revolution has a back story we want to share. We saw a photo of kids painting in Tahrir from the BBC with this caption:

“Schools in Cairo have been closed during the protests. But there are so many mothers who want to attend the demonstration that many bring their children here – to a kindergarten organised by the demonstrators.”

Since we couldn’t find more information on this online we asked a few protesters who were actively tweeting if they would send us details. Here is a heartwarming, earnest, and surprisingly gripping account of the uplifting role of children in Tahrir Square during three weeks of revolution. It was sent to GOOD by Mosa’ab Elshamy (@mosaaberizing) a pharmacy student in Egypt.

I’m not exactly sure when the kindergarten idea started, but I’d say it became most prominent when the situation in Tahrir got less tense, which was from the second Friday. The first one, January 28, in which people marched from every district in Cairo to Tahrir, was a violent and bloody one. Police used every possible means of suppression from tear gas to live ammunition. Very few families stayed in Tahrir then as it wasn’t safe.

The place was mostly occupied by young men but, still, a few women were present there. The second Friday, the 4th of February, was a festive one. It was after the tense situation in Tahrir cooled for a bit, and the army had finally stepped into the picture, offering protection and keeping the thugs away. The mood stayed like that throughout the week until the decisive Friday, February 11, when Mubarak stepped down and jubilation ensued.

Some of the kids would do their own marches around the square, with people applauding and smiling at them.

So, from this second Friday, the 4th, till a week later, Tahrir was one of the happiest places on earth. The spirits were wonderful throughout, and more people started believing in us. Tahrir was much safer, the thugs’ attacks had stopped. Many factors allowed families to come to Tahrir then. A lot of them would usually come early, spend the day chanting, singing, and enjoying the general mood, then leave before the curfew hours started. There were a few families that stayed, though, and that sparked the idea to create a kindergarten in Tahrir Square.

via A Moving Letter from Egypt About the Role of Children in Tahrir Square – Culture – GOOD.

quotes, dogs, twitter:

Outside of a dog, a book is probably man’s best friend, and inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.” Groucho Marx

via Twitter / @DailyLit: Outside of a dog, a book i ….

20
Feb
11

2.20.2011 … we’ve seen alot today … north and south …

Egypt Uprising, Middle East Unrest, Bahrain, military might:

There comes a moment in the life of almost every repressive regime when leaders — and the military forces that have long kept them in power — must make a choice from which there is usually no turning back: Change or start shooting.

The Legacy of 18 Days in Tahrir Square (February 20, 2011)

Egypt’s military, calculating that it was no longer worth defending an 82-year-old, out-of-touch pharaoh with no palatable successor and no convincing plan for Egypt’s future, ultimately sided with the protesters on the street, at least for Act 1.

In so doing, they ignored the advice of the Saudis, who, in calls to Washington, said that President Hosni Mubarak should open fire if that’s what it took, and that Americans should just stop talking about “universal rights” and back him.

As the contagion of democracy protests spread in the Arab world last week, Bahrain’s far less disciplined forces decided, in effect, that the Saudis, who are their next-door neighbors, were right. They drew two lessons from Egypt: If President Obama calls, hang up. And open fire early.

via When Armies Decide an Uprising’s Fate – NYTimes.com.

Jane Austen: 🙂

In this book, Rachel M. Brownstein considers Jane Austen as heroine, moralist, satirist, romantic, woman, and author, along with the changing notions of these categories over time and texts. She finds echoes of many of Austen’s insights and techniques in contemporary Jane-o-mania, a commercially driven, erotically charged popular vogue that aims to preserve and liberate, correct and collaborate with old Jane. Brownstein’s brilliant discussion of the distinctiveness and distinction of the novelist’s genius clarifies the reasons why we read Jane Austen—or why we should read her—and reorients the prevailing view of her work. Reclaiming the rich comedy of Austen while building a new narrative of authorship, Brownstein unpacks the novelist’s fascinating entanglement with her readers and admirers.

via Why Jane Austen?.

Harry Potter, parenting:  Since the HP books and movies were such a big part of my kids childhood, I loved looking back on these images of Harry, Hermione and Ron as they grew up in the movie versions.

http://www.instyle.com/instyle/package/general/photos/0,,20164501_20440996_20873748,00.html.

culture:  Very interesting perspective …

The paper posits a triangle, with the family, the individual, and the state in the corners, and argues that the Nordic countries prioritise a different dynamic than Germany or the United States. As Bagehot summarises:

Americans favour a Family-Individual axis, this suggests, suspecting the state as a threat to liberty. Germans revere an axis connecting the family and the state, with a smaller role for individual autonomy. In the Nordic countries, they argue, the state and the individual form the dominant alliance. The paper cited, by the way, is entitled: “Pippi Longstocking: The Autonomous Child and the Moral Logic of the Swedish Welfare State”. It hails Pippi (the strongest girl in the world and an anarchic individualist who lives without parents in her own house, with only a monkey, horse, a bag of gold and a strong moral compass for company) as a Nordic archetype.

This framework provides a way to think about how Americans think about the state. My colleague notes below that America has an exceptionally small government, and that the reasons may be historical, cultural, or institutional, or all of the above, and that the causal connections reinforcing the small-state approach would be difficult to untangle. Whatever the causes of America’s underlying moral logic, though, it’s interesting to think how this plays out today. It makes sense that if America posits a strong family-individual axis—as a hedge in the absence of state support, if not in opposition to it—that Americans would be more preoccupied with issues that pertain to individuals and the family, and would drag those issues into the political realm. (This new bill from South Dakota, however, which would make it a “justifiable homicide” if you kill someone to prevent them from killing a fetus, is taking it rather far.)

via Family and the state: The underlying moral logic | The Economist.

gift ideas, whiskey:  We have a few single malt lovers in my family!

Anyone can drink and enjoy booze, but if you really want to know about a certain type of liquor, you’re gonna need to try more than what you’ll find at the local state store.

via 101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die | Uncrate.

random, resort living:  Wouldn’t that be fun instead of a golf cart!

Inspired by Audi’s classic racers and based on a limited-edition pedal car model, the rear wheel-drive Type C is powered by a small electric motor and a lithium-ion battery that propels one human — up to 5′ 11″ — at speeds of up to 18 mph, and as far as 15 miles. Sure, it’s not a speedster by any means, but it’s a much sportier way to get around the island than that golf cart you’ve been driving.

via Audi Auto Union Type C E-Tron Study | Uncrate.

NBA basketball:

But the fact is that Griffin jumped over a car and dunked an ally-op thrown from a sunroof; McGee dunked three balls on a single jump; Serge Ibaka dunked after snatching a stuffed animal from the basket with his teeth. These are not meaningful feats, but they are impressive nonetheless. Griffin admitted afterward that he worried about meeting the astronomical expectations. Just think what they will be like next year.

via Once again, Clippers rookie Blake Griffin dunks over high expectations – Lee Jenkins – SI.com.

random, history, WWI: You go girl!

Florence Green, from King’s Lynn, Norfolk, was 17 years old when she joined the Women’s Royal Air Force, in the late summer of 1918. Come the 11th day of the 11th month, she was working as a waitress at RAF Marham, when the pilots greeted news of the German surrender by clambering into their planes and bombing nearby RAF Narborough airfield with bags of flour. Narborough, not to be outdone, retaliated with their own daring raid, this time dropping bags of soot.

Yesterday the Air Force marked Mrs Green’s birthday with the delivery of a rather more traditional nature: a cake. At 110, Mrs Green joins a highly exclusive club of “supercentenarians” – only around one in 1,000 of those with a letter from the Queen on the mantelpiece push on to this next landmark.

via Florence, the last Great War veteran in Britain, turns 110 – News, People – The Independent.

green, bicycles, London:  I still have never been able to rent a bike …

Two-thirds of London’s “Boris bikes” have had to undergo repairs in their first six months of operation, new figures on the state of the capital’s fleet of cycles for hire have revealed.

Transport for London (TfL) has disclosed that their repair teams are being called out to fix the rental bikes at the rate of more than 30 every day of the week, as the strain of millions of journeys takes its toll.

via Two-thirds of London’s Boris bikes need repairs – Home News, UK – The Independent.

16
Feb
11

2.16.2011 … mind is lots of places … Bahrain, Boulder, Charlotte, Atlanta, Naples … technology makes the world smaller.

Uprising in the Middle East, Bahrain:  Unlike Egypt,  where most have a visual picture, albeit ancient, of pyramids and pharaohs, few have much knowledge of Bahrain, ancient or modern.  I only became aware of it beyond its name last year when I met our South African exchange student.  Her family’s primary residence is there because her father is a banker working out of the Middle East, and it is/was considered the safest.  Now the democracy movement has moved there.  I watch … I wish I knew more.  I wish I could understand what is going on and where this is going

Protests in Bahrain entered their third day on Wednesday, as tens of thousands continued to occupy a major intersection in the capital and thousands more marched to mourn a second man killed in Tuesday’s clashes with security forces.

A committee set up by seven opposition groups to coordinate the protests called for a massive demonstration on Saturday, forecasting a gathering of at least 50,000 people.

Crowds massed at the hospital morgue, as the body of the man killed on Tuesday was ferried out on top of a land-cruiser in a coffin covered with green satin. Thousands of men followed the coffin, many holding pictures of the deceased, beating their chests and chanting “God is great” and “Death to the Al Khalifa,” a reference to the country’s ruling family. Security forces remained withdrawn from protest areas, stationed in large battalions around a kilometer away.

At the Pearl roundabout, a central traffic circle in the financial district of the capital which has been claimed by the protesters, more tents and makeshift food stalls sprung up Wednesday, with those who spent the night there in a festive mood. Young men, many carrying Bahraini flags, chanted and danced, while a loudspeaker broadcasted a steady stream of speeches from activists.

The mourners are expected to march to the central roundabout later in the day, further swelling the numbers there.

Bahrain is a tiny, island kingdom in the oil-rich Persian Gulf, best known for its banking prowess and bars that cater to nationals from alcohol-free Saudi Arabia next door. While it pumps little crude itself, its neighbors are some of the world’s biggest petroleum producers.

Its position straddling the Gulf has made it a longtime, strategic ally of Washington. The U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet is headquartered in Bahrain, though no American warships are actually home-ported here.

via Protests Swell as Bahrain Demonstrators Mourn – WSJ.com.

Bernie Madoff, banking, Great Recession:  Is he getting even?  The NYT Op-Ed piece that follows is a great read even if you do not agree.

Disgraced Wall Street financier Bernard Madoff said in an interview published online Tuesday that banks and hedge funds were “complicit” in his scheme to fleece victims out of billions of dollars.

Madoff did not name any institutions in his series of interviews with The New York Times but said banks and hedge funds “were complicit in one form or another.” He said they failed to scrutinize the discrepancies between his regulatory filings and other information.

via Madoff to NY newspaper: Banks ‘complicit’ in fraud – WSJ.com.

The billions that vaporized in Madoff’s Ponzi scheme amounted to a rounding error next to the eye-popping federal bailouts, including those pouring into too-big-to-fail banks wrecked by their own Ponzi schemes of securitization.

via At Last, Bernie Madoff Gives Back – NYTimes.com.

faith and spirituality:  When anthropologists and psychologists discuss the breakdown of the nuclear family, there is often a comment about the importance of the family meal.  From a spiritual standpoint,  I found this blogpost very interesting.

The table is one of the most intimate places in our lives. It is there that we give ourselves to one another. When we say, “Take some more, let me serve you another plate, let me pour you another glass, don’t be shy, enjoy it,” we say a lot more than our words express. We invite our friends to become part of our lives. We want them to be nurtured by the same food and drink that nurture us. We desire communion. That is why a refusal to eat and drink what a host offers is so offensive. It feels like a rejection of an invitation to intimacy.

Strange as it may sound, the table is the place where we want to become food for one another. Every breakfast, lunch, or dinner can become a time of growing communion with one another.

via February 16, 2011 – The Intimacy of the Table.

business, mergers, Family Dollar, Howard Levine, Charlotte: I heard a commentator on the radio the other day quip that Charlotte should be renamed “Levine-McColl” (like Winston-Salem?)  because of the importance of these two men and their families.  If the Levine’s sold Family Dollar I do not think it would impact Charlotte like a merger of other local companies … many do not know it is headquartered here …

Mr. Peltz’s Trian Group contacted Family Dollar’s chairman and chief executive, Howard Levine, on Tuesday and said it had amassed a 7.9 percent stake in the retailer, according to the filing. The investment firm has offered to pay between $55 to $60 a share in cash for the rest of the company, valuing Family Dollar at between $7 billion and nearly $7.6 billion.

At the low end of the range, Trian’s offer represents a 25 percent premium over Family Dollar’s Tuesday closing stock price of $43.96. Shares in the company soared more than 30 percent in after-hours trading.

Family Dollar’s stock has risen 39 percent over the past 12 months.

via Peltz Offers More Than $7 Billion for Family Dollar – NYTimes.com.

travel, adventure travel:  If money were no object then every vacation would be an adventure for John … but part of the adventure is planning it yourself.

Mr. Robertson creates 15 to 20 trips a year; he also takes the bespoke quality to a new level, having personally accompanied travelers (there’s a maximum of six per trip) on each trip so far. The packages, which start at around $7,000 a person (they can range up to $500,000, since each trip is custom-designed), span all seven continents and range in length from two to 21 days. They also make good use of Mr. Robertson’s wide network. On a recent hunting and whiskey-making getaway, for example, guests stayed at a seaside castle in Scotland that’s not open to the public.

via A New Entrant in Adventure Travel Outfitters – NYTimes.com.

marathons, adventure travel:  John loves Chicago’s, has wanted to run London’s … never thought about Las Vegas’s …

Marathons are popular around the globe, and it’s not uncommon for people to fly great distances to run in one. After all, if you’re going to work that hard, you might as well reward yourself with interesting sites, great pre-race carb-loading and the reward of a champion’s feast afterward. Here are three marathons that are among the best for an all-around great experience.

via Where is the World’s Best Marathon? | Spa & Sport | Four Seasons Magazine.

business, business secrets, Coca-Cola, Atlanta:  Those who read this “blog” know that I am brand loyal to Apple.  But before Apple, I was brand loyal to only one other company … Coca-Cola … I am an Atlanta girl:  I loved real Coke; I loved that the “secret formula” was locked away in the vault at the Trust Company (now SunTrust); I loved Atlanta’s Anonymous Donor (when everyone knew it was Mr. Woodruff); I pay money to go to the World of Coke … at least once a year;  I have read multiple books about its corporate history … truly.  Is the secret formula now out …

One of the most closely guarded trade secrets in the history of commerce may be a secret no more: NPR’s “This American Life” thinks it has found the exact recipe for the world’s most popular soft drink in a 1979 newspaper article.

According to the show’s host, Ira Glass, the drink’s secret flavoring component, which was created by pharmacist John Pemberton in 1886, is something called “Merchandise 7X.” The show’s staff recently stumbled across the February 8, 1979 edition of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, which published an article on page 28 about a leather-bound notebook that once belonged to Pemberton’s best friend, another pharmacist in the Atlanta area named R. R. Evans. The notebook contained a number of pharmacological recipes–but the main entry, for students of commercial history, was what’s believed to be the exact recipe for the soft drink: all of the ingredients listed with the exact amounts needed to whip up a batch.

The Journal-Constitution piece also featured a photo of the page in Evans’ notebook detailing Coke recipe–essentially revealing the recipe to the world. But since 1979 well antedated the explosion of digital media, the photograph of the recipe didn’t travel far beyond the Atlanta area.

Coke’s recipe is one of the most closely guarded secrets in American commerce, steeped in cloak-and-dagger lore. After businessman Asa Griggs Candler bought out Pemberton–who also conjured up cough medicines and blood purifiers, among other things–in 1887 for $2,300, the exact recipe for 7X was placed in the vault in an Atlanta bank. It’s been reported that only two company employees are privy to its ingredients and how they’re mixed at any given time–and that those two aren’t allowed to travel together out of fear that a traveling accident might take both of their lives.

According to company historian Mark Pendergrast, Candler was so paranoid about the recipe leaking out of his proprietary control that he would go through the company mail himself to prevent any employees from seeing invoices that might tip off its ingredients.

“It’s this carefully passed-on secret ritual,” Pendergrast told Glass, “and the formula is kept in a bank vault at Sun Trust, which used to be the Georgia Trust Company.”

via Did NPR’s ‘This American Life’ discover Coke’s secret formula? – Yahoo! News.

economics, St. Valentine’s Day, LOL, UNC-CH:  OK, one last VD post.  I loved this …

This annual event has really become a classic in the economics department,” said Sarah Whitford, executive co-president of the club.

Byrns said he hopes students take away more than a laugh from his lecture, adding that he also wants them to learn to approach love rationally and look at the bigger picture.

“I hope they take away the technique of making themselves better people,” Byrns said.

“I hope they take away that, even though I teach economics, this isn’t all about money. It’s about relationships and what you give the world.”

During his lecture, Byrns said that learning to love yourself is the greatest love of all, quoting Whitney Houston.

“Giving love is so much harder than receiving love because in order to give love you have to be a whole person,” Byrns said. “Asking and demanding love is a sign that you have issues you need to work through and that love should be a gift.”

via The Daily Tar Heel :: Ralph Byrns gives last-ever lecture on economics of love.

Apple, iPad: I knew this was coming.  I was not about to buy a magazine every month for full price …

Apple launched a subscription service at the App Store for magazines, newspapers, videos, and music bought through its App Store.

In a move that goes a long way to addressing concerns of many in the magazine and newspaper sectors, Apple said today that publishers will be allowed to set the price and the length of the subscription term. The processing of payments will be Apple’s job and handled within the App Store. Apple will collect 30 percent of the revenue.

“Our philosophy is simple,” Steve Jobs wrote in a statement. “When Apple brings a new subscriber to the app, Apple earns a 30 percent share. When the publisher brings an existing or new subscriber to the app, the publisher keeps 100 percent and Apple earns nothing.





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July 2020
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