Posts Tagged ‘Christmas music

08
Dec
11

12.8.2011 … used bookstores are wonderful … so loved my find – The Frugal Gourmet Celebrates Christmas … Spotify is great … mourning for the VT community …

used bookstores, A Reader’s Corner, Louisville KY, The Frugal Gourmet Celebrates Christmas (Jeff Smith), Christmas, Christmas traditions: I found a wonderful book in a used bookstore, A Reader’s Corner, over Thanksgiving . The book is entitled The Frugal Gourmet Celebrates Christmas and is by Jeff Smith. It is not a cookbook . ” I hope you use this book to help your family better understand the profound and joyous holiday.” I have always enjoyed the Frugal Gourmet and think this a very interesting twist to his usual cookbook. He does in contain a dish for each representative in the traditional creche scene.

social media:  🙂

This video is an artistic take on how the story of the nativity might have read had a social network existed at the time of Jesus’s birth. Follow this historical period as it unfolds as a digital narrative. This vignette is great for highlighting the truths and circumstances of our Savior’s birth in a fresh, unique way.

Like the song? O Come Emmanuel, by Folk Angel, is available for free when you purchase and download the video from IgniterMedia.com.

via A Social Network Christmas – YouTube.

liberal arts, education, careers, success:  Worked for me …

I never figured out the admission formula, but as a former CEO with more than 30 years in management at a Fortune 50 firm, I can offer advice on that second big question: pursue a liberal arts education. For most people, it’s the best foundation for a successful career.

… But as someone who spent many years assessing the skills and talents of management prospects for a wide range of disciplines and industries, I know that the candidates who were the most attractive manager prospects were those with a well-exercised mind, leadership potential, and the passion to make a difference. These success factors can be cultivated in many ways, but all are best developed by taking courses in the liberal arts and sciences.

Developing one’s mind is no different from developing a strong body: exercise and, specifically, cross training. By studying art, science, the humanities, social science, and languages, the mind develops the mental dexterity that opens a person to new ideas, which is the currency for success in a constantly changing environment. And just as an aspiring major league pitcher needs a live arm and a calculating, cool head to pitch effectively, so too does a management prospect need to be educated broadly to respond effectively to ambiguity and uncertainty. Completing a broad liberal arts curriculum should enable a student to develop the conceptual, creative and critical thinking skills that are the essential elements of a well-exercised mind.

via A.G. Lafley: A Liberal Education: Preparation for Career Success.

Davidson College, Davidson basketball, Vanderbilt: Davidson shows no fear!

As the game began to wind down, as Vanderbilt threatened to push the lead into the 20s, the Wildcats stopped taking turns and found their scorer – De’Mon Brooks, a 6-7 sophomore forward out of Charlotte Hopewell.

If you were to ask somebody how Brooks gets his points, there would be no obvious answer. He has no stunning go-to move, no crossover dribble that entices fans to jump and shout, nothing terribly pretty.

A fan held up a sign early that said: WE WILL NOT FEAR.

Brooks did not fear. In the first half he scored six points on four field goal attempts and grabbed two rebounds. He couldn’t back the bigger and burlier Commodores down.

In the second half, Brooks scored 18 points and grabbed seven rebounds. He forced his way into the lane and hit jump shots. He spun. He fought.

One play more than any other attests to his work: Blocked out, he followed a miss by going one-on-one, one-on-two, one against the world. He somehow grabbed the rebound over the two Vanderbilt big men, drew a foul and hit two free throws.

The 18-point deficit became 14, 12 and seven. With 31 seconds remaining the Wildcats cut the lead to six. With nine seconds left, Davidson cut the lead to three.

But the Commodores had enough. They won 87-83.

You don’t have to go to the Triangle to see big-time basketball. This was a taut, dramatic and exciting game on a small campus in a gym full of noise.

Be interesting to see what Brooks does Saturday against an athletic Charlotte team when the Wildcats and 49ers play for the unofficial championship of Mecklenburg County.

via Davidson shows no fear | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Spotify, Christmas music, Amy Grant: Amazing thing about Spotify is that I can listen to whatever Christmas album I want and do not have to go to the basement and dig out the box that has tapes and cds in it. Love that … am currently listening to my usual first christmas album … Amy Grant’s A Christmas Album  (1983).

Coca-Cola Company, secret formula:

The Coca-Cola Company has moved its secret formula for the first time in 86 years, taking it from a bank vault to a new repository on exhibit at its downtown Atlanta museum.

The world’s largest beverage maker says the new vault containing the formula will be on display for visitors to its World of Coca-Cola museum. However, the 1886 formula itself will remain hidden from view.

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola says the decision to move the formula from a vault at SunTrust Banks Inc. had nothing to with the bank’s decision in 2007 to sell its long-held stake in Coca-Cola.

via Coca-Cola moves formula for 1st time since 1925  | ajc.com.

 

Christmas traditions, nativity scenes, zombies: Where can I get one? 🙂

… and, finally, in keeping with our current cultural fascination with all things zombie, i give you the etsy craftiness of: the zombie nativity. really, just, no comment.

via 27 worst nativity sets: the annual, growing list!.

Facebook, value:  Long term staying power …

Rightly or wrongly, what’s caused me to start to evaluate whether Facebook has peaked is my own declining use of the site. I find myself using it less and less each day, sometimes going days or weeks without checking it. Interestingly, I have also observed that many in my network are posting less often. What may be happening is that consumers are experiencing Facebook fatigue.

I recently polled almost 500 high school students in San Jose, and shockingly, not all of them were on Facebook. But perhaps not surprisingly, nearly all who were said they were basically bored with the site and had been using it significantly less.

Now, depending on how heavy of a technology user you are, you may find the idea of Facebook on its way out surprising or not surprising. For example, many of the young people I surveyed conveyed that they were ready for something else. Call me crazy, but I firmly believe that Facebook has either peaked or is on the cusp of peaking.

All of my thinking on this comes, of course, on the heels of news reports about Facebook’s preparing its IPO. But it also comes at a time when Facebook has to overcome negative press due to a settlement with the FTC over privacy issues. Those events are on opposite sides of the spectrum and could potentially be used to argue for or against Facebook’s long-term staying power.

If you’ve been using Facebook for more than a few years and think back to how you used it in the beginning, you’ll most likely remember using it quite frequently for long periods of time. Much of this initial time spent connecting with friends and family or rediscovering old friends was what made Facebook great. Even many who are new to Facebook may still find themselves using it heavily by doing some of those same things.

But at some point, Facebook usage becomes more about profile management and quick checkups than heavy usage. Now, although this isn’t bad, it’s not what Facebook wants as it looks to maintain a large, healthy business.

via Facebook on Decline? Some Users Bored, New Competition | Techland | TIME.com.

 

01
Jan
11

1.1.11 … Happy MMXI!

New Year’s Eve, holidays, history, NYC:

The first New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square occurred in 1904, just after the New York Times had relocated to a new building in what had been known as Longacre Square. Publisher Adolph Ochs had successfully pushed for a renaming of the district, and the triangular area where the new building sat at the intersection of 7th Avenue, Broadway, and 42nd Streets has since then been known as Times Square.

That year Ochs sponsored a party to beat all parties to celebrate the new location. An all-day street festival was capped off with a fireworks display, and there were thought to have been 200,000 people in attendance. The Times continued to sponsor a New Year’s Eve event in the area, and New Yorkers soon began going to Times Square instead of ringing in the new year at Trinity Church as had been the previous custom.

A few years later the city banned the use of fireworks, and that led to the creation of a new tradition. At first, Ochs’ team developed a creative use of lights. At the end of 1905, lights were configured to read “1906” and these electric lights flashed from the tower of the Times building, reportedly visible from miles away. The Times tower was also festooned with electric streamers that lighted the building’s four corners.

But the creative thinkers were still at work.

via Kate Kelly: The Times Square Ball Drop and the Story Behind It.

CSR: The Year in CSR: The Four Trends of 2010 | Fast Company.

random: government regulation, Chicago: “bird-friendly construction for all new city buildings.” … why?  “Highland Park is in the flight path of a number of migrating birds that like to follow the Lake Michigan shoreline”

The city council in the northern Chicago suburb of Highland Park will soon consider a proposal to require bird-friendly construction for all new city buildings.

City officials tell the Chicago Tribune that if the new law is passed, all future public buildings would be required to incorporate bird-safe architecture that’s designed to lower the number of bird collisions with buildings.

Private developers would not be affected, but Highland Park Director of Community Development Michael Blue says he hopes the city’s example would influence them as well.

Bird-friendly architecture includes curved windows and awnings, which have been shown to lower the incidences of bird collisions with buildings.

Highland Park is in the flight path of a number of migrating birds that like to follow the Lake Michigan shoreline

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

random, Disney: “”interactive cakes,” cakes equipped with miniature projectors that can produce simulations of landscapes and, naturally, Disney characters.”

According to tech blog Gizmodo, Disney has been awarded a patent for so-called “interactive cakes,” cakes equipped with miniature projectors that can produce simulations of landscapes and, naturally, Disney characters.

Okay. That’s weird enough. But, how would the cakes be interactive? When cutting a slice or using specially coded utensils, the projectors might instantly create a special effect. For example, Captain Hook might instantly appear and draw his sword as one approaches the cake with a knife.

via Dawn of the Interactive Cake | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

iPad apps, lists:  The 7 Most Innovative iPad Apps of 2010 | Slideshows. ,iPhone App Helps You Actually Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions This Time | Fast Company, The Top Ten iPhone (and Android) Apps of 2010 – Digits – WSJ.

bookshelf, Children’s/YA lit:

If you were in the market this season for a book that would appeal to a teenager, you probably noticed that the young adult sections in bookstores and on bestsellers lists were filled with titles bearing dark and scary themes.

Whether it’s Suzanne Collins’s “The Hunger Games” trilogy or James Paterson’s “Maximum Ride” series, the popularity of post-apocalyptic fiction doesn’t seem to be abating.

via The Dark Side of Young Adult Fiction – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com.

-and-

Oh, To Be Young: The Year’s Best Teen Reads : NPR.

NBA basketball, Stephen Curry, Charlotte:  Most there were probably pleased to have the Warriors win.  That is how strong the love is for Curry in Charlotte.

Between Ellis and Charlottean Stephen Curry (24 points on 10-of-17 shooting), the Warriors scored with exceptional ease much of this game. Golden State shot 49 percent to the Bobcats’ 42 percent. But the Warriors never scored again after Ellis’ layup with 1 minute, 20 seconds left, and that should have allowed the Bobcats to steal this one.

This is what you call a teaching moment, following Silas’ first loss in three games as Larry Brown’s replacement.

“I think he was looking to penetrate, but (the Warriors) were really crowded” around him, Silas said of Jackson’s last shot.

“We called for a specific set, then didn’t get into that set. We need to point it out in practice, so next time they’ll know what to do.”

via Curry, Warriors hold off Bobcats – CharlotteObserver.com.

politics, VP Joe Biden:  Biden the linchpin?

Vice President Joe Biden is a career politician who has spent virtually his entire adult life in Washington politics — seemingly the antithesis of Barack Obama’s hope-and-change message.

Yet with a new political order in Washington, the success of Obama’s presidency hinges more and more on the negotiating skills and political instincts of his No. 2.

Facing a revived Republican Party, the White House is expected to increasingly deploy Biden as a presidential surrogate to find compromises and coax reluctant lawmakers into crossing party lines. Even Biden’s penchant for veering off message is being reevaluated inside the White House as a bridge to ordinary voters who appreciate blunt talk.

A model for Biden’s role in the next session of Congress was the recent passage of the New START nuclear arms treaty with Russia. Biden, who built a reputation as a foreign policy expert during his 36 years in the Senate, prevailed in an internal White House debate over whether to press for ratification in the lame-duck session.

via Biden is a linchpin of Obama’s presidency – chicagotribune.com.

Christmas music, music, lists:  I must like lists … it is interesting to see what others think is best or worthy. Christmas Playlist 2010 | CU Independent.

health, obesity: “Rich foods work much like heroin on the brain, making it hard to stop eating them.”

It seems so simple: Too much food and not enough activity make people fat.

But the actual processes that create and perpetuate that imbalance are proving to be astoundingly complex.

Biology, physiology, psychology, genetics and environment figure in the obesity equation to varying degrees. Scientists across North Carolina and beyond are trying to understand how, in recent decades, the population has bloated to a point that lean people are a minority.

“There is no simple answer,” said Bernard Fuemmeler, a Duke University researcher who is studying the mind-body link in obesity. “People tend to think that it may be willpower or just a lack of control. And these may be reasons, but not explanations for what is driving the epidemic.”

In their quest to find explanations, researchers across the state – at Duke, UNC Chapel Hill, Wake Forest and East Carolina universities – are discovering or are building upon findings that prove just how intractable a foe fat can be:

Rich foods work much like heroin on the brain, making it hard to stop eating them.

via Your body is thwarting your weight-loss efforts – CharlotteObserver.com.

bookshelf, lists:  More lists … Best Books Of 2010: The Complete List : NPR., Book Club Picks: Give ‘Em Something To Talk About : NPR.

real estate, I.M. Pei, Chicago, Great Recession, Great Recovery?:

The John Hancock Tower in Boston was a 62-story glass emblem of the commercial real estate market’s collapse, so its sale—for $930 million—could be a sign that the market for office buildings is picking up again.

Boston Properties Inc., the largest U.S. office real investment trust, is the new owner of New England’s tallest building in a deal announced late Wednesday. The REIT paid $289.5 million in cash and assumed $640.5 million in debt, Bloomberg reports.

The sellers, Normandy Real Estate Partners and Five Mile Capital Partners LLC, had bought the building for $661 million.

Designed by I.M. Pei, the sleek office building literally halved in value after Broadway Partners, led by young entrepreneur Scott Lawlor, bought it for $1.3 billion and then defaulted on a portion of the loan in January 2009, as what had been a booming market went bust. Because Lehman Brothers was a big lender and buyer in the commercial real estate market, its collapse a few months earlier had a domino effect.

via John Hancock Tower Sells For 930 Million In Symbolic Deal – The Business Blotter – Portfolio.com.

baby boomers, retirement:

It may be hard to believe, but the generation that transformed America as it came of age in the 1960s is now entering its senior years.

“There are 7,000 boomers a day who will be turning 65 in 2011, which is a significant birthday for sure,” says Steve Cone, executive vice president of AARP.

Sixty-five used to be the age when Americans stopped working, kicked back and embarked on serious leisure to make up for all those decades of the daily grind. But just like with every other stage of life they’ve gone through, baby boomers are expected to transform how we think about “retirement.”

Leading the way will be couples like Stephanie and Stan Zirkin. She will turn 65 on May 14; he’s already 65, not officially a boomer, but, as he puts it, “close enough.”

via Boomers Take The ‘Retire’ Out Of Retirement : NPR.

The Supreme Court: I agree …

WASHINGTON—Chief Justice John Roberts decried the partisan warfare that has slowed the appointment of federal judges to a crawl, writing in his year-end report Friday that political gamesmanship on Capitol Hill has left some courts burdened with “extraordinary caseloads.””Each political party has found it easy to turn on a dime from decrying to defending the blocking of judicial nominations, depending on their changing political fortunes,” the chief justice wrote. He called on Congress and the president “to find a long-term solution to this recurring problem.”The chief justice, a 2005 appointee of former President George W. Bush, took no position on any specific nominee, nor did he identify lawmakers by name in the annual report, which customarily includes figures on the court system’s workload and a plea for more money.But while styled as a condemnation of both parties, in practical terms the message was a knock against Senate Republicans, who have fought to minimize the imprint President Barack Obama leaves on the federal bench.

via Chief Justice Decries Brawling Over Judicial Nominees – WSJ.com.

random, music, street art:

The snow and subway stress have been no match for cellist Dale Henderson this week. In fact, with more straphangers waiting longer for trains, he’s had an easier time accomplishing his mission: sharing Bach’s cello suites with as many people as possible.

“There was incredible density,” Mr. Henderson said after playing in the Times Square station on Wednesday night. “It felt really good.”

Mr. Henderson, 34, has been performing in the city’s subways for about two years, but it’s not technically busking because he no longer accepts money in exchange for the music. “It always felt bad to be doing it for money,” he said. “People will insist. They say, ‘Just take the money.’ I don’t know why.”

via Subway Cellist Brings Music to the Masses – WSJ.com.

culture:  This reminded me of my cousins taking friends from Atlanta down to Pineview, GA, to learn how to rock on the front porch!


“We’re all overstimulated,” said Ms. Lee. “I think it’s important to stop all that for a while and see what several hours of being bored really feels like.”

via Boredom Enthusiasts Discover the Pleasures of Understimulation – WSJ.com.

history, pardons, Billy the Kid, random: Sorry, Billy.

The iconic outlaw Billy the Kid will not receive a posthumous pardon after all, New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson announced Friday, his last day in office.

Stephanie Simon explains why New Mexico may give Billy The Kid a pardon for a crime he committed in 1879. Plus, President Obama may cut corporate taxes and why 2010 was turbulent for airline travelers.

Mr. Richardson had been considering whether to give the Kid a pardon based on sketchy, but plausible, historical evidence that the gun-slinging, cattle-rustling, sheriff-shooting outlaw had been promised clemency by the territorial governor in the 1880s, Lew Wallace.

Historians had produced several newspaper articles from the time quoting Mr. Wallace as saying that he had promised to wipe clean a murder charge against the Kid in return for his testimony against three men in an unrelated killing.

But in the end, “the governor just felt there wasn’t enough conclusive proof,” said Eric Witt, deputy chief of staff for Mr. Richardson. “He takes the power of the pardon very seriously.”

On ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Mr. Richardson explained further.

“The romanticism appealed to me but the facts and the evidence did not support it,” Mr. Richardson said.

via Old West Outlaw Billy the Kid Fails to Win a Pardon – WSJ.com.




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