Posts Tagged ‘Bored Panda

23
Jan
16

1.23.16 … Let it freezing rain …

View from front steps …

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Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast, NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly: A slightly different perceive …

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NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly Like This Page · Yesterday ·   Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast clearly visible from the International Space Station! Stay safe! #YearInSpace

Source: (1) Massive snowstorm blanketing the East Coast… – NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly

CLT weather, freezing rain/sleet/snow, WSOC-TV – PHOTOS:

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PHOTOS: Freezing rain, sleet and snow fell in the region today and viewers sent us hundreds of photos like this one from @EmilyKozel #CLTSnow MORE PHOTOS

Source: WSOC-TV – PHOTOS: Freezing rain, sleet and snow fell in the region…

 geometric drawings, walking: 

Higher Perspective Simon Beck creates incredible geometric drawings by walking in the snow!

Source: (3) Higher Perspective

 Ice Melt: 

easiest way to make the ice melt — The ingredients needed are:

1/2 a gallon of warm water

2 ounces of rubbing alcohol

6 drop of liquid dish detergent

Source: To Make Ice Melt, He Mixes These Three Ingredients. Its Effectiveness Surprised Me!

Cape Winelands , South Africa, travel, The best places to visit in 2016, lists, Business Insider:

The Cape Winelands is where some of the world’s most popular wines are produced, making it an ideal destination for wine tasting. The area’s wineries are lined along some of the most scenic routes, including a historic wine estate that dates back centuries. Enjoy top-notch wine alongside a variety of locally produced cheese, olives, fruit, and organic produce, or try a meal at one of Franschoek’s many acclaimed restaurants.

Source: The best places to visit in 2016 – Business Insider

Sacred Harmony of Geometry,  Sacred Geometry Really Is,  EnergyFanatics.com:

There will come a day when music and its philosophy will become the religion of humanity. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan What Sacred Geometry Really Is Sacred Geometry means literally “The Sacred Measure of the Earth”. But it could also be called “The Blueprint of all Creation”. In reality, Sacred Geometry is a profound spiritual science, which has been taught for thousands of years in spiritual traditions around the world. This is because Sacred Geometry reveals the actual patterns by which Spirit creates our World.1 There are a Ton of esoteric teachings with Sacred Geometry all through them. Yet no one really knew what Sacred Geometry REALLY represented: The segmented BLUEPRINTS to ENERGY; The Mathematical Formula of CREATION. Sacred Geometry represents the Segmented Blueprints of Magnetic Currents & Neutral Particles of Matter.2 One of the most important discoveries of the new quantum physics is that of the holographic nature of the universe. The geometric language of light, that forms the underlying matrix of this hologram, is the alphabet of the new paradigm. The primary infrastructure of all existence is written in the Sacred Geometric language of light. All is light … all is geometry. Sacred Geometry is the ‘graphic code’ that reveals the processes of inherent order underlying all of creation. The mathematical laws of Sacred Geometry govern every system of growth, every motion in the universe, from atomic bonds to spiraling galaxies.3

Source: Sacred Harmony of Geometry: What Sacred Geometry Really Is | EnergyFanatics.com

Remote Year, Travel the World for a Year While You Keep Your Job, Brit +: 

Here’s the deal: You love your work. You love to travel. Unfortunately, you can’t always have the best of both worlds (at least not with out a major career change) – but what about when you can? Enter: Remote Year, a company that will essentially arrange a trip around the world for you while you work remotely.

Source: This Company Will Help You Travel the World for a Year While You Keep Your Job | Brit +

Anshuman Ghosh, @moography, quirky, street photography,  fusion between what was real and what was not, phone framing:“I’ve got crazy ideas in my head when it comes to how I would like to see the world,” says Anshuman Ghosh (@moography), an Indian business developer based in South Africa. He was initially drawn to street photography, but Anshuman wasn’t able to create the world he imagined in his mind — one that was less serious and more quirky. “I wanted to create something that was a fusion between what was real and what was not,” he says. “I came up with this technique I call phone framing.” Anshuman sketches a drawing on paper, cuts it out and aligns everything together to create a seamless visual illusion. “Placing the phone in the picture gives me the freedom to trick my audience into believing the phone is more than something that it is.”

Source: Instagram Blog

Novel’s First Sentence, A Secret History | Electric Literature:

A great first sentence is very important. In a novel, it’s a “promise,” a “handshake,” an “embrace,” a “key.” Great first sentences are celebrated everywhere literature is cherished and mandated everywhere it’s taught. They’re a pleasure and a duty—the “most important sentence in a book,” everyone agrees. But they haven’t always been important. When Daniel Defoe wrote the first English novel, Robinson Crusoe, in 1719, first sentences weren’t important, and so he wrote, “I was born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.” When Charlotte Brontë wrote Jane Eyre in 1847, first sentences still weren’t important, and even so she wrote, “There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.”

Source: In Search of the Novel’s First Sentence: A Secret History | Electric Literature

Neural Algorithm, ‘Paint’ Photos, Van Gogh To Picasso, Bored Panda:

A group of researchers at the University of Tubingen, Germany, have developed an algorithm that can morph an image to resemble a painting in the style of the great masters. Technically called “deep learning” algorithms, they are already in use by companies such as Google for image recognition and other applications. “The system uses neural representations to separate and recombine content and style of arbitrary images, providing a neural algorithm for the creation of artistic images,” the researchers wrote in their paper. “Here we introduce an artificial system based on a Deep Neural Network that creates artistic images of high perceptual quality.” A photograph of apartments by a river in Tubingen, Germany was processed to be stylistically similar to various paintings, including J.M. Turner’s “The Wreck of a Transport Ship,” Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night,” and Edvard Munch’s “The Scream.”

Source: New Neural Algorithm Can ‘Paint’ Photos In Style Of Any Artist From Van Gogh To Picasso | Bored Panda

Paris, Bookstore Shakespeare &Co., VICE | United States:

George died in 2011 at the age of 98, by which point he had upgraded from a bed in the shop to a flat on the third floor in the same building. I’m living here now, in his former apartment, ostensibly to finish my second novel. But more practically and pressingly, I’m a “homeless wanderer.” People have been asking me how I got this position, whether it was hard to obtain. The short answer is no, and the long answer is yes: I parted ways with a partner I loved, leaving the home where we’d lived together, and lost a contract I was relying on, so I asked Sylvia if I could stay for a while. She said, without question or hesitation, that I could stay for as long as I needed. George called Shakespeare & Company a “socialist utopia masquerading as a bookstore,” and I feel infinitely grateful to George and Sylvia for creating and maintaining a space that prioritizes community.

Source: What It’s Like to Live Inside the Legendary Paris Bookstore Shakespeare & Co. | VICE | United States

Shakespeare, religion, OUPblog: 

In this play, as in others, Shakespeare calls on the ambiguous associations of Catholic figures, images and ideas, as a means of engaging his audience with the problems he frames. He seems to revel in the pleasures of slippery meaning. By flirting with stereotypes and sectarian expectations he makes his audience think more deeply about the difficulties of the plays and their own culture. Whatever Shakespeare’s personal religion was, the religion he put on stage was both playful and probing.

Source: What was Shakespeare’s religion? | OUPblog

07
Jul
14

7.7.14 … turtles gone awry …

25 Of The Most Creative Sculptures And Statues From Around The World, Bored Panda, Nelson Mandela:  Have I mentioned that I really love fun, interactive, made you think, beautiful, ugly, symbolic, public art?  Nelson Mandela … #11 … that’s my favorite.

9. Black Ghost, Klaipeda, Lithuania

11. Nelson Mandela, South Africa

via 25 Of The Most Creative Sculptures And Statues From Around The World | Bored Panda.

Cross-Charlotte bike trail is proposed, CharlotteObserver.com:

The whirr of bike chains and snap of gear shifts should become more common sounds in parts of Charlotte in coming years.

That’s because the city stands ready to pump up Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s lagging trail network for bicycles. City transportation planners propose to help expand the Little Sugar Creek Greenway and two other greenways into a 30.6-mile bikeway from Cabarrus County to York County, S.C.

The Cross-Charlotte Trail, as it’s called, would advance the Little Sugar Creek Greenway from its northern point at Cordelia Park, near uptown. The multiple-use trail would go through the NoDa arts and entertainment district, join the Toby Creek and Mallard Creek greenways in the UNC Charlotte area and pass south of U.S. 29 to the county line.

via Cross-Charlotte bike trail is proposed | CharlotteObserver.com.

Taylor Swift: Autographs Are Obsolete Because Of Selfies: I had not thought about this!!

The Wall Street Journal’s newest columnist, Taylor Swift — yes, that Taylor Swift — has a message for all you old fogies out there: Autographs are so over.

“I haven’t been asked for an autograph since the invention of the iPhone with a front-facing camera,” Swift wrote Monday in her WSJ column on the future of music. She called autographs “obsolete.”

For young people, Instagram followers are “currency,” she argued. And she has a point. Instagram is the most important social network for teens, according to a recent survey by the investment bank Piper Jaffray. How are you suppose to impress your friends with a name scribbled on a piece of paper?

If anyone can tell us what the kids are into, it’s their fearless leader. She’s got 9.7 million Instagram followers, 41.7 million Twitter followers and 66.6 million Facebook “Likes.” (Plus seven Grammys, but who’s counting?)

via Taylor Swift: Autographs Are Obsolete Because Of Selfies.

Anne Hathaway, Emma Stone’s Paparazzi Trick, Vanity Fair:  I like this …

 

While she and husband Adam Shulman were walking their dog, Anne Hathaway decided to pay direct tribute to Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield. The couple shielded their faces with signs, and Hathaway’s read:

Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield had a great idea! Please check out: http://www.girleffect.org [an organization that empowers young women], http://www.feedingamerica.org [a nonprofit network of domestic food banks], and http://www.worldofchildren.org [a charity geared towards raising awareness for children’s issues].

Stone and Garfield have, on several occasions, endeared themselves to the public in this identical way by thwarting the paparazzi and shining a light on charities that are near and dear to their hearts. As for Hathaway, her earnest enthusiasm, especially around her 2013 Oscar win, has earned her a lot of surprising criticism. In a post-Jennifer Lawrence world, the concept of “genuine likability” vs., say, studio polish, can make or break careers. If Hathaway wanted to model her behavior after anyone in order to gain some of that unfairly elusive “likability” credit from the public, she couldn’t pick a better model than Stone. Be it throwing her heart in a late-night lip-synch battle, or playfully calling out her boyfriend, Garfield, on his sexist ideology, Stone is always a hit. Hathaway, on the other hand, always has to work for it.

Why is it so much harder for Hathaway? It’s impossible to say. But if she’s going to keep on emulating popular actresses we have our fingers crossed for a carefree J.Law stumble, a salty Mila Kunis interview, and some brassy Emma Thompson tomfoolery. But, if not, we suggest Anne just be herself.

via Anne Hathaway Tries to Pull Off Emma Stone’s Paparazzi Trick | Vanity Fair.

MyRecipes.com:  I friend of mine highly recommends this site. MyRecipes.com – Recipes, Dinner Ideas and Menus.

Wheaton College injunction: The Supreme Court just sneakily reversed itself on Hobby Lobby:  “This is an institution, the turtle tells us, that moves slowly, deliberately, and removed from the knee-jerk pace of the political branches.”

The architecture of the U.S. Supreme Court Building is rife with turtles. There are turtles holding up the lampposts in the courtyard and turtles engraved in the stone decor. You can buy turtle coffee mugs at the gift shop. The turtle is said to represent the slow and deliberate pace of justice. This is an institution, the turtle tells us, that moves slowly, deliberately, and removed from the knee-jerk pace of the political branches.

Yet moments before they adjourned for their summer recess, the justices proved they can act quite quickly and recklessly when it comes to violating the terms of a controversial opinion they handed down only days earlier. It’s as if the loaner car the court gave us in the Hobby Lobby ruling broke down mere blocks from the shop.

In Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court ruled that it was a “substantial burden” on the religious freedoms of closely-held corporations for the government to require them to provide contraception as part of their employee health care plans. The court didn’t say that the government could never require a company to do something that violated its religious beliefs, but rather that the government had to use the “least restrictive alternative.” That means that if there is a slightly less burdensome way to implement the law, it needs to be used. To prove that the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate was not the “least restrictive alternative,” the court pointed to a workaround in the law for nonprofits: If there are religious objections to a medical treatment, third parties will provide coverage to the employees.

It’s the butterfly effect: Any time Wheaton flapped its religious-conscience wings, a woman ends up with an IUD.

Yet in an unsigned emergency order granted Thursday evening, the very same court said that this very same workaround it had just praised was also unconstitutional, that this workaround also burdened the religious freedom of religious employers. Overnight, the cure has become the disease. Having explicitly promised that Hobby Lobby would go no further than Hobby Lobby, the court went back on its word, then skipped town for the summer.

via Wheaton College injunction: The Supreme Court just sneakily reversed itself on Hobby Lobby..

Why turtles?

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— Decorative turtles encircling the base of exterior lamp poles, symbols of the deliberative pace of justice.

via Behind-the-scenes tour reveals Supreme Court traditions, grandeur – CNN.com.

Court architects and planners landed on one creature to symbolize longevity, patience, and the deliberate pace of justice – the turtle. Turtles can be found all throughout the architecture of the building, the gift shop, and around DC. Other symbolic animals include the lion, symbolizing guardianship, the ram for strength, and the owl for wisdom. Try and find the turtles hidden on the building’s façade!

via Hitting the Gavel – Tidbits on Court Traditions | Neal R. Gross and Co., Inc..

A well-known scientist (some say it was Bertrand Russell) once gave a public lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits around the sun and how the sun, in turn, orbits around the centre of a vast collection of stars called our galaxy.

At the end of the lecture, a little old lady at the back of the room got up and said: “What you have told us is rubbish. The world is really a flat plate supported on the back of a giant tortoise.”

The scientist gave a superior smile before replying, “What is the tortoise standing on?”

“You’re very clever, young man, very clever,” said the old lady. “But it’s turtles all the way down.”

via Obama’s Supreme Court Nominee: Turtles All the Way Down.

19
Jan
14

1.19.14 … book jackets and wine labels …

 “Ballet Shoes” , Nol Streatfeild, “You’ve Got Mail”, book jackets,  wine labels,  small independent bookstores: So, I saw a refernce on a FB page to  “Ballet Shoes” and asked, “Isn’t  the book that this film is based the one  that is refernced in one of the later scenes in You’ve Got Mail?”

A Mighty Girl Pick of the Day: “Ballet Shoes,” a 2007 BBC movie adaptation of the Noel Streatfield novel, starring Emma Watson of Harry Potter fame. This compelling film tells the story of three orphaned girls, Pauline (Watson), Petrova, and Posy, living together as sisters and being supported — barely — by one elder sister, Sylvia.

The three girls each have high ambitions: Petrova wants to fly airplanes, Posy wants to dance ballet, and Pauline wants to be an actress. The story follows the girls as each of them pursues their dreams and learns important lessons about kindness, love, and family.

These loving sisters and their determination to write their names in the history books are sure to inspire every watcher and their willingness to stand alongside one another in support is heartwarming. This lovely film is recommended for ages 7 and up.

via (3) A Mighty Girl.

And the answer is yes …

“Nol Streatfeild wrote Ballet Shoes and Skating Shoes and Dancing Shoes. Id start with Ballet Shoes its my favorite. Although Dancing Shoes is completely wonderful but its out of print.”

via Ramblings of an English Teacher: You’ve Got Mail.

And then I had a great FB conversation …

FB friend: ” I love that scene. We’ve come full circle here with only a small independent bookstore in my immediate area. I try to frequent it, but it is so hard to beat the price and convenience of Amazon.I still have to go in person for browsing fun. I am drawn to certain book jackets the same way i shop for wine by the wine labels.”

me: “I love book jackets and wine labels! I was in my independent bookstore yesterday, picking up an signed copy of a book for a “spiritual” basket for my church’s youth mission trip fundraiser. i asked if it had discounts because I needed 8+ books for the basket. (Long story, short: spiritual basket contains ministers and staffs’ favorite books with personal notes among other things) … I of course prompted a discourse on why they could not compete with Amazon…) As for wine labels, i was just commenting to my sister in law, that all the small vineyards John and I loved on our last visit to Napa 24 years ago, some because of their fun labels , are now big vineyards.”

Fyodor Dostoevsky, doodles manuscripts, Open Culture:  Puts Dostoevsky in a new light. 🙂

Few would argue against the claim that Fyodor Dostoevsky, author of such bywords for literary weightiness as Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, mastered the novel, even by the formidable standards of 19th-century Russia. But if you look into his papers, you’ll find that he also had an intriguing way with pen and ink outside the realm of letters — or, if you like, deep inside the realm of letters, since to see drawings by Dostoevsky, you actually have to look within the manuscripts of his novels. Above, we have a page from Crime and Punishment into which a pair of solemn faces (not that their mood will surprise enthusiasts of Russian literature) found their way

via Fyodor Dostoevsky Draws Elaborate Doodles In His Manuscripts | Open Culture.

Tweet of the Day:  I’m really slow sometimes.

Huffington Post

(@HuffingtonPost)

1/15/14, 9:36 PM

Girl choir breaks stained glass ceiling at Canterbury Cathedral

CANTERBURY, England (RNS) Canterbury Cathedral, mother church of the 85 million-member worldwide Anglican Communion, will have its first girls’ choir perform since it was rebuilt nearly 1,000 years ago.

On Jan. 25, worshippers will hear the voices of 16 girls between the ages of 12 and 16 at a historic Evensong service, which will include the music of English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Until now, only male voices have been heard at the cathedral’s services.

via Canterbury Cathedral Will Have Girls’ Choir Perform For The First Time Ever.

The Best Airport Food, lists, WSJ.com:  I hate airport food and never venture beyond Starbucks or McDonalds. Anyone else with recommendations?

Middle Seat favorites: Urban Taco’s chicken tinga and Dos Equis Amber barbacoa tacos at DFW, Legal Sea Foods chowder and crab cakes in Boston or Philadelphia (and returning to Washington’s Reagan National this spring), and that incredible barbecue beef from The Salt Lick, which must be chased by Amy’s Mexican vanilla ice cream.

Farther afield, one of my all-time memorable meals was the salade gersoise at 8e Ciel at the airport in Toulouse, France. Every conceivable preparation of duck—and Toulouse is known for its duck—is nestled on greens and priced at about $26. The restaurant, a highlight of an otherwise dreary, small airport, features regional cuisine “advised” by chef Michel Sarran, with the added bonus, for aviation buffs, of a broad view of the Airbus factory flight line.

via The Best Airport Food in the U.S. and Beyond – WSJ.com.

And a few additions from FB Friends …

FB Friend: “The Varsity on Concourse C ATL”

FB Friend:  The article here mentions Legal seafood at Boston. I’ve had good seafood at BWI too. The new Delta concourse in NY (Kennedy?) has great restaurants. Houston has beer vendors with carts that roll down the concourses!

FB Friend: “Ditto on BWI. Used to be a great little gourmet restaurant in Bakersfield but I haven’t been back there in a while.”

1968 Artist Imagines What John Paul George & Ringo,  “When I’m Sixty-Four”, Open Culture:

When I get older losing my hair,

Many years from now,

Will you still be sending me a valentine

Birthday greetings bottle of wine?

Paul McCartney’s wistful song “When I’m Sixty-Four” was released on the Beatles’ 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The next year, an artist named Michael Leonard tried to imagine what the young musicians might look like four decades later — on their 64th birthdays. We never got a chance to figure out whether he sized up Lennon and Harrison correctly. But we know that Paul, even at 71 today, never got jowly. And Ringo never went the suit route. You can see for yourself when the two perform at the Grammys on January 26.

via In 1968, Artist Imagines What John, Paul, George & Ringo Will Look Like When They’re 64 | Open Culture.

How sugar affects the brain, Nicole Avena,  Why Diets Fail by Nicole Avena, TED-Ed , YouTube:  My name is ______, and I am an addict, a sugar addict.

Sad, but true ..

I mentioned a new book called Why Diets Fail by Nicole Avena, a neuroscientist and research psychologist at Columbia University who has done a lot of work in this area. She\’s particularly interested in the neurotransmitters and brain receptors involved in eating. In lab experiments with rats, she\’s shown how overeating tasty foods (like sugar) can produce changes in the brain and behavior that resemble addiction.

The Salt

Is Sugar Addiction Why So Many January Diets Fail?

Science

Overeating, Like Drug Use, Rewards And Alters Brain

Avena has also just put out a clever TED-Ed video with colorful visuals to help explain the details of just why sugar makes our brains go bonkers.

As the video shows, the key player in the reward system of our brain — where we get that feeling of pleasure — is dopamine. Dopamine receptors are all over our brain. And doing a drug like heroin brings on a deluge of dopamine.

Guess what happens when we eat sugar? Yes, those dopamine levels also surge — though not nearly as much as they do with heroin.

via Why Sugar Makes Us Feel So Good : The Salt : NPR.

Elena Shumilova/Russian Mother,  Magical Pictures, Two Kids With Animals On Her Farm,  Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Bored Panda:  These are more than magical … 

These wonderful photographs by Elena Shumilova plunge the viewer into a beautiful world that revolves around two boys and their adorable dog, cat, duckling and rabbit friends. Taking advantage of natural colors, weather conditions and her enchanting surroundings, the gifted Russian artist creates cozy and heartwarming photography that will leave you amazed.

The boys in the photographs are the photographer’s sons and the animals belong to the farm she runs. “I largely trust my intuition and inspiration when I compose photos. I get inspired mainly by my desire to express something I feel, though I usually cannot tell exactly what that is” Shumilova explained to BoredPanda.

Rural settings, natural phenomena and the changing seasons seem to be the greatest stimuli in her works. “When shooting I prefer to use natural light – both inside and outside. I love all sorts of light conditions – street lights, candle light, fog, smoke, rain and snow – everything that gives visual and emotional depth to the image,” the photographer said.

Shumilova told us her passion for photography manifested in early 2012 when she got her first camera. Her most recent equipment includes the Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera and a 135mm lens. As a mother who doesn’t want to miss out on her growing children, she says she shoots every day and processes the images at night.

We suggest you take a cup of tea, lean back comfortably in your armchair and browse this beautiful collection of Elena Shumilova’s photographs.

via Russian Mother Takes Magical Pictures of Her Two Kids With Animals On Her Farm | Bored Panda.

Snowboarders, lawsuits,  Alta Ski Area, OutsideOnline.com, the Fourteenth Amendment(citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws): So I asked my guys, one ides, one skis, what do you guys think?  I think there are some valid arguments since it is on government land.

Four snowboarders and a Utah nonprofit corporation have sued Alta Ski Area and the U.S. Forest Service, challenging the resort’s skiers-only rule.

The lawsuit states that Alta’s policy prohibiting snowboarders from riding at the resort violates the Fourteenth Amendment, which addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws.

Alta is one of three resorts in the country that does not allow snowboarding, and it is the only one that operates on public land controlled by the U.S. Forest Service, according to the lawsuit.

via Snowboarders Sue Alta Ski Area | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

LOL, man’s best friend: Sounds like my house!!

Photo




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