Posts Tagged ‘bankers

08
Feb
13

2.8.13 … I am a happy nerd …

UNC Festival of Legal Learning, Hotel Siena, Southern Seasons, Weathervane at Southern Seasons, The Siena Hotel,  Chapel Hill NC: I am a happy nerd … Southern Seasons was a treat … as was shrimp and grits at Weathervane at Southern Season. And finally The Siena Hotel beats the Waldorf Astoria … much better toiletries and turn down service with chocolates.

blizzards, 2013 NE blizzard, NYTimes.com:  Hoping all are safe and warm …

Watching the snowfall forecasts from the potent blizzard sweeping into the Northeast we’re at the western edge of the robin’s egg 12-24 inches zone, I can’t help but think back to March, 2010, when we lost power for five days after the Hudson Valley and other regions were paralyzed by several feet of snow.

via Blizzards as Teachers – NYTimes.com.

Downton Abbey, Valentine’s Day, LOL:

basset hounds, kith/kin, vacations, Madrid: Hidden amongst my son’s vacation pictures … 🙂

Photo

donuts/doughnuts, Firecakes, Chicago:  Sounds like voodoo donuts to me!

DONUTSCreative confections in River NorthThe latest addition to Chicago’s coffee-dunking circuit, Firecakes is a small-batch donut shop from the owner of La Madia, rotating a roster of sweetness like Tahitian vanilla glazed, blood orange and raspberry jelly, and Nutella long johns that’ll provide a comfortable home for your (hazel)nuts. Oh, there’s also a maple-glazed pineapple and bacon donut…

Sallie Krawcheck,  Lessons from My Bosses, LinkedIn:

The best: at one firm, the culture was to hire unconventionally, bringing in people with a broad range of backgrounds. The talent we uncovered, where others weren’t looking, could be amazing. In contrast, a couple of CEOs surrounded themselves with a long-tenured “inner circle” and filtered information through them. One of the many reasons for the financial melt-down was the unexamined groupthink that pervaded Wall Street, enabled by senior managers “breathing the same air.”

via Lessons from My Bosses | LinkedIn.

Sallie Krawcheck, bankers, compensation:

Sallie Krawcheck didn’t pull any punches when she was president of Bank of America-Merrill Lynch’s wealth management unit, and now she’s using her bully pulpit as a LinkedIn blogger to explain why paying bankers in stock is a lousy idea.

In 2013, banks must change the way they compensate their senior executives, Krawcheck (left) argues in her Tuesday blog post, saying that company boards are making a mistake by moving to more equity ownership for senior execs since the 2008 crash. She certainly has an insider’s view of the business: Krawcheck is a veteran not only of BofA, but of Citi Smith Barney and Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.

“Coming out of the crisis, the national discussion focused on ‘pay them less’ and very little on ‘pay them better,’” writes Krawcheck, who was summarily fired in September 2011 when BOFA Chief Executive Brian Moynihan went public with plans to reorganize the bank’s management and operating units. “Instead, the long-term conventional wisdom that senior executives should be aligned with equity holders remained unexamined: the amount they are paid is often based on stockholder metrics (like ROE), and the form of payment is in increasing proportions of stock.”

Claiming that she herself and the rest of the banking world now know that their business is unlike any other, Krawcheck then goes on to list her top 10 reasons paying bank executives in more stock is “a bad idea.” (See No. 10 on the list, where Krawcheck name-checks her former firm.)

10. Look at the evidence. Naming names, Krawcheck points out that the biggest CEO equity holders in 2007 were at Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley and Countrywide. As she puts it: “‘Nuff said.”

via Sallie Krawcheck: Top 10 Reasons It’s Bad to Pay Bankers in Stock.

Iceland, Family Trip, vacations, bucket list,  National Geographic:  I’m scheming …

Iceland is one of the warmest cold countries you’ll find—especially so toward children. It seems everywhere you look there are pram-pushing moms and blond-haired kids swarming the capital of Reykjavik. The big hit for children (and adults) will be the city’s 18 mostly open-air geothermal pools (82–109°F); most also have slides and fountains. Use a pool visit to introduce the concept of renewable resources. Iceland is on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a belt of mountains and rift valleys where periodic eruptions widen the ocean floor. One of the world’s most tectonically volatile places, it feeds more than 200 volcanoes and 600 hot springs and heats 85 percent of Iceland’s homes. Add to this energy produced by the nation’s rivers and streams, and the country essentially gets all its electricity from nature.

via Iceland’s Ring Road: Best Family Trip — National Geographic.

 Yoda, Star Wars, Stuart Freeborn, The Two-Way : NPR: Funny, I think he looks a little like Yoda.

Makeup Artist Who Created Yoda Dies; Stuart Freeborn Was 98

via Makeup Artist Who Created Yoda Dies; Stuart Freeborn Was 98 : The Two-Way : NPR.

Fashion Week 2013, WSJ.comFashion Week 2013 – WSJ.com.

Star Trek, William Shatner, ISS, Twitter:  kinda cool …

Captain James Kirk of the Starship Enterprise called up an astronaut in space today for a cosmic conversation that began on Twitter and warped all the way into space.

Actor William Shatner, who famously portrayed Kirk in the original science fiction TV show “Star Trek,” called the International Space Station today (Feb. 7) to ask real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield what life is like on a spaceship.

On Jan. 3, 2013, Commander Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency started tweeting with William Shatner, “Captain Kirk” of the original Star trek series, and with other Star Trek cast members, plus one very famous real spaceflyer.

“I’m so moved to be able to speak to you for this brief moment,” Shatner told the astronaut via phone.

You can see a video of Shatner’s call to the space station here.

Hadfield, representing the Canadian Space Agency, is serving a five-month tour on the football field-sized space station orbiting Earth. Last month, he and Shatner struck up a virtual conversation on Twitter when the actor wrote, “@Cmdr_Hadfield Are you tweeting from space?”

Eventually, their conversation pulled in other “Star Trek” notables like George Takei (who played Hikaru Sulu), Will Wheaton (Wesley Crusher) and Leonard Nimoy (Spock).

Today, Shatner and Hadfield connected in real time for a chat about life in space, and life on the stage.

via ‘Star Trek’ Actor William Shatner Calls Astronaut in Space (Video) | Space.com.

Corby Kummer, 15-Course Tasting Menu, Eleven Madison Park, Vanity Fair:  Wow …

As part of his strenuous, on-the-ground reporting for his recent Vanity Fair article about “totalitarian” chefs and their increasingly elaborate tasting menus, “Tyranny—It’s What’s for Dinner,” author Corby Kummer endured a five-hour, 15-course meal at Eleven Madison Park, the Manhattan restaurant owned by chef Daniel Humm. Here is Kummer’s course-by-course, or round-by-round, report, along with the approximate time each course was served.

via Foodies Gone Wild: Corby Kummer’s Annotated, 15-Course Tasting Menu from Eleven Madison Park | Vanity Fair.

 

07
Nov
11

11.7.2011 … Boston: Flour for raspberry poptarts … then riding around Boston on a Hubway bikeshare bike! … then Green line to Boston College to walk a Chartres-style labyrinth … walk focusing on Isaiah …

Boston, travel, adventures, Flour, labyrinths, Boston College:  First up … I smell like blood oranges … because everything  at Mandarin Oriental Boston … soap, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, etc. … is scented that way … Can’t decide if I like smelling like expensive orange juice … then I am off … walked past the Public Library to Copley Sq. Station an onto the Green Line … Then Red Line … Then to favorite bakery in Boston …Flour where I had a Raspberry “pop tart” …  Oh my!

Next up … Riding around Boston on a Hubway bikeshare bike! … Then Green Line to Boston College to walk the Chartres- style labyrinth …

emotionally intelligent signs, Daniel Pink: 🙂

Each week PinkBlog readers send us lots of examples of emotionally intelligent signage they’ve spotted in their communities.

via 4 diverse emotionally intelligent signs | Daniel Pink.

college life, car sharing:  Haven’t students always shared their cars?

Would you rent your car when you’re not using it? Which happens to be 92% of the time, by the way. Four new services — including one exclusively for Stanford students — can help you do just that. Meaning peer-to-peer car sharing may be the next hot startup business.

via USA TODAY College Breakfast Linkage: November 2 | USA TODAY College.

Church of England, OWS, tax debate, bankers,  “Robin Hood” tax :  First he evicts them, then the  Archbishop of Canterbury urges debate of tax on bankers …

A day after St. Paul’s Cathedral suspended legal action to evict hundreds of anti-capitalist protesters camped outside its doors, the Most Rev. Rowan Williams, the archbishop of Canterbury and the spiritual leader of the world’s Anglicans, was quoted on Wednesday as expressing sympathy for their cause.

“There is still a powerful sense around — fair or not — of a whole society paying for the errors and irresponsibility of bankers; of messages not getting through; of impatience with a return to ‘business as usual’ — represented by still soaring bonuses and little visible change in banking practices,” he said in an article published in The Financial Times.

With the Church of England’s leadership in a crisis over its handling of the protesters, the archbishop’s remarks seemed to offer a belated attempt to lay out an agenda.

Archbishop Williams supported a Vatican statement last week endorsing the idea of a “Robin Hood” tax on financial transactions and for a separation of retail and investment operations at banks that have relied on bailouts from public funds.

via Archbishop of Canterbury Urges Debate of Tax on Bankers – NYTimes.com.

brain chemistry, heartache, science:

I know I’m not physically hurt. Though it feels like I’ve been kicked in the stomach with steel-toed boots, my abdomen isn’t bruised. Spiking cortisol levels are causing my muscles to tense and diverting blood away from my gut, leading to this twisting, gnawing agony that I cannot stop thinking about. I can’t stop crying. I can’t move. I just stare at the ceiling, wondering when, if ever, this pain is going to go away.

It doesn’t matter that my injuries are emotional. The term heartache isn’t a metaphor: emotional wounds literally hurt. The exact same parts of the brain that light up when we’re in physical pain go haywire when we experience rejection. As far as our neurons are concerned, emotional distress is physical trauma.

Evolutionary biologists would say that it’s not surprising that our emotions have hijacked the pain system. As social creatures, mammals are dependent from birth upon others. We must forge and maintain relationships to survive and pass on our genes. Pain is a strong motivator; it is the primary way for our bodies tell us that something is wrong and needs to be fixed. Our intense aversion to pain causes us to instantly change behavior to ensure we don’t hurt anymore. Since the need to maintain social bonds is crucial to mammalian survival, experiencing pain when they are threatened is an adaptive way to prevent the potential danger of being alone.

Of course, being able to evolutionarily rationalize this feeling doesn’t make it go away.

via Time – and brain chemistry – heal all wounds | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network.

college, education, Great Recession, economy:  We have a lot of work to do …

To turn things around, the country needs 20 million people to have some postsecondary education by 2025, according to “The Undereducated American,” a report by Anthony Carnevale and Stephen Rose of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

This means 15 million would hold bachelor’s degrees; 1 million would hold associate degrees; and 4 million would have attended some college, but earned no degree. At that level, 75 percent of the workforce would have at least one year of postsecondary education. That would be a big increase from the current pace, which would lead to 65 percent of the labor force with at least some college by 2025.

If the goal was met, 55 percent of American workers would have at least an associate degree, compared with 42 percent today. Among the youngest age group, 60 percent of workers would have an associate or bachelor’s degree, compared with the 42 percent who had a college degree in 2005.

The report maintains that the ramped-up education efforts are needed to provide companies with the high-skilled workforce to be more productive and competitive. Meeting this higher education goal could potentially boost the gross domestic product by $500 billion and add $100 billion in additional tax revenues, the report says. The other dilemma that education would address is the widening chasm in earning between high school graduates and college-educated Americans, who earn on average 74 percent more.

The new report projects that if demand for educated workers grows at a faster rate than supply for 15 years, the wage gap between having a bachelor’s degree and high school diploma will rise to 96 percent. To meet the demand for more skilled workers and to reduce inequality, the number of young people attending college will need to rise from 66 percent today to 86 percent by 2025, it says.

via Lack of College-Educated Workers Will Hurt Economy – College Bound – Education Week.

Davidson College, slam-poetry, FreeWord, Carolina Collegiate Slam:  This is a past event, but isn’t it amazing the new activities of college students … from dance troups to slam-poetry to acapella  (beyond the Ivies) …

Davidson College’s slam-poetry team, FreeWord, invites the public to the first -ever Carolina Collegiate Slam on Saturday, November 5.

The event titled “This Slam Will Not Be Televised,” will bring together eight teams of poet-performers from seven Carolina institutions to competitively recite their original work, and will begin at 8 p.m. in the Duke Family Performance Hall.

Tickets are free for all college and high school students, and $3 for non-students. Tickets can be ordered by calling 704-894-2135 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, or online at http://www.davidson.edu/tickets.

The Carolina Collegiate Slam was organized by Davidson student-poet James Tolleson ’13. “James had the idea, so we sent out invitations to a couple of schools,” said FreeWord President Natasha Rivera ’12. “We had no clue we’d have such a positive response.”

via  Words Will Fly as Davidson Hosts Inaugural Intercollegiate Poetry Slam Competition

children’s/YA literature, Maurice Sendak, Rare Velveteen Rabbit: Maurice Sendak illustrations of  Velveteen Rabbit circa 1960 ( a very good year by the way.)

For instance, I recently discovered some fantastic little-known artwork by Andy Warhol for two volumes of the Best in Children’s Books series from 1958-1959. But the series, it turns out, is a treasure trove of hidden gems. The the 1960 volume Best in Children’s Books #35, hidden wherein is a version of The Velveteen Rabbit illustrated by none other than Maurice Sendak, he of Where The Wild Things Are fame

via Maurice Sendak’s Rare Velveteen Rabbit Illustrations circa 1960 | Brain Pickings.

college, college majors, economic reality,  tv, advice:  🙂

Over the past 25 years the total number of students in college has increased by about 50 percent. But the number of students graduating with degrees in science, technology, engineering and math (the so-called STEM fields) has been flat…

Economic growth is not a magic totem to which all else must bow, but it is one of the main reasons we subsidize higher education.

The potential wage gains for college graduates go to the graduates — that’s reason enough for students to pursue a college education. We add subsidies to the mix, however, because we believe education has positive spillover benefits that flow to society. One of the biggest of these benefits is the increase in innovation that highly educated workers bring to the economy.

As a result, an argument can be made for subsidizing students in fields with potentially large spillovers, such as microbiology, chemical engineering, nuclear physics and computer science. There is little justification for subsidizing majors in the visual arts, psychology and journalism.

via College Majors Matter – NYTimes.com.

There have always been television shows that glamorize the profession of their characters. These programs give the illusion that their occupations consist of environments filled with scandalous drama, striking colleagues and, most importantly, easy and trouble-free labor.

It’s easy to fall in love with these programs when they project a great, easy lifestyle with a huge salary. But do these shows give audiences a false impression of the real-life careers? Given the poor job market that graduates face, it’s probably a mistake to pick a career based on what you see on TV.

Here are some examples of top television shows not to use as career guides.

Project Runway – Fashion Design

Damages – Law

Hawaii Five-0 – Criminal Justice

via Don’t pick your major based on these three TV shows. Please. | USA TODAY College.

labyrinth walks:  Commonly Reported Effects of Labyrinth Walking Labyrinth Pathways: reduced agitation, anxiety and blood pressure; calming, centeredness … peace.




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