Posts Tagged ‘Boulder

09
May
11

5.9.2011 … The flooding Mississippi R. is 3 miles wide at Memphis … I can’t imagine … prayers …

natural disasters, flooding, Mississippi River, Memphis, prayers:  

At a late Sunday afternoon press briefing, Col. Vernon Reichling of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said the Mississippi River in Memphis, usually a half-mile wide, now measures 3 miles across. Reichling said he expected the river to crest Tuesday at 48 feet, just below the record set in 1937 of 48.7 feet; it is the first time the Mississippi River has exceeded even 41 feet since that record 1937 flood.

via Sunday flood updates: River now 3 miles across in Memphis » The Commercial Appeal.

Jasmine Revolution, China:

The clampdown is concentrated on foreign groups or activities that have significant ties to foreign governments, run prominent outreach programs, encourage free speech or promote Internet freedom.

Senior Chinese officials appear to believe that the United States in particular helped set off and sustain the uprisings that toppled dictators in the Arab world. In mid-February, messages appeared on the Chinese Internet calling for people to hold similar protests across the nation. Some of the people spreading word of the so-called Jasmine Revolution are Chinese who live overseas.

One message called for Chinese to protest on Feb. 20 at a McDonald’s outlet on Wangfujing, a popular shopping street in Beijing, and the government became concerned when Jon M. Huntsman Jr., who was then the American ambassador to China, appeared that afternoon outside the restaurant.

Embassy officials said Mr. Huntsman, who left his job at the end of April, was not aware of the calls for a protest, but the Chinese government quickly began canceling outreach activities sponsored by the American Embassy. That included one-time appearances by Mr. Huntsman in Chinese cities and regularly scheduled education programs in which American officials meet with Chinese students, according to interviews with foreigners and Chinese.

“The cynic in me believes that, given the likely timing of this decision and of the onset of the Egyptian protests, this is not really about money or the value of international conferences, but about minimizing extended face-to-face dialogues with foreigners who might share ideas that were ‘bu shufu,’ ” said one American involved in cultural events, using the Chinese phrase for “discomforting.”

Foreign journalists have also faced unusually direct harassment from security officials. Starting in late February, scores of journalists were warned about their coverage and visited at their homes.

In meetings in February and March with one American journalist, security officers tried to make the case that American officials, together with foreign journalists and others with ties overseas, were conspiring to stir up chaos in China. They talked about the appearance of Mr. Huntsman at the McDonald’s on Feb. 20, and they mentioned a meeting that he held with foreign journalists at the embassy on March 10, citing them as proof of the United States’ hand in fanning the flames of revolution.

via China Blames Foreigners for Trying to Foment Unrest – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden death, Dalai Lama, moral issues, forgiveness:

But the Dalai Lama’s camp responded almost immediately, claiming this was not at all the gist of his remarks, emphasizing his appeal for us to distinguish between “the action” and “the actor” and stressing that, as a fellow human being, even bin Laden deserves our compassion and forgiveness. But, he stressed, “forgiveness doesn’t mean forget [sic] what happened.”

via Dalai Lama: Osama bin Laden Deserves Compassion – Global Spin – TIME.com.

Osama bin Laden death, Maureen Down, moral issues: Know where she stands … “We have nothing to apologize for.”

But within days, Naval Seal-gazing shifted to navel-gazing.

There was the bad comedy of solipsistic Republicans with wounded egos trying to make it about how right they were and whinging that George W. Bush was due more credit. Their attempt to renew the debate about torture is itself torture.

W. preferred to sulk in his Dallas tent rather than join President Obama at ground zero in a duet that would have certainly united the country.

Whereas the intelligence work that led to the destruction of Bin Laden was begun in the Bush administration, the cache of schemes taken from Osama’s Pakistan house debunked the fanciful narrative that the Bush crew pushed: that Osama was stuck in a cave unable to communicate, increasingly irrelevant and a mere symbol, rather than operational. Osama, in fact, was at the helm, spending his days whipping up bloody schemes to kill more Americans.

The really insane assumption behind some of the second-guessing is that killing Osama somehow makes us like Osama, as if all killing is the same.

Only fools or knaves would argue that we could fight Al Qaeda’s violence non-violently.

President Obama was prepared to take a life not only to avenge American lives already taken but to deter the same killer from taking any more. Aside from Bin Laden’s plotting, his survival and his legend were inspirations for more murder.

If stealth bombers had dropped dozens of 2,000-pound bombs and wiped out everyone, no one would have been debating whether Osama was armed. The president chose the riskiest option presented to him, but one that spared nearly all the women and children at the compound, and anyone in the vicinity.

Unlike Osama, the Navy Seals took great care not to harm civilians — they shot Bin Laden’s youngest wife in the leg and carried two young girls out of harm’s way before killing Osama.

Morally and operationally, this was counterterrorism at its finest.

We have nothing to apologize for.

via Killing Evil Doesn’t Make Us Evil – NYTimes.com.

Paris, France, travel, lists, Question:  Anything else YOU think should be on the list?

From impassioned revolutionaries and ostentatious royals to the world of ancient Gaul, the history of Paris is filled with drama, intrigue and excitement. Thus, it is of little surprise that this is not only one of the world’s most beautiful and romantic cities, but that it is also brimming with fantastic historic sites. The following are our top ten historic sites of Paris.

via Top Ten Historic Sites of Paris.

travel, lists, places, hotels:

Location, location, location. This real estate mantra is something to live by when seeking out the perfect hotel. For history buffs, a hotel setting can be key to a stay.

From balcony panoramas of World Heritage sites to hidden ancient baths in the basement, some hotels have that little something extra to really immerse their guests in history. So, where can one find these perfect places from which to enjoy the sites of cultures past?

We asked our friends at historical travel website Historvius.com to put together a selection of just some of the very best hotels for history lovers.

via 15 Great Hotels For History Lovers (PHOTOS) – AOL Travel News.

Harvard Initiative, Advanced Education:  This seems exciting to me …

In short, the program represents a new, “third stage” in higher education, says Rosabeth Moss Kanter, the initiative’s co-founder and director, and one of the three Harvard professors who in 2005 first envisioned a wider role for the nation’s colleges and universities. Such institutions have long launched young adults into the world from undergraduate and graduate/professional programs. Now, she says, these schools need to do the same for older adults.

Doug Rauch, former president of Trader Joe’s, works on his project for getting ‘excess’ food to the hungry with Prof. Fernando Reimers, a co-chairman of Harvard’s leadership program.

“Clearly, we need additional leaders to take on social challenges—and here we have this large population of adults leaving first careers who are going to live for another 20 or 30 years,” Prof. Kanter says. Higher education “can be the resource that gives these individuals the skills and direction they need.”

For now, the Harvard initiative remains small: About 20 to 30 fellows a year take part. That said, Prof. Kanter expects the program to grow steadily—and, ideally, to be replicated at schools across the country.

Indeed, the initiative is a “sign of things to come,” says Marc Freedman, chief executive of Civic Ventures, a San Francisco nonprofit focused on expanding the contributions of older Americans. Already, he notes, a growing number of resources—community colleges, webinars, alumni groups and life coaches, among others—are helping the 50-plus crowd transition into jobs and careers in the social-service and nonprofit arenas.

Eventually, these multiple pathways, Mr. Freedman adds, will “enable individuals in the second half of life to move seamlessly from ‘what’s last’ to ‘what’s next.’ ”

That platform could soon be adopted elsewhere. A meeting in Miami in June will give other schools a chance to learn about Harvard’s model for educating advanced leaders, Prof. Kanter says. She likens the effort to the growth of the nation’s business schools, which began to appear at the turn of the 20th century and are now a familiar part of the academic landscape.

“We think someday this will be a stage of higher education that many colleges and universities will want to have,” Prof. Kanter says. “We want to make this a movement.”

via It’s Not Too Late to Go to Harvard – WSJ.com.

bookshelf, Three Cups of Tea:  Well, I have had this book next to my bed for several years … Nothing like controversy to make me fish it out and begin.

Greg Mortenson, author of the bestseller “Three Cups of Tea,” was sued for fraud on Friday in a class-action case accusing him of fabricating much of his story to promote the book and his Montana-based charity.

The lawsuit comes nearly four weeks after Mortenson and his Central Asia Institute (CAI) came under fire in an expose aired on the CBS television news program “60 Minutes,” which sparked an investigation by the Montana attorney general.

The “60 Minutes” report challenged the credibility of biographical details in Mortenson’s memoir and said his institute, founded to build schools for girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan, was largely being used to promote the book.

via Lawsuit accuses Three Cups of Tea author of fraud | Reuters.

Paris, Jim Haynes, Sunday Dinner, kith/kin:  I am jealous … a good friend is going next Sunday … when she told me about it … and I looked it up … I remember this Jim Haynes’ NPR interview.  I can’t wait to hear about it.

Every week for the past 30 years, I’ve hosted a Sunday dinner in my home in Paris. People, including total strangers, call or e-mail to book a spot. I hold the salon in my atelier, which used to be a sculpture studio. The first 50 or 60 people who call may come, and twice that many when the weather is nice and we can overflow into the garden.

Every Sunday a different friend prepares a feast. Last week it was a philosophy student from Lisbon, and next week a dear friend from London will cook.

People from all corners of the world come to break bread together, to meet, to talk, connect and often become friends. All ages, nationalities, races, professions gather here, and since there is no organized seating, the opportunity for mingling couldn’t be better. I love the randomness.

I believe in introducing people to people.

via Jim Haynes.

How to make the gods laugh: tell them your plans! Nevertheless I hope the future includes my continuing to live here in my Paris atelier, travelling to see friends, writing newsletters and books, hosting friends, organizing the Sunday dinners, and enjoying every minute of life. For me, happiness is an intellectual concept, and I decided years ago to be happy. In spite of (and because of) everything, I love life. It has been good to me, and I hope that I have been good to it.

via Jim Haynes.

137th Kentucky Derby, Pat Forde: “The Derby almost always has a jarring plot twist or two. But this was an all-timer.” … read on …

Instead, the hugely accomplished Velazquez wound up riding the colt that would take him to his first Derby victory after years of heartache. And just like that, the 37-year-old Albarado — who won a stakes race Saturday on the Derby undercard — wound up watching his mount surge to glory on the home stretch with a complete stranger on his back.

The Derby almost always has a jarring plot twist or two. But this was an all-timer.

“The proper thing to do is to congratulate Graham and Johnny,” said Albarado, who has won many big races but never the Derby. “Johnny rode a great race. But you get taken off the day before? It’s kind of sad.”

One jockey’s sadness became another jockey’s elation. Velazquez has himself been bruised by the Derby gods, losing top-shelf contenders the week of the race three straight years. Before Uncle Mo there was Eskendereya, the likely heavy favorite in 2010 who was scratched just days before the Derby, and before that was Quality Road, scratched the Monday of Derby week with a hoof injury.

via Robby Albarado and John Velazquez: A tale of two jockeys at the Kentucky Derby – ESPN.

Boulder, places, happiness, Gretchen Rubin, kith/kin:  My two boys would agree … it is a wonderful place …

He says where he lives is a huge component of his happiness. “I lived in San Francisco, lived in Miami, New York City, Chicago, and I just think that this community, for me and what I wanted to do, it just fit.”

“This community” is Boulder, Colorado, where Dave – who owns a restaurant called (what else?) Happy – is far from the only one mainlining the vibe of well-being.

“There’s an energy here you just don’t feel in other places,” said one resident, Sean.

Ingrid Asmus wouldn’t walk her dog Strider anywhere else.

“Up there the spring beauties are blooming and the bluebells are out and the sand lilies are starting to come out,” she remarked. And she’s only five minutes from downtown.

If happiness is a state of mind, then Boulder is its capital.

What Gretchen re-discovered is the wisdom of that old saying: Happiness is a journey, not a destination, and one best guided by daily … incremental changes in lifestyle… with one above all:

“Ancient philosophers and contemporary researchers agree that maybe the key the happiness, if you had to pick just one thing, is strong relationships with other people,” she said. “So take the trip to see your sister’s new baby, go to the reunion, throw a party. Connections – anything that’s going to make you feel more connected with other people is going to add to your happiness.”

via The pursuit of happiness – CBS News.

LOL:

YouTube – Most interesting thing I ever saw done to a dog..mp4.

24
Apr
11

4.24.2011 … “Sing and Rejoice” … “Jesus Christ is Risen Today” … “Awake the Trumpet’s Lofty Sound” … “Alleluia, Alleluia! Give Thanks” … “In Christ there is no east or west, in Him no south or north; but one great fellowship of love throughout the whole wide earth.” … “The Day of Resurrection” … “Christ is Alive” … Hallelujah” … Again, Happy Easter!

Easter, faith and spirituality, worship, worship music, FPC:  The service was beautiful … I loved the music and feel blessed for the music ministry at our church … “Sing and Rejoice” … “Jesus Christ is Risen Today” … “Awake the Trumpet’s Lofty Sound” … “Alleluia, Alleluia! Give Thanks” … “In Christ there is no east or west, in Him no south or north; but one great fellowship of love throughout the whole wide earth.” … “The Day of Resurrection” … “Christ is Alive” … hallelujah” …
Easter, history, cultural history:

In The Mood for Easter

Long before the birth of 50-foot blow-up bunnies and AstroTurf egg hunts, people still gathered with the folks they loved most and celebrated Easter. Here, a look back.

via Easter: The Early Days – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Easter, Bones, LOL, quotes, twitter:  From Hart Hanson, the producer of Bones:

Happy Easter. To quote Seeley Booth: “Jesus is not a zombie. I should not have to tell you that.” Temperance Brennan does not agree.

via (4) Twitter / Home.

Easter, cultural Easter, lists:

Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Easter

From dressing up as witches to burning effigies of politicians, the world holds many more Easter traditions than just dyeing eggs.

via Sweden’s Easter Witches – Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Easter – TIME.

Easter, cultural Easter, Easter baskets/candy, chocolate Easter bunny:  I think I start with the tail … be right back I’ll check!

Adults may be sneaking goodies from kids’ Easter baskets because they appear very knowledgeable about the best way to eat chocolate bunnies. Eating bunnies’ ears first won hands down. “Apparently, this is the most appropriate way to enjoy a chocolate bunny,” said Graham, who admits to eating bunnies’ ears first, himself. Of 1,000 adults surveyed, 76 percent said they start with the ears when they munch a chocolate bunny. Eating bunnies’ feet first (five percent) and tail first (four percent) were not popular choices.

via Taking a Bite Out of the Bunny: Ears Munched First According to Easter Survey – Press Relases – News & Hot Topics – NCA.

Easter, cultural Easter, Easter baskets/candy, Peeps:  This one is funny …

If bragging rights are more valuable than time and money, then Racheal Jones and Ramona Wesely, both of Dallas, and Kathleen Canedo of Oakton, Va., and Hillary Berman of Bethesda, Md., are on Easy Street.

The Texas duo made a mad dash from the Lone Star State to Chicago (arrived Thursday, back home Friday) to deliver their diorama, “Satine the Sparkling Peep from Moulin Peep,” in time for our judges’ panel to deem it their hands-down favorite.

Canedo and Berman made a more leisurely trip from the East Coast, blogging about and posting photos of their journey with their “Larry Peep Live on PNN” diorama in tow. The judges’ panel, comprising movie critic Michael Phillips, visual arts reporter Lauren Viera and theater critic Chris Jones, awarded Canedo and Berman No. 2 honors, once they stopped marveling at the detail of “Larry Peep’s” glasses and little suspenders.

via Peeps contest, Easter, Peeps diorama, – chicagotribune.com.

health, substance abuse, danger:  Alcohol wins … no big honor …

You may want to think twice before going to happy hour tonight.

Alcohol is more dangerous than heroin, crack cocaine, and methamphetamines, at least according to a new study published in The Lancet, a British medical journal.

The study, which was conducted on behalf of the Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs, evaluated the dangers that various drugs pose to the user’s mental and physical health, as well as the harm it may cause the community, in terms of crime and health care costs.

The researchers found that heroin and crack cocaine were the most harmful drugs to the person using them, but alcohol was the most harmful to the community, and overall, when all the factors were added up, alcohol ranked as the most dangerous drug with a score of 72. By comparison, heroin, the next highest, had a score of 55, and other drugs like tobacco, cannabis and LSD scored just a fraction of that.

via Alcohol: The Most Dangerous Drug | Food & Drink | Lifestyle | Mainstreet.

Notre Dame Cathedral, history, places, Paris, France, quotes:

… walk in as tourists, walk out as pilgrims …

The history of France’s Notre Dame Cathedral – CBS News Video.

4/20, Boulder, followup:  Didn’t find the Teague boys in the pictures … Whew.  4/20 in photos | CU Independent.

places, tourist attractions, Charlotte, 2012 DNC: If this is the best we can do, we are gong to have some bored dems.

This week’s Charlotte Business Journal features two Top 25 lists: the Area’s Top Tourist Attractions and North Carolina State Parks.

via Top of the List: Tourist Attractions, State Parks | Charlotte Business Journal.

Middle East awakening, Bahrain, Royal Wedding:  Verygracious of the prince … probably best for his monarchy, too.

Bahrain’s crown prince on Sunday declined an invitation to attend Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding, saying he did not want the Gulf nation’s unrest to tarnish the celebration.

Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa sent his regrets to Prince Charles after questions emerged over the British monarchy’s decision to invite a member of Bahrain’s Sunni ruling family, which has waged a wide-ranging crackdown against Shiite protesters calling for more freedoms.

Bahrain’s rulers have imposed martial law and are backed by a Saudi-led military force to try to quell the uprising. At least 30 people have died in Bahrain since mid-February, including four who died while in official custody, and many well-known activists and lawyers have been imprisoned.

The news helped to avoid a potentially awkward situation during the April 29 wedding. Campaigners in Britain complained when palace officials said Saturday that the prince was attending the nuptials, and some petitioned Foreign Secretary William Hague to revoke the invitation.

via Bahrain Crown Prince Declines Royal Wedding Invite – NYTimes.com.

random acts of violence, follow-up, Robert  Barber, FPC, obituary:  Mr. Barber was a member of FPC.  I did not know him or his wife, but his absence was felt at Easter worship today.

He and Barber were both retired colonels – a “couple of old military guys,” he said.

“We’d walk down the hallway, and I’d say, ‘You know, Bob, we’re in step,'” he said, laughing. “Old habits die hard.”

Brown and Barber were both members of the Rotary Club of Charlotte, where Brown said Barber took minutes and compiled newsletters.

“This man had not missed a Rotary meeting in 15 years,” Brown said.

He said Barber was devoted to his church, First Presbyterian in uptown, his profession and his family.

At work, Barber had a reputation as a skilled professional who could easily connect with his co-workers.

“He would work 80 hours a week if it meant turning around a community hospital,” Brown said.

Outside of work, Barber had many interests, including muscle cars, motorcycles and genealogy, Brown said.

“I think I’ve only known a couple of people in my life I’d consider Renaissance men,” Brown said. “Bob was one of them.”

via Witness heard victim’s lament after shooting | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

 art, graphic art, Maira Kalman:  Maira’s take on the British war poster …

Keep Calm And Carry On | anything goes.

Maira Kalman, art, TED videosMaira Kalman | Profile on TED.com.

art, graphic art, Maira Kalman, interview: I just like this woman …

Are there places or things you avoid because they sap your creativity?

I avoid malls. They are deadly.

via Inspiration Boards: Maira Kalman.

computer art, math, Davidson College, Tim Chartier, random:

Tim Chartier at Davidson College has discovered that if you make things out of candy there’s no lack of volunteers to help you clean up. He takes images and transforms them mathematically into arrays of candy pieces. Here you can see President Obama, as rounded to the set of m&m color values. Mathematically, the algorithm picks the available color which is closest in red-green-blue-space to the average of the pixels it replaces.

via Make: Online | Math Monday: Candy Images.

Also see Math Movement – Sugar-coated CoM&Mander-in-Chief.

20
Apr
11

4.20.2011 … with two boys in Boulder 4/20 is not my favorite day …

4/20, Boulder, CU:

In Boulder, April flowers not only bring May showers, but also clouds of marijuana smoke over the Norlin Library Quad on 4/20 at 4:20 p.m. Though this event attracts a large group, reactions and views are mixed.

Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws in Washington, D.C., released a letter on 4/20 in 2010, where he referred to these nationwide smoke-outs as “protestivals” happening across the country.

via 4/20 perspectives | CU Independent.

4/20, LOL:  A few more sites for those of you who are just learning about 4/20 (that would be me until Jack went to Boulder …)  Stoner Lingo Decoded: The Super High History of 420 – TIME NewsFeed. … Welcome to Potopia – Newsweek … and a joke ….

When Parents Text

Happy 4/20!

ME: How come harry potter fans dont get a name?! there are trekkies and twihards.

MOM: Pot heads.

via Facebook.

movies, film/lit, The Help:  I hope I respond better to the movie.  My objection to the book is that the author casts a very wide net of condemnation … and I don’t think things were quite so black and white.  But I will definitely go to the movie.  The Help Trailer Released – GalleyCat.

Ayn Rand, politics, Davidson:  I am getting tired of Ayn Rand.  I have some friends who became Randists in college  … it wasn’t pretty. Definitely don’t need a Randist element in the GOP, but obviously we already have it.

Welcome to the Ayn Rand Congress. As I write in a piece for the April 25 issue of the dead-tree magazine, “Rand has always been a lodestar for proponents of limited government.” But never so much as now. Conservative commentators like Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck herald her work. Tea Partyers hoist signs that name-check her literary heroes. Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee chair and GOP man of the moment, has passed out Rand’s novels to staffers and called her the reason he got into politics. Rand’s theory of a two-tiered society — split between the “producers” who shoulder society’s burdens and the “looters” who mooch off their efforts — is one of the strains of thought that animate the Tea Party movement, along with free markets (check), individual liberty (check) and limited government (check). Strands of Rand’s objectivist philosophy are woven through most of Congress’s weighty debates about tax rates and regulations (Alan Greenspan was a Rand protégé), wage scales and social-welfare programs. The 112th Congress has been dominated by apocalyptic debates over fiscal policy; in the last line of Atlas Shrugged, John Galt traces a dollar sign “over the desolate earth.” You could argue that the essential confrontation of this Congress is not between Democrats and Republicans but between people who see income inequality as a major social problem and those who consider it a natural byproduct of an equal-opportunity society.

via Rand Paul Cites Tea Party Prophet Ayn Rand in Congress | Swampland.

news, Fidel Castro:  My generation grew up with classmates whose parents had fled Cuba; I don’t think I ever got what had happened … It is a strange part of our North American/US history … the Cold War and Communism at our back door.

News that Fidel Castro has resigned from the Central Committee of Cuba’s Communist Party isn’t very surprising — slowed by chronic health problems, the 84-year-old has effectively been out of political life since passing over the reins to his brother Raul in 2006. He now looks more familiar to us in a loose track suit than his once iconic military fatigues. (See a terrific photoessay of the Cuban rebels in the jungle over a half century ago.) TIME was there, though, when the bearded revolutionary ousted Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. After the jump: an excerpt from TIME’s gripping Jan. 26, 1959 cover story on Castro’s rise to power.

via Fidel Castro Steps Down from Cuba’s Communist Party Central Committee – Global Spin – TIME.com.

careers, listsFive Best Job Search Sites.

tv, food television shows, lists:  They say we are cooking less and watching food shows more !  Ten food television shows you should be watching – chicagotribune.com.

culture, Tax Day, statistics:  The only thing I get is that we are spending more than we are taking in …

There’s a movement afoot to mail every taxpayer a “taxpayer receipt,” a breakdown of how the government spends its money. The goal is to educate people about where their taxes go, since Americans are famously unaware about such matters.

But as long as we’re talking about educating Americans about fiscal policy, why not start with what they actually pay in taxes, and what they earn, relative to their fellow Americans?

I am constantly amazed by how little Americans know about where they stand in the income and taxing distribution. The latest example is evident in a recent Gallup study, which found that 6 percent of Americans in households earning over $250,000 a year think their taxes are “too low.” Of that same group, 26 percent said their taxes were “about right,” and a whopping 67 percent said their taxes were “too high.”

via Rich People Still Don’t Realize They’re Rich – NYTimes.com.

green, wind farms:  A while back I noted seeing the wind farm in the English Channel, it was an amazing sight.  It will be interesting to view one off our coast.

A federal agency approved a construction and operations plan for the Cape Wind project off the Massachusetts coast, clearing the way for work to begin on America’s first offshore wind farm as early as this fall, Interior Secretary Kenneth Salazar announced Tuesday.

Approval by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement was required before construction of the proposed 130-turbine wind farm in Nantucket Sound could get under way.A

via Mass. offshore wind farm approved; Nation’s 1st – CBS News.

art, the law:  This is one combination I was not expecting … “rediscovering art through law.”

Legal Art Gallery » GALLERY.

cars:  I always loved seeing a mini or micro as a child.  Since the intro of the mini cooper they really are no big deal to the current generation …  the vintage ones are down right comical.

Mini- and Micro-Cars Coming To New York Auto Show – Speakeasy – WSJ.

romance, blog posts, Jane Austen: I have followed Cheryl for several years … love her fiance’s proposal.  Oh, to be young again!

And with such a prospect before me, dear reader, I said yes!

The two gentlemen in costume were friends of James’s, unknown to me; James wrote the scripts with all the Jane Austen references to please me, featuring characters with defects (greed and vanity) that would highlight his own suit in turn–“classic literary foils,” he says. He rented the costumes for them from a shop in Midtown.

via Brooklyn Arden.

blog sites, favorites:  Delancey Place is quickly becoming a favorite.

… very simply a brief daily email with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context. There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, primarily historical in focus, and will occasionally be controversial. Finally, we hope that the selections will resonate beyond the subject of the book from which they were excerpted.

via home | www.delanceyplace.com | eclectic excerpts delivered to your email every day from editor Richard Vague.

137th Kentucky Derby, Louisville places, events:  It almost time for Derby delirium!  Triple Crown Talk | Derby Delirium | BloodHorse.com Blog Stable.

Google, Google Places:  Trying to figure if this would be useful … Google Places.

health, medicines, lists:  Any surprises here? Chart of the Day: The Top 15 Prescription Drugs in America – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic.

DanielPink, acronoym:  I have to admit I never heard of  TANSTAFL, but it is true …

Daniel Pink

RT @markknoller: Obama quotes old saying acronym TANSTAFL (tahn’-stah-fil): “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.”

via (31) Twitter / Home.

10
Feb
11

2.10.2011 … I am off to a festival … festival of legal learning at UNC … whooppee!

faith and spirituality:  Really liked this post by Brene Brown.

As I look around at the political and social struggle around us, I’m reminded of my own struggle to find/reclaim faith in my life. As a lover of all things certain, I wanted faith to work like an epidural; to numb the pain of vulnerability. As it turned out, my faith ended up being more like a midwife – a nurturing partner who leans into the discomfort with me and whispers “push” and “breathe.”

Faith didn’t make my life less vulnerable, it simply offered to travel with me through the uncertainty.

via faith, doubt and inspiration – my blog – Ordinary Courage.

Egypt Uprising:  Makes you think …

In a region where the truth and truth-tellers have so long been smothered under the crushing weight of oil, autocracy and religious obscurantism, suddenly the Arab world has a truly free space — a space that Egyptians themselves, not a foreign army, have liberated — and the truth is now gushing out of here like a torrent from a broken hydrant.

And the this is a titanic struggle and negotiation between the tired but still powerful, top-down 1952 Egyptian Army-led revolution and a vibrant, new, but chaotic, 2011, people-led revolution from the bottom-up — which has no guns but enormous legitimacy. I hope the Tahrir Square protesters can get organized enough to negotiate a new constitution with the army. There will be setbacks. But whatever happens, they have changed Egypt.

After we walked from Tahrir Square across the Nile bridge, Professor Mamoun Fandy remarked to me that there is an old Egyptian poem that says: “ ‘The Nile can bend and turn, but what is impossible is that it would ever dry up.’ The same is true of the river of freedom that is loose here now. Maybe you can bend it for a while, or turn it, but it is not going to dry up.”

via Speakers’ Corner on the Nile – NYTimes.com.

quotes, pity quotes, Julia Child:  Love this old article/interview with Julia Child!

The problem with the world right now is that we don’t have any politicians like Roosevelt or Churchill to give us meaning and depth. We don’t have anyone who’s speaking for the great and the true and the noble. What we need now is a heroic type, someone who could rally the people to higher deeds. I don’t know what’s to become of us.

via Julia Child Interview – Eating Healthy and Smart – Quotes about Diets – Esquire.

Gabrielle Giffords, recovery, miracles:

Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords has recovered enough from a bullet to the brain to ask for toast with breakfast.

Few details are available, but Pia Carusone, Giffords’ chief of staff, confirmed that the congresswoman made the verbal request on Monday when hospital workers at TIRR Memorial Hermann brought her a meal.

“The doctors say she is recovering at lightning speed considering her injury but they aren’t kidding when they say this is a marathon process,” Kelly wrote on Facebook. “There are encouraging signs every day, though.”

via Giffords speaks, asking for toast with breakfast – U.S. news – msnbc.com.

health care:  But Gabrielle Giffords costs are fully covered … many are not so fortunate.

What is clear, however, is that her care at one of the country’s top five rehab sites will be paid for through a federal workers compensation program, providing essentially unlimited time and money to help her regain cognitive, physical and social functions.

“What she’s needed, she’s gotten,” said Pia Carusone, Giffords’ chief of staff, who confirmed to msnbc.com that Giffords’ care after the Jan. 8 attack that killed six and injured 13 will be treated as a workplace injury.

via Brain injury victims struggle to find care – U.S. news – msnbc.com.

restaurants, farm-to-table, Boulder, Salt:  Add Salt to my Boulder list …

In every bite of a dish from Salt, one can taste a medley of flavors that impart more than just the delight of a quality, flavorful meal, but also a dedication to sustaining the ecology and businesses of Boulder.

Salt is one of the few restaurants in America that has fully immersed itself in the culture of farm-to-table dining, a culinary approach in which restaurants (and family kitchens) get their products from nearby farms, ranches and vendors, instead of ordering them from a corporate third party.

“The term farm-to-table is the shortest distance, the fewest hands, that it takes to get a vegetable from the ground to the table,” said Kevin Kidd, the executive chef at Salt. “It’s the farmer selling it and it going directly to the chef.”

Kidd said the benefits of farm-to-table dining go beyond a kitchen filled with fresh food, but also contribute to a sustainable environment and localized economy.

via From farm to table | CU Independent.

city v. country, culture, people watching:

Living in a rural setting exposes you to so many marvellous things—the natural world and the particular texture of small-town life, and the exhilarating experience of open space. I wish there were some way you could have all that and still be reminded of the wild array that we humans are. Instead, it seems like you can watch birds or people, but not both.

via Free Range: On the Wing : The New Yorker.

Egypt Uprising, Wael Ghonim:

In an exclusive interview with CNN, Ghonim also said it is “no longer the time to negotiate” with the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

“There’s a lot of blood now” that has been spilled, he said.

Ghonim played a key role in organizing the protests that have convulsed Egypt for more than two weeks. He was the administrator of a Facebook page that is widely credited with calling the first protest January 25.

“This is not about me,” he said several times during an hour-long and emotional interview in a relative’s Cairo apartment..

He conceded that President Hosni Mubarak has “sacrificed a lot” for Egypt but said the 82-year-old leader represents a system that needs to be replaced. He demanded that Mubarak’s ruling National Democratic Party be immediately dissolved. He also said, though, that Mubarak should be treated with dignity.

via Egyptian Google exec is ‘ready to die’ for change – CNN.com.

Apps, tv, Bones: So an App to enhance my tv watching of Bones … Of course I will try it, but I did not enjoy tweeting and tv-watching so I probably will not like this.

It’s the Bones hook-up we’ve been waiting for!

In an effort to enhance fans’ viewing experience, Fox has launched the Bones Show Companion, a new iPad app that will automatically synchronize with the current episode as its broadcast in each time zone to provide content that is both wholly unique and pretty freakin’ cool.

via Scoop: Fox Launches Bones App – TVLine.

cookbooks, comic books:  Funny … I think I can figure it out without the graphics!

According to the Strong Buzz, Amanda Cohen, the chef/owner of Dirt Candy, has signed a deal with publisher Clarkson Potter to create a cookbook disguised as a graphic novel.

via The Cookbook as Comic Book | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

random, history, food, foodies: Just read it …

THE ROMAN HISTORIAN Livy famously regarded the glorification of chefs as the sign of a culture in decline. I wonder what he would have thought of The New York Times’ efforts to admit “young idols with cleavers” into America’s pantheon of food-service heroes.

With their swinging scabbards, muscled forearms and constant proximity to flesh, butchers have the raw, emotional appeal of an indie band … “Think about it. What’s sexy?” said Tia Keenan, the fromager at Casellula Cheese and Wine Café and an unabashed butcher fan. “Dangerous is sometimes sexy, and they are generally big guys with knives who are covered in blood.”

That’s Severson again, by the way, and she records no word of dissent in regard to the cheese vendor’s ravings. We are to believe this is a real national trend here. In fact the public perception of butchers has not changed in the slightest, as can easily be confirmed by telling someone that he or she looks like one. “Blankly as a butcher stares,” Auden’s famous line about the moon, will need no explanatory footnote even a century from now.

Whether gluttony is a deadly sin is of course for the religious to decide, and I hope they go easy on the foodies; they’re not all bad. They are certainly single-minded, however, and single-mindedness—even in less obviously selfish forms—is always a littleness of soul.

via The Moral Crusade Against Foodies – Magazine – The Atlantic.

statistics, economics, men v. women:  We still have a long way to go, baby!

Young women are outpacing men in educational attainment and there’s little sign males will make up ground any time soon.

Nearly one in four women had earned a bachelor’s degree by the time they reached age 23, compared to just one in seven men, the Labor Department said Wednesday. And while a growing share of professions are expected to require a college education in the future, men don’t appear poised to make up the education gap.

via Women Likely to Continue Outpacing Men in Education – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

random, Apps, faith and spirituality:

A new application being sold on iTunes, “Confession: a Roman Catholic App,” cannot be used as a substitute for confession with a priest, the Vatican said Wednesday. The application was developed by American entrepreneurs with the help of two priests and the blessing of a bishop. It features a questionnaire of sins, and is promoted as a tool both to revive interest in confession and to help Catholics prepare for the sacrament. But some media reports cast the app as a “virtual priest” for Catholics who do not have time for church, prompting the Rev. Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman, to respond, “One cannot speak in any way of ‘confession by iPhone.’ ”

via App Can’t Replace Confession, Vatican Says – NYTimes.com.

Bless me father for I have sinned. It has been 300 tweets since my last confession.

Whether you’ve been “borrowing” free Wi-Fi or coveting your neighbor’s avatar — or, heaven forbid, something worse — a new mobile app is designed to help you atone for it.

Lame tech jokes aside, the makers of “Confession: A Roman Catholic App” say their software is seriously designed to help believers with the sacrament, and to help those who have left the church take a digital step back home.

Worry not, faithful Catholics: The $1.99 application, for the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, is not intended to replace the confessional. Instead, it’s designed to complement the act of confession, offering a “personal examination of conscience” (password-protected, of course) and a step-by-step guide to sin-confessing.

via New app helps Catholics confess on the go – CNN.com.

faith and spirituality, Christianity, culture: Very interesting article …

More and more Christians choose a church not on the basis of its denomination, but on the basis of more practical matters. Is the nursery easy to find? Do I like the music? Are there support groups for those grappling with addiction?

This trend is a natural extension of the American evangelical experiment. After all, evangelicalism is about the fundamental message of Christianity—the evangel, the gospel, literally the “good news” of God’s kingdom arriving in Jesus Christ—not about denomination building.

If denominationalism simply denotes a “brand” vying for market share, then let denominationalism fall. But many of us believe denominations can represent fidelity to living traditions of local congregations that care about what Jesus cared about—personal conversion, discipleship, mission and community. Perhaps the denominational era has just begun.

via Russell D. Moore: Where Have All the Presbyterians Gone? – WSJ.com.

health, health care, globalization, technology, history:  A little history of epidemics and a modern-day use of technology to help detect new viruses …

That’s why it’s so welcome to see the launch of the new Predict project, an online mapping tool that will allow scientists to track outbreaks of animals diseases that could threaten human beings. Funded by the U. S. Agency for International Development (USAID) — and led by a group of institutions, including the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the innovative new Global Viral Forecasting Initiative (GVFI) — the system will monitor data from World Health Organization alerts, news reports, online message boards for epidemiologists, to create a digital map of where animal outbreaks are occurring around the world and where they might threaten human beings.

The consortium was put together in 2009, during the H1N1 pandemic, and the hope is that a better information tracking system will help scientists avoid being caught off guard. As Damien Joly of the WCS told the New York Times:

We strongly believe in public access to the data we collect. It doesn’t do public health much good to collect data and let it sit while it awaits publication.

The Predict tool (download a PDF about the project here) is just the latest indication that the global human health community is finally beginning to take animal disease seriously. That hasn’t always been the case — just compare the vast World Health Organization to its relatively tiny animal counterpart, the World Organization for Animal Health. But nearly 75% of all new, emerging or reemerging diseases affecting human beings in the 21st century originated in animals, including HIV/AIDS, SARS and influenza.

What’s needed is a “one health” approach of the sort pioneered by Nathan Wolfe of the GFVI, who patrols areas in the deep developing world where humans and animals closely overlap. We may not be able to stop the next flu pandemic or new emerging disease as it passed from animals to human beings — but we should know when it happens.

via USAID’s Predict Tool Will Help Scientists Keep Track of Animal Disease Outbreaks—and Protect People – TIME Healthland.

college, heart-strings, Wake Forest University, kudos: What a great story … kudos, Coach Walter!

Wake Forest baseball coach Tom Walter has donated a kidney to a freshman player who suffers from a disease that can lead to kidney failure.

Both Walter and outfielder Kevin Jordan were recovering Tuesday in an Atlanta hospital one day after the transplant was performed.

“For us, it’s almost like it’s been divine intervention,” Jordan’s father Keith told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Tuesday from Atlanta.

Dr. Kenneth Newell, the lead surgeon on the team that removed Walter’s kidney, said in a statement issued Tuesday by Wake Forest that he expects Walter and Jordan to recover fully.

The school says the recovery time for both the 42-year-old Walter and Jordan is expected to be several months. Walter said it will be two months before he is back to normal. Keith Jordan says his son could swing a bat again in 6-8 weeks, and he expects Kevin to enroll in summer school in June and prepare for the fall semester.

via Baseball Coach Donates Kidney to Star Player – CBS News.

quotes, happiness quotes:

“Love takes up where knowledge leaves off.” Saint Thomas Aquinas

via Twitter / @DailyLit: “Love takes up where knowl ….

Davidson College, literature: Sounds interesting.

For his latest novel, Davidson College’s Alan Michael Parker got a big helping of inspiration from The Home Depot.

Parker’s new literary comedy, “Whale Man” (WordFarm; $18), is about a guy who builds a life-sized wooden whale on his mother’s front lawn.

via Davidson professor’s new novel is a whale of a tale – CharlotteObserver.com.

green:

How it works? The station’s ventilation system includes heat exchangers that convert all that excess warmth into hot water. That water is then pumped to the nearby building, where it reportedly reduces energy costs by as much as 25 percent.

via Commuters’ surplus body heat used to warm office building – Springwise.

food, food regulation:  The incredible edible egg is better, but still not incredible.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced Tuesday that in its routine reevaluations of the nutritional content of foods, it discovered that domestic chicken eggs — which hadn’t been looked at since 2002 — has had something of a nutritional makeover.

Compared with the egg of 2002, the current-day egg has 14% less cholesterol and 64% more vitamin D. A large egg now has 185 mg of cholesterol and 41 IU of Vitamin D, down from 212 mg of cholesterol and up from 18 IU of Vitamin D. It also still contains 70 calories and 6 g of protein. (More on TIME.com: Is School Lunch Making Your Kids Fat?)

via The Updated Egg: Less Cholesterol, But Is It a ‘Healthy’ Food? – TIME Healthland.

The President, USA, high-speed rail:  This may be worthy of federal money in my opinion … may.

U.S. passenger trains are, quite simply, a global laughingstock. Most of them travel at speeds that were common a century ago. Meanwhile, bullet trains have been zipping around Western Europe and East Asia for years, China is building more high-speed rail than the rest of the world combined, and even countries like Morocco and Brazil are getting into the game. “It works everywhere else in the world,” says Alstom Transport vice president Chuck Wochele, whose French firm is one of 30 train manufacturers that have pledged to build or expand U.S. factories if they land high-speed contracts. “Unfortunately, it’s been politicized in the U.S.”

via High-Speed Rail: Obama Pledges $53 Billion for Upgrades – TIME.

quotes, happiness quotes:

“Whoever is happy will make others happy too.”

— Anne Frank

via The Happiness Project, Moment of Happiness. Gretchen Rubin.

quotes, random, LOL:

NCIS rerun quote: “Love means never having to read her her Miranda rights.” – Abbie 🙂

via NCIS rerun quote:….

10
Dec
10

12.10.2010 … pets are loving this cold weather and their weak master!

you have got to be kidding:  Christian Extremist Group to Picket Elizabeth Edwards Funeral.

tv, culture, holidays, Christmas:  I just watched this and I have to admit I wasn’t sure what the message was.  At the most basic level, it is saying that Christmas is a cultural holiday, not a religious holiday.  Community – Abed’s Uncontrollable Christmas – Video – NBC.com.

holidays, Christmas, Atlanta, Louisville:  Pink pig in Atlanta!!  A Christmas Carol and glassblowing ornaments in Louisville … two of my favorite towns made the list.  Best Southern Christmas Vacations – Photos – SouthernLiving.com.

fast food, KFC, Africa:  Having been to South Africa, KFC is everywhere … even in very small villages.  So this was very ineresting to read.

Of the roughly one billion people in Africa, KFC estimates it currently reaches 180 million.

When McDonald’s Corp. arrived in South Africa in the mid-1990s, KFC worried about the impact the burger giant would have on its business. So KFC began opening new restaurants and remodeling existing ones to make them more modern. By the early 2000s, KFC had about 300 restaurants in South Africa.

KFC quickly outpaced McDonald’s, which has fewer than 200 restaurants in Africa. With more than 600 KFCs in South Africa now, the chicken chain has a 44% share of that country’s $1.8 billion fast-food market, followed by South African chain Nando’s, with 6%, and McDonald’s and the local Chicken Licken, each with a 5% share.

“The KFC brand is highly aspirational in Africa. People will save up to buy the $3 meal, even if only once every three months,” Mr. Warren says.

KFC sells chicken more cheaply in South Africa than most parts of the world because local labor costs are lower and chicken suppliers don’t charge as much, partly because South Africa is a major producer of corn to feed the birds.

via KFC Savors Potential in Africa – WSJ.com.

Boulder, kudos, superlatives: Boulder … smartest city … who would have thunk it.

Colorado was the only state to take two spots in the top 10. The smartest city, Boulder, is home to the University of Colorado, which probably explains the high proportion of degree holders. Five out of every six people in Boulder have attended college. Many other top-ranked schools are college towns; Ann Arbor, Mich. is home to the University of Michigan, Durham, N.C. is home to Duke, and Washington has a handful of universities within city limits.

via Where Are America’s Smartest Cities? – TIME NewsFeed.

politics, Constitutional law, Bush v. Gore,The Supreme Court:

This month marks ten years since the Court, by a vote of five-to-four, terminated the election of 2000 and delivered the Presidency to George W. Bush. Over that decade, the Justices have provided a verdict of sorts on Bush v. Gore by the number of times they have cited it: zero.

Momentous Supreme Court cases tend to move quickly into the slipstream of the Court’s history. In the first ten years after Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 decision that ended the doctrine of separate but equal in public education, the Justices cited the case more than twenty-five times. In the ten years after Roe v. Wade, the abortion-rights decision of 1973, there were more than sixty-five references to that landmark. This month marks ten years since the Court, by a vote of five-to-four, terminated the election of 2000 and delivered the Presidency to George W. Bush. Over that decade, the Justices have provided a verdict of sorts on Bush v. Gore by the number of times they have cited it: zero.

But the least we can expect from these men and women is that at politically charged moments—indeed, especially at those times—they apply the same principles that guide them in everyday cases. This, ultimately, is the tragedy of Bush v. Gore. The case didn’t just scar the Court’s record; it damaged the Court’s honor.

via The ten-year anniversary of Bush v. Gore : The New Yorker.

The five who came down on that side: Chief Justice William Rehnquist and justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas.

Scalia has become known for telling those who object to what the court did to “get over it.” Toobin argues in The New Yorker’s latest issue that the decision “didn’t just scar the court’s record, it damaged the court’s honor.”

via 10 Years Later: Was The Supreme Court Right On ‘Bush V. Gore’? : The Two-Way : NPR.

 

Steph Curry, NBA, Davidson basketball:  Heal fully, Steph.  I’ll wait til next year to se see you play …

While X-rays showed no fracture and a subsequent MRI showed no torn ligaments, this is the fourth major sprain of Curry’s ankle this season, the San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News report. Curry was carried of the floor by teammates and may miss an extended period of time, according to the reports. He is listed as doubtful for Friday’s game against Miami.

via Stephen Curry injured; Radmanovic calls on teammates to practice harder – NBA – Sporting News.

 

31
Oct
10

‎10.31.2010 … Happy Halloween … fed my soul at worship … fed by body at Amelie’s …

Halloween, holidays, google doodle :  Happy Halloween!  Gotta love the Scooby Doo Halloween doodle!

travel, restaurants, places, Boulder: A few more suggestions … my boys went to Pizzeria Basta and absolutely loved it.  Next time …

Boulder has won just about every shiny happy lifestyle award a city can: Healthiest, Most Educated, Most Bicycle-Friendly—the list goes on. And this year, it can add one more: Bon Appétit’s Foodiest Town in America.

… I have more questions to ask him, but I have to stop and walk. Finally, a pint of Left Hand Brewing Company lager and a few pizzas (one with house-made sausage and mozzarella and another with seasonal local potatoes and goat cheese) from Pizzeria Basta come to the rescue.

via America’s Foodiest Town 2010: Boulder, Colorado.

Davidson, kudos:  Dr. Murphy gave a very inspiring talk at Davidson’s convocation yesterday.

A Davidson College alumnus who organized a medical mission to Haiti following the Jan. 12 earthquake will speak at the college’s fall convocation Oct. 30.

Dr. Greg Murphy, a 1985 graduate who now works as an urologist and general surgeon in Greenville, N.C., has conducted short-term medical missions in developing countries for 20 years. But Murphy said he never seen such a dire situation as Haiti, and two weeks after the quake, he and 15 other medical personnel he recruited began seeing patients at St. Damien Hospital in Port-au-Prince.

via Physician who served in Haiti speaking at Davidson convocation | Huntersville Herald.

technology, the Cloud: Coming next …

Moving beyond mere Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), the company is positioning Windows Azure as a Platform-as-a-Service offering: a comprehensive set of development tools, services, and management systems to allow developers to concentrate on creating available, scalable applications.

Over the next 12-18 months, a raft of new functionality will be rolled out to Windows Azure customers. These features will both make it easier to move existing applications into the cloud, and enhance the services available to cloud-hosted applications.

The company believes that putting applications into the cloud will often be a multistage process. Initially, the applications will run unmodified, which will remove patching and maintenance burdens, but not take advantage of any cloud-specific functionality.

Over time, the applications will be updated and modified to start to take advantage of some of the additional capabilities that the Windows Azure platform has to offer.

Microsoft is building Windows Azure into an extremely complete cloud platform. Windows Azure currently takes quite a high-level approach to cloud services: applications have limited access to the underlying operating system, and software that requires Administrator installation isn’t usable.

via Future of Windows Azure — platform is the service – CNN.com.

food, restaurants, Charlotte: Amelie’s Bakery was very good!  Charlotte NC :: Amelie’s French Bakery :: Amelie’s French Bakery and Cafe.

tv, movies, James Bond: ‎… Bond Weekend on TNT … What more could a girl want … (followup — so far I have only watched 2)

facebook, internet, religion, things past, Westminster:  Friday I asked Westminster friends on FB if they remember reading/watching Francis Schaeffer’s How then Should We Live in Christian Ethics senior year?  The answers varied … from we had senior ethics? … to  memories of other books we read , memories of the teachers (cute Mr. Trotter, Mrs. Eastham) and papers written … No one else remembers watching the videos … Do you remember them?  YouTube – How Should We Then Live 10#1.

lists:  I like lists … but I can see why Ebert doesn’t.  Why Roger Ebert Loathes Top 10 Film Lists – WSJ.com.

history, literature: Bill Wood referenced Girolamo Savonarola and the 15th century “bonfire of the vanities.”  I really hate it when I have completely missed a literary reference.

Girolamo Savonarola (21 September 1452, Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna – 23 May 1498, Florence) was an Italian Dominican priest and leader of Florence from 1494 until his execution in 1498. He was known for his book burning, destruction of what he considered immoral art, and hostility to the Renaissance. He vehemently preached against the moral corruption of much of the clergy at the time, and his main opponent was Rodrigo Borgia, who was Pope Alexander VI from 1492, through Savonarola’s death, to 1503.

via Girolamo Savonarola.

After Charles VIII of France invaded Florence in 1494, the ruling Medici were overthrown and Savonarola emerged as the new leader of the city, combining in himself the role of secular leader and priest. He set up a republic in Florence. Characterizing it as a “Christian and religious Republic,” one of its first acts was to make sodomy, previously punishable by fine, into a capital offence. Homosexuality had previously been tolerated in the city, and many homosexuals from the elite now chose to leave Florence. His chief enemies were the Duke of Milan and Pope Alexander VI, who issued numerous restraints against him, all of which were ignored.

Painting of Savonarola’s execution in the Piazza della Signoria.

In 1497, he and his followers carried out the Bonfire of the Vanities. They sent boys from door to door collecting items associated with moral laxity: mirrors, cosmetics, lewd pictures, pagan books, immoral sculptures (which he wanted to be transformed into statues of the saints and modest depictions of biblical scenes), gaming tables, chess pieces, lutes and other musical instruments, fine dresses, women’s hats, and the works of immoral and ancient poets, and burnt them all in a large pile in the Piazza della Signoria of Florence.[2] Many fine Florentine Renaissance artworks were lost in Savonarola’s notorious bonfires — including paintings by Sandro Botticelli, which he is alleged to have thrown into the fires himself.[3]

Florence soon became tired of Savonarola because of the city’s continual political and economic miseries partially derived from Savonarola’s opposition to trading and making money. When a Franciscan preacher challenged him to a trial by fire in the city centre and he declined, his following began to dissipate.

During his Ascension Day sermon on May 4, 1497, bands of youths rioted, and the riot became a revolt: dancing and singing taverns reopened, and men again dared to gamble publicly.

via Girolamo Savonarola – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

As a metaphor, Tom Wolfe used the 15th century event and ritual as the title for his 1987 novel The Bonfire of the Vanities and its film adaptation.

via Bonfire of the Vanities – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

education, literature, film/lit:  Sometimes it is the really odd classes that stay with a preson their whole life.

Students in the course write essays and blog about such movies as 28 Days Later and Night of the Living Dead and books such as the Jane Austen send-up, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith.

“The course looks at what fears about society and ideology are expressed in zombie fiction,” Rivers says, “such as becoming part of a society where the individual ceases to exist, or what zombies, who persuade us to become them by consuming us, have to say about persuasion and identification.”

One student, Rohit Mukherjee (NHS’12), wrote about how in movies and books, zombies kill people just because they are different.

“At our core, we possess the same force of destruction as the zombie masses,” Mukherjee wrote. “No virus led the Hutu masses to hack their Tutsi neighbors to death … their rage was intrinsic.”

via Georgetown University: Students Attack Tough Subjects Through Zombies.

museums, NYC:  I would like to see this museum one day …

McKim Building Reopening

The Morgan’s landmark 1906 building by McKim, Mead and White closed in early June for the first extensive restoration of its interior spaces in more than one hundred years. The building will reopen to the public on Saturday, October 30 with a full slate of special activities and we invite you to join us to mark the occasion.

The afternoon’s festivities will begin with a welcome and talk about the McKim building project and the Morgan collections by director William M. Griswold. Throughout the day, musicians, including the New-Trad Octet, a New Orleans-style band exploring the roots of early American music, will perform. Docents will be on hand to provide visitors with historical insight into the Morgan’s architecture. All events are included with admission to the Morgan.

via The Morgan Library & Museum – Public Programs – McKim Building Reopening.

08
Oct
10

10.8.2010 … lunch with friend … then visit family for the weekend … hope fall weather continues … think pink …

random, party ideas, re-invention, Davidson:  I heard of having the old-fashioned photo booth at weddings and parties, but this is the first one I have seen … fun idea!

Think Pink:  Well, it is silly … but now everyone on FB knows that October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and while breast cancer is most certainly a disease worthy of awareness and fund-raising, sometimes attempts at raising awareness are a little… peculiar.

Remember last year’s Facebook campaign where all of your lady friends suddenly had status updates like “Black,” “Red,” or “Polka dots” and no one had any clue what was up? Oh, but then word got around that the updates were the bra colors of choice and the updates were meant to pique interest of those left out of the joke (read: males) in order to raise awareness about breast cancer. Um, ok?

While the logic of the trend didn’t quite connect–does titillating (no pun intended) men lead to cancer awareness? Or does it just titillate men?–it did raise a lot of speculation for a few days and at least the updates were breast-related.

(See TIME.com’s Faces of Breast Cancer.)

This year’s Facebook awareness mission, however, is even more unusual.

You may have noticed several status updates in the past few days with phrases such as “I like it on the couch,” or “I like it on the floor.” These status updates aren’t referencing creative places the updater likes to, well, you know. Instead these locations are the places that the updater likes to keep their… purse.

Seriously.

But by updating their status with such a mysteriously evocative statement, women are, um, arousing attention to the breast cancer campaign. Right?

To reiterate, there is nothing wrong with campaigning for breast cancer awareness (or any disease, for that matter). In fact, quite the opposite is true–the effects of successful campaigning for the disease has led to a significant reduction in the disease. Yet what exactly does provocatively saying where you like to keep your purse have to do with a horrible disease that has challenged millions of lives?

So as well-intentioned as some of these updates might be, they seem a little misguided. My guess is that interest in breast cancer isn’t exactly what you’ll be piquing.

via Breast Cancer Awareness: “I Like It On My Status Update” – TIME NewsFeed.

… and byt the way … “I like it on the kitchen table … I must remember that … I am very inconsistent.” via Facebook | Dennard Lindsey Teague.

culture:  I just got rid of two today!

Still trying to squeeze into those size 8 jeans or that sea foam bridesmaid dress from your cousin’s wedding back in 1997? Ladies, it might be time to clear out your wardrobe. A recent U.K. study found the average woman has 12 items of clothing worth $459 gathering dust in their closet because they are either too big or too small for them to wear, reports the Telegraph. That’s a total of $8.5 billion worth of clothes waiting for the day when they might fit again.

via Study: Women Own 12 Ill-Fitting Outfits – TIME NewsFeed.

blog, history: Intersting post in a blog I have been following.

Appropriately, therefore, we start with a football shirt.

Football – or association football to give it its proper title – may have evolved on the public school fields of nineteenth century Britain, but today it’s a global giant.

We live in a world more connected than at any other time in history and what else unites disparate, discrete and geographically remote parts of the world in the same way as football? Go anywhere and you could probably find someone who’ll discuss with you not just the game itself, but teams and people playing it on the other side of the world.

But this isn’t just any football shirt: it bears the name of Didier Drogba, an African who grew up in France and whose skills have led to his global fame. Through television, radio, magazines, billboard posters, the Internet, Drogba’s face and tremendously gifted feet are known the world over. And Didier plays for Chelsea, a team based in London and owned by a Russian.

via BBC – A History of the World.

random, community service, kith/kin:  A freind sent me this about a creative project in the Black Belt region of Alabama …

More significant, it seemed to work in the Black Belt, a region that a New York Times writer, in the days before the cotton economy went bust, described as a “garden of slavery.” Poverty rates may register higher in other counties in the region, and racial disparities have proved wider, but Hale County has long been the Black Belt’s front porch. Hale was where James Agee and Walker Evans drew their famed portrait of Depression-era tenant farmer life, “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men,” a book that has served as a primary text for students of rural America in the decades since. And Hale was where Samuel Mockbee and D. K. Ruth established the Rural Studio, a design-and-build program for Auburn University architecture students, focused on creating high-concept, low-cost homes for indigent residents. Don’t be “house pets to the rich,” Mockbee told his charges, sounding a clarion that inspired, among others, John Bielenberg.

All this attention to social ills did not come without social costs. Almost 75 years have passed since Agee and Evans traveled the county to document the lives of poor white folk, but their work still has the power to inflame residents. If outsiders see Evans’s photos and Agee’s text as a candid examination of an ailing region, insiders often see the book as the product of crusading interlopers, the sort of people who parachute into the region today with little understanding of local concerns.

via Pop-Up Community Center – The Healing Powers of a Pie Shop – NYTimes.com.

random, gift ideas: What do you carry in your saddlebag?

Saddleback Gadget Pouches

Just because you need to carry and protect your gadgets doesn’t mean you have to look like a tool doing so. Saddleback Gadget Pouches ($31-$55) are crafted from rugged boot leather that develops a fine patina over time, held together with industrial marine grade thread, with pigskin lining, and a 100 year warranty — no joke. Made in sizes to store anything from an iPhone all the way up to that shiny new iPad.

via Saddleback Gadget Pouches | Uncrate.

random: Calling all ninjas … ok, very random. 🙂

Private Ninja Lessons

We love ninjas, pirates, robots, and zombies here at Uncrate HQ, but there’s only one of those that we’d actually consider becoming. Private Ninja Lessons ($200) can help you on your way to becoming a stealth assassin or just improving your self-defense skills. The 90-minute sessions — held in Bronxville, NY — are led by an actual Shidoshi, and include history, tradition, and philosophy lessons before the ninjutsu-based self-defense, awareness, and combat strategy practice begins, possibly including some weapons training, but most likely not teaching you how to effectively throw a ninja star.

via Private Ninja Lessons | Uncrate.

food/drink:  No surprise here …

Below is a list of worst beers in the world as rated by the thousands of beer enthusiasts at RateBeer.com. Dare to try them? We don’t advise it. We provide this list in the name of beer education. We aren’t picking on the fat kid as much as we’re making a few big brewers accountable for their products that are more about beer hype and marketing than substance. Often the pitch of mass marketing campaigns work against them among craft beer enthusiasts.

If you’re interested in how good real beer can be, we can certainly help you out! Try a link or two in the right hand column.

score count style

1 Olde English 800 3.2 0.96 52 Malt Liquor

via The Worst Beers In The World | RateBeer.com.

history, random, culture, travel:  interesting history of tipping.

To understand how tipping got here, a little bit of history might be on the menu. The etymology of tipping is just as widely misunderstood as the practice itself. It’s commonly accepted that the origin of “tipping” or “tip” comes from the British (who eschew tipping more than we do) in the early 19th century, who used to hang signs in pubs with the word “TIP” as an acronym of “To Insure Promptitude,” when in fact, it actually first appeared as a verb in George Farquhar’s 1707 The Beaux’ Stratagem after being used in criminal circles as a word meant to imply the unnecessary and gratuitous gifting of something somewhat taboo, like a joke, or a sure bet, or illicit money exchanges. That feeling of being robbed by having to tip for bad service? Now you know: the word tipping came from criminals.

Tipping started to mature in the 16th century, when currency was given out of gratitude or compassion outside of religious establishments. But now it’s less compassion and gratitude than fear of embarrassment or social shame, driven by what publisher William Rufus Scott called a capital-S “Social Convention” in 1916. Scott wrote an infamous polemic against the contemporary practice of tipping entitled The Itching Palm, in which he described tipping as “the price of pride…what one American is willing to pay to induce another American to acknowledge inferiority.” Scott stuck at the heart of the issue: “The ‘what will people say’ mania holds the average person in an iron obedience to a custom which is innately loathesome. It makes you conspicuous to be a dissenter. The serving persons understand this psychology perfectly.”

But speaking of the supposed meritocracy: there isn’t one. Dare to learn what might be the dirtiest secret of American tipping? In a totally random sample, it’s racist.

Here’s a dinner conversation you’ll never have: in 2008 Ian Ayers published a study in the Yale Law Review collecting data from taxicab rides in New Haven. Ayers found that black cab drivers were tipped one-third less than white ones, and that black passengers tipped one-half less than white passengers, noting that if tipping were mandated, it’d reduce both the tendency of black drivers to receive less than their white counterparts, and the tendency of white drivers to eschew picking up black passengers for fear of bad tips.

Why should tipped professionals be discriminated against by race, or beauty? Endless studies note time and time again that attractive Americans tend to make more money than unattractive Americans in the same fields. Just last June, Newsweek reported that attractive women and men earn four and five percent more than their less-attractive counterparts, respectively. In the world of tipped economies, equal opportunity loses to the reinforcement of prejudices dangerous to society. Even the Supreme Court thinks so: in 1971’s Griggs v. Duke Power, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was ruled to prohibit businesses with discriminatory practices against those protected under it, even if that effect is unintended. Tipping, which has been proven to be discriminatory, could be downright unconstitutional.

via App Exclusive: The Death of Tipping — Gourmet Live.

Asheville, places, travel: Well, I wilh I had seen this one 5 weeks ago … I say visit the Grove Park … but don’t stay there … Enjoying the Crafts—and Rafts—in Asheville, N.C. – WSJ.com.

religion, God, US, culture:  Very interesting …

If you pray to God, to whom — or what — are you praying?

When you sing God Bless America, whose blessing are you seeking?

In the USA, God — or the idea of a God — permeates daily life. Our views of God have been fundamental to the nation’s past, help explain many of the conflicts in our society and worldwide, and could offer a hint of what the future holds. Is God by our side, or beyond the stars? Wrathful or forgiving? Judging us every moment, someday or never?

via Americans’ views of God shape attitudes on key issues – USATODAY.com.

Boulder, places, travel:  Next week … maybe i will try the Dushanbe Teahouse …

Where to eat: One of the more-exotic restaurants in Boulder is the Dushanbe Teahouse (1770 13th St.; 303-442-4993; boulderteahouse.com), an ornate structure given to Boulder in the 1990s by one of its sister cities, Dushanbe, Tajikistan

via In Boulder, Colo., Bring Your Dog – WSJ.com.




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