Posts Tagged ‘Barbara Brown Taylor’s An Alter in he World

09
Mar
12

3.9.12 … “When someone asks us where we want to be in our lives, the last thing that occurs to us is to look down at our feet and say, ‘Here, I guess, since this is where I am.’” – Barbara Brown Taylor

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2012 Lenten Labyrinth Walks, Davidson College Labyrinth and Peace Garden @ Hobart Park, Barbara Brown Taylor’s An Alter in he World, moss cross, kith/kin:

I walked at my college today in Hobart’s Park where the Park was updated and rededicated in memory of a classmate Ed Goode. Ann Gibert, a fellow Atlantan and Davidsonian, met me for this walk and pointed out the moss cross, something I would have never noticed.

Friends immediately jumped on the pics from this walk. One pointed out the the ”incredible picture with the moss and the brick!” Barbara W, RA and Elizabeth all commented on my walk and said they would seek them in their communities. Barbara noted that Barbara Brown Taylor’s book, An Altar in the World, references walking labyrinths in one chapter.

I searched for several quotes that I like.

“Solviture Ambulando—it is solved by walking—said Augustine of Hippo, one of the earliest theologians of the Christian Church. What is “it” you ask? If you want to find out, you have to do your own walking.” Barbara Brown Taylor, An Altar in the World. (New York: HarperOne), 61.

And Barbara Brown Taylor writes in her section “The Practice of Walking on the Earth,”

“This truth is born out by the labyrinth – – an ancient spiritual practice that is enjoying a renaissance in the present century. For those who have never seen one, a labyrinth is a kind of maze. Laid out in a perfect circle with a curling path inside, it rarely comes with walls. Instead, it trusts those who enter it to stay on the path voluntarily. This path they be outlined with hand-placed stones out-of-doors or painted right on the floor indoors. Either way, it includes switchbacks and detours, just like life. It has one entrance, and it leads to one center.

The important thing to note is that the path goes nowhere. You can spend an hour on it and end up 12 feet from where you begin. The journey is the point. The walking is a thing.” (Barbara Brown Taylor, An Altar in the World, 51)

“”Most of us spend so much time thinking about where we have been or where we are supposed to be going that we have a hard time recognizing where we actually are. When someone asks us where we want to be in our lives, the last thing that occurs to us is to look down at our feet and say, “Here, I guess, since this is where I am.” (Barbara Brown Taylor, An Altar in the World, 56.)

I was reminded that I had heard BBT speak at Davidson last month and asked her to sign the page where she begins her discussion of labyrinths! I , too, thought it a great book.

Blessings from the path!

3.9.12

And I just thought this interesting:

Tweet of the morning …

Library of Congress (@librarycongress)

3/9/12 7:21 AM

Happy birthday, Amerigo Vespucci! In 1507 Martin Waldseemüller honored the explorer by naming a continent after him. 1.usa.gov/UxOJ6




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