Posts Tagged ‘Benjamin Franklin

23
Mar
14

3.23.14 … Keep Calm and Keep Walking …

2014 Lenten Labyrinth Walks, Grace Cathedral San Francisco: I get tired of the modifications to this iconic British sign … but I like this one.

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco

Liked · March 20

http://www.gracecathedral.org/lent #lent

Kids These Days: Growing Up Too Fast Or Never At All? : NPR:  As I have said before, I had an idyllic childhood in Brookwood Hills Atlanta.  I heard this  on NPR. I too wonder if we don’t fantasize how much better it was when we were children?

On the cover of the April issue of The Atlantic there’s a picture of a boy who could be 6 or 7. He’s looking to the right toward an adult, whose hand he’s holding. He’s also wearing a helmet and knee pads. And — for further protection — he has a pillow strapped to his torso.

Hanna Rosin says when kids do things that feel risky on a playground, it allows them to conquer a fear and gain independence.

In an interview with All Things Considered, Rosin tells host Robert Siegel that she had long wondered why statistics show that today’s parents both work more and spend more time with their children than previous generations. She says it has to do with the lack of independence people allow their children these days.

“What’s happened now is we’ve swung way too far in the other direction such that we’ve become preoccupied with safety, and that’s really having an effect on the culture of childhood so that we’re stripping children of their independence, of their ability to take risks, which are key to a happy childhood,” she says.

You can read highlights from the conversation below.

via Kids These Days: Growing Up Too Fast Or Never At All? : NPR.

Son Of God Movie, “Diogo Morgado Puts the Carnal in Incarnate But Was Jesus Really A Babe?” The Daily Beast: Speaking of Jesus … With my mom — watching Son Of God at CineBistro at Town Brookhaven.   I found no time to consider whether the actor was a “babe.” Both my mother and I were overwhelmed by the gruesome aspects of the film. We realize that death by crucifixion is by its nature gruesome.

 Son of God is in theaters now! This major motion picture event brings the story of Jesus’ life to audiences of all kinds through compelling …

The Clifton Chronicles series, Jeffrey Archer, book series:  Goodreads | The Clifton Chronicles series by Jeffrey Archer.

Benjamin Franklin, quotes, Will Rodgers, death and taxes:  I like this twist on the Benjamin Franklin quote.

In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Letter to Jean Baptiste Le Roy, 13 Nov. 1789

via Benjamin Franklin Quotes.

Dog,  $1.9 Million, News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com, conspicuous consumption, Tibetan mastiffs: Wow!  Many years ago we had a Saint Bernard.  A friend quipped that we should have named him Thorstein.  I’ll let you figure that one out.

In what might be the most expensive dog sale ever, a property developer paid 12 million yuan—or $1.9 million—for a Tibetan mastiff puppy on Wednesday.

He acquired the one-year-old golden-haired mastiff at a “luxury pet” fair Tuesday in China’s eastern province of Zhejiang, according to the Qianjiang Evening News.

“They have lion’s blood and are top-of-the-range mastiff studs,” the dog’s breeder, Zhang Gengyun, told the paper. Another of his red-haired pups sold for six million yuan, he added.

Tibetan mastiffs, which are enormous and sometimes ferocious, bear a passing resemblance to lions—if you squint. They’re now a prized status symbol among China’s elite, causing prices to skyrocket.

via Dog Sells for $1.9 Million | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

Elizabeth Kiss, Rhodes Scholars: Great day to be a Wildcat! Check out #13 …

13. Elizabeth Kiss is an American academic and educator. She is the eighth president of Agnes Scott College, a liberal arts college for women in Atlanta, Georgia. Previously, she was the Nannerl E. Keohane Director of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. She specialises in moral and political philosophy and has published on a number of topics, including moral judgement and education, human rights, ethnic conflict and nationalism, and feminist debates about rights and justice. As a Rhodes Scholar, she studied for a BPhil and DPhil in Philosophy.

via 13 Famous Rhodes Women — The Rhodes Project.

bloody Mary, garnish:  Garnish, lately, has been getting out of control … This reminds me of the bloody mary I “shared” with my son in Vail.

Photo: Garnish, lately, has been getting out of control.

Garnish, lately, has been getting out of control.

“The bacon bloody mary was HUGE and included a stick of bacon that tasted like it was soaked in maple syrup.” in 16 reviews

via Westside Cafe and Market – Vail, CO | Yelp.

 Basset hound clown car, YouTube, kith/kin:  Several people sent this one to me.  I wonder why?  🙂

Basset hound clown car…incredible!

via ▶ Basset hound clown car…incredible! – YouTube.

Is this a dog house, or a clown car?

Watch the video above to see the first Basset Hound “magic trick” you’ve probably ever seen. Just when you think it isn’t possible for any more dogs to appear, another one comes running out of that teeny, tiny, little dog house.

We know what you’re thinking: what sorcery is this?

via Basset Hounds Keep Magically Appearing From This Tiny Dog House And It’s Ridiculous.

Poggio Mirteto, Lenten Abstinence : NPR:

Every year, Poggio Mirteto thumbs its nose at Lenten austerity and instead celebrates the Carnevalone Liberato, or Freedom Festival, commemorating the day it shed the yoke of papal authority in 1861.

The town of Poggio Mirteto fills with costumed revelers during the folk tradition of “Carnevalone Liberato,” a celebration of liberation from the Papal States.

via Tiny Italian Town Thumbs Its Nose At Lenten Abstinence : NPR.

 New Yorker cartoon, Paul Noth, Jackson Pollock, kith/kin: Another one today that reminded me of my son.  Jack taught me  taught me to appreciate Pollock and with whom i love to enjoy sushi. I realize that there is a difference between “appreciating ” Pollock and “liking” Pollock.   Jack did his high school “senior exit project” on Pollock. I learned so much and learned to “appreciate” Pollock.

A cartoon by Paul Noth. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/NnSj43

Shooter Jobs, LOL, too soon:  i got reprimanded for reposting this because it was too soon.  It was.  It may always be too soon.  I am amazed at the quick wit of some people.

Shooter Jobs

March 19

25
Apr
11

4.25.2011 … Easter Monday … Happy anniversary to many (so many post Lent weddings!) …

religion and spirituality, culture, academics:  Post Easter … really enjoyed this article.

To bring a little scientific order to the matter, researchers taking part in a multinational project called Explaining Religion have spent three years gathering data on various aspects of religious practice and on the sorts of moral behaviour that religions often claim to govern. The data-collection phase was wrapped up at the end of 2010, and the results are starting to be published.

At the moment, most students of the field would agree that they are still in the “stamp collecting” phase that begins many a new science—in which facts are accumulated without it being clear where any of them fit in. But some intriguing patterns are already beginning to emerge. In particular, the project’s researchers have studied the ideas of just deserts, of divine disapproval and of the nature of religious ritual.

One theory of the origin of religion is that it underpins the extraordinary capacity for collaboration that led to the rise of Homo sapiens. A feature of many religions is the idea that evil is divinely punished and virtue is rewarded. Cheats or the greedy, in other words, get their just deserts. The selflessness which that belief encourages might help explain religion’s evolution. But is the idea of universal just deserts truly instinctive, as this interpretation suggests it should be?

via Religious studies: The good god guide | The Economist.

culture, parenting, daughters, teenagers, kith/kin:  It is hard enough once they hit 15 or so … but at 7-12 … come on parents, do the right thing.  I took it as a very nice compliment when a friend who saw a picture of my daughter and said, “…good skin to dress ratio, Mom!!! My friends with girls say that is the hardest part about prom, finding a dress with the right ratio:)”  Thanks, Susra.

Yeah, that 8-year-old girl was something to see all right. … I hope her parents are proud. Their daughter was the sexiest girl in the terminal, and she’s not even in middle school yet.

In 2007, the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls issued a report linking early sexualization with three of the most common mental-health problems of girls and women: eating disorders, low self-esteem and depression. There’s nothing inherently wrong with parents wanting to appease their daughters by buying them the latest fashions. But is getting cool points today worth the harm dressing little girls like prostitutes could cause tomorrow?

A line needs to be drawn, but not by Abercrombie. Not by Britney Spears. And not by these little girls who don’t know better and desperately need their parents to be parents and not 40-year-old BFFs.

via Parents, don’t dress your girls like tramps – CNN.com.

parenting, bullying, culture:  Again, parents need to take their job seriously.  There is no excuse for bullying in the early years.  Parents must take responsibility.

Katie is donating many of the books and toys to other kids.

A fan created a Facebook event suggesting that people wear “Star Wars” gear on December 10 to support Katie. The Goldmans also asked participants to donate Star Wars toys to charities for the holidays. About 20,000 people have signed up.

“What strikes me is how these individuals who were once so isolated are now part of a very tight community,” Goldman wrote on her blog this month. “They have found each other; they are plugged into each other, and they have each other’s backs. Now they have Katie’s back, too.”

Katie isn’t doing any more interviews. There are scales to practice, Spanish words to memorize, baby sisters to play with. She still has to wear the dreaded eye patch, and eat lunch with the kids in her class. She is very busy being 7.

But on December 10, her school will host Proud To Be Me Day. Kids will be encouraged to wear something that shows what they’re interested in, whether it’s princesses, sports, animals and anime.

Katie will have the force of thousands behind her, and a “Star Wars” water bottle.

via ‘The Force’ is with you, Katie – CNN.com.

public spaces, places, NYC:  I think I may just take the night megabus to NYC and spend the day … any body want to go?

The great outdoors calls, and even without counting Central Park, there’s a great deal of it in New York City. There are more than 1,700 parks in the five boroughs, according to the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation. (Though with the 0.04 acre Septuagesimo Uno Park, on 71st Street between West End and Amsterdam Avenues, on that list, it’s a number best taken with a grain of asphalt.) Here, a baker’s dozen’s worth of sites to enjoy the warm weather, when it arrives.

via A Warm-Weather Guide to New York City – NYTimes.com.

culture, Benjamin Franklin, Jane Mecom (Benjamin Franklin’s sister), history:  Never knew old Ben had a sister … interesting story.

That world was changing. In 1789, Boston for the first time, allowed girls to attend public schools. The fertility rate began declining. The American Revolution made possible a new world, a world of fewer obstacles, a world with a promise of equality. That required — and still requires — sympathy.

Benjamin Franklin died in Philadelphia in 1790, at the age of 84. In his will, he left Jane the house in which she lived. And then he made another bequest, more lasting: he gave one hundred pounds to the public schools of Boston.

Jane Mecom died in that house in 1794. Later, during a political moment much like this one, when American politics was animated by self-serving invocations of the founders, her house was demolished to make room for a memorial to Paul Revere.

via Poor Jane’s Almanac – NYTimes.com.

college life, UVA, fraternities:  This story is troubling … but the solution proposed is too broad.

I had a miserable semester back at home, working in a department store and looking for somewhere else to go to school. But the truth was that I wanted to go to Virginia. I went back in the spring, and while few things have had as a profound an effect on my life as my UVA education, my deep mistrust of the fraternities limited the ways I engaged in life on campus and almost robbed me of the education itself.

If you want to improve women’s lives on campus, if you want to give them a fair shot at living and learning as freely as men, the first thing you could do is close down the fraternities. The Yale complaint may finally do what no amount of female outrage and violation has accomplished. It just might shut them down for good.

via Shutter Fraternities for Young Women’s Good | Home Land – WSJ.com.

Easter basket/candy, Peeps, Peep Show, Chilean Miner Rescue:  Another Peep contest!

This year’s winning diorama, which depicts the dramatic rescue of 33 mine workers in Copiapo, Chile, last October, is the work of Mary Jo Ondrejka from Reston; Bryn Metzdorf from Fairfax; and Margaret Hartka from Parkton, Md. A Peep version of miner Ariel Ticona meets his newborn daughter for the first time, while Peep Johnny Barrios Rojas is greeted by both his wife and mistress.

via Peeps Show V – The Washington Post.

hobbies, needlepoint, kith/kin:  My grandmother did needlepoint and I love every piece of work she did.  It is a beautiful art.

It wasn’t long ago that the word “needlepoint” conjured up thoughts of dusty cushions with fusty florals. But in recent years, thanks to a handful of retailers, designers and enthusiasts, the craft has become cool again.

via It’s not your grandmother’s needlepoint – The Washington Post.

science, physics, “God particle”:  Wow …

The world’s largest atom smasher is rumoured to have found the Higgs boson, the subatomic particle otherwise known as the ‘God particle’.

The speculation is based on a leaked internal note, said to be from physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 17 mile-long particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland.

The rumours started when an anonymous post disclosed part of the note on Columbia University mathematician Peter Woit’s blog, Not Even Wrong.

Awestruck: An amateur photographer takes a picture during an open day at the 17 mile-long LHC atom smasher in Switzerland

While some physicists are dismissing the note as a hoax, others say the find could be a huge particle physics breakthrough in understanding the workings of the universe.

Physicist Sheldon Stone of Syracuse University said: ‘If it were to be real, it would be really exciting.’

More…

The genius who shrank the globe: Why after 70 years we should celebrate jet engine inventor Frank Whittle

The Higgs boson is predicted to exist by the particle physics theory known as the Standard Model. The Higgs boson, physicists believe, bestows mass on all the other particles and was crucial to forming the cosmos after the Big Bang.

via Science world buzzing over rumours elusive ‘God particle’ has been found | Mail Online.

Middle East Awakening, oil crisis, Chicago:  $4.27 in Chicago …

Chicago's at top as gas prices jump again

Chicago at top as gas prices jump

The average U.S. price of a gallon of gasoline has jumped about 12 cents over the past two weeks, and Chicagoans are paying the highest average price in the country. The Lundberg Survey of fuel prices puts the average price for a gallon of regular at $3.88, as of April 22. Chicago had the highest average price for gas at $4.27.

via Chicago Tribune: Chicago news, sports, weather and traffic – chicagotribune.com.




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