Posts Tagged ‘copyright

07
Mar
14

3.7.14 … @HistoryInPics … “I’m not sure I’d recommend that a young person go into law … When I was starting out, it was more of a profession, and your worth was determined by the service you provided. Now it’s become more of a business, and your worth is determined by the fee you’re able to collect.” …

 @HistoryInPics, Atlantic Mobile:  I love their stuff.  And their story is really interesting …

There is a new ubiquitous media brand on Twitter.

No, I’m not talking about Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media or BuzzFeed or The Verge, or any other investor-backed startup.

I’m talking about @HistoryInPics, which, as I discovered, is run by two teenagers: Xavier Di Petta, 17, who lives in a small Australian town two hours north of Melbourne, and Kyle Cameron, 19, a student in Hawaii.

They met hustling on YouTube when they were 13 and 15, respectively, and they’ve been doing social media things together (off and on) since. They’ve built YouTube accounts, making money off advertising. They created Facebook pages such as “Long romantic walks to the fridge,” which garnered more than 10 million Likes, and sold them off. More recently, Di Petta’s company, Swift Fox Labs, has hired a dozen employees, and can bring in, according to an Australian news story, 50,000 Australian dollars a month (or roughly 43,800 USD at current exchange rates).

But @HistoryInPics may be the duo’s biggest creation. In the last three months, this account, which tweets photographs of the past with one-line descriptions, has added more than 500,000 followers to bring their total to 890,000 followers. (The account was only established in July of 2013.) If the trend line continues, they’ll hit a million followers next month.

The new account has gained this massive following without the official help of Twitter, which often sticks celebrity and media accounts on its recommended-follow list, inflating their numbers.

As impressively, my analysis of 100 tweets from the account this week found that, on average, a @HistoryInPics tweet gets retweeted more than 1,600 times and favorited 1,800 times.

For comparison, Vanity Fair’s Twitter account—with 1.3 million followers—tends to get a dozen or two retweets and favorites on any given tweet.

I’ve got about 140,000 followers and I’ve tweeted more than 30,000 times. I can’t remember ever having a single tweet get retweeted or favorited as much as the average @HistoryInPics tweet.

via The 2 Teenagers Who Run the Wildly Popular Twitter Feed @HistoryInPics – Atlantic Mobile.

@HistoryInPics, Atlantic Mobile, copyright, media: I’m clipping this article twice.  Interesting legal issues and analysis.

The audiences that Di Petta and Cameron have built are created with the work of photographers who they don’t pay or even credit. They don’t provide sources for the photographs or the captions that accompany them. Sometimes they get stuff wrong and/or post copyrighted photographs.

They are playing by rules that “old media” and most new media do not. To one way of thinking, they are cheating at the media game, and that’s why they’re winning. (Which they are.)

I interviewed Di Petta on Skype and got him to walk me through the details of building this little empire of Twitter accounts. As he openly talked through how he and Cameron had built the accounts, I asked him how he felt about criticism that they didn’t source or pay for images.

“The majority of the images are public domain haha,” he responded.

So I said, great, let’s look through the last five together. And not all of them were in the public domain. So, I said, “How do you think about the use of these images?”

“Photographers are welcome to file a complaint with Twitter, as long as they provide proof. Twitter contacts me and I’d be happy to remove it,” he said. “I’m sure the majority of photographers would be glad to have their work seen by the massives.”

I pressed him on this point. Shouldn’t the onus be on him and Cameron to get those rights from the photographers they assume would be grateful?

“It would not be practical,” he said. “The majority of the photographers are deceased. Or hard to find who took the images.”

Then he said, “Look at Buzzfeed. Their business model is more or less using copyright images.”

I said most people in the media don’t appreciate Buzzfeed’s interpretation of the fair use exemption from copyright law. “The photographers I know would want me to ask you if you see anything wrong with profiting from their work?” I asked him.

“That’s an interesting point,” Di Petta responded. “I feel like we’re monetizing our traffic, but they would see it as we’re monetizing their images.”

“They would say, ‘Without our images, you have no traffic,'” I said.

“They do have a point,” he conceded. “But whether we use images X or Y, there will be traffic to the site. But I can see their point of view.”

In this logic, Di Petta echoes the logic of all social media networks.

Facebook, Twitter, and (especially) Pinterest all benefit from people sharing copyrighted images. Visual content—none of which the companies create themselves—drive almost all social media sites. And they pay for none of it.

via The 2 Teenagers Who Run the Wildly Popular Twitter Feed @HistoryInPics – Atlantic Mobile.

Humans of New York, lawyers, profession v. business:

“I’m not sure I’d recommend that a young person go into law.”

“Why’s that?”

“When I was starting out, it was more of a profession, and your worth was determined by the service you provided. Now it’s become more of a business, and your worth is determined by the fee you’re able to collect.”

via Humans of New York.

Maira Kalman, What I choose to illustrate and why, YouTube, Inktalks.com: Ok, so I love Maira Kalman …

via ▶ Maira Kalman: What I choose to illustrate and why – YouTube.

Published on Feb 6, 2014

http://inktalks.com Celebrated illustrator and author Maira Kalman believes that everything that delights you needs to be documented. Sharing images from a range of her projects, Kalman talks about her curiosities and inspirations. Exploring the themes that matter to her the most — time, work, and love — Kalman fascinates us with her wisdom, whimsical illustrations, and her clever trick to slow down time.

via ▶ Maira Kalman: What I choose to illustrate and why – YouTube.

“What protects you in this world from sadness and from the loss of an ability to do something? … Work and love.”

Maira Kalman is one of the most beloved illustrators working today and one of my greatest heroes, a singular spirit living at the intersection of art and philosophy. In this fantastic talk from India’s INK Conference, Kalman takes us on a journey into her wonderfully idiosyncratic mind and expansive soul, revealing along the way the poetic and profound universalities of our human triumphs and tribulations.

via Maira Kalman | Brain Pickings.

polar vortex 2014, frozen Chicago:  One of my favorite places seen from a different perspective.

Weatherist.com

Like This Page · March 3

Great shot of frozen Chicago!

via Weatherist.com.

MASTERPIECE | Downton Abbey Season 4, Unsung Heroes of Downton, Isis, PBS, YouTube: Isis! “The bitch gives you nothing!”

via MASTERPIECE | Downton Abbey, Season 4: Unsung Heroes of Downton – Isis | PBS – YouTube.

Which Rory Gilmore Are You, Buzzfeed:

Which Rory Gilmore Are You?

You got: In Puppy Love Rory

WB / Via homeofthenutty.com

You’re young and in love! Nothing can stop you! Keep that feel-good attitude going for as long as you can. Everyone around you must be pretty happy for you, too.

via Which Rory Gilmore Are You.

Time Magazine, New Look, Cool New Ad Format, Re/code: I mentioned Time yesterday and its humble beginnings as a clipping service.  I love that it is still evolving.

Time magazine is going to have a new corporate home soon, when its parent company, Time Inc., spins out from Time Warner. And today it has a new digital look: Time’s website has been overhauled, and you should be able to see some of the changes tonight and the rest tomorrow morning.

As always, it makes more sense for you to go look at the site than for me to describe it to you — in particular, so you can see a mind-bending interactive photo taken from the spire at the top of One World Trade Center and an accompanying video and story (those should all be up by Thursday morning).

via Time Magazine Has a New Look, and a Cool New Ad Format | Re/code.

art, classic paintings, world cities,  Google Street View, in pictures | Cities | theguardian.com:  Absolutely loved this!

Classic paintings of world cities meet Google Street View – in pictures

Following on from his amazing series last week, here are Halley Docherty’s latest collages for us – well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world, from Istanbul to Saint Petersburg and Tokyo to New York, superimposed on to Google Street View

via Classic paintings of world cities meet Google Street View – in pictures | Cities | theguardian.com.

NC General Assembly Moral Monday protesters, NewsObserver.com, Institute for Southern Studies:

Institute for Southern Studies

“The Raleigh attorney argued that no witness called by Wake County Assistant District Attorney Lawrence Cameron touched on a key element for trespass crimes — the owner of the property. ‘In this case, Judge, you have to be told this is the property of another,’ McWilliam argued. ‘This is not the property of another. This is the very property of the very people who were on the property that day.'”

via Facebook.

RALEIGH: 7 NC General Assembly Moral Monday protesters acquitted | State Politics | NewsObserver.com.

startups,  Tuft & Needle,  Amazon’s No. 1 Mattress, Re/code:  I love a good startup story!

When Daehee Park and JT Marino left the tech startup they worked for to strike out on their own, they looked for a different pace, perhaps something in an “old-fashioned industry” ripe for change.

They landed in mattresses.

The industry, dominated by the big S companies – Simmons, Serta and Sealy — was an unlikely target for two digital entrepreneurs. But Park and Marino, the founders of Tuft & Needle, borrowed a concept familiar to the tech world they fled: That it’s possible to make money producing a better, more affordable product by cutting out the middlemen and controlling prices.

On that foundation, their mattresses, which are sold directly to consumers from their website and on Amazon and come with high-touch customer service, have soared to the top ranks on Amazon.com. The company’s products are not only the highest-rated mattresses sold on Amazon, but also the highest-rated product in the online retailer’s giant furniture category overall. Tuft & Needle mattresses have received 188 five-star reviews out of 212 in total.

It is paying off as well. After generating $1 million in sales in 2013, the company’s first full year in business, Tuft & Needle’s revenue hit $500,000 in January and February of this year alone, and it is on pace to clear $5 million in sales by the end of 2014. It’s a drop in the bucket in the $7 billion dollar U.S. mattress sector, but it is a category that rarely sees five-times growth.

The company is also profitable, the founders said in an interview.

via How Bootstrapped Startup Tuft & Needle Created Amazon’s No. 1 Mattress | Re/code.

24
Jul
13

7.24.13 … To Steal a Mockingbird? …

Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, literary agents, legal rights, copyright, To Steal a Mockingbird?, Vanity Fair, kith/kin:  My mom actually remembers Harper Lee from Alabama.  So all my life I have heard about this reclusive one novel Pulitzer Prize winning author.  I also really enjoyed the book and the movie (and the play which I saw in Annapolis MD last fall).

Also loved this on Harper Lee …

[http://www.biography.com/people/harper-lee-9377021/videos]

In high school, Lee developed an interest in English literature. After graduating in 1944, she went to the all-female Huntingdon College in Montgomery. Lee stood apart from the other students—she couldn’t have cared less about fashion, makeup or dating. Instead, she focused on her studies and on her writing. Lee was a member of the literary honor society and the glee club.

Aspiring Writer

Transferring to the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, Lee was known for being a loner and an individualist. She did make a greater attempt at a social life there, joining a sorority for a while. Pursuing her interest in writing, Lee contributed to the school’s newspaper and its humor magazine, the Rammer Jammer. She eventually became the editor of the Rammer Jammer.

via Harper Lee Biography – Facts, Birthday, Life Story – Biography.com.

This article is fascinating and well worth  your time.

 

To Steal a Mockingbird?

The notoriously private author Harper Lee is now waging a public courtroom battle. Her lawsuit charges that in 2007 her agent, Samuel Pinkus, duped the frail 80-year-old Lee into assigning him the copyright to her only book, To Kill a Mockingbird—then diverted royalties from the beloved 1960 classic. Mark Seal investigates a scandal packed with publishing legends

via To Steal a Mockingbird? | Vanity Fair.

26
May
13

5.26.13 … copyright and Chris Hadfield ISS rendition of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” …

Chris Hadfield,  YouTube, David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”, ISS, copyright:  

 

CHRIS HADFIELD has captured the world’s heart, judging by the 14m YouTube views of his free-fall rendition of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”, recorded on the International Space Station (ISS). The Canadian astronaut’s clear voice and capable guitar-playing were complemented by his facility in moving around in the microgravity of low-earth orbit. But when the man fell to Earth in a neat and safe descent a few days ago, after a five-month stay in orbit, should he have been greeted by copyright police? Commander Hadfield was only 250 miles (400 km) up, so he was still subject to terrestrial intellectual-property regimes, which would have applied even if he had flown the “100,000 miles” mentioned in the song’s lyrics, or millions of kilometres to Mars. His five-minute video had the potential to create a tangled web of intellectual-property issues. How does copyright work in space?

via The Economist explains: How does copyright work in space? | The Economist.

08
Nov
10

‎11.8.2010 … wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened … studying forgiveness with my ChristCare group … blessed …

Billy Graham, Charlotte, evangelism:  Happy Birthday, Rev. Graham.  It is hard not to know who Billy Graham is if you live in Charlotte.  I frequently drive down Billy Graham Boulevard (on my way to the airport) and by the Billy Graham Library.  His column appears regularly in our paper.  But on my recent trip to South Africa, Simon, our guide in Kruger,  asked me if I knew Billy Graham … knew in the sense of knew who he was … I said yes and told him that Charlotte, my home, was Rev. Graham’s childhood home and the home of his world-wide ministry.  Simon spent several minutes retelling of his multi-day encounter with Rev. Graham as a guide to him, his family and traveling party.  He was touched by Mr. Graham.  And when Rev. Graham left he gave him his “expensive” animal and plant guide … well used and well-worn now.  He truly touched Simon.  Rev. Graham knew Simon and Simon knew Rev. Graham.  I know Rev. Graham a little better now.  If someone who reads this knows how to get a message to Rev. Graham.  Tell him Simon says hello and thank you.

It will be a quiet celebration today in Montreat, as Billy Graham gathers with family to mark his 92nd birthday.

via Graham still looking to serve the Lord at age 92 – CharlotteObserver.com.

law, copyright, me: I hope I show adequate legal and intellectual respect for the work of others … My blog is a “clipping service.”  The comments are mine.

What makes this story astonishing, really, is that unless it’s an incredibly elaborate hoax, this isn’t some isolated example. This is how this magazine apparently did business for years — and that lends credibility to the idea that Griggs may have honestly thought that she was allowed to just copy whatever she wanted from the Internet. Again, she was crediting the authors. Not always the sources, but at least the writers. It’s a weird head-fake in the direction of treating people fairly, which smells a little bit like — just as she told Gaudio — she actually thought this was fair.

There’s much about this that isn’t known, and it’s important to hold to your skepticism about some of what’s happened since this turned into a meme (for instance, some additional obnoxious responses showed up on Facebook yesterday purporting to be from Griggs, but not everyone thinks they actually were). Griggs hasn’t been heard from directly since all this happened.

Internet justice is always swift and often severe, which can be satisfying at a moment like this if you happen to be a person who creates content. At the same time, it’s a really sobering reminder that in this case, the mob may very well be correct, but what would it have taken to slow it down if it weren’t true?

via The Day The Internet Threw A Righteous Hissyfit About Copyright And Pie : Monkey See : NPR.

bookshelf, quotes, Great Recession: Maybe I will get this book for my kith/kin children …  “All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

Since then, Taibbi’s columns have been a destination for those trying to understand what happened in the aftermath of the financial meltdown. His new book, Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids and the Long Con That Is Breaking America, tries to make the subject even clearer in the colorful language Taibbi’s readers know well.

“All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

via ‘Griftopia’: The Financial Crisis Easily Explained : NPR.

LOL. As Seen On TV :  The egg thing reminds me of a scene in Bridget Jones Diary!  An As Seen on TV Thanksgiving: Products that could help.

Facebook, British Monarchy: I “Liked” them …

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has joined Facebook, adding a presence on the world’s most popular social network to the royal family’s accounts on Twitter, photo-sharing site Flickr and YouTube.

The British monarchy‘s Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/TheBritishMonarchy) does not allow users to “friend” the Queen or to send her messages, but offers updates on royal news and diary events.

via Britain’s Queen Wins 60, 000 Fans on Facebook Debut – NYTimes.com.

parenting, motherhood, culture, me:  I bought into cloth diapers and organic food (but not homemade) … silly me.

In the oscillations of feminism, theories of child-rearing have played a major part. As long as women remain the gender most responsible for children, we are the ones who have the most to lose by accepting the “noble savage” view of parenting, with its ideals of attachment and naturalness. We need to be released from guilt about our children, not further bound by it. We need someone to say: Do the best you can. There are no rules.

via Erica Jong on the Madness of Modern Motherhood – WSJ.com.

If I had a million dollars …:  Just the description makes me want one. 🙂  Canon G Series: The Aspirational Point-and-Shoot | Plugged In – WSJ.com.

business, urban life, pop-ups: As I have said before I want to live in a city big enough to support pop-ups.  They are a modern-day indicia of a BIG city.

The two-year pilot program provides temporary seating platforms for restaurants not eligible for sidewalk cafés licensed by the Department of Consumer Affairs because of narrow sidewalks or zoning restrictions.

The owners of Fika Espresso Bar and Bombay’s Restaurant, located near each other on Pearl Street in the Financial District, housed the city’s first pop-up café, which went up in August and is expected to come down in the next two weeks.

The first curbside wooden platform, measuring 6 feet wide by 84 feet long provided space for about 50 chairs and 14 tables, and attracted throngs of lunch goers.

“My business went up by about 14%,” estimated Prashant Bhatt, owner of Bombay’s Restaurant. “If you come at lunch time there’s no place to sit outside.”

The business owners split the cost of the pop-up café, which they said was slightly more than $10,000 each.

via Pop-Up Cafés to Reappear in 2011 – WSJ.com.

random, men, consumer products, gift ideas:  OK, years ago  (pre-internet) my law associates and I would get into these highly intellectual conversations about certain topics (i.e., is the chocolate milk product Yoohoo or Yahoo … we called a 7-11 to find out).  One topic was why is a man’s “makeup” bag called a “dopp” kit … We found the answer from an older army man … But anyway here is a great Christmas idea for the man  who has everything (and the answer to the question) …

Dopp kit, Il Bisonte; John Allan’s mint conditioner; Sephora travel dental kit; Mason Pearson pocket brush; Kiehl’s Facial Fuel eye de-puffer; Jurlique Chamomile Soothing Mist; Diptyque Tam Dao body lotion; Anthony facial scrub; John Allan’s ocean shampoo; Lightfoot Pure Pine shave creme soap; Marvis Classic Mint travel toothpaste; Clark’s Ultra Rich Lip Balm; The Art of Shaving pure badger brush; Jack Black Double-Duty face moisturizer; Hermès Eau d’Orange Verte soap.

via The Best Ways to Fill Your Dopp Kit – WSJ.com.

Apple, IBM: Good article … two of my favorite stocks.  Like the illustration, too.

Illustration by The New York Times

The two companies have long been cast as polar opposites, even before Apple’s commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl that depicted a female rebel (Apple) striking a blow against a corporate Big Brother (I.B.M.).

Today, Big Blue is seen as a machine — a company that caters to big corporate and government customers and is known for steady improvement and five-year profit plans. Indeed, I.B.M.’s profit rose 12 percent for the third quarter, the 31st consecutive quarter that the company delivered higher earnings. Apple, by contrast, is seen as a consumer-product hit factory that is on a roll.

Yet I.B.M. and Apple can be viewed as the yin and the yang of high-tech innovation, as two companies with more in common than is generally understood. There is a lot of eureka invention and deep science in I.B.M.’s varied businesses, industry experts say. And Apple’s continuing success, they add, is explained in good part by its ability to make innovation a managed system, more machinelike.

via Apple and I.B.M. Aren’t All That Different – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession:  Hope so …

But positive indicators can and do disappoint, so I decided to consult an expert on these matters: Ian Shepherdson, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. As a reader of economic tea leaves over the last five turbulent years, Mr. Shepherdson has a darn good record. For instance, unlike the throng of economists who failed to see the housing crisis coming, Mr. Shepherdson warned his clients in fall 2005 that real estate would crash and a recession would ensue.

He was early, of course, and now acknowledges that he was not nearly emphatic enough in his warnings. But he was fundamentally right back then and has been consistently on target since. So, I am happy to report that he sees the beginnings of a turn in the economy that could translate to a rise in gross domestic product growth and an improving employment picture in the second half of 2011.

via Forecaster Ian Shepherdson Sees an End to Economic Gloom – NYTimes.com.

random, culture, Charlotte: Enjoy … and let me know if you hear about such an event in Charlotte!

Knight Foundation is funding 1,000 Random Acts of Culture over the next three years. So if you live in any of these eight cities – Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami – be on the lookout and have your cellphones ready.

via What a Joyful Noise: 650 Singers Burst into Hallelujah as part of Random Act of Culture | Knight Arts.

random, kith/kin, new blog:  I could so see some of my friends doing this!  On the Road with Honey: Atlanta to Chicago by Kevin Austin | LikeTheDew.com.

media, journalism, boundaries:  I always thought the New Yorker was more literary than political commentary.  They certainly jump right into the fray with their covers!

In his inaugural address in January 2009, President Barack Obama promised a new era of diplomacy in foreign affairs. “To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history,” he said. But, he continued, “we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.”

He didn’t know that he might as well have been speaking to the Republicans.

The November 15, 2010 cover of The New Yorker features Obama offering to shake the hand of Republican congressman John Boehner, who is expected to take over as the next Speaker of the House. Instead of offering his hand to shake in return, Boehner offers Obama his fist.

The illustration is by Barry Blitt and recalls his controversial July 2008 cover for the magazine, which featured Obama wearing a turban and giving a fist bump to Michelle Obama in the Oval Office.

via John Boehner Gives Obama ‘Terrorist Fist Bump’ On New Yorker Cover.

tv, Sherlock Holmes, me: wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened …

In with three criminally clever whodunits, A Study in Pink (October 24), The Blind Banker (October 31) and The Great Game (November 7), consulting detective Sherlock Holmes teams up with former army doctor John Watson to solve a dizzying array of crimes with his signature deductive reasoning. From the writers of Doctor Who, Sherlock is co-created and written by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat.

via Masterpiece | Sherlock | PBS.

recipes, chicken, comfort foods:  Roast chicken is one of my favorite “comfort foods.”  I will try this … Rozanne Gold’s “Opinionated Way to Roast a Chicken” | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

The Supreme Court, politics:  great article …

One of the legacies of the pitched battle ten years ago is that voters appreciate now, in a way they did not before Florida 2000, that our elections, like any human endeavor, are fraught with errors. Bush v. Gore thus opened eyes and lowered expectations. Voting in America is guaranteed by law but not in fact. The votes of some simply don’t get counted.

So did the Court lose respect among Americans for its ruling in Bush v. Gore? Did it lose legitimacy? You can argue it both ways and scores of legitimate scholars have gleefully done so. If the Court did lose some credibility, and I think it did, clearly it did not lose enough to generate much of an anti-Court backlash. The Justices are still going strong– witness their landmark corporate speech case this past January in Citizens United. And so are their critics. Bush v. Goredidn’t change the world. The world changed shortly after Bush v. Gore and it’s likely never going to change back.

via Bush v. Gore: The Disputed Election Fades Into History.

architecture, design,Chicago: As my kids say … fail …

Sprucing up a dull city plaza sounds good in theory, but the outcome depends upon the vision of enlightened clients and the talents of skilled designers. Both, unfortunately, are in short supply in the tidy but clinical revamp of the Plaza of the Americas, a small public space whose importance is magnified because it provides one of the few openings along densely-packed North Michigan Avenue.

When it opened in 1965, the plaza possessed a multitude of smaller touches that made it a welcoming public space. Planter boxes filled with shrubs, trees and flowers lent color to the cityscape. The planters had broad ledges where pedestrians were free to sit. Multi-colored lights made the plazas’s fountains sparkle at night. The plaza’s aggregate surface, with its varied hues of crushed stone, was a cut above dull gray concrete.

But flash forward to the first decade of the 21st Century, and the picture looked very different. The aggregate was crumbling and the plaza’s drainage grates were failing. In winter, water would pool up and turn into dangerous sheets of ice. The plaza’s undergirding was deteriorating, too. That raised a simple but contentious question: Who would pay to fix things up?

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

Jane Austen, movies:  Mollywood … Mormon film industry!

Alert Janeite Sylvia M. let us know that a new, modern-set version of S&S, called Scents and Sensibility, is in production for release in 2011. It looks like it is a product of the Mormon film industry, which also produced a modern-set version of P&P a few years back. Not much info available yet about the new movie, but well, hello Brandon.

(Somebody else told us about this–it has something to do with perfume–and we wish they would remind us about it comments! Sorry!)

via AustenBlog.

11
Aug
10

8.11.2010 …. so fun to talk anthropology with jack … et leaves for the long drive on Friday …

quotes:  From my friend Ann … may apply to my boys as well.  Mark Twain said “Don’t let your schooling interfere with your education.”

education, anthropology, Jack:  Jack came home from CU today having just completed a course in medical anthropology.  He highly recommends this book … Righteous Dopefiend.  Although he thought it might be too rough, too real, for me, I am thilled that he is that excited about a class.  I was an econ major and I never came home talking about my econ courses … some professors, yes, but not the courses.

This powerful study immerses the reader in the world of homelessness and drug addiction in the contemporary United States. For over a decade Philippe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg followed a social network of two dozen heroin injectors and crack smokers on the streets of San Francisco, accompanying them as they scrambled to generate income through burglary, panhandling, recycling, and day labor.

via Righteous Dopefiend : Philippe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg – University of California Press.

cities, urban renewal, Syracuse:

But recently, in numbers not yet statistically measurable but clearly evident at the ground level, they’ve been coming back to the city, first as a trickle, and now by the hundreds. In some ways it’s a part of the natural ebb and flow of urban demographics. But it is also the result of a new attitude among the city’s leadership, one that admits the failure of the re-industrialization efforts of the last decades and instead invents ways to attract new types of residents and keep current ones from leaving. Call it urban renewal 2.0, gentrification on a citywide scale.

Mr. Destito, for example, grew up in nearby Rome, a small city at the foothills of the Adirondacks. He wanted a bigger city to settle in, so he traveled the country for three years, working in different places and observing what he found appealing in each one — places like Nashville, Denver and Atlanta, many of them “bustling with activity where you could be alone or with people, hang out in parks, ride a bike, find an arts community,” he said.

Eventually, he realized, why not Syracuse? Its low cost of living would let him work less and enjoy life more. Most important, it offered the chance to make a visible impact on a community, something that would be much harder to do in a bustling metropolis. “I saw the potential, the opportunity to recreate some of what it once had,” he said. “I saw interesting things happening and I wanted to be part of it.”

via Rebirth of a City – Opinionator Blog – NYTimes.com.

movies, list:  Another list … Photos: The Best Dance Movies Ever – Newsweek.

Davidson: A new logo???

At Fan Day Saturday, see Wildcat logo’s new look | Sports.

random, LOL:  girl quits job on dry erase board exposes farmville boss called her hopa theCHIVE.

legal, copyright:

Jennifer Caleshu of the Bay Area Discovery Museum send this “copyright caution” (interesting that it’s not a “warning”) from a course reader in her Haas MBA program:

COPYRIGHT CAUTION: As you know, copyright protection of original intellectual property is a big deal, particularly to the content authors and publishers. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that unauthorized copying or sharing of files, passwords, or access is prohibited. Bluntly, this activity is illegal. As with most things in life, it’s best to just do the right thing.

via Emotionally intelligent copyright notice | Daniel Pink.

philosophy, religion:

Well, unless you’re Buzz Lightyear, we know that’s impossible; you can’t go beyond what has no end. But the representation of infinity, or the reality of it, makes for some very complex reasoning.

In 1450, Nicholas of Cusa (c. 1401-1464), Bishop of Brixen (Bressanone, Italy), claimed in his De Docta Ignorantia (“On Learned Ignorance”) that wisdom lies in the impossibility of the finite human mind to understand the infinity of God, in whom all opposites are combined.

via To Infinity And Beyond : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR.

banking, Charlotte:  Right in BofA’s backyard!

Fifth Third Bank is finding opportunity in Bank of America Corp.’s backyard.

Fifth Third plans to open a new retail branch and private banking office in the ground floor of the Fifth Third Center, a building owned by BofA that was renamed when Fifth Third moved its N.C. corporate offices uptown this spring. The ground-floor space was occupied by Zink American Kitchen, which closed last week.

via Fifth Third branching out – Charlotte Business Journal.

end of an Era:  very sad …

Sea Island Co., operator of the famed Georgia coastal resort since the 1920s, will file for bankruptcy protection today and announce a deal to sell most of its assets, according to the company’s top executive.

The buyers are investment firms Oaktree Capital Management, of Los Angeles, and Avenue Capital Group, of New York, Sea Island Chairman Bill Jones III said in an e-mail late Tuesday to residents of the resort’s gated community.

via Sea Island Co. to file Chapter 11, sell properties  | ajc.com.

advertising, As Seen on TV:  Don’t you just want to order this junk sometimes!

A Bottle Top is a small, plastic cone-with-a-cap that turns the top of your soda can into the top of a soda bottle. It’s a charming little product that solves a problem you didn’t know you had.

I don’t like pressing my lips to an aluminum can, which produces a lingering metallic taste. Soda cans slosh around and spill in the car. An open can loses its fizz, and my kitchen always seems littered with half full (of is it half empty?) cans.

via Bottle Top review: An invention you didn’t know you needed.

college: OK, this is going too far …

This year’s version of the Common Application was due to be posted online around 12:01 a.m. on Aug. 1 — it wound up going up a few minutes earlier — and I wondered: How soon had the first application been sent in, by whom and why?

That application, to New York University, was submitted by Cree Bautista, 17, who is entering his senior year at Pflugerville High School outside of Austin, Tex. The time? About 3:30 a.m., only hours after the form went up.

via The First Common Application for the Class of ‘15 – The Choice Blog – NYTimes.com.




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