Posts Tagged ‘D-Day

10
Jun
14

6.10.14 … troglo life? …

France’s Cave Homes, Travel | Smithsonian, Tours FR, Loire Valley, Saumur FR, troglo life:  Anyone ever heard of France’s Cave homes? The pastoral care minister at my childhood church, North Avenue in Atlanta, mentioned them when he was visiting my mom on Friday. Sounds fascinating!! They are near Tours FR where Molly will be studying this fall.

Turnquant-abandoned-caves-7.jpg__600x0_q85_upscale Les-Hautes-Roches-Hotel-5.jpg__600x0_q85_upscale

In the morning, I headed toward Saumur on old highway N 952, along the Loire. An hour or so later, I arrived in Saumur—not just where Bonnells live, but the epicenter of troglo life in France. There are hundreds of miles of caves in and around Saumur, some bored into the hillsides, some under the plains. Most are abandoned. Others have been revamped as troglo hotels, restaurants, museums, artist galleries, wineries, farms for mushrooms, silkworms and snails, a rose water distillery and a disco. Even a troglo zoo, where large animals live in open quarries and enclosed caves display bats and other lovers of dim light.

via A Tour of France’s Cave Homes | Travel | Smithsonian.

William Dabney of Virginia, American balloon flyer, D-Day, Omaha Beach,  French Legion of Honor medal, segregated 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion:

10390492_10152209746626406_2597573197691387397_n

Per Donna Morris … Per Linda Hervieux : William Dabney of Virginia was an American balloon flyer. He landed on Omaha Beach early on D-Day and was lucky to be alive when he got his TNT-armed blimp aloft, protecting our troops from German planes. In June 2009, he was awarded the French Legion of Honor medal, which he’s wearing in this photo. Until then his unit, the segregated 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, had been forgotten. Rarely are they mentioned in history books and Hollywood has never shown them in a D-Day movie. But they were there, the only black combat troops to land with the white infantry. Since meeting Bill, I’ve been researching a book about his battalion.

Palace Malice, Dogwood Stables, Campbell/Umhau Family, 2013 Belmont Stakes, 2014 $1.25 million Metropolitan Handicap at Belmont Park, kith/kin: Congrats Dogwood Stables, Cot and Ann Campbell, Campbell/Umhau Family!! Pretty extraordinary!

Palace Malice proved his class in the $1.25 million Metropolitan Handicap at Belmont Park, winning the second Grade 1 of his career for Dogwood Stables a year after taking the 2013 Belmont Stakes.

Fourth with three furlongs left to go, the 6-5 favorite in a 12-horse field shifted off the rail and split rivals to run down tiring pacesetter Broadway Empire, then put away 2013 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile winner Goldencents while driving clear by a length, Romansh came in a half-length back in third.

“It’s pretty extraordinary to have a horse win the Belmont a year ago and come back and win the Met Mile from the No. 1 post carrying 124 pounds and beating last year’s Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile winner,” trainer Todd Pletcher remarked. “In the process, it’s an unbelievable accomplishment.”

Broadway Empire struck out for the early lead in the Met Mile and was tracked with about a one-length advantage by Goldencents, making his first start of the year. A quarter went in :23.01 seconds and a half in :45.76 seconds while 124-pound highweight Palace Malice, getting the rail trip from post 1 under Hall of Fame jockey John Velazquez, moved up from seventh race third, then fourth as Romansh made his outside move in pursuit of Goldencents and the leader.

Rounding the turn Palace Malice shifted gears and found running room between horses, easily clearing the tiring Broadway Empire on his inside before digging deep to pass Goldencents to his outside within the furlong grounds. The 4-year-old son of Curlin ran the mile in 1:33.56.

“When I finally got him through, he started running,” Velazquez said. “He was [hesitant to go through]. The room was there, but I kind of have to keep him busy, keep him busy. The spot was there, but he went to jump from one side to the other one and I almost lost my spot. I got after him again, and he finally got through. Once he got through, he started running. [Out of the gate], the first jump was OK and the second jump he kind of grabbed himself a little. He didn’t really bobble, he just stumbled a little bit, just a jump. After that I had to make sure I got him in the race.”

Goldencents’ connections said they were also pleased with their runner, who had not raced since finishing seventh in the Cigar Mile at Aqueduct Racetrack last November.

“We needed a little tuneup,” said Leandro Mora, assistant to trainer Doug O’Neill. “This was his first race since he finished seventh in the Cigar. Too bad we couldn’t have a race in between. We did all we could. We’re extremely happy. We ran a great second, so we’re fine. We’re going for the Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita.” Palace Malice returned $4.70, $3.70, and $2.90 while Goldencents paid $5.80 and $4.80. Romansh brought $7.90, while Shakin It Up, Clearly Now, Broadway Empire, Scarly Charly, Declan’s Warrior, Vyjack, Normandy Invasion, Capo Bastone, and Moreno completed the order of finish.

Bred in Kentucky by W.S. Farish out of the Royal Anthem mare Palace Rumor, Palace Malice is undefeated in four starts in 2014, all of them graded stakes. He earned an automatic berth to the Nov. 1 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile at Santa Anita Park in the Met Mile, a Breeders’ Cup Challenge “Win and You’re In” event.

via ESPN Horse Palace Malice takes Met Mile.

California Chrome, 2014 Belmont Stakes, Triple Crown:  Speaking of horses …

10417804_10152222792241156_8580150640776459868_n

High Museum of Art/Atlanta, 6.3, Elizabeth Musser’s The Swan House:  Childhood friend Elizabeth Musser wrote a wonderful historical novel using this tragedy as the historical backdrop.  It was truly a sad event in the history of Atlanta.

10276978_10152065559286036_6648136609493183222_n

Fifty-two years ago today, more than 100 Atlantans were killed in an airplane crash outside Paris at Orly Airport. The group had just completed a three-week trip sponsored by the Atlanta Arts Association and were headed home to Atlanta when the crash occurred.

From that tragedy, the Atlanta community came together to create the Memorial Arts Center as a tribute to the people who had long supported the arts in the city. The Woodruff Arts Center of today grew from those beginnings and today is one of the largest arts centers in the world.

In memory of the individuals and families affected by the Orly tragedy, and in recognition of their meaning to all of us associated with the Woodruff Arts Center, we have placed commemorative flowers by the Rodin sculpture on our front lawn today.

via High Museum of Art, Atlanta.

15
Aug
11

8.15.2011 … ET has dry sockets, enough said …

cars, kith/kin:  My mom drove little cars … Opels … maybe that’s why I love the little guys.

With seven inches less wheelbase than a Mini Cooper and tipping the scales at 400 fewer pounds, the 500 is a mighty small car. Yet, I found plenty of room for my six-foot, two-inch frame inside, and the wee Fiat was relatively composed, quiet, and daresay refined on the highway. And the 38-mpg it returned at highway speeds wasn’t too shabby, either, especially compared to the Ford F-150 I’m assigned to drive next.

The 500 isn’t for everybody. There will continue to be a need for larger vehicles for families, contractors, and others. Some will likely insist on driving larger vehicles just because they can, as long as they can afford the fuel. But if the 500 is one example of what to expect as manufacturers work to meet upcoming mileage requirements, the future doesn’t look so bad. It proves that small and affordable doesn’t have to be boring. And down the road, it may be that the Sequoia will be the vehicle drawing looks at stoplights.

via Italian take-out: Fiat 500 is spicier than expected.

Great Recession, taxes v. spending, The Oracle of Omaha:  The Oracle has spoken …

While the poor and middle class fight for us in Afghanistan, and while most Americans struggle to make ends meet, we mega-rich continue to get our extraordinary tax breaks. Some of us are investment managers who earn billions from our daily labors but are allowed to classify our income as “carried interest,” thereby getting a bargain 15 percent tax rate. Others own stock index futures for 10 minutes and have 60 percent of their gain taxed at 15 percent, as if they’d been long-term investors.

These and other blessings are showered upon us by legislators in Washington who feel compelled to protect us, much as if we were spotted owls or some other endangered species. It’s nice to have friends in high places.

Last year my federal tax bill — the income tax I paid, as well as payroll taxes paid by me and on my behalf — was $6,938,744. That sounds like a lot of money. But what I paid was only 17.4 percent of my taxable income — and that’s actually a lower percentage than was paid by any of the other 20 people in our office. Their tax burdens ranged from 33 percent to 41 percent and averaged 36 percent.

If you make money with money, as some of my super-rich friends do, your percentage may be a bit lower than mine. But if you earn money from a job, your percentage will surely exceed mine — most likely by a lot.

Job one for the 12 is to pare down some future promises that even a rich America can’t fulfill. Big money must be saved here. The 12 should then turn to the issue of revenues. I would leave rates for 99.7 percent of taxpayers unchanged and continue the current 2-percentage-point reduction in the employee contribution to the payroll tax. This cut helps the poor and the middle class, who need every break they can get.

But for those making more than $1 million — there were 236,883 such households in 2009 — I would raise rates immediately on taxable income in excess of $1 million, including, of course, dividends and capital gains. And for those who make $10 million or more — there were 8,274 in 2009 — I would suggest an additional increase in rate.

My friends and I have been coddled long enough by a billionaire-friendly Congress. It’s time for our government to get serious about shared sacrifice.

via Stop Coddling the Super-Rich – NYTimes.com.

Normandy, France, D-Day, LIFE:  This is another good LIFE gallery. Before and After D-Day: In Color – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

history, The Civil War, war strategy:

Shortages led to inflation and, as the price of foodstuffs spiked, buying power steadily decreased, by about a sixth during the first year of the conflict. Increases in prices were especially marked in areas close to the front lines,where food distribution was directly affected by the fighting. A typical Southern family’s food bill was $6.65 per month at the time of secession, $68 per month in 1863, and $400 per month in 1864. Indeed, by the spring of 1863, prices for food and dry goods were going up about 10 percent a month. Butter that cost 20 cents a pound when secession was declared commanded seven times as much a year later — and up to 100 times as much in some locales, if it was available at all, during the last year of the war. Untenable prices led to outbursts of civil unrest and incidents, ranging from the looting of supply trains to bread riots in Richmond and other Southern cities.

Before the first summer of the war was over, Southerners had already begun to suffer the effects of shortages imposed by the conflict. Few could conceive, however, just how severe the privations they would ultimately have to endure would become in the months and long years that followed.

via Squeezing the South into Submission – NYTimes.com.

physical media, digital media:  I feel this way every time I go by a former Blockbuster.

The decline and/or demise of once mighty retailers such as Borders, Tower, Blockbuster, Hollywood Video, Suncoast and Virgin Megastores is some of the most tangible evidence of an undeniable, inevitable truth: Physical media are starting to go away. Digital-music downloads and subscription services have already rendered CDs only slightly less quaint than LPs. Streaming video from companies such as Netflix and Amazon is starting to make DVDs — and even Blu-ray — look stale. I still buy more dead-tree books than I have time to read, but my instinctive response when I learn of a new one I might want to buy is usually “Is this available for Kindle?”

via Why I Already Miss Books: A Lament for Physical Media – TIME.

Harry Potter, Pottermore:  Anybody have a Pottermore Beta invite?  Pottermore Insider: Beta testing (and registering for October).

Professor Munakata, comics:  I may have to buy one of these!

Munakata

Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure was serialised last year in Japan and has now been now translated into English. Its star – a portly ethnographer-cum-archaeologist who solves crimes and explains civilisations – is already well known to millions of Japanese readers, who follow his exploits in a series of Hoshino Yukinobu-penned comics. Hoshino’s work is blend of science fiction and thriller, layered with a rich mix of western and Asian myth and history.

If that sounds a bit like Look and Learn, there are pages in the book that seem exactly so, as the professor elaborates on real events, artefacts and characters.

The professor is a staunch supporter of the British Museum. Photograph: British Museum

Munakata is also well-versed in the debate surrounding disputed objects such as the Parthenon marbles, the Rosetta stone, and the Benin bronzes. Meanwhile, the Lewis chessmen are key players in the story.

Munakata is against repatriating these objects, praising the British Museum’s history of collecting, and fostering public access. “I am one of many Japanese scholars,” he says, “who have benefited from that generosity.”

via The British Museum: marbles, murals… and manga! | Books | The Guardian.

religion, class:  Sounds interesting.

Throughout American history, from the antebellum days to contemporary times, class and religion have been repeatedly tied together. Dr. Sean McCloud at UNC Charlotte will join us to talk about his research on the intersection of religion and class across American History and talk about what he thinks the meaning of class is in today’s world, and why it’s important to insert the issue of class into religious study.

via WFAE 90.7 FM.

trains, Grand Central Station, Oyster Bar, NYC,  Le Train Bleu , Gare de Lyon, Paris:  One of my most memorable meals was at a restaurant at the Edinburgh train station … chicken cordon bleu … so I may have to try these two to compare “train fare.”

In praise of Grand Central Station’s Oyster Bar and Le Train Bleu at the Gare de Lyon in Paris, “grand invitations to a railway journey, however long or short.”

via The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

international relations, China, US, Pakistan: Peace is a long way off.

In the days after the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, Pakistan’s intelligence service probably allowed Chinese military engineers to examine the wreckage of a stealth American helicopter that crashed during the operation, according to American officials and others familiar with the classified intelligence assessments.

Such cooperation with China would be provocative, providing further evidence of the depths of Pakistan’s anger over the Bin Laden raid, which was carried out without Pakistan’s approval. The operation, conducted in early May, also set off an escalating tit-for-tat scuffle between American and Pakistani spies.

American spy agencies have concluded that it is likely that Chinese engineers — at the invitation of Pakistani intelligence operatives — took detailed photographs of the severed tail of the Black Hawk helicopter equipped with classified technology designed to elude radar, the officials said. The members of the Navy Seals team who conducted the raid had tried to destroy the helicopter after it crashed at Bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, but the tail section of the aircraft remained largely intact.

via U.S. Aides Believe China Examined Stealth Copter – NYTimes.com.

apps, photography, kith/kin, random:  My mother always had me part my hair on the side because she said nobody’s face is the same  on each side.  I think I will avoid this app.

Artist Julian Wolkenstein is keeping a weblog of all the photos folks upload using the app. Here’s the odd thing: The pictures are utterly, completely, and totally frightening (which probably has a lot to do with the crappiness of camera phones). Half the people resemble aliens. The rest could pass for some combination of Jeffrey Dahmer and Herman Munster. Everyone’s rendered ugly in a similar way, and there’s something sort of beautiful about that.

via Crazy App: Which Side of Your Face Is Better Looking? | Co. Design.




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 617 other followers

August 2020
S M T W T F S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031