Posts Tagged ‘comfort food

17
Jun
13

6.17.12 … 16 Must-Try Fried Chicken Spots … Only two restaurants in The South … You have to be kidding me …

fried chicken, comfort food, Austin TX:  Only two restaurants in The South, and they are both in TX, made this Zagat’s list of fried chicken spots.  You have to be kidding me.

 

Is there any comfort food more soul-satisfying than fried chicken? Not only that, but fried chicken is trending right now in a major way at gourmet restaurants around the U.S. Just in time for summer, we’ve rounded up some of the best spots to savor the deep-fried birds in eight of our blog cities. Check out two of the top places in each town for fried chicken in the slide show, and be sure to watch this video about some of the country’s best offerings.

via 16 Must-Try Fried Chicken Spots in 8 U.S. Cities | Zagat Blog.

08
Jan
13

1.8.13 Did I say … ROLL TIDE!

BCS Championship, University of Alabama, Notre Dame University, rout:

 A rout is a chaotic and disorderly retreat or withdrawal of troops from a battlefield, resulting in the victory of the opposing party, or following defeat, a collapse of discipline, or poor morale.

via Rout – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

 

Just seemed right. 🙂

Over the past few weeks, a little nickname for tonight’s Alabama–Notre Dame college-football national title game has gained some traction: “Catholics vs. Cousins.” You see, because Notre Dame is a Catholic school. And Alabama is a backwater that spawns inbreeding, don’t you know? Get it?

via ‘Catholics vs. Cousins’ in Notre Dame–Alabama Football Game | TIME.com.

comfort food, doughnuts, Krispy Kreme:  Kill me now …

Photo: Craving dark chocolate? Introducing our new Dark Chocolate Strawberry and Double Dark Chocolate Doughnuts- http://krispykreme.com/doughnuts.

 – Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and Coffee.

 

comfort food, grilled cheese: comfiest?

In terms of comfort food, grilled cheese is the comfiest.

via Grilled Cheese Recipes: 25 Mouthwatering Sandwiches.

corporate social responsibility, bottom line:

We don’t foresee a time in the near future when measures of social performance will be as objective as the measure of long-term financial performance we’ve developed. That said, we will continue to track how CEOs are doing in the two areas, with the aim of encouraging leaders to shine in both.

via Can Companies Both Do Well and Do Good? – Morten T. Hansen, Herminia Ibarra, and Urs Peyer – Harvard Business Review.

Downton Abbey, kiss:  Kiss of death?

Later, Matthew goes to her bedroom to smooth things over. Because it’s bad luck to see the bride before the wedding, they talk with a door between them and then share a kiss with their eyes closed. But Mary peeks – will it bring bad luck? Well, her horse-drawn carriage did make it to the chapel and the pair returned safely from their honeymoon in the south of France.

via Downton Abbey Season 3 Premiere – The 5 Best Moments : People.com.

birthdays, statistics: I’m not very common. Two of my three children are not very common. 🙂

A friend posted an interesting data table on my Facebook wall yesterday, which was my birthday. The data listed each day of the year with a ranking for how many babies were born in the United States on each date from 1973 to 1999. Some interesting trends are evident in the data. Apparently, people like to make babies around the winter holiday season because a large proportion of babies are born in September (ours is due Sept. 24, btw).

via How Common Is Your Birthday? | The Daily Viz.

 

07
Oct
11

10.7.2011 … grocery, grocery store or HT, Kroger, etc? … Christmas in October? … Since I mentioned Christmas – Amy Grant … Pez dispensers … OK a very random day!

words, local customs, retailing, Christmas, Amy Grant, PEZ dispensers, random, holiday traditions:  Ok … It’s October 7 … I went to the grocery (do you say grocery, grocery store or call it by its franchise name… Harris Teeter, for me?), and I smelled cinnamon. Looked up and saw a display of McCormick holiday spices, next to that display Christmas tree shaped Little Debbie cakes, next to that fake Oreos filled with peppermint cream, and finally Christmas cookie cutters. Has someone gone mad??

Speaking of Christmas, I just saw a e-mail which lists Amy Grant’s Christmas holiday tour, and I  have to admit Amy Grant’s early Christmas album is still my first to listen to every Christmas season … old habits die hard. Thank you Mary Phil  for introducing me to her a million years ago.

And while I am discussing holidays … found this fun quiz … HowStuffWorks “PEZ Quiz”. ‎:) … I wish I had saved 21 years of PEZ dispensers from my children’s Christmas stockings, Easter Baskets, Halloween surprises and birthdays …

Steve Jobs, RIP, tributes, speaking ill ... :

Gizmodo Tribute Video To Steve Jobs – YouTube.

When Steve Jobs resigned from Apple in August, 7,000 miles away in Hong Kong, graphic design student Jonathan Mak Long, “shocked” by the CEO’s departure, did what he knew best: He created a design to honor the Apple co-founder.

The 19-year-old posted the image, the Apple logo with the bite changed to a profile of Jobs, to his Tumblr blog. Known as Jonathan Mak, he initially received about 80 notes on the image. Then word came this past Wednesday that Jobs had died, after a long battle with cancer. Mak reposted the homage, which this time caught fire on the Web, attracting an almost immediate response of 10,000 likes and reblogs on his Tumblr site and surging to 180,000 — in one day. Comments included “awesome invention like steve jobs.” One thought it should be the “new Apple logo.” Another wanted to “use it as a tattoo.”

Speaking in fluent English (which he said he learned from watching the TV show “Friends”), the Polytechnic University School of Design student told Yahoo! in a Skype interview that the image was a tribute to Jobs’s contributions to the world: “I wanted to commemorate him. He’s such an integral part of Apple. I thought it would be fitting to include him in the Apple logo.” Long added, “With Jobs gone, Apple is literally missing a piece.”

via Apple tribute logo a Web hit | Today in Tech – Yahoo! News.

Everybody fails. It’s what comes next that counts.

Jobs wormed his way back into Apple, first as an adviser, then as interim chief executive, then by dropping the “interim.” What followed must be among the greatest comebacks in business.

He proved himself to be the Thomas Edison of our age: prickly, yes, but adept at combining technology and business to change peoples’ lives.

Edison has the more impressive portfolio — you can get by without your iPod more easily than you can without lightbulbs. No, really, you can.

But Jobs has the more impressive following.

For many people who heard the news of Jobs’ death, there was an immediate lurch of sadness.

On the sidewalk beside the Apple Store along Chicago’s North Michigan Avenue, Jobs’ fans on Thursday created a shrine to his memory. They left flowers, lit candles and placed fresh apples on the concrete. The same spontaneous tributes occurred at Apple Stores in London, Paris, Tokyo and elsewhere around the world.

“I promise to always take the next big step,” said one message left for Jobs in Chicago.

“Let’s go invent tomorrow,” said another, invoking a Jobs quote.

via The amazing reaction to the death of Steve Jobs – chicagotribune.com.

mike10072011

Political Cartoons from Mike Luckovich.

 

“Everyone always wanted a piece of Steve,” said one acquaintance who, in Mr. Jobs’s final weeks, was rebuffed when he sought an opportunity to say goodbye. “He created all these layers to protect himself from the fan boys and other peoples’ expectations and the distractions that have destroyed so many other companies.

“But once you’re gone, you belong to the world.”

Mr. Jobs’s biographer, Mr. Isaacson, whose book will be published in two weeks, asked him why so private a man had consented to the questions of someone writing a book. “I wanted my kids to know me,” Mr. Jobs replied, Mr. Isaacson wrote Thursday in an essay on Time.com. “I wasn’t always there for them, and I wanted them to know why and to understand what I did.”

Because of that privacy, little is known yet of what Mr. Jobs’s heirs will do with his wealth. Unlike many prominent business people, he has never disclosed plans to give large amounts to charity. His shares in Disney, which Mr. Jobs acquired when the entertainment company purchased his animated film company, Pixar, are worth about $4.4 billion. That is double the $2.1 billion value of his shares in Apple, perhaps surprising given that he is best known for the computer company he founded.

Mr. Jobs’s emphasis on secrecy, say acquaintances, led him to shy away from large public donations. At one point, Mr. Jobs was asked by the Microsoft founder Bill Gates to give a majority of his wealth to philanthropy alongside a number of prominent executives like Mr. Gates and Warren E. Buffett. But Mr. Jobs declined, according to a person with direct knowledge of Mr. Jobs’s decision.

Now that Mr. Jobs is gone, many people expect that attention will focus on his wife, Laurene Powell Jobs, who has largely avoided the spotlight, but is expected to oversee Mr. Jobs’s fortune. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Mrs. Powell Jobs worked in investment banking before founding a natural foods company. She then founded College Track, a program that pairs disadvantaged students with mentors who help them earn college degrees. That has led to some speculation in the philanthropic community that any large charitable contributions might go to education, though no one outside Mr. Jobs’s inner circle is thought to know of the plans.

Mr. Jobs himself never got a college degree. Despite leaving Reed College after six months, he was asked to give the 2005 commencement speech at Stanford.

In that address, delivered after Mr. Jobs was told he had cancer but before it was clear that it would ultimately claim his life, Mr. Jobs told his audience that “death is very likely the single best invention of life. It is life’s change agent.”

The benefit of death, he said, is you know not to waste life living someone else’s choices.

“Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.”

via With Time Running Short, Steve Jobs Managed His Farewells – NYTimes.com.

Personally, I think this person should have just stopped “talking.”  I was taught not to speak ill of the dead …

In the days after Steve Jobs’ death, friends and colleagues have, in customary fashion, been sharing their fondest memories of the Apple co-founder. He’s been hailed as “a genius” and “the greatest CEO of his generation” by pundits and tech journalists. But a great man’s reputation can withstand a full accounting. And, truth be told, Jobs could be terrible to people, and his impact on the world was not uniformly positive.

We mentioned much of the good Jobs did during his career earlier. His accomplishments were far-reaching and impossible to easily summarize. But here’s one way of looking at the scope of his achievement: It’s the dream of any entrepreneur to effect change in one industry. Jobs transformed half a dozen of them forever, from personal computers to phones to animation to music to publishing to video games. He was a polymath, a skilled motivator, a decisive judge, a farsighted tastemaker, an excellent showman, and a gifted strategist.

via What Everyone Is Too Polite to Say About Steve Jobs.

food, comfort food, chicken pot pie, recipes, kith/kin:  I cooked for a friend’s family following surgery the other night.  When I asked my husband asked what I should cook, he recommended ordering pizza … he doesn’t like my cooking … so I cooked my favorite no recipe comfort food … Chicken pot pie. Enjoy!

Dennard’s Chicken Pot Pie

3 large chicken breasts, cooked at 350 until done, then cut into bite size pieces.

line 9×9 glass baking dish or tall round baking dish with ready made pie crust, reserving enough crust for top … bake 10 minutes

in saucepan, add two cups cream, 1 can cream of chicken soup, chicken broth, salt and pepper, a little white wine  … simmer to slightly thickened

cook/thaw carrots in bite size pieces, peas and corn … frozen is fine, as much as you like … add any others that you like

put chicken pieces in bottom of pre baked pastry pan

add veggies

add cream mixture

cover with pastry dough

cook at 350 for 40-45 minutes!

 

 

 

Great Recession, IMF, Olivier Blanchard,  fiscal policy: Interesting interview – Olivier Blanchard on fiscal policy: A complicated game | The Economist.

Pat Robertson, Mitt Romney, faith and politics:  I just wish religious affiliation were not the issue in US politics … high moral character is what matters …not the source of your high moral character.

Robertson’s non-endorsement of Romney, for those who have ears to hear, trumpets two critical things to the Republican evangelical base: affinity and electability. At first glance, Robertson’s comments may seem like faint praise for a candidate who is currently the front-runner for the GOP nomination, and for one who unsuccessfully lobbied Robertson for an endorsement in 2008. But it could make an enormous difference for Romney, not only when he addresses the annual “Values Voter Summit” this weekend, but also on the longer campaign trail.

Most critically, by pronouncing Romney part of the Christian fold, Robertson signals that Romney’s faith is not so different from that of the white evangelical Protestants who form a strong core of the Republican base. The declaration that Romney is an “outstanding Christian” is a dramatic upgrade from Robertson’s more tepid comments in the last presidential campaign. In 2007, Robertson dubbed Romney an “outstanding American,” while his Christian Broadcasting Network Web site also declared-under the heading “How Do I Recognize a Cult?”-that “when it comes to spiritual matters, the Mormons are far from the truth.”

This Christian embrace should be a godsend for Romney, given that Americans generally want president’s with strong religious values, and that a significant portion of the electorate still holds reservations about the Mormon faith.

via Why Pat Robertson’s ‘endorsement’ of Mitt Romney matters – Figuring Faith – The Washington Post.

marijuana, food, food – drink, Compassionate Investigational New Drug program, US Government Programs:  Odd … Gourmet magazine online article about eating/drinking marijuana and a US Government Program, the Compassionate Investigational New Drug program, provides free reefers!

Her description pretty neatly sums up the common expectation of eating marijuana: a bit of psychoactive Russian roulette with a strange aftertaste.

Beer probably has the most natural affinity with marijuana; after all, hops and marijuana are botanically speaking, kissing cousins. Boutique brewers in Europe and home brewers in the U.S. have been known to use cannabis tincture and plant matter to create THC-infused beer. Within the bounds of American law, Nectar Ales in Paso Robles, California, makes Humboldt Brown Ale with denatured hemp seeds (containing no measurable THC). The toastier, nuttier quality of the seed is highlighted rather than the herbal, funky character one would get from the plant itself. It is an interesting, unexpected expression of hemp, enjoyable even without its famous effects.

Jeremiah Tower, seminal in the creation of New American cuisine, first during his time as a chef/owner at Chez Panisse (1972–78) and later at Stars, knows a thing or two about letting ingredients speak for themselves, and letting them kick, if that’s what they want. He gives cannabis a clear, though not overpowering, voice in his Consommé Marijuana, recalled (with recipe!) in his 2004 memoir California Dish. The consommé was created in the spring of 1969 as the third course of a “self-consciously decadent” 11-course meal he prepared in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Made with 1 cup of marijuana stems steeped in 6 cups of rich chicken stock, it was strained and served over a chiffonade of nasturtium flowers and basil. As Tower recalls, the dish: “provided another level of stimulation. But not stoned. The brew takes forty-five minutes to reach the brain, by which time (as the menu planned) we were on to dessert, tasting strawberries and cream as we’d never tasted them before.”

There is, after all, the Bloody Maryjane, based on another drink attributed to him—the Bloody Mary—with a marijuana tincture replacing the vodka.

All of these applications point to a far richer culinary legacy than Alice B. Toklas’ brownies might lead us to expect. If legalization of marijuana comes at the same pace as smoking continues to get marginalized, we could be entering the age of ingested marijuana.

When that age comes, it could appear, rather than with a puff of smoke, in a glass, on a plate, or maybe even poured over a chiffonade of nasturtium flowers.

via Beyond Pot Brownies: Food + Cooking : gourmet.com.

Free reefers: Federal program ships marijuana to four

Uncle Sam a drug pusher? It’s true. For the past three decades, a handful of Americans have been getting regular deliveries of high-grade marijuana, courtesy of the federal government. It’s all part of the Compassionate Investigational New Drug program, a little-known initiative that grew out of a 1976 court decision that created the nation’s first legal pot smokers. Of the 14 people who were in the program initially, four are still alive. Keep clicking to meet the government-sanctioned marijuana mavens and learn more about the program – including where the government gets the pot in the first place…

via Free reefers: Federal program ships marijuana to four Pictures – CBS News.

Appalachia, Berea College: I absolutely loved this article about the US region Appalachia and the people who are Appalachians.  And the picture that illustrates the article is great … reminds me of “Song of the Lark.”

Color Me Appalachian 1

As a native Kentuckian, I thought that I knew the state. But the first time I heard traditional mountain music, I was awestruck—I had never heard anything like it before. A student, Ashley Long, was singing “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive” with the Berea College Bluegrass Ensemble. Darrell Scott’s lyrics and Long’s haunting voice brought tears to my eyes. The song tells the story of a man’s great-granddaughter, who sings about the family lineage in the “deep, dark hills of eastern Kentucky,” where the “sun comes up about 10 in the morning and the sun goes down about 3 in the day,” and “you spend your life just thinking how to get away.” The pain and the despair were palpable in the lyrics and in the style of singing.

When I came to Berea College four years ago, I accepted employment as a college professor; but I quickly realized that I had embarked on something more than just a job or career path. I was drawn to Berea because of its 150-year history and its commitment to African-American students. But I did not want to live in what I regarded as the mountains (in reality, the foothills), so I commuted from Lexington the first year, not telling my family that I had taken a job in the region. I knew they would worry about my living there because of all the negative stereotypes of racist white mountain people.

I didn’t know, but would soon learn, that Appalachian people represent a distinct cultural group. I didn’t understand that their music, traditions, and values were rooted in a way of life I knew very little about; my family and I had accepted as truth all the stereotypes. Over time, I came to know that the rich culture of Appalachia extends beyond Kentucky, including 13 states from Mississippi to New York, with West Virginia the only state entirely in the region.

After a year of commuting, I decided to move. I had found the people in town friendly, and there was a vital black community.

My experience at Berea was different from any other job I had had as a college professor. My first surprise was that, in my first class, there were more African-American students than I had taught in 13 years of my being a professor in Kentucky. The college’s minority enrollment has ranged between 17 percent and 23 percent over the last 10 years, in a state whose African-American population is only about 8 percent.

While it was wonderful working at a predominantly white institution with a significant number of African-American students, even more surprising were the white students. Most of them—60 percent of the 1,500 students on campus—identify themselves as Appalachian. As the semester progressed and I got to know them a little, I found them different from other white people I had encountered. I had worked with working-class whites before, but these students’ differences existed apart from socioeconomic status. Aside from the cultural differences, they were devoid of “white entitlement”; there was a humility and respect that I had never experienced from white students before. They were outspoken about some things and shy about others; they were smart, but not savvy—I found contradiction after contradiction.

Talking with them about their homes in rural Appalachia was similar to talking to international students about their lives in developing countries. I simply did not understand their culture—I hadn’t realized that although these people were white, they were not part of mainstream white culture. That first semester was challenging because I was working with a group that I knew very little about. But I wanted to know more.

In my second semester, I took the college’s weeklong Appalachian Seminar and Tour. I thought it would answer all my questions about the region, but within minutes, I realized that nothing was straightforward. My first question was: “Is it pronounced “Ap-uh-lay-chuh” or “Ap-uh-lach-uh?” (I had been taught the former in grammar school.) Chad Berry, director of Berea’s Appalachian Center, explained that those outside the region said the former, while those inside the region said the latter. I decided to use the regional pronunciation. This was a place where I wanted to belong. I had already begun to feel connected, and I wanted to explore those feelings in more depth.

via Color Me Appalachian – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

UNC Basketball, college basketball:  Kinda fun … UNC  to play Michigan aboard aircraft carrier on Veterans Day.

This Veterans Day, the UNC men’s basketball team will kick off the season against Michigan State in unfamiliar territory — on an aircraft carrier.

And on Nov. 11, the Tar Heels will have an ally in the captain’s chair.

Captain Bruce H. Lindsey, commanding officer of the USS Carl Vinson, leads almost 5,000 crew members with a UNC basketball jersey draped over his captain’s seat.

His daughter, senior Blair Lindsey, gave him the jersey after UNC won the 2009 NCAA National Championship.

Lindsey said he fought to have the inaugural Carrier Classic played on the USS Carl Vinson.

“When I heard that they were thinking about playing the game onboard an aircraft carrier, I thought it would be an awesome way to show a little recognition of the Carl Vinson crew for all of their sacrifices protecting our great country’s freedoms,” Lindsey said in an email.

“This game will really boost the morale of the crew — especially since we will be deploying again soon afterward for six months.”

Lindsey added the fact that the Tar Heels will be playing on the Carl Vinson is an added bonus. He said he has been a UNC fan since he moved to Reidsville, N.C., during high school.

via The Daily Tar Heel :: UNC men’s basketball to play aboard aircraft carrier on Veterans Day.

zombie genre, tv,  The Walking Dead:  Anybody a fan of ” The Walking Dead?”

You’ve been hearing about the show for a year or more, the much-ballyhooed second season starts on cable TV in a few weeks, and now all of The Walking Dead: The Complete First Season is available on a single disc from redbox. (Episodes 1-4 are on Side A–flip it over and episodes 5-6 are on Side B).

If you’re already a fan of AMC’s terrific horror-drama series The Walking Dead, you probably don’t need much convincing to give that first season a quick re-watch before Season Two starts.

But if you’ve heard the hot, undead buzz and are curious what all the fuss is about, or if you’re not a hardcore zombie fan and wonder why you should bother with yet another “silly zombie thing,” let’s get you up to speed and fully on board.

via Zombie 101: 5 Things You Need to Know About The Walking Dead | Redblog.

Occupy Wall Street, revolution: “Do these people, like others worldwide who are disillusioned with their governments, have the potential to spark a mass movement?”

If you stopped by Zuccotti Park in New York and asked 10 protesters what their goals were for Occupy Wall Street, you might get 10 different answers. This has led some reports to call the group unfocused, but that may be normal for an emerging movement: would 10 young Egyptians in Tahrir Square in January have been any more unanimous?

One protester, in an interview that Fox News has not aired, said he and others were calling for “more economic justice, social justice — Jesus stuff — as far as feeding the poor, health care for the sick.” Another protester, a former Marine who was elected by Occupy Wall Street participants to speak for them, told NPR that he wanted to overthrow the government and reconstruct it. Will these big ideas get lost now that labor unions and other established interests are joining forces with Occupy Wall Street, bringing their more concrete demands?

The protest already is more popular than Congress. So what are the demonstrators doing right, and what could they be doing better? Do these people, like others worldwide who are disillusioned with their governments, have the potential to spark a mass movement? What are they missing?

via Can Occupy Wall Street Spark a Revolution? – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession:  US a third word nation?  moral failure? read on …

Is the United States a Third-World Nation? 10/7/2011 6:30:00 AMMichael Lewis, author of the new book “Boomerang,” says the United States and many European nations suffered a moral failure which lead to economic collapse. Lewis insists that the U.S. economic situation will get much worse before it gets better.

via Video – Author Michael Lewis States That the United States has Suffered a Moral Failure – WSJ.com.

social networking, over 55, dating sites:

If you think online dating is the domain of the young, maybe it’s time to check in with your mother. Now, people 55 and older are visiting American dating sites more than any other age group — up 39 percent in the last three years, according to the Internet tracking firm Experian Hitwise. The No. 2 group? Singles 45 to 54. According to IBISWorld, a market research firm, and the United States Census Bureau, about 37 percent of people 50 and older are unmarried. And the divorce rate among the 50-plus demographic is high. With so many older Americans unattached, living independently into their later years, and increasingly comfortable using the Internet, they, too, are logging on for love.

And they may be better at finding it than their younger cohorts. Dating industry professionals say that singles in their 20s and 30s are typically focused on marriage and starting a family, while older singles (many of whom have been married before) have a more relaxed approach and are careful to pick companions who share their interests.

“Baby boomers have been one of the fastest-growing demographics for a lot of online dating companies,” said Caitlin Moldvay, an analyst for IBISWorld. The growth comes at the same time that some younger singles (18 to 34) are moving away from dating sites to social networking sites like Facebook as “a proxy for online dating,” said Bill Tancer, the general manager of global research for Experian Marketing Services.

Greg Liberman, the president and chief executive of Spark Networks — which owns specialty dating sites including JDate, ChristianMingle, BlackSingles, SilverSingles — said that for the first eight months of this year, Spark had a 93 percent increase in new members 50 and older across all of its dating sites, compared with the same span of time last year. “We’re seeing significant growth,” Mr. Liberman said.

He’s also observed that, while it’s been common for parents to buy dating site memberships for their adult children, now adult children have begun buying memberships for their widowed and divorced parents. Gone is the heyday of personal ads in The New York Review of Books.

via For Those 55 and Over, Love at First Click – NYTimes.com.

fonts, design, Fortune Magazine: Just thought this interesting …

Two-time National Magazine Award winner John Korpics has a lengthy editorial design resume that includes Premiere, GQ, Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, InStyle, Fortune, and now ESPN The Magazine where he just joined as Creative Director. One of his final acts at Fortune was the annual “500” issue. It’s always a hefty production, but this year’s is a particularly typographic feast.

via Fonts In Use – Fortune Magazine, “500” Issue.

03
Sep
11

9.3.2011 … New (to me) restaurant Dish tonight … then we’ll see what the Redbox has in stock …oh, oh …. And then we saw …. a stretch … Truck!

Dish, restaurants, comfort food, Charlotte: Dish was good comfort food.  I enjoyed tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich!

“Dish is a disarmingly unpretentious kind of joint you immediately warm to as though it were your mama’s or grandma’s kitchen. The menu is one you can afford with food you grew up on. Best of all, if you are lucky enough to live in this neighborhood, Dish is a place you can walk to, and walk into knowing you will see people you know.”

– Creative Loafing

via Welcome to Dish.

random, LOL, Charlotte: we saw a stretch truck! Only in Charlotte.  Unfortunately, it was gone before I could get a pic.

The Beaver movies, review, controversy:  Anyone seen the Beaver?  My take –  definitely not uplifting … funny, but in a dark way … I of course researched a couple of questions as I watched.  Interestingly, I researched more than I usually do.  Maybe because of the troubling themes or the dark and slightly bizarre nature of the film.

1: Is it Michael Caine’s voice for the beaver?

Can you talk about the importance of the beaver’s voice? Gibson’s voice [as the beaver] could almost be swapped out by Michael Caine.

He’s not quite as slow as Caine, but we wanted him to have a very deliberate and distinct voice, because he’s Walter’s coping mechanism, but at some point the coping mechanism he’s using begins killing him.

via SXSW: Interview with Jodie Foster for The Beaver | Lost In Reviews.

2) Why did Jodie Foster use Mel Gibson?

And that stance applies to her latest movie, The Beaver, a dramedy directed by Foster and starring Mel Gibson as an emotionally comatose man wielding a hand puppet. In the film, which expands to more theaters this weekend after an underwhelming box-office performance in limited release, Gibson plays a father and toy company owner who comes to life with the help of an obnoxious furry appendage who orders Gibson’s near-catatonic Walter to get over himself . Active both behind and in front of the camera, Foster plays his patient yet ultimately frustrated wife.

The odd little movie was already topically a tough sell — and that was before Gibson’s misbehaving overshadowed anything a Hollywood screenwriter could cook up. Foster was aware, before the movie opened, that it was “not for everyone. I don’t really make movies that have to be for everyone. I was really moved by a movie that talked about so many incredibly deep things, and things that touched me about family and sadness and loneliness. It’s the movie I really wanted to make,” she says, adding ruefully that “it’s been a weird path.”

No kidding. Foster is, of course, referring to her star’s notorious image implosion as Gibson made headlines for vitriolic, threatening voice-mails left to his former girlfriend and the mother of infant daughter Lucia. That, coupled with the anti-Semitic comments he made after his 2006 arrest for drunken driving, has made him Hollywood’s actor non grata and seemingly left audiences unable to separate the man from the respected actor. Gibson has retreated from the public eye, leaving Foster to speak on his behalf and promote their film.

“He has a weird mouth. As we know, he says anything that comes out of his head,” she says.

Not that Foster has appointed herself Gibson’s apologist or one-woman PR machine. “I’m not defending him. I can’t defend what he does. He has to defend what he does,” Foster says. “He’s an excellent actor. He’s a great friend. He’s someone I love. When you love somebody, you don’t just run away from them when they’re struggling. I will always be there.”

via Jodie Foster talks for ‘The Beaver,’ Mel Gibson – USATODAY.com.

3) Any relationship to Leave it to Beaver?

The other Beav, as insomniac devotees of nostalgia TV may recall, was the youngest son of the Cleavers, a television brood who smiled through “Leave It to Beaver” in the late 1950s and early ’60s. Like other postwar shows it enshrined a traditional nuclear family, with a full-time homemaker mom and dad with an outside job. The family in “The Beaver” is more off kilter: mom, Meredith (Ms. Foster), designs roller coasters out of her home office, and dad is, well, bonkers. But Meredith still performs her motherly role, pretty much as June Cleaver did a half-century ago. Only now, in the Age of Dysfunction, she smiles through the tears, even when her husband brings his creepy handy helper into their conjugal bed.

Is the puppet a totem of the Cleavers and constructed fantasies of family? Probably not, though imagining that’s the case makes “The Beaver” more interesting to watch. As written by Kyle Killen, the film adheres to a gnawingly familiar arc in which an unhappy family suffers, learns from its pain (the script is a veritable lesson plan) and comes together because, well, they’re family. That’s a nice idea. Even so, it’s hard not to believe that everyone, the children and audience included, might have been happier if Meredith had institutionalized Walter. He’d still get to keep his therapy puppet, and Mr. Gibson would still be able to deliver a gesturally and vocally persuasive performance as the man with two heads, one meat and one cloth.

via ‘The Beaver’ With Mel Gibson and Jodie Foster – Review – NYTimes.com.

4) Reviews: My take –  worthy of a redbox rental … definitely not uplifting … funny, but in a dark way.  Other Reviews?  Most definitely panned.

The Beaver might have been interesting if it was boldly, defiantly, autobiographical – with Gibson holding a toy Adolf Hitler puppet. Or if it was about a stressed beaver with a Gibson puppet.

Instead we have a standard-issue indie-quirk picture which draws laborious parallels between the mixed-up middle youth grownups and their teenage offspring: Gibson’s adolescent son, who worries about turning out like his appalling dad, makes money writing other people’s class papers in their style – ventriloquising them, in fact – and he too is alienated from his emotions.

Kyle Killen’s script is pretty similar in feel to Alan Ball’s screenplay for American Beauty and its themes of midlife crisis and absurdity have a little of movies such as Being There and Network. And of course the creepy hand-puppet gaining, as it were, the upper hand, must inevitably remind the audience of Michael Redgrave in Cavalcanti’s Dead of Night.

In each case, the situation’s power surely consists in the leading character having some compelling vulnerability, or some genuine hurt or need, which endows the resulting dysfunction with dramatic meaning and force. And Gibson’s character, tellingly, hasn’t really done anything bad, apart from generally suffer from grouchy middle-aged depression. The person who really should be depressed is his wife (played by Foster herself) who has the quirky job of roller-coaster designer, but is landed with a blandly written role.

The Beaver might not have been bad if it was acted with some subtlety and realism and something approaching a sense of humour. Well, Gibson will have to get his teeth into something else.

via Cannes 2011 review: The Beaver | Film | The Guardian.

Maybe Ms. Foster thought she was doing Mr. Gibson a favor by showing that he could play a troubled man who simply needs help. The problem is that, as an actor, Mr. Gibson doesn’t do normal anymore and is at his best playing men on the verge, as in “Edge of Darkness,” a thriller about a cop hunting his daughter’s murderer. It was a suitably blunt character for an actor who has become a blunt instrument and has a lock on loony tuners and angry patriarchs. That should make Walter a fine fit for Mr. Gibson, except that there’s no there there to the character, just a puppet with a bad attitude and good timing. A raggedy rage-aholic, it steals the show, handily. Take away his puppet, and the man disappears.

via ‘The Beaver’ With Mel Gibson and Jodie Foster – Review – NYTimes.com.

Steve Jobs, philanthropy, journalism, followup:  After the NYT published a rather scathing report of Steve Job’s lack of philanthropy, I found Bono’s response enlightening … and wonder why the NYT report missed this.

As a founder of (Product)RED, I’d like to point out that Apple’s contribution to our fight against AIDS in Africa has been invaluable. Through the sale of (RED) products, Apple has been (RED)’s largest contributor to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria — giving tens of millions of dollars that have transformed the lives of more than two million Africans through H.I.V. testing, treatment and counseling. This is serious and significant. And Apple’s involvement has encouraged other companies to step up.

Steve Jobs said when we first approached him about (RED), “There is nothing better than the chance to save lives.”

I’m proud to know him; he’s a poetic fellow, an artist and a businessman. Just because he’s been extremely busy, that doesn’t mean that he and his wife, Laurene, have not been thinking about these things. You don’t have to be a friend of his to know what a private person he is or that he doesn’t do things by halves.

BONO

Dublin, Sept. 1, 2011

via Bono Praises Steve Jobs as Generous and ‘Poetic’ – NYTimes.com.

9/11:  Some very powerful videos here.  9/11 aftermath: Eerie subway tour – The Washington Post.

Great Recession, Keynesian economics, End of an Era:  Some great articles about how we got to this place and where we go next?  I don’t necessarily agree, but I think they are worth reading.

It is self-evident that conventional economics has failed, completely, utterly and totally. The two competing cargo cults of tax cuts/trickle-down and borrow-and-spend stimulus coupled with monetary manipulation have failed to restore advanced Capitalism’s vigor, not just in America, but everywhere.

Conventional econometrics is clueless about the root causes of advanced finance-based Capitalism’s ills. To really understand what’s going on beneath the surface, we must return to “discredited” non-quant models of economics: for example, Marx’s critique of monopoly/cartel, finance-dominated advanced Capitalism. (“Capitalism” is capitalized here to distinguish it from “primitive capitalism.”)

All those fancy equation-based econometrics that supposedly model human behavior have failed because they are fundamentally and purposefully superficial: they are incapable of understanding deeper dynamics that don’t fit the ruling political-economy conventions.

Marx predicted a crisis of advanced Capitalism based on the rising imbalance of capital and labor in finance-dominated Capitalism. The basic Marxist context is history, not morality, and so the Marxist critique is light on blaming the rich for Capitalism’s core ills and heavy on the inevitability of larger historic forces.

In other words, what’s wrong with advanced Capitalism cannot be fixed by taxing the super-wealthy at the same rate we self-employed pay (40% basic Federal rate), though that would certainly be a fair and just step in the right direction. Advanced Capitalism’s ills run much deeper than superficial “class warfare” models in which the “solution” is to redistribute wealth from the top down the pyramid.

This redistributive “socialist” flavor of advanced Capitalism has bought time–the crisis of the 1930s was staved off for 70 years–but now redistribution as a saving strategy has reached its limits.

via charles hugh smith-Marx, Labor’s Dwindling Share of the Economy and the Crisis of Advanced Capitalism.

The Keynesian pump-priming of Mr. Bush and the pump-flooding of Mr. Obama have been unmitigated disasters. The inescapable reality is that the government cannot create wealth and every dollar it spends must be taken from the private sector, which can. As Ayn Rand wrote, “You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality.”Martha’s Vineyard is a great place to avoid reality, but our president is well-rested now and ready to try his luck once more with a big-government stimulus program. This from the man who famously said, “We’ve got a big hole that we’re digging ourselves out of.” Please, just stop digging. Instead, give Americans themselves a chance to stimulate our economy.Entrepreneurs will create the jobs and reignite the economy if the government will create a predictable business climate and then just get out of the way. Start by eliminating every chokehold the government has on the economy. Make the Bush tax cuts permanent (until fair flat-tax reform can be enacted). Repeal Dodd-Frank. Suspend Sarbanes-Oxley until it can be reformed. Repeal Obamacare. Institute an immediate moratorium on new government regulations and take a machete (not a scalpel) to the current Federal Register. And finally, stow the destructive and divisive class-warfare language that is unbecoming of an American president.

In short, allow Americans to be Americans once more.

via WOLF: Prosperity starts with Americans, not Uncle Sam – Washington Times.

What’s worse – at least in Obamaworld – is that I, like most physicians, have two jobs: I’m also responsible for a business that creates jobs and employs some great Americans. This despite our government’s burdensome taxes, regulations and licenses, which already have created formidable obstacles to entrepreneurial success. You don’t believe me? Try launching a company or getting a new drug approved. Heck, try starting a lemonade stand. As if these barriers weren’t enough already, Obamanomics increases taxes, regulatory burdens and uncertainties that weigh heavily on each new hire. And yet I stubbornly ignore the president’s incentives by keeping many good people employed. In my defense, however, medical practices today have to hire their own in-house bureaucracies just to cope with the demands of Washington’s bureaucracies. You might think it would be nice if health care money went to, you know, health care, but don’t be naive – your government knows best.

Embarrassingly, I must confess that I balance my own budget, both personal and professional. I realize that’s anathema to Obamanomics, but I just can’t escape my vice of fiscal sanity. What’s more, even though there’s “shovel-ready” money to be had from “Obama’s stash,” I stubbornly insist on paying my own bills. This sometimes leads to difficult choices: I’m the only doctor in America, for example, who drives a car officially declared a “clunker” by his own cousin-in-chief, but I’m from the branch of the family that doesn’t believe in spending money you don’t have – plus, I love my SUV. Still, the undeniable reality is that according to the Obama way of thinking, I obviously sabotaged our economy when I undercut the stimulus and its related gimmicks like “Cash for Clunkers” by refusing to participate in the giveaways.

Worst of all, however, I have become the single greatest impediment to Americans’ prosperity in Obamaworld: a high-wage earner. That I clawed my way toward the American dream with humbling jobs since the age of 12, volunteered for a grinding decade of medical training and lived more of my adult years deep in the bottom rungs of incomes than the top, I know now, is no excuse. Obamanomics is about spreading the wealth, not creating it. In my defense, wildly increased taxes, stifling malpractice insurance and even steep medical school loans have worked wonders to erase the gains. Still, Mr. Obama claims that families earning more than $250,000 a year are “millionaires and billionaires.” Who knew? Those tax-free corporate jets can’t be far behind.

Of course, I’m not alone. Tens of millions of Americans are frustrating the socialist aspirations of this president simply by getting up each morning and going to work. You know who you are. You’re not just suckers, you’re saboteurs. Barack Obama would prefer we all be wards of the state rather than active producers. How else can you explain the incentives he champions: endless jobless benefits, cradle-to-grave welfare handouts, “tax cuts” for non-taxpayers, and on and on. Thus proclaims the president who himself raked in a cool $7.2 million over the past two years, “I do think at a certain point you’ve made enough money.” The key word there is “you.”

Obamanomics hasn’t failed America; we’ve failed it. We refused to become the wards of the state as it demands. I cling (though not bitterly) to my belief that America would be better served if Barack Obama concentrated more on spreading my work ethic than my wealth. I now realize that by serving my community rather than organizing it, by creating jobs and wealth and by holding dear the American dream, I have sabotaged Obamanomics. I hope America will forgive me.

via WOLF: I’m exactly what’s wrong with Barack Obama’s America – Washington Times.

teaching,teachers, professions, culture, Mrs. Clay, E. Rivers School, The Westminster Schools, kudos:  I found myself bashing teachers at dinner last night … then I read this and I said to myself … thank you, Mrs. Clay (E. Rivers School, Atlanta) for teaching me in 1968 that  I can be race-blind, and thank you, The Westminster Schools for establishing a very high standard and meeting it with the gift of so many great teachers.  I need to write my own thank you essay.  Add that to the list.

But how do we expect to entice the best and brightest to become teachers when we keep tearing the profession down? We take the people who so desperately want to make a difference that they enter a field where they know that they’ll be overworked and underpaid, and we scapegoat them as the cause of a societywide failure.

A March report by the McGraw-Hill Research Foundation and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development found that one of the differences between the United States and countries with high-performing school systems was: “The teaching profession in the U.S. does not have the same high status as it once did, nor does it compare with the status teachers enjoy in the world’s best-performing economies.”

The report highlights two examples of this diminished status:

• “According to a 2005 National Education Association report, nearly 50 percent of new teachers leave the profession within their first five years teaching; they cite poor working conditions and low pay as the chief reason.”

• “High school teachers in the U.S. work longer hours (approximately 50 hours, according to the N.E.A.), and yet the U.S. devotes a far lower proportion than the average O.E.C.D. country does to teacher salaries.”

via In Honor of Teachers – NYTimes.com.

Stonehenge, archeology, new discoveries,Digging for Britain, tv:   I am fascinated with Stonehenge.  I will have a new show to watch – Digging for Britain.

Prof Darvill said: “It’s a little piece of keyhole surgery into an important monument, but it has actually lived up to our expectations perfectly.”

The area has many springs, which may have been associated with ritual healing in prehistoric times – and their existence may be the reason why these particular stones were quarried for another monument so far away.

Prof Wainwright said: “The important thing is that we have a ceremonial monument here that is earlier than the passage grave.

“We have obviously got a very important person who may have been responsible for the impetus for these stones to be transported.

“It can be compared directly with the first Stonehenge, so for the first time we have a direct link between Carn Menyn – where the bluestones came from – and Stonehenge, in the form of this ceremonial monument.”

A new series of BBC Two’s Digging for Britain begins at 21:00 on Friday, 9 September.

via BBC News – Tomb found at Stonehenge quarry site.

Michael Vickers, Al Qaeda, counterterrorism, CIA:   “I just want to kill those guys,” Mr. Vickers likes to say in meetings at the Pentagon, with a grin. … Mr. Vickers’s preoccupation — “my life,” he says — is dismantling Al Qaeda. I guess you have to think like that to do what he does … I would think it would have both an emotional and spiritual toll on him.

Every day, Michael G. Vickers gets an update on how many in Al Qaeda’s senior leadership the United States has removed from the battlefield, and lately there has been much to report. Al Qaeda’s No. 2 died in a C.I.A. drone strike late last month, another senior commander was taken out in June, and the Navy Seals made history when they dispatched Osama bin Laden in May.Enlarge This Image

Michael G. Vickers, once a Green Beret and a C.I.A. operative, helped persuade a cautious Robert M. Gates, then the defense secretary, to go along with the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

“I just want to kill those guys,” Mr. Vickers likes to say in meetings at the Pentagon, with a grin.

Mr. Vickers’s preoccupation — “my life,” he says — is dismantling Al Qaeda. Underneath an owlish exterior, he is an ex-Green Beret and former C.I.A. operative with an exotic past. His title is under secretary of defense for intelligence, and he has risen to become one of the top counterterrorism officials in Washington.

As covert American wars — in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia — continue in the second decade after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, so will the questions of legality, morality and risk that go along with them.

via A Man Behind the Hunt for Al Qaeda – NYTimes.com.

02
Jun
11

6.2.2011 … 27!

 

Anniversaries:  Today is my 27th wedding anniversary … seems like yesterday … seems like a long time ago …

RIP, William Gresham:  Big William’s funeral was hard for everyone there … He was 51 and wasn’t sick … it wasn’t expected, it wasn’t a blessing … and the funeral was different, beautiful, touching , but different.  They played this song … so now it will forever be William’s song to me …

Paris, travel:  A few ideas from Bon Apetit!

 

You know how we feel about the City of Light. Remember this gorgeous Guy Savoy video we fell in love with? Remember the budget-friendly Paris travel guide we asked Clotilde Dusoulier to write for the March 2011 issue? Or that time we told you a certain bartender at Paris’s Bar Hemingway made it one of the world’s best?  And then there are the hours we’ve spent perfecting our versions of classic French recipes, from macarons to coq au vin.

 

via Like us On Facebook, Enter to Win a Trip to Paris. It’s That Easy.: BA Daily: Blogs : bonappetit.com.

 

commencement speeches, fails:  Another one for you …  I am beginning to think they are an anachronism.

If you’re keen on delivering a great speech, a wise strategy would be to actually write one.

Tasked with responsibility of delivering the commencement address for the University of Maryland University College Class of 2011, actor Richard T. Jones, best known for his roles in the Why Did I Get Married films, attempted — with limited success — to improvise his way to inspiring remarks.

The video is circulating around the Web, and to say the least, the reviews are not pretty. As one member of the graduating class put it, “Richard T. Jones = Commencement Speech Fail!”

via Actor Richard T. Jones Improvs Embarrassing UMUC Commencement Speech (VIDEO).

photography, Arctic Lights: beautiful

 

Terje Sørgjerd has done it again — you’ll never see light quite like this.

Just weeks after producing two incredible viral hits, “The Aurora” and “The Mountain” (the latter of which attracted over 26 million views), the 32-year-old Oslo, Norway native has created this clip, a fantastic time-lapse shot shortly before “midnight sun” near the Arctic Circle. It’s the result of a grueling 12 day journey (it was shot between April 29 and May 10) that could have easily claimed the life of the filmmaker. He managed to fall in freezing Arctic water twice, and was even hospitalized after falling from a rock during the trip.

Incredibly, the footage is virtually unadultered. “The only post-production here is all done in raw adjustments, there is absolutely no HDR, composite or photoshop involved,” Sørgjerd said in an interview with The Huffington Post.

via ‘The Arctic Light,’ Time-Lapse Video Captures Breathtaking Northern Phenomenon (HD VIDEO).

colleges, superlatives, small classes, lists:  I think this is one of the most important criteria in evaluating a college.

Yesterday, US News and World Report released their list of universities with the highest percentage of small classes. Unwieldy, research-centric universities aren’t generally famous for their individual attention, but some large universities do have a surprisingly high proportion of classes with 20 people or less in them.

via 10 Universities With The Highest Percentage Of Small Classes.

Facebook, unfriend, culture, divorce:  It is hard to unwind a marriage … even harder now …

By the time my ex and I filed for divorce, however, Facebook was so ingrained in our lives, it was actually on the table during mediation.

“I think we need to unfriend each other,” my soon-to-be ex wife said across the big conference room table.

We hadn’t even begun discussing splitting up the furniture or the house or the dogs.

All of a sudden, my divorce was Real. And perhaps there is no better symbol of the finality of a divorce than how it’s borne out online. After several years of learning how to communicate with each other (and thousands of dollars in therapist’s fees), we were now deciding not to communicate via the world’s easiest way to stay connected.

Which is to say, for all the remarkable bringing together that social networking affords us–for all the warm fuzzy long lost high school classmates and unknown cousins and dictatorships brought down–there’s another side to the phenomenon.

It makes it really hard to let go of someone.

via Adam Paul: Til Death Do Us Unfriend.

food, comfort food, grilled cheese sandwiches, San Francisco:  I want one in Charlotte!

 

A surprisingly appetizing announcement was made today at a tech conference in Silicon Valley today: The creator of the Flip camera plans to open a small chain of high-tech grilled cheese restaurants.

Jonathan Kaplan, whose Flip cam was recently phased out of production by the tech giant Cisco, said his fast-casual (think Chipotle) restaurant chain will be called The Melt, specializing in grilled cheese and soup combos. The first four locations, hoped to be open by Thanksgiving, will all be in the Bay Area. As befits its hi-tech terroir (the silicon in the soil adds a distinct “venture capital” scent), The Melt will have its own mobile app for ordering on the run. Last time we checked (i.e. ordered Domino’s from our beds), this wasn’t a super novel development, but we’re obviously sold on anything that makes it easier to eat melty sandwiches.

via Flip Cam Creator to Open Geeked-Out Grilled Cheese Chain: BA Daily: Blogs : bonappetit.com.

 


 


21
Apr
11

4.21.2011 Happy birthday to many … maundy thursday … college tour of Davidson …

education, elite colleges, our kids, parenting, college admissions: Wow.  This article really makes you think about the pressure we are putting our kids under.

RIGHT NOW, IN admissions offices in Cambridge and New Haven and Palo Alto, the teenage children of some of America’s most thoughtful and devoted mothers are coming in for exceptionally close scrutiny—as is, so these women feel, the parenting they have offered their youngsters for the past 18 years. This is the tail end of reading season, when our august universities must turn to what their relentless high-school visiting and U.S. News  World Report boosterism have wrought: a staggering number of requests for an absurdly small number of spots at their schools. Harvard recently announced that this year it is considering an astronomical 35,000 applications for only about 1,640 spaces in the freshman class. The great hope of today’s professional-class parents—whose offspring still make up the majority at elite colleges, no matter how much progress the institutions have made in widening the socioeconomic range of their student bodies—was that the ebbing of the so-called echo boom would save their children from the heartless winnowing. The late 1990s and the 2000s saw an uptick in the number of teenagers in America, and there was a belief, in many quarters, that the increasingly competitive nature of elite-college admissions was a by-product of that demographic fluke. But now, although the number of teens has receded, the percentage of those kids who nurture the dream of attending a selective college continues to skyrocket. And so, for this year’s most accomplished and talented high-school seniors, the reckoning is at hand.

via The Ivy Delusion – Magazine – The Atlantic.

4/20, followup, kith/kin:  Well, I guess I am glad it’s not Boulder!

Congratulations to Tallahassee, Florida, on being named America’s pot capital. (But a cautionary note: This list could be dubious.)

via LikeTheDew.com, 420 Celebrations: America’s Pot Smoking Capitals – The Daily Beast.

food, comfort food, history:  Nam, nam, nam …

Some sources say that people began making cheese sandwiches during the great depression because bread and cheese were easily acessible. Now you can find these fantastic bundles of joy in several high end restaurants as chefs have put their own gourmet twist on it!Not to stop there, grilled cheese has only gotten more popular this century. In 2004, one particular sandwich sold for $28,000 on eBay because the grilled part of the sandwich resembled the Virgin Mary. The weirder part is the sandwich never got moldy, even 10 years later. The good part is, the woman who made the sacred sandwich donated all the money to charity. See, grilled cheese not only tastes good, but does good!

via Nam, Nam, Nam: It’s National Grilled Cheese Month! Show Your Support | Tonic.

random, Royal Family, facts:  To an outsider, QEII just seems silly not to retire …

Today Prince Charles becomes the longest-serving heir apparent in British history, having spent 59 years, two months and 14 days as first in line to the throne. To mark Charles’ momentous day, NewsFeed takes a look at 10 other royals waiting for their day in the sun.

via Royals in Waiting: Prince Charles and the World’s Other Heir Apparents – TIME NewsFeed.

UNC, basketball, feel good story:  🙂

SP_UNC1

College basketball doesn’t get any more glamorous than it does at North Carolina, a school that boasts one of the sport’s most prestigious programs. On this campus, the basketball players are lords of the manor.

But this spring, Carolina’s men’s team has started a new tradition, one that stands in sharp contrast to the booming prominence of the sport.

Since they bowed out of the NCAA’s Elite Eight last month, members of North Carolina’s Tar Heels have been showing up a campus dormitory courts to play five-on-five pickup basketball games with students. We caught up with some of the players at a recent session.

Since they bowed out in the NCAA Tournament’s Elite Eight last month, the players have been killing time before finals exams by showing up at outdoor courts at campus dormitories to play five-on-five pick-up games with students—just for fun. To make sure they draw a crowd, the players announce their plans beforehand on Twitter.

via North Carolina’s Students Get Educated – WSJ.com.

digital books, libraries:  Maybe the two can merge …

Amazon today announced Kindle Library Lending, a new feature launching later this year that will allow Kindle customers to borrow Kindle books from over 11,000 libraries in the United States. Kindle Library Lending will be available for all generations of Kindle devices and free Kindle reading apps.

“We’re excited that millions of Kindle customers will be able to borrow Kindle books from their local libraries,” said Jay Marine, Director, Amazon Kindle. “Customers tell us they love Kindle for its Pearl e-ink display that is easy to read even in bright sunlight, up to a month of battery life, and Whispersync technology that synchronizes notes, highlights and last page read between their Kindle and free Kindle apps.”

Customers will be able to check out a Kindle book from their local library and start reading on any Kindle device or free Kindle app for Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone. If a Kindle book is checked out again or that book is purchased from Amazon, all of a customer’s annotations and bookmarks will be preserved.

“We’re doing a little something extra here,” Marine continued. “Normally, making margin notes in library books is a big no-no. But we’re extending our Whispersync technology so that you can highlight and add margin notes to Kindle books you check out from your local library. Your notes will not show up when the next patron checks out the book. But if you check out the book again, or subsequently buy it, your notes will be there just as you left them, perfectly Whispersynced.”

With Kindle Library Lending, customers can take advantage of all of the unique features of Kindle and Kindle books, including:

Paper-like Pearl electronic-ink display

No glare even in bright sunlight

Lighter than a paperback – weighs just 8.5 ounces and holds up to 3,500 books

Up to one month of battery life with wireless off

Read everywhere with free Kindle apps for Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry and Windows Phone

Whispersync technology wirelessly sync your books, notes, highlights, and last page read across Kindle and free Kindle reading apps

Real Page Numbers – easily reference passages with page numbers that correspond to actual print editions

Amazon is working with OverDrive, the leading provider of digital content solutions for over 11,000 public and educational libraries in the United States, to bring a seamless library borrowing experience to Kindle customers. “We are excited to be working with Amazon to offer Kindle Library Lending to the millions of customers who read on Kindle and Kindle apps,” said Steve Potash, CEO, OverDrive. “We hear librarians and patrons rave about Kindle, so we are thrilled that we can be part of bringing library books to the unparalleled experience of reading on Kindle.”

via Amazon Media Room: News Release.

news, violence, Atlanta:  Random acts of violence …why?

ATLANTA — A group of 20 to 25 youths boarded a commuter train bound for Atlanta’s airport, and viciously attacked the passengers, police said.

One of the teenagers bashed a rider in the face with a soda-pop can, pushed him down and stole his wallet, according to a police report. Another passenger was punched in the face, the report stated.

Both of the riders who were attacked work for Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines, police said. They have been staying at a hotel near Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

via Police: 20-25 teens storm Ga. train, attack riders – Breaking News – Macon.com.

11
Feb
11

2.11.2011 … Chapel Hill … last evening (2.10) with E and A … Very enjoyable.

law, CLE:  I have not said this very often … but great CLE at the Festival of Legal Learning.  But with titles like these how could you go wrong … 🙂 … actually there are a few I would skip.

Lessons For Lawyers From Biographies And Autobiographies

So, You Be The Judge

Identity Theft & The Internet

Judicial Amendment Of The US Constitution

Supreme Court & Educational Domains

Lawyers & Civil Society

NC Lawyers & The Revolution

Recent Developments In Internet, Privacy

Religion & The Schools

Families, Government & Political Ideals

Role Of Forensic Psychology In The Legal Arena

Ethical Action In Challenging Times

travel, Chapel Hill:  Stayed at the lovely Siena, dinner at PIOLA, Famosi per la Pizza one night and K&W Cafeterias Chapel Hill NC the other (if you must know I had fried chicken, turnips and broccoli), and a long slow walk through A Southern Season … first time to visit and I only spent $44!!

.

Seth Curry, basketball, Duke, UNC:  Earlier I said I thought I “might could” pull for Duke because he’s Steph’s little brother.  I am not sure I can do it.  But I do smile when he plays.

Curry, a sophomore guard, scored all but four of his season-high 22 points in the second half and shot 8-for-12 from the field. The rest of Duke’s team shot 7-for-33, but Smith and Curry scored enough to spark the comeback and hold off North Carolina in a game of huge importance in the race for first place in the ACC.

via Curry surge carries Duke past UNC at Cameron – CharlotteObserver.com.

quotes, politics:

Fox News: Inspire Magazine is the “Martha Stewart Living of terrorists.”

recipes, food, comfort food:  Probably my favorite … Chicken Pot Pies : Food Network.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 621 other followers

September 2019
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930