Posts Tagged ‘cars

11
Jun
13

6.11.13 … Porsche 918 Spyder: $845,000 …

cars, rich people, Porsche 918 Spyder, hybrid cars, Speakeasy , WSJ:  really rich or really stupid?

 

But the debate lost steam recently with the rollout of the production version of the Porsche 918 Spyder, a plug-in hybrid supercar with a top speed of 211 miles an hour and a price of $845,000.

Even though the German sports-car maker touts the new car’s potential for high fuel economy, its lithium ion battery and the electric motors mounted on its front and rear axles are designed to boost performance. And the combination works well. With its V8 engine and electric motors, the 918 puts out a staggering 887 horsepower and can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds – about even with the quickest sport motorcycles.

via Porsche 918 Spyder: Finally, A Hybrid Car For Really Rich People – Speakeasy – WSJ.

23
Jul
11

7.23.2011 … gathering of the clan …

Davidson, 4th Rich, reunion, Tuxedo NC:  Our second great gathering of the 4th Rich clan … what a delightful evening.  Thanks, McGrady.  For a few pics … Gathering.

green, Dartmouth College:

In June 2010, faculty, staff and administrators at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire had their desk trash cans replaced with six-inch-tall cartons. One year later, Dartmouth has sent 200 less tons of trash to the landfill, and recycling is up by one third.

It’s a simple strategy. Every desk gets one large “zero sort” recycling box for paper, glass, aluminum and plastic and one tiny trash tub for whatever cannot be recycled, which at Dartmouth is essentially a few types of drink lids and certain types of plastic bags and packaging materials. When the trash tub reaches its meager capacity, the owner has to empty it at a disposal area.

via With Tiny Cans, a New Trash Equation – NYTimes.com.

Harry Potter:  In case you can’t remember, like me … “Harry Potter – A Look Back” – YouTube.

Google+:

Forget being friended on Facebook or followed on Twitter. What you really want now is to be Circled—or so Google hopes.

The company’s latest social-networking effort, Google+, lets users organize people into Circles of friends so you can choose what you share with each group. It offers multi-person video chats and a feature called Sparks that encourages users to plug into news that interests them. It integrates with Picasa, Google’s photo site.

Google+ is designed to compete with Facebook, but judging from my non-techie friends’ reactions over the past two weeks, the initial setup can be confusing. Plus, many of them aren’t eager to build another social network. This week, I’ll take a step back to explain Google+, how it differs from Facebook and just what’s with the Circles.

via Going in Google+ Circles. Review of Google+ – Katherine Boehret – The Digital Solution – AllThingsD.

As virtual world expert Wagner James Au has chronicled on his blog New World Notes, this is posing problems not just for political dissidents but for many virtual world users who’d prefer to go by their avatar names. His post was a response to a Second Life user, Opensource Obscure, who had his account suspended for “violating community standards.”

Google spokesperson Katie Watson has confirmed that the company will require real names for Google Profiles, the requisite for people to establish their Google Plus accounts. There is a place in your Google Profile account where you can list nicknames, and that’s what Google suggests users do who are interested in listing their other online names and persona. Those who do establish Google Profiles under a pseudonym face account suspension.

via No Pseudonyms Allowed: Is Google Plus’s Real Name Policy a Good Idea?.

Looking for an easy way to move your photos from Facebook to Google Plus? So were we. That’s why we were happy to discover this Web application, available in the Chrome Web store, that does the work for you. Available only as a browser add-on for Google Chrome, Move2Picasa exports all your Facebook albums and photos and imports them into Picasa for you, for free. You can then share those pictures with your Circles on Google Plus.

via How to Move Your Facebook Photos to Picasa & Google Plus.

food, lobster rolls:  OK I had my first lobster roll in Boston, and I will admit it was pretty good.  I felt stupid paying $25; but honestly, it was so good it was worth it.

Neptune Oyster- Boston Lobster Roll

Leave it to the World Financial Center to host its pumped-up opposite. At Ed’s Lobster Bar Kiosk on the waterfront, 225 Vesey Street (Liberty Street); (917) 364-3787, lobsterbarnyc.com, Ed McFarland’s six-ounce celery-and-chive-dotted blob of musky mayonnaise-y lobster meat bobs atop its butter-drenched roll like one of the sprawling yachts in the adjacent marina ($25). It’s an object of conspicuous consumption as befits the captains of finance.

via New Lobster Rolls – NYC – Restaurant Review – NYTimes.com.

random, Chinese fakes: Guo Meimei: The TIME Cover Girl Who Wasn’t – Global Spin – TIME.com.

Civil War, history, random, quotes: The article was interesting on lots of levels … but the closing quote just made me laugh!

“At Gettysburg, I had one woman who said to me, ‘I don’t understand how they fought this battle with all these statues here,’ ” Chaney said.

via Whatever Happened to … the statue of Gen. Lee at Antietam – The Washington Post.

technology, education: Whole new world …

Cathy Davidson spotted the gorilla but only because, as a dyslexic, she gave up immediately on trying to count the tosses. That shock of seeing what others missed became the germ of her remarkable new book, Now You See It, which offers a fresh and reassuring perspective on how to manage anxieties about the bewildering pace of technological change: “Distraction is your friend,” she says.

Davidson is a Duke University English professor, part of a tribe that’s not known for embracing the future. But she is a cofounder of HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory), an international network of academics inspired by new technology, which administers the annual Digital Media and Learning competition with the MacArthur Foundation. Davidson believes that true conceptual innovation is needed to reinvent our homes, schools, and workplaces for the demands of the digital age. She calls her approach “technopragmatism,” or “technorealism.”

In the book, Davidson tells the story of her extensive arm rehab, which includes a fascinating insight from her physical therapist, who found that her patients who sustained injuries toward the end of a decade in their lives — at 29, 39, even 69 — tended to recover more quickly and completely than those who had just passed that milestone, who felt too old. Davidson, then in her early fifties, was determined to be an exception. “What was very interesting was how little relationship there was in rehab between physical damage and healing. Much more important was attitude — not some goofy optimistic thing, but almost some kind of stubbornness about possibility,” she says.

That very stubbornness is what Davidson models. Even as she works with her students to help rewrite the rules, she’s not going to let people of her own generation off the hook for turning their backs on the new reality. “When I hear from those 40-year-old, 50- year-old Luddites, I’m thinking, What else is wrong in your life that you have to make such a wall? If you’re that worried about distraction, something else is going on.”

via Duke’s Cathy Davidson Has A Bold Plan for Change | Fast Company.

NASA Shuttle Program, end of an era, photojournalism:  I really enjoyed this photo essay.

When the end of the program was announced, my father and I knew we had to do something special. We have spent the past three years securing access and photographing scenes few people have ever witnessed. It has been quite a bit of work, but I have felt humbled and privileged every minute I have been at the space center.

In the simplest terms, these photographs tell a story of the work of men and women who showed up every day and launched spaceships. By doing their jobs well, these workers — from much-hailed astronauts to Harley-riding technicians — have made the extraordinary task of spaceflight seem mundane.

via The space shuttle: Portrait of an American era – The Washington Post.

cars, Volvo, green, electric cars, hybrid cars:  OK, I want one.

Volvo is taking a shotgun approach to vehicle electrification, essentially blasting away with a whole lot of concepts to see what hits the bullseye.

The Swedish automaker’s already wowed us with the slick C30 Electric, a car that it really ought to go ahead and sell already. Volvo keepts telling us we’ll see the C30 electric (pictured) in 2013. Then it wheeled out the diesel-electric V60 Plug-In Hybrid, which could be in (some?) showrooms next year.

Now it’s experimenting with extended-range electrics, which are another way of saying plug-in hybrids that use gasoline engines to boost electric range. One is a straight-up riff on the Chevrolet Volt, a car Volvo vp of business development Paul Gustavsson told us is “a milestone in the industry.”

Although range-extended drivetrains are more complex than either internal combustion or electric systems, they offer the flexibility of a conventional car, the efficiency of an EV and the reduced greenhouse gas emissions of a hybrid.

via Volvo Packs More Buckshot in Its Electric Shotgun | Autopia | Wired.com.

National Geographic Traveler,  apps, Above France:  Enjoyable app for someone planning a trip.

Today, National Geographic Traveler and app developer Fotopedia are launching a brilliant new iOS app for wanderlust enthusiasts, called “Above France.” The new app provides a bird’s eye view of France’s beauty including a stunning collection of more than 2,000 photographs taken by helicopter pilot and professional photographer, Frank Mulliez.

via National Geographic Travelers new app: Above France – TNW Apps.

 

18
Jul
11

‎7.18.2011 … early morning drive from ATL .. then PT … and now HP …

Harry Potter, movies:  Definitely, a HP day!  Harry Potter premiere photos from Twitter – storify.comMagical Recap: The Harry Potter Saga in 5 Minutes – Video – TIME.com.

Harry Potter, movies, Draco Malfoy: 🙂

Tom Felton is just happy to have all of his hair. After a decade of dyeing it platinum blond to play Draco Malfoy in the “Harry Potter” films, he’s finally been allowed to stay off the bleach.  He doesn’t have to religiously wear sunscreen, either, now that he’s no longer required to have ghostly white skin.

Speakeasy caught up with Felton a day before the New York premiere of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” the final film in the series.  Check out the video below to hear Felton’s thoughts on playing the villain to Daniel Radcliffe’s Bond, whether Draco truly gets redemption and why he’s happy with the length of the last film.

via Tom Felton On Playing Draco Malfoy: The Boy Who Hated Harry Potter – Speakeasy – WSJ

literature, travel, Harry Potter, Harry Potter Generation:  Where would you like to go?  Hogwarts was a favorite.  An aside, several cllerages market themselves to the Harry Potter Generation as being “like” Hogwarts … i.e. Sewanee, Kenyon, Yale …

Given that this is the season of travel, I thought I’d highlight responses to a recent creative challenge that asked which fictional place (from a novel or story) would you want to go this summer.

via DailyLit Readers’ (Fictional) Summer Destinations « DailyLit Blog.

 

Harry Potter, Children’s/YA literature: The fact that some call the children of the 90’s the Harry Potter Generation speaks as to its classic nature.  Quality literature is a different discussion.

To some extent, it matters little whether scholars label the series high-quality literature; millions of people around the globe consider the book to be a good read. And as doctoral student Todd Ide suggests, one need only look at the amount of scholarly work in the form of presentations, articles, chapters and books with a Harry Potter focus to see the impact of the series on literary scholarship.

But can we equate popularity and passion with quality? Phil Nel voices the sentiment of many when he asserts, “Rowling is gifted at inventing a carefully imagined parallel universe, great at creating character, and a skilled crafter of plots.” On the other hand, Jeffrey Canton compares the series to other works of fantasy and finds it lacking in craft.

“Every time I read Alice in Wonderland, I am astounded by Carroll’s text — that’s what I don’t find in Rowling — some fabulous moments but overall — it’s a great son et lumiere show but that’s all it is.”

One of the most interesting discussions centers on the community of readers. Some have suggested that though reading is often a solitary experience, many of us read Harry Potter as part of a community, discussing, interacting, writing fan fiction. Rowling has seemed acutely aware of her audience and has interacted with that community of readers increasingly through the text as the series went on. (Ebony Elizabeth Thomas)

In fact, with Harry set to move onto the recently announced Pottermore, the series will soon be at the forefront of digital social media.

via Is Harry Potter classic children’s literature? – College, Inc. – The Washington Post.

cars, green:

THE first Fisker Karma, a luxury four-seater high-performance electric car, will be delivered to its first customer, one Leonardo di Caprio, on July 21st. The Hollywood film star will find that unlike other electric cars, the Karma has been designed to be driven like a conventional combustion-engined vehicle, but also with the ability to change its character and use electricity for a different driving style.

via Electric cars: Karma chameleon | The Economist.

Jane Austen:

It’s been 200 years since readers first met the serious-minded Elinor Dashwood, heroine of Jane Austen’s first published novel, “Sense and Sensibility.” Austen-mania got off to a slow start, as the four books published during her lifetime were anonymous. But it has made up for time lost. Now, Austen is a superstar. Films, sequels, prequels and updated versions of her books bring her plots (and her life) to readers and moviegoers. And then there is the work of the academics: She was heartbroken by an Irishman — no, she was gay; she was conservative — no, she was a feminist. We love her; we hate her; we can’t agree about her; we know we should read her. Myths about her abound, but there are some truths we should universally acknowledge.

via Five myths about Jane Austen – The Washington Post.

cars, Mercury Villager, me:  I just saw a mercury villager,  green with gold trim husband, just like the one I drove for  10 years.  The woman inside looked very hot and  tired and had windows rolled down; I assume the a/c is no longer working. My Villager was a great car,  10 years 200,000. Just seeing her made me think of the many miles traveled together!

weather, derecho, vocabulary:  Wicked weather … new word.

The line of storms contained all of the characteristics of a derecho, defined as a widespread, long-lived windstorm associated with a band of rapidly moving showers and storms.

High winds at about 18,000 feet energized the fast-moving storms that ripped through Chicago Monday morning. (Twisterdata.com) The derecho was energized by very strong high altitude winds of 60-70 mph and abundant low level moisture. Its impacts extended well beyond Chicago. AccuWeather’s Henry Margusity tweeted as of 11 a.m. that the storms have traveled 425 miles, produced almost 200 wind damage reports, and caused more than a million power outages. As of 11:30 a.m., the storms stretched from around Lansing, Michigan to Fort Wayne, Indiana. The storms are likely to affect Detroit, Ann Arbor and Toledo Ohio through early this afternoon with the potential for damaging winds.

 

via Chicago blasted by violent line of thunderstorms, known as derecho – Capital Weather Gang – The Washington Post.

25
Jun
11

6.25.2011 … happy jc is tired and sick … too much fun …. lazy summer day … JBT in Maine enjoying cool and golf … nice …

music, UNC, memory lane:  Couldn’t help noticing a Chi Psi’s posting of YouTube – Devo ” Gut Feeling ” first time in live in 1977. That and “Whip It” …  You guys were fun, but strange!

blog post of note, kith/kin, timelessness, age:  What peers are you referring to Cary?  As always I enjoyed your post!

Sometimes I weird out my peers.  And sometimes I feel lonely and alien at the grown-up table.  Yet I’m of a certain age, which a friend and I recently laughed about meaning that, when there’s such a need, I’m “the one who needs to kill the spider.”

I feel like I’m a part of a caravan of purposeful wanderers, typified by risking, trusting, seeking out rainstorms and dancing, while not eschewing the pain of the world or an honest admission of whatever IS.  I pinch myself when I look through a mental Rolodex at the names and faces of these glorious ones with whom I do life.

Even as I claim my hard-earned status as one of the elders of my “generation,” often called on to lead, I am also often called on to learn from my younger teachers.  We are a generation, co-journeyers.

Here’s to a spacious redrawing of generational boundaries.

via catapult magazine Chosen generation.

Mordecai Scott, CMS, Charlotte, Davidson College, GlobeChangers award, kudos:  Kudos to local and Davidsonian Mordeccai Scott!

Mordecai Scott, a 2006 West Charlotte High School graduate who overcame family hardships to attend Davidson College, received the Jefferson Award for public service earlier this week in Washington, D.C.

He was one of 10 to receive the GlobeChangers award at a Tuesday event at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center. Known as the “Nobel Prize for Public Service,” the awards are presented each year over two days of ceremonies.

Scott was nominated for his efforts to overcome childhood hardships to graduate from college.

Scott, one of eight children, moved frequently between shelters and relatives after his parents divorced. He carried a 0.68 GPA and was on the verge of dropping out when, at age 12, school staff got involved.

With help from the nonprofit group Communities In Schools, Scott began to envision himself attending college. He went on to receive a scholarship from Davidson and graduated in 2010.

via West Charlotte graduate wins national public service award.

2012 Nissan Murano CrossCabriole, cars, reviews:  I don’t think I have ever read a more scathing car review.  Sad, it is kinda cute.

In the midst of this automotive banquet, the CrossCabriolet is like a sorbet of mouse scat.

via 2012 Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet: A CUV at CrossPurposes With Competence | Rumble Seat by Dan Neil – WSJ.com.

food/drink, wine, boxed wine, lists:  Next time I need a box of wine I have a list to try!

Of course, this wasn’t always the case. It used to be that all boxed wine was bad. That was easy. Now things are trickier, because a number of producers are actually putting good wine – and sometimes really good wine – into boxes. It’s actually possible to go out there, trade your twenty bucks for a 3 liter (that’s four bottles-worth) box of wine, and end up not only with something you can tolerate, but something you’ll actually enjoy quite a bit.

NV Pepperwood Grove Big Green Box Chardonnay ($20)

In your face Chardonnay, in an old-school California way: it’s big, ripe, oaky, and luscious. If you like that style, this one’s for you.

via Box wine with serious bang for the buck – Eatocracy – CNN.com Blogs.

FBI, 10 Most Wanted, memory lane:  Does anyone else remember standing at the post office looking at the pictures of the 10 Most Wanted?   I guess people get this info through tv shows and the internet now … but I thought they always looked dark and ominous and almost always men.

With James Bulger’s arrest and Osama bin Laden’s death, there are eight names left on the current FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List. Who’s left, and just what did these fugitives do?

via The FBI’s ‘Ten Most Wanted’: Two Down, Eight To Go : NPR.

Newt Gingrich, 2012 Presidential Election:  Ah, Newt … it’s two early for two Pinocchios!

The Pinocchio Test

Even at a running length of more than two minutes, Gingrich’s video gives a misleading impression of the Federal Reserve’s explanation of its actions during the economic crisis — and the role of the Dodd-Frank law in forcing those disclosures. His speech gives a clearer view of his critique but that is not an excuse since fewer people will read the speech than see the video.

Two Pinocchios

via Newt Gingrich’s video attack on the Federal Reserve – The Fact Checker – The Washington Post.

Jane Austen, history, Steventon, parenting, cottages:  I never thought about it, but talk about “refrigerator moms” … 18th century mothers of means really did not parent!  Also enjoyed the  discussion of English cottages.

I recently went to Steventon again, the birthplace of Jane Austen and where she spent her formative years until the age of twenty six. Steventon was where she thought she would spend the rest of her life. As soon as she was born she was sent to live with a family in the village. The mother of the household she was sent to became Jane’s wet nurse. Mrs Austen had nothing to do with her children as babies. This might provide an explanation for Jane’s aversion towards her mother as she grew older but it also explains that her attachment to Steventon was not just through her own family and the rectory but it was linked to the wider community and she had very close ties to some of the villagers.

via Steventon and Barton Cottage « Jane Austen’s World.

Andrew Lovedale, Access to Success Foundation, Davidson College, basketball, kudos:  I know I talk about Steph Curry a lot … but another member of the dream team is giving back. Kudos, Andrew Lovedale!

Andrew Lovedale

Access to Success (A2S), the foundation created by former Davidson men’s basketball player Andrew Lovedale to benefit underprivileged children through athletic, education and spiritual programs, is preparing for a pair of firsts:

A trip to Lovedale’s hometown Benin City, Nigeria, from June 27-July 6.

The inaugural “Kicks from ‘Cats: The Andrew Lovedale 5K” walk/run on the Davidson College cross country trail on Sept. 10, 2011.

The Nigeria team includes Lovedale, Davidson College Assistant Sports Information Director Lauren Biggers, former Davidson Assistant Director of Marketing and Promotions Morgan Clark, Davidson graduates Claire Asbury (2010) and Eloise Grose (2006) and Lowe’s Companies Inc. employee Lindsay Biggers. They’ll spend 10 days in Lovedale’s hometown of Benin City.

The trip will focus on building long-term partnerships with three schools, an orphanage and a church. The team will also be delivering the basketball shoes raised earlier this year through the Kicks from ‘Cats Shoe Drive, held at the Davidson College men’s basketball game against the College of Charleston on Jan. 29, as well as other sporting equipment and school supplies donated by Lowe’s employees. They’ll also run basketball and volleyball clinics.

via Lovedale foundation plans Nigeria trip, 5K fund-raiser  | Sports.

boodos, new vocabulary:  I had to find the opposite of kudos for the next entry. 😦  And actually there really isn’t one …

Boodos

“Boodos” is the opposite of “Kudos”

via Urban Dictionary: Kudos!.

Anthony’s, restaurants, Atlanta, boodos: I have been to quite a few wedding functions at Anthony’s and they were delightful … Very poorly done, Anthony’s … BOODOS!

Anthony’s, a legendary Atlanta spot for wedding receptions, has closed.

Now dozens of couples say they’re not only out thousands of dollars in deposits, but have no place for their reception.

Valiree Eaton booked her reception last fall. She said when she called to finalize plans for her July 3 wedding, a recording said Anthony’s was out of business. “I’m a bit of a wreck. I’m extremely stressed. Weddings are stressful enough without this,” said Eaton. “I feel like my wedding day has been marred,” she added.

via Reception Hall Leaves Brides-To-Be In Limbo – News Story – WSB Atlanta.

Pearl S. Buck, The Good Earth, Pearl Buck in China, book shelf:  Another to add to my bookshelf!  I loved The Good Earth when I read it in high school.  I may re-read it to see what I think now.

Pearl Buck in China by Hilary Spurling

Pearl S. Buck’s 1931 blockbuster The Good Earth earned her a Pulitzer Prize and, eventually, the first Nobel Prize for Literature ever awarded to an American woman. These days, however, it’s her life story rather than her novels (which are now barely read in the West or in China) that fascinate readers. In making the case for reappraising Buck’s fiction and her life, award-winning biographer Hilary Spurling transforms Buck from a dreary “lady author” into a woman warrior. Having grown up in China at the subsistence level, as the daughter of a missionary, Buck had firsthand knowledge of war, infanticide and sexual slavery when she entered college as a charity student in Virginia. As Spurling deftly illustrates, that alienation gave Buck her stance as a writer, gracing her with the outsider vision needed to interpret one world to another.

via New In Paperback: June 20-26 : NPR.

news, condolences, adventure travel, tragedy, random:  What a personal tragedy for these two friends.

A man who climbed Everest found the body of his friend who had died hours after conquering the summit only months before.

Rodney Hogg saw the body of his climbing friend Peter Kinloch on a ledge 1,000 ft below the peak as he neared the top of the mountain.

Mr Kinloch, 28, had been attempting the Seven Summits Challenge last year, in which climbers attempt to conquer the highest peak of each continent.

via Climber discovers frozen body of best friend on peak of Everest | Mail Online.

Huguette Clark, RIP, tragedy, random, kudos, boodos:  Sad this woman never seemed to enjoy life and it ends with folks arguing about her money.  Kudos to her for leaving the bulk to the arts.  Boodos to those who won’t allow her to rest in peace.

Huguette Clark, the Montana copper mining heiress who died in New York last month at 104, has left most of her $400 million fortune to the arts – wealth from the Gilded Age that produced the Rockefellers, Astors and Vanderbilts.

According to her will, obtained by The Associated Press on Wednesday, Clark gave to Washington’s Corcoran Gallery of Art a prized Claude Monet water-lily painting not seen by the public since 1925.

The Manhattan district attorney’s office is looking into how Clark’s affairs were managed while she spent the last two decades of her life in a hospital, a virtual recluse, people familiar with the probe have said. Before that, she lived in the largest residence on Fifth Avenue – 42 rooms.

The people spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak publicly about the probe.

The daughter of one-time U.S. Sen. William A. Clark left instructions for the creation of a foundation “for the primary purpose of fostering and promoting the arts,” according to the will prepared and signed in 2005, when she was 98.

About $300 million will go for the arts, including the 1907 Monet from his famed “Water Lilies” series, which is worth tens of millions of dollars, said attorney John Dadakis, of the firm Holland & Knight.

via Huguette Clark, Montana Mining Heiress, Leaves NY Fortune To Nurse, The Arts.

weddings, events, food, cakes:  After looking at this collection I feel like the world keeps upping expectations … I loved it when a friend’s daughter family and friends all gathered and baked an assortment of wedding cakes and another friend did the same thing but had wedding pies!  My mom still talks about the aunt that baked hers.  I think these television cake shows have upped the ante.

Not every bride and groom’s wedding cake will be as enormous as that enjoyed by Britain’s Prince William and Kate Middleton (pictured) — but no matter whether it’s as intricate as a future queen’s or as simple as a cupcake with a heart-shaped candle, every wedding cake is fancy and fabulous.

via Simple as Love – Fabulous and Fancy Wedding Cakes – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

26
May
11

‎5.26.2011 Restoration Day … house has gutters going up … and ET has biopsy to hopefully show restoration to full health!

Davidson College, Agnes Scott College, grants, college learning, kudos:  Kudos to two fine colleges for enhancing the learning of its students.

Davidson College will share a $200,000, two-year grant with Agnes Scott College from The Teagle Foundation to develop strategies for improved student learning. Davidson will focus on helping first-generation college students, while Agnes Scott seeks to support students in overcoming hurdles encountered in pursuing degrees in math and science.

About 40 of the 500 students in Davidson’s latest entering class were first-generation students.

“Without a family history of college attendance, these students may have difficulty navigating the college experience during their first year,” said Verna Case, associate dean of teaching, learning and research at Davidson. “The Teagle grant will enable us to assess their needs early on and provide assistance to help them achieve academically.”

via Teagle Grant Will Boost Learning Strategies at Davidson and Agnes Scott

Facebook, law:  Be careful what you post … Caveat FBor …

Be careful what you post on your Facebook account, because it might end up being used against you in a court of law. This isn’t another case where someone else may be claiming that anything and everything that you post online is fair game in terms of copyright, however.

Instead, there’s the possibility that you might end up as your own worst enemy in any future lawsuits as opposing counsels use your Facebook updates or photos to prove their case – whether or not they’re normally available for public viewing.

San Francisco-based lawyer Eric Sinrod writes about what he calls “a judicial willingness to compel the disclosure of Facebook material to the other side in litigation” over at FindLaw, noting that “in at least one case, McMillen v. Hummingbird Speedway, the court ordered that disclosure of the Facebook password of one of the parties so that access could be gained by the other side to the relevant Facebook account.”

This isn’t always the case; Sinrod also mentions another case, Piccolo v. Paterson, where the court refused a similar request – although, as he points out, this may have been because similar evidence was available already.

But there is something disturbing about the lengths to which even “private” information can be made public if the court decides that it’s necessary. The moral of this story may, in the end, be that you shouldn’t put anything on Facebook that you wouldn’t feel comfortable sharing with the world, Friends-Only or not.

via Even Your ‘Friends Only’ Facebook Material Can Be Used in Court – Techland – TIME.com.

John Edwards, slime bags, law:  New tag … slime bags … Go for it US Justice Department.

The U.S. Justice Department has given prosecutors the go-ahead to seek an indictment against former U.S. Senator and two-time presidential candidate John Edwards, according to multiple broadcast reports.

via Report: Prosecution of John Edwards OK’d | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

green, cars, jealous, Chevy Volt:  I really want an electric car … just like the idea. So if GM or Volvo …or anyone else wants a tester in Charlotte, PICK ME!

A battery powers the Volt, which Motor Trend magazine named its 2011 Car of the Year. The four-passenger car can go 38 miles on a fully charged battery, Hanley said. The battery is recharged by plugging it into a standard 120-volt household outlet. Hanley recharged her Volt each night via an outlet in her garage.

The Volt, however, also can run on gasoline when the battery’s charge is used up.

“Once the battery is depleted, the (gas-powered) engine will kick in, and act as a generator” to power the electric motor, General Motors spokesman Tony Macrito said.

“You can go another 300-plus miles” with the gas in the 9-gallon tank, Macrito said.

The car switched to gas power “a few times when I had to go downtown,” Hanley said. The Volt made the switch seamlessly, she said.

“I wondered if it was going to start knocking like a jalopy, with black fumes coming out, but there was no discernible difference.” The car was “zippy,” Hanley said, with a smooth ride.

The dashboard display made it easy to figure out whether she was using the battery or gas.

“I am just excited they have this new technology, especially now when Chicago has the highest gas prices in the county,” Hanley said. “I think it’s a relevant topic for people who care about oil dependency and the environment.”

via Winnetka woman gets a shot with the Chevrolet Volt –.

Restoration Day, prayers, organ donations, Landon Powell, kith/kin:  Well, today is the day we find out if ET’s liver has returned to full health … prayers.  ET’s doctor is very hopeful he will be in full remission and that will be an end to it … However, please consider organ donation.  There are many who are not fortunate and need your healthy organs.

In partnership with the non-profit organization Donate Life South Carolina, in 2010 A’s catcher Landon Powell founded the Donors on the Diamond charity event to promote organ donation in South Carolina.

The mission of Donate Life South Carolina is to increase the supply of organs and tissues for transplantation and provide assistance for South Carolina transplant recipients with hopes that one day an organ or tissue will be available for every South Carolinian in need of a transplant.

Prior to reaching the Major Leagues, Powell recovered from two ACL knee surgeries in three short years in which he was a recipient of ligaments from tissue donations. In January of 2009, Powell was diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis, a rare liver disease with no known cure. The disease can be controlled with medication, but Powell will need a liver transplant at some point in his life.

Because of this, organ and tissue donation has become very important to Landon and his family and this was the driving factor in his involvement of raising awareness for organ and tissue donation.

via Landon Powell’s Donors on the Diamond | oaklandathletics.com: Community.

25
May
11

5.25.2011 ‎… sometimes PT hurts …

music: Friend pointed this artist out … I kinda like them.  YouTube – The Apache Relay “Live at Grimey’s_American Nomad with State Trooper bonus”.

products, consumers, Made in the USA, lists:  I enjoyed this list .. I only own two … Weber grills and a few pieces of fiesta ware … Made in USA: 10 Great Products Still Made Here (Slide 1 of 10) – CBS MoneyWatch.com.

technology, smart phones:  I still don’t use those funny squares … but it appears it is the next way.

About eight months ago, the three-store chain started putting these “quick response” codes in its train ads. When customers scan the little squares with their smartphone cameras, a coffee menu pops up on their screens. Then they can order a cup of coffee on the train—and have it waiting when they arrive at one of Ethical Bean’s shops.

Business has doubled since then, says Chief Executive Lloyd Bernhardt. “We catch people who are on the go and don’t have a lot of time,” he says.

via Quick-response codes aim to capitalize on the boom in smartphones – WSJ.com.

cars, compact cars, history, design, quotes: “Gorgeous design costs no more than boring design,” says Mr. Krafcik.

Today, however, cars such as the new Elantra are giving Honda a tough challenge. Hyundai has designed all versions of the Elantra—not just one low-volume variant—to achieve a 40-mpg highway rating from the government. Where Honda offers a five-speed automatic, the Elantra has six speeds, which helps improve efficiency. The Hyundai’s interior appointments, materials and design match up well against the new Civic, which suffers from cheap-looking, black, plastic panels in the dash.

The Elantra’s exterior styling was designed in Hyundai’s California studios and uses tricks familiar to German luxury brands, such as bold creases along the sides and well-defined wheel arches to give the car a “fast” look.

“Gorgeous design costs no more than boring design,” says Mr. Krafcik.

Evidently, auto shoppers agree. Elantra sales more than doubled in April.

via Auto Makers Sweeten the Recipe for Small Cars – WSJ.com.

blog posts, bucket lists, lists, Chicago:  This is a pretty good list of things to do in Chicago … My New Year’s Resolution: A Chicago Bucket List | She’sWrite.

blog posts, superlatives, Paris, public restrooms, Magnificent Mile, Chicago, The Fountain on Locust, St. Louis:  Another good one from friend Cary …

One of my themes in life (cause it’s straight from the good old B-I-B-L-E from which I like to take all my themes in life) is that “the truth shall set you free.” And on the streets of Paris the particular truth that humans do need bathrooms from time to time did indeed set me free — to pursue more culture, more croissants, more adventure.

And in five days’ time it only cost me a couple of Euros.  Money well spent.

via Parisian Restrooms Not for Customers Only « Holy Vernacular.

… and this reminded me of an article in the Tribune years ago which listed the best public restrooms on the Magnificent Mile … it was Ralph Lauren … I searched but could not find the old article , but found this … What’s America’s best restroom? – USATODAY.com.  Seems Cary isn’t the only one who likes nice , clean, free restrooms.

It’s in The Fountain on Locust, a vintage ice cream parlor in St. Louis, according to an annual vote.

A beautifully appointed, clean bathroom is a treat when traveling. And there are several good ways to find them. Check out thebathroomdiaries.com (which helps travelers flush out nice lavs and also honors best restrooms with its “Golden Plunger” awards) or sitorsquat.com, which points you toward the nearest bathrooms when you’re out and about and even has an iPhone app.

Anyone care to recommend a favorite pit stop?

via What’s America’s best restroom? – USATODAY.com.

E. Rivers Elementary School, Atlanta, places, Edward Lindsey, kith/kin, Yoda:  My brothers first graduation speech!  At our public elementary school.  I think he did a great job … Sounds a little like Yoda!

Returning now to the question I posed a few minutes ago — how will this community look in 40 years? The answer is that I HAVE NO IDEA.  What I do know is that in the not too distant future it will be in your hands.  Therefore, the lessons you have learned and will learn in the next few years will give you the tools to deal with the challenges our community faces.

So, in conclusion, remember, show passion, try something new and unique, dare to fail, and take an interest and give back to your community.  If you do these things, I know that Atlanta and Buckhead will be in safe hands in the next forty years when you stand where I am standing.

via Graduation Speech to E. Rivers Elementary School May 24, 2011.

20
Apr
11

4.20.2011 … with two boys in Boulder 4/20 is not my favorite day …

4/20, Boulder, CU:

In Boulder, April flowers not only bring May showers, but also clouds of marijuana smoke over the Norlin Library Quad on 4/20 at 4:20 p.m. Though this event attracts a large group, reactions and views are mixed.

Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws in Washington, D.C., released a letter on 4/20 in 2010, where he referred to these nationwide smoke-outs as “protestivals” happening across the country.

via 4/20 perspectives | CU Independent.

4/20, LOL:  A few more sites for those of you who are just learning about 4/20 (that would be me until Jack went to Boulder …)  Stoner Lingo Decoded: The Super High History of 420 – TIME NewsFeed. … Welcome to Potopia – Newsweek … and a joke ….

When Parents Text

Happy 4/20!

ME: How come harry potter fans dont get a name?! there are trekkies and twihards.

MOM: Pot heads.

via Facebook.

movies, film/lit, The Help:  I hope I respond better to the movie.  My objection to the book is that the author casts a very wide net of condemnation … and I don’t think things were quite so black and white.  But I will definitely go to the movie.  The Help Trailer Released – GalleyCat.

Ayn Rand, politics, Davidson:  I am getting tired of Ayn Rand.  I have some friends who became Randists in college  … it wasn’t pretty. Definitely don’t need a Randist element in the GOP, but obviously we already have it.

Welcome to the Ayn Rand Congress. As I write in a piece for the April 25 issue of the dead-tree magazine, “Rand has always been a lodestar for proponents of limited government.” But never so much as now. Conservative commentators like Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck herald her work. Tea Partyers hoist signs that name-check her literary heroes. Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee chair and GOP man of the moment, has passed out Rand’s novels to staffers and called her the reason he got into politics. Rand’s theory of a two-tiered society — split between the “producers” who shoulder society’s burdens and the “looters” who mooch off their efforts — is one of the strains of thought that animate the Tea Party movement, along with free markets (check), individual liberty (check) and limited government (check). Strands of Rand’s objectivist philosophy are woven through most of Congress’s weighty debates about tax rates and regulations (Alan Greenspan was a Rand protégé), wage scales and social-welfare programs. The 112th Congress has been dominated by apocalyptic debates over fiscal policy; in the last line of Atlas Shrugged, John Galt traces a dollar sign “over the desolate earth.” You could argue that the essential confrontation of this Congress is not between Democrats and Republicans but between people who see income inequality as a major social problem and those who consider it a natural byproduct of an equal-opportunity society.

via Rand Paul Cites Tea Party Prophet Ayn Rand in Congress | Swampland.

news, Fidel Castro:  My generation grew up with classmates whose parents had fled Cuba; I don’t think I ever got what had happened … It is a strange part of our North American/US history … the Cold War and Communism at our back door.

News that Fidel Castro has resigned from the Central Committee of Cuba’s Communist Party isn’t very surprising — slowed by chronic health problems, the 84-year-old has effectively been out of political life since passing over the reins to his brother Raul in 2006. He now looks more familiar to us in a loose track suit than his once iconic military fatigues. (See a terrific photoessay of the Cuban rebels in the jungle over a half century ago.) TIME was there, though, when the bearded revolutionary ousted Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. After the jump: an excerpt from TIME’s gripping Jan. 26, 1959 cover story on Castro’s rise to power.

via Fidel Castro Steps Down from Cuba’s Communist Party Central Committee – Global Spin – TIME.com.

careers, listsFive Best Job Search Sites.

tv, food television shows, lists:  They say we are cooking less and watching food shows more !  Ten food television shows you should be watching – chicagotribune.com.

culture, Tax Day, statistics:  The only thing I get is that we are spending more than we are taking in …

There’s a movement afoot to mail every taxpayer a “taxpayer receipt,” a breakdown of how the government spends its money. The goal is to educate people about where their taxes go, since Americans are famously unaware about such matters.

But as long as we’re talking about educating Americans about fiscal policy, why not start with what they actually pay in taxes, and what they earn, relative to their fellow Americans?

I am constantly amazed by how little Americans know about where they stand in the income and taxing distribution. The latest example is evident in a recent Gallup study, which found that 6 percent of Americans in households earning over $250,000 a year think their taxes are “too low.” Of that same group, 26 percent said their taxes were “about right,” and a whopping 67 percent said their taxes were “too high.”

via Rich People Still Don’t Realize They’re Rich – NYTimes.com.

green, wind farms:  A while back I noted seeing the wind farm in the English Channel, it was an amazing sight.  It will be interesting to view one off our coast.

A federal agency approved a construction and operations plan for the Cape Wind project off the Massachusetts coast, clearing the way for work to begin on America’s first offshore wind farm as early as this fall, Interior Secretary Kenneth Salazar announced Tuesday.

Approval by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement was required before construction of the proposed 130-turbine wind farm in Nantucket Sound could get under way.A

via Mass. offshore wind farm approved; Nation’s 1st – CBS News.

art, the law:  This is one combination I was not expecting … “rediscovering art through law.”

Legal Art Gallery » GALLERY.

cars:  I always loved seeing a mini or micro as a child.  Since the intro of the mini cooper they really are no big deal to the current generation …  the vintage ones are down right comical.

Mini- and Micro-Cars Coming To New York Auto Show – Speakeasy – WSJ.

romance, blog posts, Jane Austen: I have followed Cheryl for several years … love her fiance’s proposal.  Oh, to be young again!

And with such a prospect before me, dear reader, I said yes!

The two gentlemen in costume were friends of James’s, unknown to me; James wrote the scripts with all the Jane Austen references to please me, featuring characters with defects (greed and vanity) that would highlight his own suit in turn–“classic literary foils,” he says. He rented the costumes for them from a shop in Midtown.

via Brooklyn Arden.

blog sites, favorites:  Delancey Place is quickly becoming a favorite.

… very simply a brief daily email with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context. There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, primarily historical in focus, and will occasionally be controversial. Finally, we hope that the selections will resonate beyond the subject of the book from which they were excerpted.

via home | www.delanceyplace.com | eclectic excerpts delivered to your email every day from editor Richard Vague.

137th Kentucky Derby, Louisville places, events:  It almost time for Derby delirium!  Triple Crown Talk | Derby Delirium | BloodHorse.com Blog Stable.

Google, Google Places:  Trying to figure if this would be useful … Google Places.

health, medicines, lists:  Any surprises here? Chart of the Day: The Top 15 Prescription Drugs in America – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic.

DanielPink, acronoym:  I have to admit I never heard of  TANSTAFL, but it is true …

Daniel Pink

RT @markknoller: Obama quotes old saying acronym TANSTAFL (tahn’-stah-fil): “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.”

via (31) Twitter / Home.

27
Feb
11

2.27.2011 … thinking about how we define things … from Sunday School … “religion.” How do you define “religion?”

FPC, Sunday School – Wired Word, Charlotte, faith and spirituality: I usually go to a Sunday School class that focuses on current news … it is called the Wired Word.  This week’s topic was NASCAR, which is both a local and national news topic. 😉  Kirk Hall opened with the question, “How do you/we define religion?”  Very interesting  question.  From Kirk’s weekly e-mail …

NASCAR was born in the Bible Belt and has always welcomed pre-race invocations and religious symbols on cars. The biblical image of running a good race comes to life on the track, and many drivers become saints — especially after their deaths. Fans of the sport value tradition, as well as the risks involved. But has stock-car racing become a kind of civil religion, one that can lead Christians astray? So our next class will focus on the spirituality of NASCAR and how it both helps and hinders the practice of the Christian faith.

Thomasville GA, kith/kin, places, favorites:  One of my favorite places is Thomasville GA … hello, Julie and Doug!  What a nice article!

THOMASVILLE, Ga. – When you think about it, there has to be something pretty impressive about a place that few people outside of Georgia have heard about but was once referred to by Harper’s magazine as “the best winter resort on three continents.”

That place is Thomasville. Deep in the farthest reaches of Georgia, about a rock’s throw from the Florida line, Thomasville is a town where time seems to have stood still and the Old South never completely faded away.

It’s no exaggeration to say that Thomasville is one of the prettiest towns in America for a number of reasons. Rolling green hills. Furrows of red clay in hues of carmine, mahogany, and cinnamon. Graceful plantations that bespeak of an era long ago. Victorian architecture. Southern breezes. Bobwhite quail whistling among the pines. Kudzu-covered roadsides. Towering magnolias and oaks drizzled with Spanish moss. And plenty of warm Southern hospitality.

via Thomasville is one of Georgia’s best-kept secrets – Travel Wires – MiamiHerald.com.

library, Charlotte, Great Recession:  It appears the recovery may be too late to save our wonderful library system.

The Future of the Library Task Force must submit its final recommendations next month. Among the items members will discuss and possibly act upon include:

Whether to increase hours, staffing and resources at the regional libraries. Those changes would come at the expense of the smaller branch libraries, and some are likely to close.

via Tuesday vote could include closing libraries – CharlotteObserver.com.

faith and spirituality, church, Marthame Sanders:  A really good piece by Marthame Sanders.

Eventually, though, it’s time to stop playing church and start being church.

That’s the very problem that Isaiah is facing when he preaches to the ancient Israelites. They do very well at playing the people of God: they do great at the trappings of faith: they follow the sacrificial ordinances, they fast appropriately, they make a great show of humbling themselves. But when it comes to being the people of God, apparently they don’t do so well. And Isaiah let’s them know that they have completely missed the point. The ritual serves its purpose, yes; but if it doesn’t change lives, then it’s useless. “You fast,” he says, “but you oppress. You humble yourself, but you fight and quarrel and attack.”

“True fasting, true faith,” he says, is “loosing the bonds of injustice. It’s letting the oppressed go free. It’s giving bread, shelter, clothing to those who have none. That is where your light will shine – not in the fires of burnt offerings, not in the making of ashes to cover yourself in showy grief – but in the divine light of goodness. That’s when you stop playing a role and start changing the world.”

How do we make that transition? How do we move from playing church to being church? What are the things that we do out of habit, and what are the things we do because they make a difference?

Isaiah does a great job of putting a mirror to Israelite hypocrisy. What would that mirror look like today? What does it mean when we dress up for church, but then gossip about those whom we see at church? What do we say about ourselves when we read these words about injustice, oppression, hunger, homelessness, but then spent the other six days – or even the rest of this day – focused on ourselves? Does Isaiah make us cringe, because these words sound too politically loaded, or do we take this as a cringe-worthy opportunity for self – and community – examination?

via A Low Salt Diet? « i feast therefore i am.

random, tv, House, Princeton:  I realized when I was visiting Princeton that the back of the Campus looks like the aerial shot for House’s hospital … that is because it is.

frist campus center – Google Search.

The locations used for exterior shots of Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital are Princeton University’s First Campus Center, [a] UCLA, and the University of Southern California.

via What Hospital does House MD take place? – Yahoo! Answers.

Warren Buffet, annual letter:  I enjoy reading it and reading the discussion … here are some early reactions.

Warren Buffett speaking to a group of students...

Image via Wikipedia

Warren Buffett has now issued his annual letter to shareholders. Now it is the shareholders’ turn. Here are some reactions from shareholders on Buffett’s letter.

via Here Is What People Are Saying About Buffett’s Letter – Deal Journal – WSJ.

cars, Volvo, station wagons, RIP:  Rest in peace, Volvo wagons … We have driven two, a 240 and a v70 for over 20 years and 350,000 miles combined.   I always assumed  I would have at least one more …

Volvo, the company most associated with station wagons for the last 20 years, will stop selling wagons in the U.S. The market is drying up. Farewell, Family Truckster, farewell (Photo: Ford Motor Co.)The Volvo wagon had been on life support for months. After dropping the larger V70 Volvo in 2010, Doug Speck, CEO of Volvo Cars of North America, told Automotive News he was giving the V50 another year because there “is a bit more energy in the small wagon segment.” Not enough, apparently. Volvo, which was sold to China’s Geely in 2010, sold just 480 V50s last year, about two per dealer.

What happened to the Volvo wagon is a classic case of automotive Darwinism. American buyers first turned away from station wagons during the 1973 oil crisis. Their extreme length, emphasized by long rear overhangs to accommodate a third seat, made them natural targets. In the 1980s, the minivan came along and stole the people-mover business. SUVs moved to the fore in the 1990s. Far more utilitarian, they offered a lot more cargo space, a command seating position, and four-wheel-drive.

via Death of the station wagon.

Apple, Macs, change:  Still more changes … I think I will wait for Lion before getting a new Mac.

But one particularly interesting under-the-hood change that we’ve learned about is an evolution of Mac OS X’s “resolution independence” features. Resolution independence has been a long talked about feature that would eventually provide support for high DPI (dots per inch) displays. While there has been the beginnings of support for it starting in Mac OS X Tiger (10.4) and into Mac OS X Snow Leopard (10.6), full support was never realized. In Mac OS X Lion, however, references to Resolution Independence has been replaced with a new system that could pave the way for these super high resolution “Retina” monitors.

via Mac OS X Lion Building in Support for Super High Resolution ‘Retina’ Monitors – Mac Rumors.

twitter, Middle East Uprising/Awakening: The twitter line reeled me in … the article is very helpful at explaining the differences in the countries involved.

Five lessons we can learn from the Middle East revolutions, including “Patience Is a Virtue” | http://ti.me/fxJ2E9

via TIME.com (TIME) on Twitter.

There’s no need to panic.

Revolutions are messy affairs. They don’t follow the easy logic of middle-school textbooks. Hostilities in the American Revolution broke out a year before the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution was not ratified until nearly seven years after the decisive battle at Yorktown. In two years starting in 1974, Portugal went from neofascism to army rule to something like a communist putsch and then to liberal democracy, where, happily, it has stayed. (Along the way, events in that little country made the end of white rule in South Africa and Rhodesia inevitable. That’s another thing about revolutions: their reverberations often surprise.) The Philippines got rid of Ferdinand Marcos in 1986 but is still groping toward a system of government that is both effective and democratic.

(See TIME’s photo-essay “Scenes from the Unrest in Libya.”)

In the 10 weeks since demonstrations began in Tunisia, the Arab Middle East has been messiness personified. We have seen the relatively swift and peaceful ouster of the regime in Tunisia; an 18-day standoff marked by peaceful mass protests and sporadic regime resistance before the departure of President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt; demonstrations for constitutional reform combatted by deadly force, followed by negotiations in Bahrain; and most recently, the outbreak of violence bordering on civil war in Libya. And this catalog of the Arab world’s democratic winter doesn’t include the protests elsewhere, against everyone from a classic big man in Yemen to hereditary monarchs in Morocco and Jordan. So what can we learn from the region’s revolutions — and those that went before them?

But the key thing about the Arab revolution — the reason we can dream that even Libya may turn out fine — is that Arabs are doing it for themselves. This revolution is a regional one, a movement in which each nation’s young people have learned tactics, technological fixes and slogans from one another. A local TV channel — al-Jazeera, not the BBC or CNN — has been a principal megaphone. The unplanned system of mutual support that has developed may turn out to have done more to bind the region together than the top-down attempts to create pan-Arabism in the 1950s. This year, says Rogan, “Arabs have been inspired by the example of fellow Arabs. What matters in the Arab world matters to Arabs.” For that reason, it matters to us all.

via Learn to Love The Revolution – TIME.

pirates, game changer:

Until four Americans died this week after they were captured by Somali raiders, the United States and other countries considered pirates a nuisance. The world’s navies catch and release hundreds of pirates off the African coast every year, and no one has worried too much about it.

The killings represent a new level of violence in the thriving high seas enterprise.

Fifteen pirates are now in custody in the incident, many of them headed to the U.S. to face criminal charges. But experts say that may be the worst option in fighting the piracy problem.

Nikolas Gvosdev, who teaches at the U.S. Naval War College, told NPR’s Talk of the Nation that the killings could be a “9/11 moment,” like when passengers and airlines decided they had to fight back against hijackers.

via Fighting Piracy At Sea And In Court : NPR.

photographs, Middle East Uprising/Awakening, Libya:  This picture says it with very few words …

CIVIL WAR WEEKEND

via DRUDGE REPORT 2011®.

history, Frederick Douglass, Civil War:

For Douglass, his warm reception in Ireland also served as an ironic contrast to difficulties he would soon face in his native land. Even as he toured Ireland, a blight was destroying the potato crop on which the island depended. In the coming years, the disaster transmogrified into a full-fledged famine, sending millions of Irish to North America. During that period and through the Civil War years, many — but not all — Irish-Americans and their leaders opposed Douglass’s fight to gain rights for African-Americans. They opposed his efforts to win rights for enslaved blacks in the South and for blacks in the North, free but denied U.S. citizenship and subject to widespread discrimination — including, in many cases, both de facto and de jure segregation.

via Frederick Douglass’s Irish Liberty – NYTimes.com.

fast food, McDonalds:  Good question, Why?  (I actually like the oatmeal … but not so much now that I know what is in it.)

The bottom-line question is, “Why?” Why would McDonald’s, which appears every now and then to try to persuade us that it is adding “healthier” foods to its menu, take a venerable ingredient like oatmeal and turn it into expensive junk food? Why create a hideous concoction of 21 ingredients, many of them chemical and/or unnecessary? Why not try, for once, to keep it honest?

I asked them this, via e-mail: “Why could you not make oatmeal with nothing more than real oats and plain water, and offer customers a sweetener or two (honey, the only food on earth that doesn’t spoil, would seem a natural fit for this purpose), a packet of mixed dried fruit, and half-and-half or — even better — skim milk?”

via How to Make Oatmeal . . . Wrong – NYTimes.com.

Academy Awards, gLee, gLee effect:  Wouldn’t you love to be a member of the PS22 Chorus, a fifth-grade glee club from Staten Island!!

The Academy Award show is Sunday night, and excitement is growing over what celebrities will wear, what they will say, and who will be the big winners. In addition, we can expect to hear some musical performances by Mandy Moore, Randy Newman and Gwyneth Paltrow (yes, she’s singing).

But there is one group performing you probably don’t know: The PS22 Chorus, a fifth-grade glee club from Staten Island.

After discovering the PS22 Chorus on YouTube, Anne Hathaway showed up at their Winter Recital in December to personally invite them to perform at the awards show. Needless to say, there was a lot of screaming.

via The PS22 Chorus Goes To The Oscars : Monkey See : NPR.

history, Mount Vernon, George Washington:  Enjoyed this article … perspective is everything.

The new Mount Vernon humanized Washington, but only by eclipsing the true meaning of him and his home for a changing nation: not a refuge from modernity but an incubator of it.

via Rebranding Mount Vernon – NYTimes.com.

TED Prize, street art, public art:  Did not know there was a TED Prize … this one is interesting.

I first met JR one afternoon late last November in his studio in Paris. The nearest Metro station is named after Alexandre Dumas, and there’s something “Three Musketeers”-ish about the team inside too: JR; one right-hand man, Emile Abinal; and the other, their “philosopher and guru,” Marco Berrebi, were winding down from a poster-pasting trip to Shanghai and preparing for a press conference about the positive aftereffects of their portraits in the Middle East. They never really had people in the studio before, and there was some cleaning up to do — for one thing, a yellow Kawasaki motorcycle was parked right in the middle of it. Hanging on a far wall, hidden between large-scale photographs of JR’s installations, was a small trophy cabinet containing two battered broom brushes, a squeegee and a box of powdered glue. “We kneel down and pray in front of that every day,” JR said.

We sat in a corner to talk about the TED Prize, which he won a month earlier. Every year since 2005, the New York-based TED organization has awarded $100,000 to prominent figures like Bono and Bill Clinton and Jamie Oliver who are expected to use the money to fulfill “one wish to change the world.” Now 28 years old, JR is the prize’s youngest winner.

“I don’t even know how they knew my work,” he said, still flush from the news. “What I love about the TED is that it’s not, Hey, take this check and enjoy. It’s, Do something with this, and we’ll help you. I think that’s the most beautiful prize I’ve ever heard of.” Until JR announces his plans this week at the TED conference, the contours of his next project are secret, but it’s likely to resemble his earlier actions, as he calls them; only this time, he says, it will be bigger.

via Supercolossal Street Art – NYTimes.com.

gLee, Katie Couric, school chorus clubs:  I have something in common with Katie Couric …

I’ll admit it, I’m a “Gleek.”

For those of you who don’t watch the show “Glee” that would be a Glee-geek (clever…huh?)

Sure the show can be sappy, but that’s often the point. It is just fun.

However, seeing some real show choirs (singing and dancing students) was even more entertaining.

In our piece for Tuesday’s “CBS Evening News, we profile the students at John Burroughs High School in Burbank, Calif.

via “Glee” effect makes high school choir cool – Couric & Co. – CBS News.

urban planing, aerotroplis, Dubai, China:  Aerotroplis?  Enjoyed this whole article about the next stage in the evolution of cities.

In public statements, Sheikh Ahmed has equated the future of Dubai with the future of Emirates, calling his country’s mammoth airport the center of a new Silk Road connecting China to the Middle East, India and Africa.

Thanks to the jet engine, Dubai has been able to transform itself from a backwater into a perfectly positioned hub for half of the planet’s population. It now has more in common with Hong Kong, Singapore and Bangalore than with Saudi Arabia next door. It is a textbook example of an aerotropolis, which can be narrowly defined as a city planned around its airport or, more broadly, as a city less connected to its land-bound neighbors than to its peers thousands of miles away. The ideal aerotropolis is an amalgam of made-to-order office parks, convention hotels, cargo complexes and even factories, which in some cases line the runways. It is a pure node in a global network whose fast-moving packets are people and goods instead of data. And it is the future of the global city.

This hasn’t been lost on Paul Romer, the Stanford University economist overseeing the development of an instant city in Honduras. He proposes building “charter cities” in impoverished states with new laws, new infrastructure and foreign investors—free trade zones elevated to the realm of social experiment. Mr. Romer sold Honduran President Porfirio Lobo on the idea in November and has stayed on as an adviser. Last month, the Honduran Congress voted to amend the country’s constitution to allow the pilot project to proceed.

The aerotropolis arrives at a moment when urban centers seemingly have started to rule the world. Just 100 cities account for nearly one-third of the global economy. “If the 20th century was the era of nations,” South Korean President Lee Myung-bak pronounced at New Songdo’s christening in 2009, “the 21st century is the era of cities.”

The aerotropolis is tailor-made for today’s world, in which no nation reliably dominates and every nation must fight for its place in the global economy. It is at once a new model of urbanism and the newest weapon in the widening competition for wealth and security.

via Aerotropolis: The Airport-Based Global City of Tomorrow – WSJ.com.

28
Oct
10

10.28.2010 … very random day , but lunch with the Trobs will keep me on my game ! … and Pride & Prejudice tonight at Davidson …

art, me, Art Institute, places, Chicago:  At 19, I fell in love with this painting and then did not “find” it again for 25 years … and when I walked in the room, it had the same impact that it did on me a 19 …  so as I am contemplating a visit to Chicago this year, I can’t wait to walk up to her again.  Do you have a painting that transcends time with you?

The Song Of The Lark 1884 – Breton Prints – Easyart.com.

A few rooms down, Jules Breton’s “The Song of the Lark,” depicting a farm girl in twilight holding a sickle and singing, received the group’s approval for its comprehensibly concretized values, though Saad mostly talked about Willa Cather’s eponymous novel.

via Objectivists on Art | The Chicago Weekly.

-and-

Jules Breton – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

lions, Art Institute, Chicago,places, traditions, terms:  I really did not believe that “wreathing” was a verb … it is … I would like to attend the Wreathing of the Lions in Chicago.

Kick off the holiday season with the Art Institute’s annual Wreathing of the Lions. After the ceremony, watch a performance of “Favorite Things” by HS2 at 11:00 in Griffin Court. Then visit a drop-in workshop to create a Welcome Home Wreath inspired by your favorite Art Institute treasures.

via The Art Institute of Chicago: Calendar: Events.

Apple MacBook Air: Maybe my next toy …

So, if you’re a light-duty user, you might be able to adopt one of the new Airs as your main laptop. If you’re a heavy-duty user, who needs lots of power and file storage, they’re likely to be secondary machines.

Overall, Apple has done a nice job in making these new MacBook Airs feel more like iPads and iPhones without sacrificing their ability to work like regular computers. But, as always with Apple, you’ll pay more than you will with Windows PCs.

via Review: MacBook Air Has iPad Feel | Walt Mossberg | Personal Technology | AllThingsD.

high school, senioritis, culture, success stories: I think CMS was attempting this with its Senior Project, buti n my opinion  it falls short.  It takes a lot of energy and money to pull off.

For many, the boredom starts in October, after early applications are filed.

Quite a few principals agree that we need to reinvent senior year. It should be a chance for teenagers to make the transition from the predictable routines and 42-minute blocks of secondary school to the self-discipline, public speaking and teamwork that is vital in college and many careers.

I know about Ralph Vasami because as classmates at Woodlands High in Hartsdale, N.Y., we both were transformed by WISE, also called the Wise Individualized Senior Experience.

While pursuing our projects off campus, we received credit for 12th-grade English and social studies. We worked closely with teachers we chose as mentors. At the end, we had to stand in front of our classmates and make presentations.

Mr. Vasami recalls himself as an ordinary student with ordinary ambitions at an ordinary high school. “I wasn’t even sure if I was going to college,” he says. But through the experiential learning of WISE, he found his calling.

He went on to Lyndon State College in Vermont; as soon as he graduated, a job was waiting at the company where he had been an intern. Three decades later, Mr. Vasami is chief executive of that company, Universal Weather & Aviation Inc., which has 1,300 employees in 20 countries and $860 million in annual billings.

The other day, I went to see my favorite high school teacher, Vic Leviatin. He and two other Woodlands teachers, Andy Courtney and Toni Abramson-Matthews, nurtured WISE from a pilot project in the early 1970s. As it spread to 60 public and private schools, it became one of the few education reforms I’ve seen that actually delivers what it promises.

via A Potential Vaccination for ‘Senioritis’ – NYTimes.com.

bookshelf, culture:  we talked about relationships and food at our wasabi retreat … I really think there is something here.

Author Mark Kurlansky’s lastest book, Edible Stories, a “novel in sexteen parts,” brings together stories of relationships and food, from Tofurkey to tripe, not to mention Belons and boudin.

via Edible Stories | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

Great Recession, emotional toll, financial toll:

A new Washington Post poll shows that concerns about housing payments have spiked since 2008 despite some improvements in the overall economy. In all, 53 percent said they are “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about having the money to make their monthly payment. Worries are the most intense among those with lower incomes and African Americans.

These concerns can be boiled down to one thing: jobs, said Karen Dynan, who worked as an economist for the Federal Reserve and on President George W. Bush’s council of economic advisers.

via Most Americans worry about ability to pay mortgage or rent, poll finds.

random, technology, internet, marketing:  I still do not understand how these companies make money. Compete Top 50: Bing And Ask Rise – MySpace, MapQuest And Flickr Fall.

prayer, analysis: I have enjoyed Sunday school classes where  we have analyzed the Lord’s Prayer line by line.  This analysis of the Serenity Prayer (used by AA and Al-Anon) is interesting.  I do not agree with her/his analysis, but enjoyed working through it.  Thoughts on a Prayer by Alex Kearns | LikeTheDew.com.

economics, single biggest economic issue in our lifetime:  Puts it front and center for me …

The need is tremendous. The nation’s network of water systems was right at the bottom of the latest infrastructure grades handed out by the American Society of Civil Engineers, receiving a D-minus. Jeffrey Griffiths, a member of the federal government’s National Drinking Water Advisory Council, told The Times: “We’re relying on water systems built by our great-grandparents, and no one wants to pay for the decades we’ve spent ignoring them. There’s a lot of evidence that people are getting sick. But because everything is out of sight, no one really understands how bad things have become.”

What has always struck me about this issue is that there is a desperate need to improve the nation’s infrastructure and a desperate need for the jobs and enhanced economic activity that would come from sustained, long-term infrastructure investment. But somehow the leadership and the will to move forward on the scale that is needed are missing.

via The Corrosion of America – NYTimes.com.

gLee, movies: Many of my friends thought it was the WORST episode.  I had watched RHPS in anticipation of the episode (having seen it twice before in college and never a fan … too weird for me).  But I felt there was some merit in the message, as did Rolling  Stone.  (aside – this may be the first time I have quoted Rolling Stone.)

He ultimately decides to cancel the musical and delivers the episode’s message: “Rocky Horror isn’t about pushing boundaries or making an audience accept a certain rebellious point of view… [The midnight shows] were for outcasts, people on the fringes… searching for anyplace where they felt like they belonged.” With that, the entire ensemble delivers a rousing, G-rated rendition of Rocky’s most popular tune to close out the show.

Bottom Line: Can Adam Shankman direct every episode? Glee has been on an upward climb in season two, peaking with last night’s episode. In two weeks: Puck is back, and the girls tackle “Livin’ On a Prayer.”

via ‘Glee’ Playback: ‘Rocky Horror Glee Show,’ Best Episode Yet | Rolling Stone Music.

movies, romantic comedies, bookshelf, random:  Whatever … It is only a structure … but what will make this an interesting romantic comedy? Also love the reference to “Love Actually and Valentine’s Day treatment.”

We never expected we’d have to write that headline. Moviegoers will soon be treated to a romantic comedy based on the parenting handbook, What To Expect When You’re Expecting.

The 600-page handbook by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel has helped millions of expectant parents (including this GalleyCat editor) cope with pregnancy. Currently, there are 14.5 million copies of the book in print.

Entertainment Weekly has the scoop: “Lionsgate has confirmed that they will adapt the bestselling pregnancy bible What To Expect When You’re Expecting and intend to give it the Love Actually and Valentine’s Day treatment. In other words, we’ll see a series of intertwining vingnettes with enough star wattage to blind most any moviegoer.”

via What To Expect When You’re Expecting Will Be Adapted as Romantic Comedy – GalleyCat.

health, diet: I think I’ll pass on this one … figuratively, that is …

Because I did enjoy the floaty sensation, but more than that, I loved what generations before (and undoubtedly after) me loved about fasting: the triumph, however briefly, over sensuality.

I wasn’t thinking about food. I wasn’t thinking about drink. I wasn’t even thinking about sex. The appetites that rule me every single day were my slaves, for once. By that third day I wasn’t craving anything. I was free.

via The Juice Cleanse – A Strange and Green Journey – NYTimes.com.

good Samaritan, teach your children well: I hope I would stop … I hope my children would stop …

“I just did what I teach kids to do, which is try to treat others as you want to be treated,” Odoms said.

“If anything, I was ticked off at the people driving by,” she said. “Even if they were scared, they should have at least stopped and talked to her and gotten some kind of information.”

via Driver who helped impaled woman: ‘People kept passing her’ – Chicago Breaking News.

libraries, education, Chicago, Great Recession:  Another example of how our infrastructure is the victim of the Great
Recession.  (And yes, i view libraries as infrastructure.)

But the situation at Whittier is hardly unique. Citywide, 164 public schools — nearly 1 in 4 elementary schools and 51 high schools — do not have standalone libraries staffed by a trained librarian.

CPS librariesTeacher Sharon Gonciarczyk, green sweater, works with students in what qualifies as a library at Durkin Park Elementary School, a windowless room that doubles as a supply area. (Terrence Antonio James, Chicago Tribune / October 24, 2010)

If they want to explore a wider world of books or get help with research from a trained librarian, children in Chicago often have to look beyond their school.

Many of the city’s public schools lack libraries, a situation that made a group of mothers in Pilsen so angry they commandeered the ramshackle field house at Whittier Elementary School for more than a month.

The mothers won, and the Chicago school board is set to vote Wednesday on measures including a library for Whittier that should end the protest.

But the situation at Whittier is hardly unique. Citywide, 164 public schools — nearly 1 in 4 elementary schools and 51 high schools — do not have standalone libraries staffed by a trained librarian.

A lack of money and space and the competing need for new technology mean libraries are often left out of school plans even as students in Chicago Public Schools struggle to meet national standards in reading.

Even at those schools that do have a library, which by CPS’ definition means at least one part-time teacher-librarian is on staff, the situation is sometimes far from ideal.

At Durkin Park Elementary School on the Southwest Side, half of a dank and windowless supply room doubles as a library. Only a few children can squeeze into the 12-foot-by-15-foot space, with barely any room to sit down to browse through a book.

“Yeah, I’m frustrated,” says Durkin Park Principal Dan Redmond. “I know we’re better off than most schools, but when I go to other schools (with better libraries) and I see what they have, it breaks my heart. It doesn’t seem fair.”

It’s not just older neighborhood schools that go without libraries. Jones College Prep, a selective enrollment high school, is one of a handful of elite schools within CPS without a library. The school’s library was replaced about five years ago with a classroom for computers and tutoring programs.

Principal Joseph Powers hopes a library will be included in a new $111 million building for the school that was approved last month.

“I feel like it’s a deficiency for the school,” Powers said. “A full-service library or media center can serve as an academic hub for the school. It becomes a place for strong student scholarship where kids go to get resources and learn from the expertise of the librarian or media specialist.”

About one-quarter of the elementary schools without libraries and nearly half of the high schools without them — 25 of the 51 — are charter schools, according to the most recent data available.

Last week, district CEO Ron Huberman said he wishes all schools had a library. But with $7 billion in unmet building needs throughout the system, he said, it’s just not possible.

“We’re having to make do,” he said. “That doesn’t mean kids don’t read, don’t have books. It just means there’s no designated space (for a library).”

Libraries became an integral part of the school experience after Congress approved $100 million for building and expanding school libraries through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

But over time, principals confronted with crowded classrooms, the need for expensive and ever-changing educational computer software, and tighter budgets have replaced full-time librarians with part-timers and volunteers, and converted library space to other uses.

“There are many schools that have (only) classroom libraries because librarians have become a discretionary purchase,” says Barbara Radner, director of the Center for Urban Education at DePaul University. “They’ve gone from being a school essential to now becoming perceived as an option.”

via 164 Chicago public schools without libraries because of lack of space, funds and competing needs – chicagotribune.com.

journalism, media: opinion v. reporting … I always said that I never knew Walter Cronkite was a liberal and that I did know that about Dan Rather,  and it was one reason, maybe the reason, that Dan Rather “was no” Walter Cronkite.

Still, I am not here to defend NPR. I just like facts to be separate from opinions, and that brings me to the large issue: we now live in a world with two types of journalism. This is a relatively new fact and, judging by the hubbub surrounding the Juan Williams firing, takes some getting used to. With the exception of the very young, everyone reading this grew up on fact-based—not opinion-based—mass media. (Yes, I know there are those on the right who think this a fantasy, but that’s what makes horse racing.)

In the old days, you might have thought you knew the political mind of many journalists, but it was not necessarily so. They were quite careful not to imbue their reporting with their personal biases. If they didn’t they tended to get fired in much the way Mr. Williams was by NPR.

Call it wishful thinking or a bias of unfounded conceit, but it is human nature to ascribe our personal perspective to those we watch, hear or read. At least it is until they give us incontrovertible evidence to the contrary. I thought a few former ABC, CBS and NBC correspondents were liberals like me until they took up with Fox News and denounced their former employers. (I’m not sure if it was wishful thinking or conceit in my case, but I’m leaning toward the latter.)

Spurred by the emergence of talk radio’s Rush Limbaugh in the 80’s, opinion became profitable. Then Roger Ailes’s particular genius saw that one could parade opinion as fact, and Fox News, a sister product to The Wall Street Journal in the News Corporation panoply, was born, signaling in turn the birth of a new, at least on a mass market scale, brand of journalism that wears its heart on its sleeve. Sure, specialty publications like The Nation and The New Republic have been around for years, but their subscriber base has always been rather modest when compared to the millions of viewers for Fox News Channel and more recently—and less grandly—MSNBC.

Viewed through this lens, the moment where a reporter or analyst for a news agency that has strict and specific rules about its employees’ conduct in the public square was bound to come. NPR says they had already warned Mr. Williams that his opinion-driven appearances on FNC constituted a breach of those rules, and had requested that his NPR affiliation not be noted in on-screen descriptions. He knew very well that he could not stand with one foot in the fact-based world of journalism and the other in the opinion-based world. This day was bound to come. There is a new line and the ethical implications are just dawning.

via NPR: Most Recent Casualty of the New Journalism by Jon Sinton | LikeTheDew.com.

architecture, Apple, Chicago: Chicagoans are architectural snobs, you know …

The tightly controlled Apple publicity machine isn’t making much of the fact that the company’s new store in Chicago’s Clybourn corridor (left) looks an awful lot like another Apple store in, of all places, an outdoor shopping center in Scottsdale, Ariz. (below)

On the face of it, importing a cookie-cutter design from that architectural nowhere to Chicago, the first city of American architecture, is an insult, particularly because Apple last year opened a custom-designed store, complete with an elegant glass roof, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

But some prototype designs are better than others, and while this one, which made its debut Saturday, has minuses, it is hard to argue with the outcome: a sleek, minimalist object, bracingly transparent, that also delivers a major upgrade to the cityscape.

via Cityscapes: Apple tweaks its cookie-cutter; new store in Chicago is less than original, but still upgrades the cityscape.

baseball, baseball cards, Honus Wagner, children’s/YA lit: Since Honus and Me: A Baseball Card Adventure was one of Edward’s favaorite books as a kid, I just jumped all over this story … add nuns and it makes it even more interesting!.

Sister Virginia Muller had never heard of shortstop Honus Wagner.

But she quickly learned the baseball great is a revered figure among collectors, and the most sought-after baseball card in history. And thanks to an unexpected donation, one of the century-old cards belongs to Muller and her order, the Baltimore-based School Sisters of Notre Dame.

The Roman Catholic nuns are auctioning off the card, which despite its poor condition is expected to fetch between $150,000 and $200,000. The proceeds will go to their ministries in 35 countries around the world.

via Nuns auctioning rare Honus Wagner baseball card – MLB – SI.com.

science, the future:

An international consortium of scientists says it has identified and catalogued the vast majority of genetic variations among people, a huge step toward the ultimate goal of mapping nearly all such differences in humans’ biological blueprints.

The project, which will cost $120 million over five years, is expected to speed efforts to study the roles genes play in many diseases, including diabetes and coronary ailments.

The 1000 Genomes Project Consortium, as it is known, used the latest technology to sequence the entire genome of 179 people and the protein-coding genes on 697 others. By studying populations of European, West African, and East Asian ancestry, the researchers are able to compare genetic information between individuals and also across different populations.

Its findings were published in related papers in Nature and Science on Wednesday.

The pilot phase identified 15 million genetic differences among the people studied, more than half of which had never been seen before, according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature. That means the database—which will be available to researchers world-wide—will list 95% of the genetic variations found in people, according to comments during a briefing by Richard Durbin of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, co-chairman of the project steering committee.

via Most Human Gene Variations Identified, Scientists Report – WSJ.com.

cars, if I had a million dollars, followup, movies, James Bond: …well, a billion … I would buy this for John!

An Aston Martin driven by Sir Sean Connery in James Bond films has gone under the hammer for £2.6m.

The DB5 was the star of Thunderball and Goldfinger

The 1964 DB5 – dubbed the most famous car in the world – was bought at an auction for well under the guide price of £3.5m.

via James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 Star Of Goldfinger And Thunderball Sold For £2.6m | UK News | Sky News.

17
Oct
10

10.17.2010 … Yesterday was perfect weather in Boulder … I can’t wait to see what is out there today … oh, in anticipation of Tuesday’s gLee, I attempted to watch The Rocky Horror Picture Show with Molly and Liv … It was too weird for all of us …

cars:

roughly $940,000

via Maybach 57 S Coupe | Uncrate.

food/drinks: I don’t think I am old, yet!

Old Man Drinks

Think twice before you start making fun of the elder statesman sitting at the end of the bar — odds are he might know something you don’t. Old Man Drinks ($10) celebrates the drinks of generations past, offering up descriptions, histories, and recipes for over 60 vintage cocktails, including Sidecars, Rusty Nails, and the aptly-named Old Fashioneds

via Old Man Drinks | Uncrate.

cars:

The Aston Martin Cygnet ($TBA) is a new production two-door hatchback — yes, you read that correctly — that forgoes the company’s normal combination of lengthy, powerful machines for eco-friendliness and efficiency of both space and design, with a body that measures just under ten feet long while affording all the creature comforts one expects from Aston Martin.

news, Chilean Miners:  they got the biggest reward …life … Rewards for Miners Rescued in Chile – NYTimes.com.




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