Posts Tagged ‘business culture

08
May
11

5.8.2011 … happy mother’s day … I have only Molly home today … so I am enjoying great peace … tomorrow all my boys roll in …

Mother’s Day:  … stolen from Ginger S. on Facebook …

To all the amazing mothers I have known, starting with my own, I would like to take this opportunity to wish you a wonderful day and send you my love. To the many mothers out there who struggle, either physically, emotionally, financially, or otherwise, with the challenges of this critical role, you are in my thoughts as well. This is our day to celebrate, embrace each other, and our precious children!

xoxo

Dennard Lindsey Teague

(Aside – My mother is  great … she adored my dad and each of her children for their uniqueness … but you have to wonder why she would let me go to the WH looking like that!)

Mother’s Day, music:

YouTube – I’ll Always Love My Mama by The Intruders.

Mother’s Day, Tina Fey, quotes:  I don’t usually quote Tina Fey … but her prayer was good!

Lead her away from Acting but not all the way to Finance. Something where she can make her own hours but still feel intellectually fulfilled and get outside sometimes And not have to wear high heels. What would that be, Lord? Architecture? Midwifery? Golf course design? I’m asking You, because if I knew, I’d be doing it, Youdammit

via A Mother’s Prayer for Her Child By Tina Fey | Write In Color.

137th Kentucky Derby, Animal Kingdom, follow-upAnimal Kingdom wins the 2011 Kentucky Derby – CBS News.

137th Kentucky Derby, traditions – Southern, culture:  OK … there must be some other southern tradition to compare to the Kentucky Derby … “Moonshining, barn-raisings, hominy-poundings, quiltings, fox hunting, homecomings, and hog-killings are but memories”

“Many institutions of Southern culture are vanishing,” Judy McCarthy wrote in “God Save the Kentucky Derby.” “Moonshining, barn-raisings, hominy-poundings, quiltings, fox hunting, homecomings, and hog-killings are but memories. The Kentucky Derby,” she added, “has been a sustaining… vestige of Southern life. Its appeal, of course, extends far beyond the Old South.”

Part of the extension into history is the hat, one of the most identifiable trademarks of race day.

“Any style of hat can be appropriate, from wide styles to bowlers to small-fitted cloches with netting,” said Rita Manzelmann-Browne, head buyer for Miss Jackson’s in Tulsa, who sometimes works with Eileen McClure, an Oklahoman, whose grandmother grew up on a Kentucky plantation. “It’s all about having fun and expressing yourself.”

So, how many hats adorns the closet of an Okie with Kentucky roots? McClure has 15 hats to choose from come Derby Saturday, and, she notes, she always watches the Kentucky Derby in one.

“Derby has character, it has history,” says McClure. “And part of that history is hats.”

via Hats Off: The Kentucky Derby Highlights a Southern Tradition by Shane Gilreath | LikeTheDew.com.

Versailles, France, travel: Q: Should we/must we go to Versailles to make our trip to France “complete?”

This former home of French kings epitomizes royal elegance in the style of Old Europe. Versailles originated in 1631 as a humble hunting lodge for Louis XIII. But his son Louis XIV built the now familiar palace on the site outside Paris and moved the nation’s government and court to Versailles in 1682.

Versailles remained the epicenter of French royal power, home to government offices and courtiers alike, until 1789—when a hungry and agitated group of mostly female revolutionaries stormed the palace and essentially evicted Louis XVI and his queen, Marie-Antoinette. The mob sent the royal couple back to Paris on the first steps of a journey that led eventually to their beheadings.

Versailles’ sprawling, stunning palace is matched by the splendor of the gardens in which it is situated. A pleasurable visit can be spent simply perusing paths and admiring fountains and flowers without setting foot inside the palace or Versailles’ other notable buildings.

via Versailles — World Heritage Site — National Geographic.

pirates, Captain Kidd, museum, Dominican Republic, travel:  Underwater snorkeling museum!  I’m game …

The submerged wreck of Captain Kidd’s pirate ship will become a “Living Museum of the Sea” reports Science Daily.

The Quedagh Merchant was found a couple of years ago just off the coast of the Dominican Republic. It’s only 70 feet from the shore of Catalina Island and rests in ten feet of water, so it’s a perfect destination for scuba divers or even snorkelers.

Underwater signs will guide divers around the wreck, and like in above-ground museums, there’s a strict “don’t touch the artifacts” policy. Often when shipwrecks are found the discoverers keep the location secret to protect them from looting. Hopefully this bold step of allowing visitors to swim around such an important wreck will help inform the public without any harm being done. One can only hope!

Captain Kidd is one of the most famous and most controversial of pirates. For much of his career he was a privateer, a legal pirate with permission from the King of England to loot enemy ships and hunt down other pirates. Privateers were one of the ways the big empires of the day harassed one another.

Kidd shouldn’t have gone to New York. He was lured to Boston by a supposed friend and then arrested and shipped to England to be put on trial for piracy. The judge found him guilty and sentenced him to hang. His body was left hanging over the River Thames in an iron cage called a gibbet as a warning to others. The museum will be dedicated on May 23, the 310th anniversary of Kidd’s execution.

via Captain Kidd’s pirate ship to become underwater museum | Gadling.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, media, twitter:  Interesting analysis of the spread of the news via twitter.

That trustworthiness, in a universe of tweeters spouting all sorts of speculation, is more important than ever. Urbahn, 27, didn’t shout about his insider connections, but enough people read his bio to understand that he was likely to have good sources inside the Pentagon. And for all the talk of Twitter making journalists of us all, it seems we still desire validation from a reporter from a major media organization.

And maybe — just maybe — the number of followers you have on Twitter matters less than who and how active they are. Urbahn didn’t have a record-breaking number of followers (who then numbered a little more than 1,000, or about 6,000 fewer than he has now), but his tweet went viral nonetheless, thanks to those followers going to bat for him. Stetler has more than 55,000 followers and tweets obsessively, but ultimately his influence was slightly less important here than Urbahn’s.

“Keith Urbahn wasn’t the first to speculate Bin Laden’s death, but he was the one who gained the most trust from the network,” writes Social Flow. “And with that, the perfect situation unfolded, where timing, the right social-professional networked audience, along with a critically relevant piece of information led to an explosion of public affirmation of his trustworthiness.”

via How Bin Laden News Exploded on Twitter: A Visualization.

Osama bin Laden’s death, US Intelligence:

In reality, bin Laden was living comfortably in the bustling town of Abbottabad, known for its good schools and relative affluence. He was living in a walled compound in a military town, hundreds of miles from the mountainous, lawless tribal regions. There were no heavily armed security guards, as some intelligence officials assumed there would be. Thanks to a satellite dish, which officials believe was for television reception only, bin Laden would have been able watch American security forces chase him around the wrong part of the country.

“I was surprised that Osama bin Laden was found in what is essentially a suburb of Islamabad,” former national security adviser and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Tuesday as news of the daring pre-dawn helicopter raid dominated the news.

America’s belief that bin Laden was hiding on the Pakistani frontier was based on two assumptions, former intelligence officials said. The first was that bin Laden would stay close to his devotees for protection, and al-Qaeda has thrived in the tribal areas of North and South Waziristan. The second was that if bin Laden had ventured into more civilized areas, his presence would be noticeable, first by locals and then by Pakistani and U.S. intelligence services.

via Why U.S. had it wrong about bin Laden’s hide-out – USATODAY.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, media, photograph, history, follow-up:

“Those were 38 of the most intense minutes,” Clinton says today. “I have no idea what any of us were looking at at that particular millisecond when the picture was taken.”

The shot, taken as the raid unfolded in real time, shows Clinton covering her mouth with her right hand.

via Clinton discusses hand gesture in riveting Situation Room photo –.

Osama bin Laden’s death, President Obama, quotes:  funny …

When bin Laden’s corpse was laid out, one of the Navy SEALs was asked to stretch out next to it to compare heights. The SEAL was 6 feet tall. The body was several inches taller.After the information was relayed to Obama, he turned to his advisers and said: “We donated a $60 million helicopter to this operation. Could we not afford to buy a tape measure?”

via Death of Osama bin Laden: Phone call pointed U.S. to compound — and to ‘the pacer’ – The Washington Post.

culture, names, kith/kin:  I hope my children understand the thought John and I put into their names.

“To me, the most important gift parents can give is a story behind their name,” Diamant says. “The more names you have and the stories of how you came to a name, the more stories are attached, the richer the name could be.”

via Biblical names abound in popular baby names list – Faith & Reason.

Apple, business culture, Steve Jobs:  I do not think I would have wanted to be in that auditorium that day …

In response to the MobileMe flop, Steve Jobs assembled the team that worked on the service and chewed them out, according to Adam Lashinsky at Fortune, who has a big story on Apple, available only on newsstands or the iPad right now.

He gathered the troops at the auditorium Apple uses on its campus to do demos of small products for the press.

He asked the team what MobileMe was supposed to do. Someone answer, and Jobs said to that person (and everyone else), “So why the fuck doesn’t it do that?”

He continued, “You’ve tarnished Apple’s reputation … You should hate each other for having let each other down … Mossberg, our friend, is no longer writing good things about us.”

Right there and then he named a new executive to run the MobileMe service.

via What It’s Like When Steve Jobs Chews You Out For A Product Failure.

Pat Forde, espn, twitter:  Pat is a friend of a friend  I started following because of his great coverage of Steph Curry … It’s amazing who adapts to new technology!  ESPN’s Pat Forde Goes From Anti-Tweet to the King of All Media Tweeters.

LOL:  Here are a few that are just fun:

YouTube – Matrix Reloaded MTV Parody.

Loving Donald Trumps newest comb-over. Image courtesy of the DU

via Facebook




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