Posts Tagged ‘Davidson College



27
Apr
14

4.27.14 … In our era, it was just what you did …

Best Graduation Rates: Colleges,  Bloomberg Best (and Worst), Davidson College: #6 … I think Davidson can do better. Actually, #6 is quite good. These are the schools that came out on top: Williams, Yale Notre Dame, Princeton and Carleton. I have three children, and the 4 year graduation rate intrigues me.  Of their friends, those that graduated in 4 years are in the minority unless they went to a private college or a smaller flagship university (i.e., UVA, UNC).  The larger universities make getting credits and completing majors extremely difficult, so that 1 or 2 extra semesters is not unusual and certainly not looked down upon.  In our era, it was just what you did.

Overview

Bloomberg ranked U.S. colleges and universities based on the four-year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate at or above 80% for full-time first-time students.

Methodology

Six-year and eight-year graduation rates were provided for comparison. Included were 1,941 public and private not-for-profit schools of four years or more that offer broad curricula; specialty schools were omitted such as military academies, seminaries and schools with religious focus, music and art schools, engineering schools, nursing schools and medical training schools. Data were for 2010 to 2011, the most recently available school year.

4-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate 6-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate 8-Year bachelor’s-degree graduation rate

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via Best Graduation Rates: Colleges – Bloomberg Best (and Worst).

Vincent Van Gogh, Discovery Place/Charlotte:

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He probably didn’t cut off his whole ear, just a lobe. He died a failure, having sold only one painting. He created most of his famous works in the last two years of his troubled life.

Vincent Van Gogh also painted on small canvases, but his larger-than-life multimedia exhibition opening Friday at Discovery Place won’t be contained. Van Gogh’s works will be cast as giants across a gallery accompanied by a soundtrack from Bach, Handel and other classical composers.

More than 3,000 images of Van Gogh’s paintings, sketches and letters will be splashed digitally from wall to floor, immersing visitors in his work through 40 high-definition projectors.

“Van Gogh Alive,” which comes to Charlotte from Moscow and moves on in 40 days to Philadelphia, is designed to intensify the emotional experience of the artist’s labors. It also provides the rare microscopic view of his highly-textured brush strokes, unusual for his era.

“Guests may have had previous opportunities to see a few authentic paintings in a gallery, but ‘Van Gogh Alive’ brings thousands of Van Gogh’s images under one roof in a stunning audio-visual format,” says Catherine Wilson Horne, Discovery Place’s president.

Van Gogh is a departure for Discovery Place, which tends to showcase scientific exhibits. But the immersive Sensory 4 technology, used in the recent the “101 Inventions That Changed the World,” drew the museum to the show, said Kaitlin Rogers, Discovery Place’s marketing manager.

In one corner, for example, guests’ silhouettes are digitally painted with Van Gogh’s style of color and light in an experience created by artist Ivan Toth Depena in collaboration with the McColl Center for Visual Art.

Another local touch for the Charlotte visit of the exhibition is the presence of actors who interpret Van Gogh’s life. Greeting visitors in character will be Van Gogh; his brother Theo; his artistic contemporary Paul Gauguin; or his model, Adeline Raxous.

Running concurrently with the exhibit, sponsored by Wells Fargo, is the IMAX movie “Van Gogh: Brush with Genius.”

via CharlotteObserver.com – News, sports & weather for Charlotte, NC.

Who Can Write About Performance Art?,  e-flux, Judson Memorial Church:  This caught my attention because, one, it is about art and two, it is being hosted by Judson Memorial Church in NYC.   And of course it sent me searching.  I took a Big Onion Tour of Greenwich Village in january 2013 and Judson Memorial was of course highlighted, both as a politically active faith community and as a significant sponsor of the arts.    There is a great Hopper painting of Judson Memorial … http://www.walkingoffthebigapple.com/2009/02/light-in-edward-hopper-sunny-side-of.html

“Why Dance in the Art World?,” presented by The Performa Institute and NYU Steinhardt at Judson Memorial Church on September 17, 2012. Photo © Paula Court.

“Who Can Write About Performance Art?”

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 6:30pm

Judson Memorial Church

55 Washington Square South

New York City

http://www.performa-arts.org

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How many histories do you need to know in order to write exciting criticism about art at the axis of dance and visual art, theater and performance, and every iteration in between?

Performa is pleased to announce “Who Can Write About Performance Art?,” a lively informative panel discussion and forthcoming series of instructional workshops investigating the myriad knowledge and skills necessary to write thoughtful and insightful art criticism at the axis of dance and visual art, theater and performance, and every iteration in between. Panelists Claire Bishop, RoseLee Goldberg, Adrian Heathfield, John Rockwell, Hrag Vartanian, and David Velasco will contribute their own expertise in writing about performance in an evening that specifically focuses on the ways and means that writers approach their writing, to be as flexible in crossing these various borders as are the artists who create multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary works. Specifically, panelists will discuss their backgrounds and interest in performance—do they come from art history, theater history, or literature?—share how they first came to write about performance, and express their ideas about the responsibilities of writing about work that demands a knowledge of several disciplines at once. Participants’ contributions are informed by their diverse perspectives and experiences in art criticism, ranging from publishing texts in international monthly art magazines, daily newspapers, and websites, to extensive, book-length scholarly publications.

via Who Can Write About Performance Art? | e-flux.

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Edward Hopper achieved fame relatively late in life, with his art career gaining momentum during the early years of the Great Depression. After years as a working artist, the Met, MoMA, and the Whitney started acquiring his paintings. Hopper turned 50 on July 22, 1932.

That year Hopper and his wife Jo moved toward the front of the building at 3 Washington Square North into a sunnier spot on the fourth floor that afforded a view overlooking the park. Inspired by the new point of view he started painting November, Washington Square, a landscape that showed the buildings on the north side of the park, prominently Judson Memorial Church. He set the unfinished painting aside for about twenty-seven years, coming back to it in 1959 and filling in the missing sky. Hopper shows Washington Square to be completely empty, not surprising for a painter known to remove people from his compositions. The painting shows a sleepy village, and with the earth tones and blue sky it looks like it could be a village in northern New Mexico.

Previous to the move to the sunny side, he painted an oil and a few watercolors of the views of the roofs from the back of the building, ones that show the chimney vents and such. City Roofs (1932) features the looming presence of 1 Fifth Avenue, the Art Deco skyscraper that upset the Villagers when it was erected. Interestingly, Hopper ignored many of the famous buildings of the era such as the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, and Rockefeller Center and stuck mainly to pedestrian subjects. This strikes me as a wise move.

via The Light in Edward Hopper: The Sunny Side of the Great Depression, and A Walk | Walking Off the Big Apple.

Sponsorship of the arts[edit]

Beginning in the 1950s, the church supports a radical arts ministry, first led by associate pastor Bernard Scott and subsequently by associate pastor Al Carmines. The church made space available to artists for art exhibitions, rehearsals, and performances. The church also assured that this space was to be a place where these artists could have the freedom to experiment in their work without fear of censorship. In 1957, the church offered gallery space to Claes Oldenburg, Jim Dine and Robert Rauschenberg, who were then unknown artists. In 1959, the Judson Gallery showed work by pop artists, Tom Wesselmann, Daniel Spoerri, and Red Grooms. Yoko Ono also had her work exhibited at the gallery.

The Judson Dance Theater, which began in 1962, provided a venue for dancers and choreographers including Trisha Brown, Lucinda Childs, Steve Paxton, David Gordon and Yvonne Rainer to create and show their work. Among others, these dancers and choreographers shaped dance history by creating postmodern dance, the first avant-garde movement in dance theater since the modern dance of the 1930s and 1940s. For the past several decades, Movement Research has presented concerts of experimental dance at the church on Monday evenings during the academic year.

In the 1970s, the church hosted various art shows and multimedia events. Most notable among these multimedia events was the People’s Flag Show in November 1970, a six-day exhibition of painting and sculpture on the theme of the American flag. The exhibit and the accompanying symposium, featuring speeches by Abbie Hoffman and Kate Millet, attracted widespread attention from the public, the press and the police. During the final days of the exhibit, three of the contributing artists were arrested, both pastors (Moody and Carmines) were issued summons (not followed up), and the District Attorney closed the exhibit on charges of desecration of the American flag.

The Judson Poets’ Theatre started in November 1961 – with a play by poet Joel Oppenheimer – as one of three off-off-Broadway venues (the others were Caffe Cino and La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club). Experimental plays and musicals by later-famous authors and directors, including Sam Shepherd, Lanford Wilson and Tom O’Horgan, were presented in the church’s main Meeting Room. Starting in the late 1960s, Carmines began writing and producing his own musicals, and later, “oratorios” that used large volunteer choruses. Especially notable were several shows using texts by Gertrude Stein, music by Carmines, with direction by the Judson Poets Theatre director Lawrence Kornfeld.

In the 1980s, the church sponsored various political-theater performances, such as those by the Vermont-based Bread and Puppet Theater. These performances included Insurrection Opera and Oratario, performed in February and March 1984. In this performance, the Bread and Puppet Theater, under the direction of its founder, Peter Schumann, used opera and the company’s now signature oversized puppets to convey an anti-nuclear message. The church has recently become the home of the West Village Chorale, directed by Michael Conley. The Chorale’s former home was St. Luke’s in the Fields on Hudson Street.

The church celebrated its centennial in 1990 with performances and symposia involving many of the artists who had been involved with the arts ministry in the 1960s and 1970s. It continues both its support of the arts and its social outreach to the community.

via Judson Memorial Church – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Spitbank Fort, Solent Forts – The Most Unique Collection of Venues:

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Our three AmaZing historic sea forts have been, or are in the process of being, transformed into the ultimate private island experience. Perfect for Private Parties, Fort Breaks, Weddings and Lunch Experiences, our venues offer something unique.

via Solent Forts: Amazing Venues.

Erev Yom HaShoah, Holocaust:

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Alex Levin, Art Levin Studio. http://www.ArtLevin.com

April 27

Tonight, on Erev Yom HaShoah-jews come together to remember the 6 million Jews who perished in the Holocaust.

NEVER AGAIN!

Please SHARE picture on your Wall!!!

via Alex Levin, Art Levin Studio. www.ArtLevin.com.

22
Apr
14

4.22.14 … On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every ‘superstar,’ every ‘supreme leader,’ every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there — on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” – Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot, Animated in Motion Graphics,  Brain Pickings:  Happy Earth Day!

From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every ‘superstar,’ every ‘supreme leader,’ every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there — on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity — in all this vastness — there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

via Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot, Animated in Motion Graphics | Brain Pickings.

 ‘Artisanal’ Toast, The Salt : NPR: 

The TIY Verdict

If you’re looking for a delicious treat — and a few extra calories — try pan-fried toast. To impress your friends, pull out the blowtorch. And when you’re stuck in a motel room and get a hankering for toast, the coffee maker should do the trick.

Or just wait for a toastery to open up in your neighborhood.

via We Didn’t Believe In ‘Artisanal’ Toast, Until We Made Our Own : The Salt : NPR.

Worth sticking with one airline?, Atlanta Forward, frequent flyer miles: 

Maybe, just maybe, more customers will make a rational decision about their next flight itinerary — not one distorted by a pathological obsession with miles, but based on ticket price and convenience. A veil is slowly being lifted from the traveling public, and at last, they’re seeing loyalty programs for what they really are: habit-forming schemes that impair your ability to make a clear-headed decision about travel and that almost always benefit the travel company more than you.

via Worth sticking with one airline? | Atlanta Forward.

Cloud Photo Storage, Family Pictures, WSJ.com: 

In my hunt for the best cloud photo option, five services stood out: Dropbox, Flickr, Shutterfly, SmugMug and the powerful yet clumsy combination of Google GOOGL +1.14% Drive and Google+. In the end, only Flickr managed to satisfy all my requirements, though SmugMug was a close second

via Cloud Photo Storage: The Best Ways to Bank Family Pictures – WSJ.com.

Survivalist Seder, Passover, go bags: Loved this!

That all changed Monday night, when he decided to use the first night of Passover to talk openly about emergencies and evacuation and disaster “without delving into paranoia and fear.”

Aaron had been thinking for a while now that for Passover, which comes with its own stash of basement boxes—foods and dishes to be used only for eight days a year—we’re all forced to create what he calls “a mini household in a closet.” And the Passover story, at least as he thinks about it, is really all about leaving home quickly in an emergency, with only the stuff you can carry.

So Aaron sent out an email to our Seder guests simply asking “for everyone (kids included) to take some time this week packing a ‘bag’ of your necessities if you had to pack up and leave your home as our ancestors did. The only requirement is that it should be something that you could reasonably carry without having to ask someone else to do it for you.” It was our first ever Emergency Preparedness Seder. We will probably do it again next year (if we make it to next year).

via Survivalist Seder: This Passover, we packed go bags..

 George F. Kennan’s Diaries, Reviewed, New Republic: Worth your time …

He is a relic of the nineteenth century, a misfit in modern times. The achievements of science, medicine, and technology leave him cold; he sees only the defilement of nature wrought by the automobile, and the corruption of the spirit brought on by consumer society, whose blight he laments with numbing frequency. (“With all due effort to avoid exaggerated pessimism and over-dramatization,” he writes, in a typical passage, from 1978, “I can see no salvation for the U.S. either in its external relations nor in the development of its life internally.”) From urban decay to the decline of the schools, from the media’s crass commercialism to sexual libertinism, he sees all about him a decadent society—late Rome—offering grounds only for hopelessness.

via George F. Kennan’s Diaries, Reviewed | New Republic.

Indy churches,  share spirit — and their space: 

Nesting, where a congregation welcomes another flock to share its home, isn’t new, but it’s a growing trend as churches face challenging demographic and financial changes. The sharing is sometimes between an established church with a dwindling membership and a newer church that can’t afford a building, although some established and healthy churches do it as an outreach, a Christian helping hand.

via Indy churches share spirit — and their space.

 Ender’s Game Movie, Roger Ebert: I actually liked it.  Worth a Redbox rental.

The movie version of Orson Scott Card’s “Ender’s Game” is way too kind, and the drama suffers greatly for it. The movie packs too much plot into 114 minutes and has serious pacing issues, and because its makers don’t have a eye for spectacular set pieces, it never looks as grand as it should. But the film’s biggest problem is a matter of tone and characterization: the characters constantly talk about how mean they can be, but their actions suggest otherwise.

via Ender’s Game Movie Review & Film Summary (2013) | Roger Ebert.

Veriditas, labyrinths, history:

The labyrinth design used by Lauren Artress is a replica of the Eleven-circuit Medieval Labyrinth from Chartres Cathedral in France. This pattern, made of Beauce quarry stone and an unnamed black stone to delineate the path, was inlaid into the stone floor in 1201. For the last 250 years, however, it has been forgotten and covered with chairs until Artress led a small group of people into Chartres cathedral to remove the chairs to experience the meditative walk first hand.

After her experience in Chartres, she returned home to Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, painted the design on canvas and opened it to the public. In 1994 the indoor tapestry labyrinth — open during cathedral hours — was installed and in 1995 the outdoor terrazzo labyrinth — open 24 hours a day — was installed in the Melvin E. Swig Interfaith Meditation Garden. Literally millions of people have walked these labyrinths. In the summer of 2007, Grace Cathedral replaced the tapestry labyrinth with a beautiful new limestone and marble labyrinth in the floor of the cathedral.

After introducing the labyrinth through the International Transpersonal Association in Ireland in 1994 and to Switzerland, Germany in 1995, her work began to focus intensely in both Grace Cathedral and Chartres Cathedral. She has led workshops around the United States, Canada, the UK and Europe. In 1997 she began to train facilitators to present the labyrinth in their communities. Now, over 4000 people have been trained in this transformational work.

Labyrinths are currently being used world-wide as a way to quiet the mind, recover a balance in life, and encourage meditation, insight, self-reflection, stress reduction, and to discover innovation and celebration. They are open to all people as a non-denominational, cross-cultural blueprint for well-being. The practice of labyrinth walking integrates the body with the mind and the mind with the spirit. They can be found in medical centers, parks, churches, schools, prisons, memorial parks, spas, cathedrals and retreat centers as well as in people’s backyards.

Go to our world wide labyrinth locator to find a labyrinth near you!

via Veriditas – About the Labyrinth.

South Africa’s Pistorius trial, Justice, The Economist:  So is this a trial of a society.

Campaigners highlight what they see as South Africa’s dangerous proliferation of firearms. The trial has brought to light several incidents when Mr Pistorius carelessly fired a gun in public, once in a crowded restaurant, another time out of his car’s sunroof after an argument with a policeman.

Some thus see him as a product of the country’s malignly macho gun culture. A string of South African men have recently shot family members after apparently mistaking them for intruders. But others point out that the number of guns in South Africa has fallen sharply since the end of apartheid in 1994 to 12.7 per 100 people, not least because stricter laws were enacted in 2000. In comparison, Americans on average own one gun per head of population. Britain has 6.7 per 100.

When Mr Pistorius declared in his testimony, “I shot out of fear,” he became the voice of many white South Africans. They tend to see themselves as living in the shadow of violent crime, retreating behind high walls, electric fences and steel doors. From there they can summon private security guards, who are twice as numerous as policemen, by pressing a panic button.

The trial has revived a long-running debate about other aspects of crime. South Africa’s murder rate is one of the highest in the world: 30.9 for every 100,000 people, compared with 4.7 in the United States. Yet the rate has fallen by half in the past 15 years. Rich whites, the most fearful among South Africans, are actually the least endangered. Most victims are poor and black.

via South Africa’s trial: Justice, after all, is being done | The Economist.

Bubba Watson,  $148 Tip at Waffle House, Bleacher Report: You rock, Bubba!

But that’s just “Bubba being Bubba,” according to USA Today. So it was hardly a surprise when Watson celebrated this year’s Masters victory win with a trip to Waffle House. He tweeted a selfie with his wife and some friends on that evening.

And it was even less surprising when Meg Mirshak of The Augusta Chronicle reported he was more than generous with the tip he left:

A waitress told a customer Tuesday morning that Watson left a $148 tip on the bill. When asked to confirm the amount, Knotts declined to say how big the tip was but said three employees split the money.

‘It was above and beyond what would have normally been shared,’ [manager Ken] Knotts said. ‘Bubba was just so gracious about everything.’

Steak n’ Shake franchise owner Preston Moss said Watson left a $24 tip on his milkshake bill.

Watson has become one of the most likable players in the game, and his dominance at Augusta means he’s one of the better players, too. Big things will be expected of Watson, and the golf world eagerly awaits to see if he can win another major outside of the Masters.

We are still awaiting a dynamic personality in golf in the post-Tiger-Woods-dominance era, and Watson is a colorful figure who is easy to root for. But we also partly cheer for him because, let’s be honest, we’re all a bit curious to see where Bubba might celebrate next.

via Bubba Watson Reportedly Leaves $148 Tip at Waffle House | Bleacher ReportA.

 

 Mt Everest Avalanche:

The avalanche struck around 06:45 local time (01:00GMT) in an area known as the “popcorn field”, just above Everest base camp at an elevation of 5,800m (19,000ft), an official told the BBC.

via Everest avalanche: Ten climbers missing (Video/Photos) – Newsfirst.

 Miniversion of Wrigley, Freeport,  chicagotribune.com: Love this one, too!

ct-little-cubs-field-talk-20140419-001

Little Cubs Field is a miniversion of Wrigley Field, including everything from the green scoreboard to the WGN press box and even a Harry Caray statue.

The park, about one-quarter the size of Wrigley, is used for youth baseball and other Freeport functions. Wrigley’s been around for a century. Little Cubs Field is starting its seventh season.

Little Cubs Field was Garkey’s brainchild. In 2002 he pitched to the local park district his dream as a place where kids could play ball, but it took a village to build it and continue improving on it, he said.

via Miniversion of Wrigley a hit in Freeport – chicagotribune.com.

Shakespeare, Davidson College, Radio Play Live on WDAV, Davidson College:

“Performing Shakespeare,” a seminar regularly taught at Davidson College by Dana Professor of English Cynthia Lewis, has been reimagined for the airwaves.

The title of the course was changed to “Radio Shakespeare,” indicating that the class will be presenting the playwright’s work on the radio rather than on the stage.

Lewis’s students will perform a broadcast of The Merchant of Venice for a live audience at the college’s radio station, 89.9 FM WDAV, at 7:30 p.m., on Saturday, April 26. This production of the Elizabethan classic harkens back to the heyday of radio drama, and occurs on the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s baptism.

Bracketing the live broadcast on April 26, Lewis’s radio Shakespeareans also will present performances before studio audiences at WDAV on Friday, April 25 and Monday, April 28. WDAV engineers will record the three performances in the studio and compile the strongest elements from each into a single podcast, which will be available for download.

The “Radio Shakespeare” students also will present another, non-recorded staged reading of The Merchant of Venice at 2 p.m., Sunday, April 27, at “Pian del Pino,” the Italian Renaissance-style villa of Margaret Zimmermann and Price Zimmermann, a former academic dean at Davidson.

The public is invited to all four performances, but space is limited. Contact Radio Shakespeare with reservation or information requests.

via Shakespeare Students Will Perform Radio Play Live on WDAV – Davidson College.

 Chicken Thigh Recipes,  Bon Appétit:  Favorite piece of chicken …

Chicken Thigh Recipes Slideshow

via Chicken Thigh Recipes Slideshow – Bon Appétit.

05
Apr
14

4.5.14 … Max Polley: “He wasn’t just passionate about things he cared about. He was passionate about lifting up things we should all care about.” …

Dr. Max Polley, RIP, obituary, Davidson College:  Max, the Axe!

And I am especially grateful for the phrasing Vance Polley used in remembering his father’s passions for his community, his college, his church, his beloved theatrical stage: “He wasn’t just passionate about things he cared about. He was passionate about lifting up things we should all care about.”

Thank you, Max, for sharing your “place of seeing.”

via Max Polley: A Passion for Things We Should All Care About.

kith/kin, Koko, sociology: My son wrote a college paper on Koko … Does Koko have “selfhood?”

Legendary comedian Robin Williams meets the most famous gorilla in the world, Koko, who is fluent in American sign language. Hilariously, Koko and Williams have an epic tickle fight just shortly after meeting one another.

via Robin Williams has a tickle fight with Gorilla. [VIDEO].

Lent, Praying the Parables, Maren Tirabassi:

Praying the parables – March 31,2014

Matthew 25: 31-33

God, be praised for this season

of the kidding of goats –

my new friend’s Nigerian dwarf kid,

my cousin’s

Tennessee fainting goats —

the vulnerable joy

in newborn sweet slickness,

the more-than-a-metaphor

tender freshening of does.

God, make us careful in our

glib recitation of parables –

for you taught love,

not division

not how to judge ourselves or others —

least of all the breech-born kid,

just saved,

bloody, wet and eyes wide open

in your loving hands.

Amen

via Maren Tirabassi.

 Atlantic 10’s postseason, Davidson basketball, The Davidsonian – Davidson College:  Next year …

Dayton’s success caused Krzyzewski’s criticism to ring hollow, especially since Coach K and his Blue Devils stumbled out of the gate against 14-seed Mercer in the tournament’s biggest upset. Yet aside from the Flyers’ out-of-the-blue tournament run, the conference as a whole was shaky at best through the tournament’s first weekend. Were it not for Tyler Lewis’s jumper rimming out at the buzzer against Saint Louis, the A-10 would have seen five of its six teams bow out in the Round of 64. Certainly the Atlantic 10 will field steep competition for the Davidson men’s and women’s basketball squads next year. But in light of this year’s flimsy performance, the conference will just as certainly receive fewer bids next time around, adding to the  Wildcats’ difficult task of earning at-large bids in future seasons.

via Evaluating the Atlantic 10’s postseason – Sports – The Davidsonian – Davidson College.

96.9 NASH FM, LOL, snarly1527108_645756898798998_1345406788_n

via 96.9 NASH FM.

Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor,  A Stroke Leads a Brain Scientist to a New Spirituality – NYTimes.com:

Her desire to teach others about nirvana, Dr. Taylor said, strongly motivated her to squeeze her spirit back into her body and to get well.

This story is not typical of stroke victims. Left-brain injuries don’t necessarily lead to blissful enlightenment; people sometimes sink into a helplessly moody state: their emotions run riot. Dr. Taylor was also helped because her left hemisphere was not destroyed, and that probably explains how she was able to recover fully.

Today, she says, she is a new person, one who “can step into the consciousness of my right hemisphere” on command and be “one with all that is.”

To her it is not faith, but science. She brings a deep personal understanding to something she long studied: that the two lobes of the brain have very different personalities. Generally, the left brain gives us context, ego, time, logic. The right brain gives us creativity and empathy. For most English-speakers, the left brain, which processes language, is dominant. Dr. Taylor’s insight is that it doesn’t have to be so.

Her message, that people can choose to live a more peaceful, spiritual life by sidestepping their left brain, has resonated widely.

via A Stroke Leads a Brain Scientist to a New Spirituality – NYTimes.com.

Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet the Spy:  I loved re-reading classics from my childhood!

Adult Read: Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet the Spy was way ahead of its time. It deals with difference in class: Harriet is upper-middle-class, whereas her best friend has an absent mother and an absent-minded father, and knows how to pay bills and balance a budget at the age of 11. Fitzhugh has Harriet go to a therapist long before this was the thing to do with “problem children.” The issue of privacy—which is on everyone’s minds recently—comes to the forefront when Harriet’s secret notebook is passed around between all the kids in her class who then stop talking to her because she wrote mean things about everyone. It’s a book to pick apart (a new way to enjoy it) now that the years of wanting-to-be-Harriet have passed.

via Classic Childhood Books That Grow With You | Zola Books.

Pope Benedict, Catholic Church, ‘conscious uncoupling’, The Week:

When Pope Benedict XVI announced he was stepping down as pope a year ago — dropping the news almost casually, in Latin, at a meeting about an upcoming canonization — nobody was sure what to call it. No living pope had handed off the keys of St. Peter since Gregory XII in 1415. If Pope Benedict had only waited some 14 months to announce his retirement — or abdication, or vacation — we might have had an apt phrase at the ready: Conscious uncoupling.

via How Pope Benedict unwittingly made the Catholic case for ‘conscious uncoupling’ – The Week.

UNC Athletics, Marcus Paige,  “Trust Me We Can All Read”, susankingblog:

I was not surprised when I saw the news reports of Marcus Paige’s appearance, along with a few other athletes, at the UNC Board of Trustees this week. They were there representing the top sports: football, basketball, soccer and lacrosse- all teams who are the pride of UNC. I laughed when I saw Paige’s quote. ‘Trust Me. We can all read.” I laughed because it seemed like the kind of smart quote a PR major might turn to after he’d witnesses all the bad coverage of UNC athletics that have filled the newspapers and airwaves of late. If there had been UNC athletes who had been cheated out of a first rate education and channeled into weak courses and sham majors that didn’t’ demand much – Paige was making it clear he was not one of those athletes.

via Trust Me. We Can All Read. | susankingblog.

Jerry Reid, University of Virginia senior, The Wall Street Journal: Fun story!

Jerry Reid will graduate from the University of Virginia this spring with a résumé that would attract the attention of any potential employer.

Under extracurricular activities, Mr. Reid lists membership in a campus literary society, brotherhood in a fraternity and two intramural flag-football championships. His academic accomplishments include a thesis reinterpreting Stonewall Jackson’s legacy. He counts rooting for Virginia’s men’s basketball team as his primary hobby.

Are you a March Madness basketball fanatic? Do you bow at the altar of the NCAA Mens Basketball Tournament? If the answer is no, Simon Constable explains why you should care.

Then there is his work experience: 45 years as a conveyor-belt salesman.

via At University of Virginia, 70-year-old Undergrad Cheers Cavaliers in March Madness – WSJ.com.

Tha Hugs, kith/kin:  At the Georgia Theater in Athens. See Tha Hugs on the Marque!

Photo: At the Georgia Theater in Athens. See Tha Hugs on the Marque ;)

Ed Lindsey for Congress:

The Truth-O-Meter Says:

Georgia has recovered more than $60 million that was lost to Medicaid fraud

Edward Lindsey on Thursday, March 20th, 2014 in press release

Lawmaker’s claim on Medicaid fraud recovery correct

,,,

Our conclusion: Georgia has submitted documentation to the feds that it has recovered $159.4 million lost to Medicaid fraud in three years in both federal and state money. Lindsey was very conservative in saying the amount recouped was “more than $60 million.”

We rate Lindsey’s statement True.

via Lawmaker’s claim on Medicaid fraud recovery correct | PolitiFact Georgia.

DST, daylight saving switch,  lost sleep,  heart attack risk,  Society | theguardian.com:

Custodian Ray Keen changes the time to daylight savings time on the 100-year-old clock on the Clay C

Switching over to daylight saving time and losing one hour of sleep raised the risk of having a heart attack the following Monday by 25%, compared to other Mondays during the year, according to a new US study released on Saturday.

By contrast, heart attack risk fell 21% later in the year, on the Tuesday after the clock was returned to standard time, and people got an extra hour’s sleep.

The not-so-subtle impact of moving the clock forward and backward was seen in a comparison of hospital admissions from a database of non-federal Michigan hospitals. It examined admissions before the start of daylight saving time and the Monday immediately after, for four consecutive years.

In general, heart attacks historically occur most often on Monday mornings, maybe due to the stress of starting a new work week and inherent changes in our sleep-wake cycle, said Dr Amneet Sandhu, a cardiology fellow at the University of Colorado in Denver who led the study.

“With daylight saving time, all of this is compounded by one less hour of sleep,” said Sandhu, who presented his findings at the annual scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology in Washington.

A link between lack of sleep and heart attacks has been seen in previous studies. But Sandhu said experts still don’t have a clear understanding of why people are so sensitive to sleep-wake cycles. “Our study suggests that sudden, even small changes in sleep could have detrimental effects,” he said.

via Daylight saving switch and lost sleep increase heart attack risk, study says | Society | theguardian.com.

Charlotte Mayor Cannon Scandal, Kevin Siers’ Editorial Cartoons | CharlotteObserver.com.

18TYxp-1.HiLa.138

Kevin Siers’ cartoons are distributed to over 400 newspapers nationwide by King Features Syndicate. He and his wife and son reside in Charlotte.

via Kevin Siers’ Editorial Cartoons | CharlotteObserver.com.

Carol Quillen, Davidson College, liberal arts education:  I heard Dr. Quillen speak on 3.29 and was intrigued by her re-imagining of the liberal arts to include both original work and entrepreneurship.

Our rapidly changing world urgently needs creative, disciplined, eloquent leaders with the courage, integrity, resilience, personal presence, and intellectual tools to tackle complex challenges in health care, education, sustainability, economic growth, and social justice.

At Davidson College, we are using new technologies both to expand our impact and to ensure that Davidson can lead in this new environment through four key strategies: 1) seeking out talented young people from around the country and world irrespective of their financial circumstances, enabling them to thrive at Davidson and beyond; 2) building a challenging curricula based on students doing original work, so that they graduate with a portfolio of work, rather than simply a transcript with grades; 3) offering students significant opportunities in emerging crucial fields, like computer science, global languages, computational biology, cognitive sciences, digital studies, and environmental studies; and 4) moving our students efficiently from our campus to meaningful work in the world.

Ultimately, our societal value is measured by what our graduates do, the lives they lead, and the impact they exert. The world is changing quickly, and we can’t wait. Join us.

via Carol Quillen, Davidson College | The Inauguration of Alison Byerly.

Ed Lindsey for Congress, Neighbor Newspapers – Barr leads in District 11 U S House poll: Update …

In a new poll regarding the District 11 U.S. House candidates in the May 20 primary election, Bob Barr leads the six Republicans running for the seat being vacated by incumbent Phil Gingrey, who is running for U.S. Senate. The district includes Vinings and parts of Buckhead and Sandy Springs.

The poll, conducted by phone interviews March 10 and 11 by Alexandria, Va.-based McLaughlin and Associates, included 300 likely Republican primary election voters in the district. It was ordered and paid for by candidate Ed Lindsey’s campaign. The results were as follows: undecided: 41 percent, Barr: 25 percent, Lindsey: 15 percent, Barry Loudermilk: 13 percent, Tricia Pridemore: 4 percent and other (including candidates Allan Levene and Larry Mrozinski): 2 percent.

In favorability ratings, Barr led the way with 38 percent, followed by Loudermilk (26 percent), Lindsey (21 percent) and Pridemore (9 percent). The poll has an accuracy of plus or minus 5.7 percent at a 95 percent confidence interval.

via Neighbor Newspapers – Barr leads in District 11 U S House poll.

Los Angeles Dodgers, The New York Yankees, Highest Payroll, Business Insider:

However, for the first time since 1998, the Yankees do not have the largest payroll in baseball. That distinction now belongs to the Dodgers with an estimated 2014 payroll of $235 million, up 147% in two years and $32 million more than the Yankees.

via CHART: Los Angeles Dodgers Surpass The New York Yankees With Highest Payroll – Business Insider.

 

 

20
Mar
14

3.20.14 … Six weeks after Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, winter is finally over …

Vernal Equinox, First Day Of Spring 2014 Arrives On Thursday March 20:

Six weeks after Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow, winter is finally over. The first day of spring, which falls on March 20, hints that higher temperatures are not far off.

For those in the Northern Hemisphere, the vernal equinox (or spring equinox) takes place in March when the sun passes over the celestial equator. This year, the sun will move across the invisible line between hemispheres on Thursday at 12:57 p.m. EDT.

Earth experiences the astronomical events we know as equinoxes and solstices four times a year. They signify the end of one season and the beginning of another.

Equinoxes occur in March and September and herald the spring and fall, while solstices — in June and December — indicate the beginning of summer and winter. While the people in the Northern Hemisphere welcome spring, people south of the equator enter autumn.

Here are some myths associated with the annual spring equinox:

The length of the day is equal to the length of the night.

Well, not exactly. Though some believe the day is just as long as the night on the spring equinox, it turns “days of day-night equality” take place just before the vernal equinox, National Geographic notes. Geoff Chester, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Naval Observatory, explained that it all hinges on location.

“Exactly when it happens depends on where you are located on the surface of the Earth,” Chester told National Geographic.

The spring equinox falls on the same day each year.

Not always. While the spring equinox tends to occur in late March, the exact date differs from year to year. This has more to do with the number of calendar days than the equinox itself. It takes the Earth slightly more than 365 days to complete one revolution around the sun. However, the Gregorian calendar rounds down to 365 days and does not account for the extra 0.256 days. So the vernal equinox may fall on March 20 several years in a row and occur on March 21 in a later year.

via First Day Of Spring 2014 Arrives On Thursday, March 20.

Charlotte NC: There is a debate going on following this HuffPost article.  I commented that it was scary, but true.  I really do believe that there is a grain of truth in the items on the list.  But I love the debate, and almost universally people who live in Charlotte love Charlotte.  It is nice.

Lately, it seems like Charlotte is topping the list of just about everything. While it is a great place for young professionals and anyone in banking, it can also be a truly bizarre place to live and an even more bizarre place to visit.

via 15 Reasons Why Charlotte Is The Weirdest.

Every time you try to describe it, you interrupt yourself and think of something better. Most people give up on trying to attach any one label to it, so they just say it’s nice.

via This is Charlotte | Our State Magazine.

Have a Sip, Davidson Wine Shop:

All the pieces are coming together – including a last-minute name change – for the Friday opening of downtown Davidson’s newest retail store, Davidson Wine Shop.  Al and Robin Gardner plan a grand opening for the new wine store in South Main Square Friday from 11:30am to 9pm with wine tastings, music and a live radio broadcast from the tasting room.

via Have a sip – Davidson Wine Shop opens Friday | DavidsonNews.net.

Shneeka Center ’14,  Watson Fellowship – Davidson College, female social mobility through sport: Kudos, Shneeka!

The TJW Fellowship, awarded through the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, is a one-year grant for independent study and travel outside the United States awarded to graduating college seniors nominated by participating institutions. It offers college graduates of “unusual promise” a year of independent, purposeful exploration and travel – in international settings new to them – to enhance their capacity for resourcefulness, imagination, openness and leadership, and to foster their humane and effective participation in the world community. Each fellow receives a $28,000 stipend.

Center will travel to Sweden, India, Senegal and Peru to study and research the topic of female social mobility through sport.

“My project strives to examine how participation in athletics is enabling females to positively or negatively influence their position in society,” said Center, who will graduate in May from Davidson with a degree in political science. “My Watson year will take me to four locations where sports are providing girls with unique opportunities to change their social standing. I aim to answer case-specific questions and uncover the methods by which sports have an influence on girls’ lives worldwide.”

via Shneeka Center ’14 Awarded Prestigious Watson Fellowship – Davidson College.

authentic pho, Korean BBQ, Pho Nam – Cornelius NC, Living Davidson – The Davidsonian – Davidson College:  I have been saying that pho was the next dish I wanted to learn to appreciate.  As with sushi, I had to have it quite a few times before I knew what good sushi or authentic sushi was.   … And now I will try this exit 28 restaurant and visit the Molls.

One of the best barbecue restaurants in Atlanta, Georgia, is a hole-in-the-wall restaurant called Heirloom Market BBQ. Although barbecue joints abound in the south, Heirloom consistently has lines of people waiting out the door and down the street for their barbecue. Heirloom Market BBQ is so popular because it is unique: It specializes in and serves Korean barbecue.

When I’m home in Atlanta, Heirloom Market is always a great place to eat, and I miss their unique barbecue while I’m at Davidson. Here, I’ve not been able to find anywhere that rivals Heirloom’s Korean barbecue—until now. Pho Nam, an authentic Vietnamese restaurant located off exit 28, serves delicious Korean barbecue.

Although the barbecue was the highlight of my Pho Nam experience, the restaurant also offers a wide selection of food including vermicelli (an angel hair rice noodle), com dia (steamed rice with a choice of toppings), Com Chien (fried rice), Pho (beef and noodle soup), and a selection of chef’s specials.

The small, humble restaurant boasts a friendly staff and delicious food. The staff focuses on creating authentic Vietnamese food and a home-like atmosphere. The owner personally greets every customer when he or she walks into the restaurant; and it is the owner, his brother and son, who run Pho Nam and work at the restaurant every day.

Tai Bassin ’15, frequents Pho Nam weekly. His favorite dishes include the Korean barbecue over white rice and the pho dish. Put quite simply, “It’s Pho Nom-enal,” Bassin said.

via Family restaurant offers authentic pho, Korean BBQ – Living Davidson – The Davidsonian – Davidson College.

2014 NCAA tournament bracket, March Madness, Davidson College, Matilda: Loved this! The Mathematician vs. the Matildas – Video – NYTimes.com.

toast, $4 a Slice, Bon Appétit, latest artisanal food craze, Trouble Coffee San Francisco, Pacific Standard: The Science of Society :

Back at the Red Door one day, I asked the manager what was going on. Why all the toast? “Tip of the hipster spear,” he said.

I had two reactions to this: First, of course, I rolled my eyes. How silly; how twee; how perfectly San Francisco, this toast. And second, despite myself, I felt a little thrill of discovery. How many weeks would it be, I wondered, before artisanal toast made it to Brooklyn, or Chicago, or Los Angeles? How long before an article appears in Slate telling people all across America that they’re making toast all wrong? How long before the backlash sets in?

For whatever reason, I felt compelled to go looking for the origins of the fancy toast trend. How does such a thing get started? What determines how far it goes? I wanted to know. Maybe I thought it would help me understand the rise of all the seemingly trivial, evanescent things that start in San Francisco and then go supernova across the country—the kinds of products I am usually late to discover and slow to figure out. I’m not sure what kind of answer I expected to turn up. Certainly nothing too impressive or emotionally affecting. But what I found was more surprising and sublime than I could have possibly imagined.

via How Did Toast Become the Latest Artisanal Food Craze? – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society.

Carol Quillen, President of Davidson College, Misadventures Magazine:

Pres­i­dent of David­son Col­lege for the last three years and a pro­fes­sor of his­tory, Carol Quillen is both the first woman and first non-alumnus to lead the col­lege, which was founded in North Car­olina in 1837 but didn’t admit women until 1972. Its biggest head­lines over the last six years have starred for­mer bas­ket­ball player Stephen Curry (maybe you’ve heard of him). Yet David­son, which con­sis­tently ranks among the top 10 lib­eral arts col­leges in the coun­try, is enjoy­ing new media atten­tion and some­thing of a growth spurt since Pres­i­dent Quillen arrived. Under her lead­er­ship, the col­lege has begun to explore online edu­ca­tion, launched an entre­pre­neur­ship pro­gram, and announced the con­struc­tion of a new “aca­d­e­mic neigh­bor­hood.” Sounds magical.

Pres­i­dent Quillen her­self has been in the spot­light recently: she spoke at Tedx­Char­lotte, and was just last week named to Pres­i­dent Obama’s Advi­sory Coun­cil on Finan­cial Capa­bil­ity for Young Amer­i­cans (yes, she flew on Air Force One).

When Carol Quillen arrived at her office for our inter­view she walked quickly and with pur­pose. In one breath she apol­o­gized for being late, beck­oned us into her wood-paneled office, told us to take a seat around an oak table, and asked her sec­re­tary to bring in a Fresca. She had the econ­omy of motion of a per­son whose days are packed. She speaks quickly, though thought­fully, and takes time to laugh. Our con­ver­sa­tion ran the gamut from moments of adver­sity to the mys­ter­ies of Twit­ter. We were riveted.

via Carol Quillen, President of Davidson College | Misadventures Magazine.

22 Hours in Balthazar, NYC, NYTimes.com:

Over the course of what I will be repeatedly told is a slow day, 1,247 people will eat here. (Normally, it’s about 1,500.) But within a narrow range, Balthazar knows how many people will come through its doors every single day of the week, and it can predict roughly what it will sell during every meal. It mass-produces high-quality food and pushes it out to customers, and its production numbers are as predictable as the system that churns out the food itself. Just about everyone who works at Balthazar calls it a machine.

via 22 Hours in Balthazar – NYTimes.com.

3.18.14 lunar eclipse:  I loved the tongue in cheek list, but missed the lunar eclipse …

Tonight will be the darkest night of the past 500 years

Thanks to a lunar eclipse on the longest night of the year, tonight we’ll be experiencing the longest, darkest night in a very long time. It’s been nearly 500 years since the last solstice lunar eclipse.

via Tonight will be the darkest night of the past 500 years.

recipe,  Ginger-Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli,  Meet Your New Favorite Meatball – Bon Appétit:  I must e hungry because this looks really good.

Ginger Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli

When it comes to meatballs, who says that pork and beef get to have all the fun? In this light and healthy recipe, chicken takes center stage: It’s doctored up with plenty of big flavor—garlic, ginger, soy, and scallions—and served with spicy Chinese broccoli to round out the meal. Healthy and fresh, plus easy to pull together on a weeknight, this is your new go-to. Why exactly? Because not only is this a great meatball recipe—it’s a great chicken soup recipe as well.

Get the recipe: Ginger-Chicken Meatballs with Chinese Broccoli

via Meet Your New Favorite Meatball – Bon Appétit.

Entering World of Literature’s Great Sleuth, NYTimes.com: Looks like a fun exhibit.

From original manuscript pages from “The Hound of the Baskervilles” to props from the current BBC hit “Sherlock,” the exhibition aims to engage all levels of enthusiasts. Galleries feature an examination of Conan Doyle and late 19th-century London, the science behind the Holmes stories and pop culture artifacts, past and present. There is also an immersive interactive Victorian-era murder mystery that visitors are asked to solve, clue by clue, after an introduction to Holmes’s scientific methods of crime-solving.

Careful not to confuse young visitors about reality and fiction, galleries are clearly delineated as containing actual artifacts and scientific data. “We separated the science lessons from the interactive mystery so the mystery was a place to practice and use the information you already learned, not a place to learn the science and history itself,” Mr. Curley said.

via Entering World of Literature’s Great Sleuth – NYTimes.com.

16
Mar
14

3.16.14 … “I had this sense that if I wasn’t really careful, that could be me: that my first kiss could be in somebody else’s clothes. And my experiences could all belong to someone else.” – Emma Watson

The Fall of France, Huguenots, economics, socialism, Edict of Nantes, entrepreneur, taxes:  Very interesting article.  An article like this makes me want to spend some time researching both the modern-day economics and French history.

It’s a stretch, but what is happening today in France is being compared to the revocation of 1685. In that year, Louis XIV, the Sun King who built the Palace of Versailles, revoked the Edict of Nantes, which had protected French Protestants – the Huguenots. Trying to unite his kingdom by a common religion, the king closed churches and persecuted the Huguenots. As a result, nearly 700,000 of them fled France, seeking asylum in England, Sweden, Switzerland, South Africa and other countries.

The Huguenots, nearly a million strong before 1685, were thought of as the worker bees of France. They left without money, but took with them their many and various skills. They left France with a noticeable brain drain.

Since the arrival of Socialist President François Hollande in 2012, income tax and social security contributions in France have skyrocketed. The top tax rate is 75 percent, and a great many pay in excess of 70 percent.

As a result, there has been a frantic bolt for the border by the very people who create economic growth – business leaders, innovators, creative thinkers, and top executives. They are all leaving France to develop their talents elsewhere.

And it’s a tragedy for such a historically rich country. As they say, the problem with the French is they have no word for entrepreneur. Where is the Richard Branson of France? Where is the Bill Gates?

via The Fall of France.

Down Syndrome: A Year of Grief and Joy, ABC News:  A wonderful read.  I would hope I could be the person that says, “Who better than us?”

And at some point, Ryan’s question changed from “Why us?” to “Why NOT us?” After all, we had beautiful life, a wonderful marriage, a daughter we adored and plenty more love to give. Who better than us?

via Down Syndrome: A Year of Grief and Joy – ABC News.

‘Live From Space’: Nat Geo,  ISS, Globalnews.ca: I recorded this show Friday night.  As I was watching the news and following twitter I noticed this tweet from fellow Davidsonian.

Thomas H. Marshburn @AstroMarshburn 6m

Watching colleagues Koichi and Rick right now on #LiveFromSpace on the Natl Geo channel. Almost feels like I’m back on-board!

I had not thought that a former ISS resident would watch. So I watched last night.  It was an awesome show.  If  NatGeo reboadcasts the show, watch it!

National Geographic Channel is targeting a subject that’s literally over our heads, bringing it down to Earth in an ambitious two-hour special.

Airing Friday at 8 p.m. Eastern/5 p.m. Pacific, Live From Space will originate from the International Space Station with American astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Koichi Wakata, who’s Japanese, as on-board correspondents.

Veteran reporter Soledad O’Brien will anchor from NASA Mission Control in Houston.

O’Brien said she’s excited about the special, and particularly happy to be hosting Live From Space from a comfortable distance.

via ‘Live From Space’: Nat Geo to air special from the space station – National | Globalnews.ca.

gap year, colleges, Tufts University: Wow … some colleges  offer to pay students to take year off.

Colleges are paying students to take a year off after high school to travel, volunteer or do internships so that students of all income brackets can benefit from “gap years.”

A new program at Tufts University and existing ones at a handful of other schools aim to remove the financial barriers that can keep cash-strapped students from exploring different communities and challenge their comfort zones before jumping right into college.

The gap year program starting this fall at Tufts will pay for housing, airfare and even visa fees, which can often add up to $30,000 or more.

Although gap years are more popular in Europe, they have started to gain traction in the United States. About 40,000 Americans participated in gap year programs in 2013, an increase of nearly 20 percent since 2006, according to data gathered by a nonprofit called the American Gap Year Association.

In 2009, Princeton University began offering applicants gap-year aid based on need. Nearly 100 students have participated, volunteering in Brazil, China, India, Peru and Senegal.

The University of North Carolina offers $7,500 to gap year applicants, while students at Wisconsin’s St. Norbert College can receive financial aid based on need, although airfare isn’t covered.

via College offers to pay students to take year off.

news, media:  news pays …

It has become a water cooler topic, with several social media references to the downed jet that kicked off the popular television series “Lost.”

Cooper’s show, which has averaged 444,000 viewers this year, reached 972,000 people on Wednesday, Nielsen said. On both of the last two nights, Cooper achieved the highly unusual feat of topping Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly among the 25- to 54-year-old age demographic. O’Reilly easily won among viewers of all ages.

So far, the plane story has meant less for Fox and MSNBC, which have a heavier concentration on political stories. Fox’s full-day average of 1.26 million people on Thursday beat the 1.1 million it has been typically drawing this year. MSNBC had 370,000 viewers, lower than its non-Olympic average of 405,000 this year, Nielsen said.

via AOL.com Article – Missing Malaysian Airlines jet nets high ratings on cable news.

Kissing Sailor in WWII-Era, RIP, ABC News:

PHOTO: U.S. Navy sailor Glenn Edward McDuffie kisses a nurse in Times Square in an impromptu moment at the close of World War II, after the surrender of Japan was announced in New York, Aug. 14, 1945.

But his life became more exciting about six years ago when Houston Police Department forensic artist Lois Gibson was able to identify him as the young man leaning over the woman in his arms to kiss her.

By taking about 100 pictures of McDuffie using a pillow to pose as he did in the picture taken Aug. 14, 1945, by photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, Gibson said, she was able to match the muscles, ears and other features of the then-80-year-old McDuffie to the young sailor in the original image.

“I was absolutely positive,” Gibson said of the match. “It was perfect.”

The identification remained controversial, partly because other men also claimed to have been the sailor in the image, but also because Life magazine, whose photographer had died years earlier, was unable to confirm that McDuffie was in fact the sailor, noting Eisenstaedt had never gotten names for those in the picture.

Yet for McDuffie, Gibson’s word was enough. A well-respected forensic artist who was in the 2005 Guinness Book of World Records for helping police identify more suspects than any other forensic artist, Gibson said McDuffie was ecstatic when she told him the results he had waited 62 years to hear.

And so began a whirlwind lifestyle of going to air shows, gun shows, fundraisers and parties to tell his story. Women would pay $10 to take a picture kissing him on the cheek, Gibson said.

“He would make money and kiss women,” Gibson said. “He had the most glamorous life of any 80 year old.”

via Man Known as Kissing Sailor in WWII-Era Image Dies – ABC News.

Davidson College Alumnus, Zillow Chief Economist “Zestimates” the Value of His Liberal Arts Education, Davidson College, Stan Humphries ’90:

Real estate is not rocket science.

Or is it?

Ask Stan Humphries ’90. He’s responsible for Zillow’s “Zestimate,” an estimated market value on every U.S. home, which is integral now to all things real estate-related on the internet since its introduction a few short years ago.

In the late ’80s, Humphries was an aerospace engineering student at Georgia Tech. He loved the academic work, but as time passed he found he did not want to become an engineer after all. He transferred to Davidson, studying political science and economics through an interdisciplinary major, with an eye toward science and technology policy.

The Davidson years were formative, personally and professionally. He met his future wife, Katherine Bagby Humphries ’90.

“It’s not just a cliché, what they say about the liberal arts,” said Humphries. “In my case, it gave me a way of thinking about the world and a critical faculty for thinking about issues and breaking down problems. It also gave me an enlarged worldview in terms of what I should be thinking about. I left Davidson thinking about life being a continual learning exercise.”

via Alumnus Focus: Zillow Chief Economist “Zestimates” the Value of His Liberal Arts Education – Davidson College.

Banksy Is #WithSyria — Are You?, TopDailyInfo.com:

Banksy, Idris Elba, Cristiano Ronaldo and Elbow are just some of the stars who are supporting the #WithSyria campaign that will see thousands of people across the world, from Moscow to Washington, standing together in a global vigil to mark the third anniversary of the crisis in Syria on Thursday, March 13.

“#WithSyria,” a stunning animated film, will be shown around the world, from an inflatable cinema in Za’atari Refugee camp in Jordan to the big screen in Times Square, and iconic locations will be bathed in light by candlelit vigils, a Banksy light projection of his famed “girl with a red balloon” — which he has redesigned to feature a young Syrian refugee — and the release of red balloons carrying messages of hope to Syrians.

The #WithSyria coalition is made up of 120 humanitarian and human rights groups from 24 countries, including Save the Children, Oxfam, Amnesty International, Hand in Hand for Syria and the International Rescue Committee. The campaign is calling for urgent action to ensure Syrians in need –- including civilians in areas under siege — can access aid and for the voices of ordinary Syrians to be heard and heeded in reconvened peace talks.

via Banksy Is #WithSyria — Are You? (VIDEO) | TopDailyInfo.com.

Ethan Alban,  Karsyn Folds, 2012 Nationals Friday Night, shag dancing, , YouTube:  Mercy, mercy, mercy … One friend say this and noted that  karsyn was leading!  And to that I say, you rock, Bossy Girl!

via ▶ Ethan Alban and Karsyn Folds – 2012 Nationals Friday Night – YouTube.

Apps, Will Allow You To Read Novels In Under 90 Minutes, speed reading, Elite Daily:

The reading game is about to change forever. Boston-based software developer Spritz has been in “stealth mode” for three years, tinkering with their program and leasing it out to different ebooks, apps, and other platforms.

Now, Spritz is about to go public with Samsung’s new line of wearable technology.

Other apps have offered up similar types of rapid serial visual presentation to enhance reading speed and convenience on mobile devices in the past.

However, what Spritz does differently (and brilliantly) is manipulate the format of the words to more appropriately line them up with the eye’s natural motion of reading.

The “Optimal Recognition Point” (ORP) is slightly left of the center of each word, and is the precise point at which our brain deciphers each jumble of letters.

The unique aspect of Spritz is that it identifies the ORP of each word, makes that letter red and presents all of the ORPs at the same space on the screen.

In this way, our eyes don’t move at all as we see the words, and we can therefore process information instantaneously rather than spend time decoding each word.

via This Insane New App Will Allow You To Read Novels In Under 90 Minutes | Elite Daily.

Emma Watson,  Elle Magazine, TopDailyInfo.com:  I like this actress.  I truly hope she has a good her on her shoulders.

“I remember reading this thing that Elizabeth Taylor wrote. She had her first kiss in character. On a movie set. It really struck me,” she said. “I don’t know how or why, but I had this sense that if I wasn’t really careful, that could be me: that my first kiss could be in somebody else’s clothes. And my experiences could all belong to someone else.”

via Emma Watson Reveals Why She’s Jealous Of Other Actresses To Elle Magazine | TopDailyInfo.com.

Colin Powell’s 60-Year-Old Selfie,  The Wire:  Love this selfie! “Eat your heart out Ellen!”

This selfie is a truly great selfie, and a good reminder that these images existed and were all over the place way before they became a thing we discussed during major news events (or as a way to sell mobile phones.) Basically, as long as there have been cameras.

We’ve always had the impulse to use technology at hand for self reflection: Jerry Saltz noted in his “History of the Selfie” that Van Gogh’s series of self portrait paintings feel really darn selfie-like, a sort of “proto selfie” that has “the same intensity, immediacy, and need to reveal something inner to the outside world in the most vivid way possible.” Professional and amateur photographers have been taking self portraits since the invention of the camera. Add Young Colin Powell to the list of those who did it early, and best.

via Colin Powell’s 60-Year-Old Selfie Is Everything You Could Ever Hope For in a Selfie – The Wire.

Adobe hardware,  iPad Pen and Ruler,  Personal Tech News – WSJ:

Adobe—the software company that brought the world iconic creative apps such as Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign—is forging into hardware. Sometime this year, AdobeADBE -1.44% will bring its first hardware products to market, starting with a digital pen and ruler set built specifically for AppleAAPL -1.11%’s iPad.

“When people hear that Adobe is getting into hardware, for many the first reaction is ‘why?’,” explained Michael Gough, Adobe’s vice president of experience design, at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas. “But, this really is within our wheelhouse. We’ve always built creative tools and these products are really just another example of that. This isn’t just another stylus.”

Adobe’s pen currently wears the codename Mighty, while the ruler is going by the name Napoleon—because “it’s a short ruler,” Gough said.

The two products, which Gough demoed at SXSW, as you can see in the video above, are built with clean lines and shod in aluminum and white plastic. They look not mistakenly like something Apple would design.

Adobe

The two devices work in tandem with an iPad drawing app that Adobe is also developing, one that enables the hardware to mimic an architects ruler and wide array of drafting templates—the greenish, flat pieces of plastic you’ve seen if you’ve been down the art aisle in any office supply store.

via Adobe Bets on an iPad Pen and Ruler in Hardware Debut – Personal Tech News – WSJ.

Frat Bros, SeaWorld, OutsideOnline.com: I’m a little worried about the 23-year-old. 😦

At 2 a.m. Thursday, five University of Houston frat brothers allegedly broke into SeaWorld San Antonio in search of ice cream and animals to take pictures with.

Their results were decidedly mixed. According to Huffington Post and San Antonio Express-News reports, the bros climbed a tree near a perimeter fence to enter the park. Once they got in, they embarked on a quest for ice cream. Somewhat surprisingly, the guys were successful, breaking into a storage container and stealing Dippin’ Dots.

That’s when things went awry. As the frat bros searched for animals to pose with, police arrived—they had been called by security guards who spotted the trespassers. Three of the intruders escaped, but authorities apprehended a 23-year-old and an 18-year old, subsequently charging them with criminal trespassing and theft under $500. Police have still not confirmed whether the students obtained the pictures they so fervently sought.

via Frat Bros Break into SeaWorld | News from the Field | OutsideOnline.com.

The Coastal Explorer, Coastal Carolina University, Georgetown SC:  I’ll have to check out the docks next time I’m in Georgetown.

Coastal Carolina University christened their new research vessel, The Coastal Explorer, this afternoon. From her home in the Georgetown Harbor, graduate and PhD students will be doing research of the marine environment of the SE coast.

Quiznos, bankruptcy, Groupon:

Quiznos has filed for bankruptcy: http://on.wsj.com/1kRNEX5

There’s more than $67,000 worth of Quiznos gift certificates out there, plus another $350,670 in Groupons. The sandwich chain says it will honor them.

Credit: Kevin Hagen for The WSJ

27
Feb
14

2.27.14 … “discipline is the creation of boundaries that keep time and space open for God. Solitude requires discipline, worship requires discipline, caring for others requires discipline. They all ask us to set apart a time and a place where God’s gracious presence can be acknowledged and responded to.” …

Davidson College President Carol E. Quillen,  President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability for Young Americans, President Barack Obama, Davidson College:  If I get to pick and choose which executive orders to support, I support this one. Kudos to President Quillen.

President Barack Obama has appointed Davidson College President Carol E. Quillen as a member of the newly constituted President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability for Young Americans.

She was among 15 members named on Wednesday to the council. It will be chaired by John W. Rogers Jr., the Chair, CEO, and Chief Investment Officer of Ariel Investments. José Cisneros, the Treasurer of the City and County of San Francisco, will serve as vice-chair.

President Obama created the new President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability for Young Americans by signing Executive Order 13646 on June 25, 2013. The council is charged with advising the President and the Secretary of the Treasury on ways to promote financial capability among young Americans.

It will seek ways to encourage building the financial capability of young people at an early stage in schools, families, communities, and the workplace, and through use of technology.

The council will seek to identify ways to build public-private partnerships between various governmental agencies concerned with youth. It will support ongoing research and evaluation of financial education for young people, and determine and disseminate effective approaches. It will identify strategies to promote financial literacy in schools, test promising approaches to increase planning, saving and investing for retirement by young people, and promote the importance of planning for financial success.

The council will hold its first meeting on March 10.

Quillen was named President of Davidson in August 2011. Previously, she was Vice President for International and Interdisciplinary Initiatives at Rice University. Quillen also was a member of the Rice history faculty, director of its Boniuk Center for the Study and Advancement of Religious Tolerance, and Vice Provost for Academic Affairs. She earned a bachelor’s degree from The University of Chicago and a doctorate degree from Princeton University.

via Quillen Named to Presidential Advisory Council – Davidson College.

Glee, kith/kin: Glee is no fun without the Molls …

via  Glee 5×09 Promo “Frenemies” (HD) – YouTube.

man’s best friend, LOL:

Atlanta History Center, Sam Inman, Swan House 1935, #wouldagrammed, kith/kin:  How cool … my kith uncle. My dad and “Uncle Sam” became friends when they were 9 or 10 years old. I think my dad had a bull dog as a kid, too.

Sam Inman playing with his dog at Swan House in 1935. #wouldagrammed

 Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen, Henri Nouwen Society Blog, Creating Space for God, discipline v. discipleship:

Creating Space for God

Discipline is the other side of discipleship. Discipleship without discipline is like waiting to run in the marathon without ever practicing. Discipline without discipleship is like always practicing for the marathon but never participating. It is important, however, to realize that discipline in the spiritual life is not the same as discipline in sports. Discipline in sports is the concentrated effort to master the body so that it can obey the mind better. Discipline in the spiritual life is the concentrated effort to create the space and time where God can become our master and where we can respond freely to God’s guidance.

Thus, discipline is the creation of boundaries that keep time and space open for God. Solitude requires discipline, worship requires discipline, caring for others requires discipline. They all ask us to set apart a time and a place where God’s gracious presence can be acknowledged and responded to.

via Daily Meditation by Henri Nouwen | A Henri Nouwen Society Blog.

Paul Hunt, 1988 USA-USSR/Los Angeles, gymnastics comedy beam routine, YouTube:

I dare you not to laugh.

via  1988 Paul Hunt gymnastics comedy beam routine – YouTube.

Paul Hunt performs on balance beam at the 1988 USA-USSR display in Los Angeles.

via  1988 Paul Hunt gymnastics comedy beam routine – YouTube.

Snurk Beddengoed,  duvet set for space-loving kids, A Mighty Girl: Loved this from my NASA knowledgeable cousin! “That’s not a shuttle suit. It kinda looks like an old Apollo suit, except they weren’t blue. Maybe it’s a Russian suit. ‘

When the small Dutch bedding company, Snurk Beddengoed, released this amazing duvet set for space-loving kids last year, it was hugely popular online but not widely available outside of the Netherlands. Since we frequently receive inquiries from parents about bedding recommendations for Mighty Girls, we’re excited to share that it’s now available on Amazon at http://amzn.to/1hsSTZl — and if we add a bedding section to A Mighty Girl, we’ll certainly highlight this fun set there as well!

For more recommendations for space-oriented and girl-empowering books, toys, clothing and room decor, check out recent blog post, “Mighty Careers: I Want To Be An Astronaut!”, at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=5812

via A Mighty Girl.

Lenbrook, BINGO

20
Feb
14

2.20.14 … Our central claim is that Americans today have elevated their expectations of marriage and can in fact achieve an unprecedentedly high level of marital quality — but only if they are able to invest a great deal of time and energy in their partnership. If they are not able to do so, their marriage will likely fall short of these new expectations … Marriage, then, has increasingly become an “all or nothing” proposition. …

The All-or-Nothing Marriage, NYTimes.com:

Our central claim is that Americans today have elevated their expectations of marriage and can in fact achieve an unprecedentedly high level of marital quality — but only if they are able to invest a great deal of time and energy in their partnership. If they are not able to do so, their marriage will likely fall short of these new expectations. Indeed, it will fall further short of people’s expectations than at any time in the past.

Marriage, then, has increasingly become an “all or nothing” proposition. This conclusion not only challenges the conventional opposition between marital decline and marital resilience; but it also has implications for policy makers looking to bolster the institution of marriage — and for individual Americans seeking to strengthen their own relationships.

via The All-or-Nothing Marriage – NYTimes.com.

geology, pangea, NYTimes.com:

“This is a true moment of discovery, although somewhat inadvertent,” said Tony Hiss, the author of “The Experience of Place,” a 1990 ode to America’s physical reality. “New York’s deepest and darkest secret, its oldest and most violent and previously only vaguely glimpsed history is finally coming to light — the schist that formed three-quarters of a billion years ago, when colliding continents compressed an ancient ocean; the even more elusive amphibolite, three times harder than concrete, that’s a slow-cooked remnant of islands as big as Japan off the New York shoreline.

“A lot of the theory about what happened down there long, long ago was known, but it had never been seen firsthand by geologists until the multiple sub-Manhattan excavations over the last decade,” Mr. Hiss said.

The application of that theory illustrates why skyscrapers historically sprouted downtown and in Midtown, but not in between. The bedrock — the formidable Manhattan Schist on which their concrete foundations rest — is closest to the surface in those two areas, though, nowadays, the technology exists to build almost anywhere.

“It’s only a matter of what type of foundation you can afford, or are willing to entertain,” said Michael Horodniceanu, the president of the transportation authority’s capital construction arm.

The dank, vast underground caverns carved by monstrous tunnel-boring machines reveal evidence of the land bridge that existed hundreds of millions of years ago, when New York adjoined what is now Morocco, before the continents ruptured, and of the faults and fractures wrought by vast physical upheavals.

“It gives us a small window to refine our maps and get a better understanding of regional geology and of the bedrock that formed in Pangea when the continents collided,” Mr. Jordan, the Parsons geologist, said. “It gives us a chance to document the behavior of Manhattan’s bedrock while advancing tunnels, and to provide a history of tectonic events. Lastly, mapping provides a geological record for posterity and use by future generations.”

via Geologists Glimpse a Heaven Below – NYTimes.com.

Transcend Politics Embrace Humanity, Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, quotes:

Photo: Transcend Politics, Embrace Humanity

robotic pills, medicine, invention:

Robotic pills could replace injectable drugs for chronic conditions such as diabetes. Advancements in scientific research have led to two FDA-approved robotic pills. How they work: http://on.wsj.com/N6p3yY

Humans of New York, discrimination:  This is one of my favorite FB pages. I am amazed at what people share. I hope it is not contrived. I wonder what I would share.

“I know this isn’t going to be a popular opinion, but I’m gay, and I don’t think there’s nearly as much discrimination as people claim. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve experienced discrimination. But it hasn’t been a huge factor in my life. I feel like a lot of people bring discrimination on themselves by getting in people’s faces too much. They like to say: ‘Accept me or else!’ They go around demanding respect as a member of a group, instead of earning respect as an individual. And that sort of behavior invites discrimination. I’ve never demanded respect because I was gay, and I haven’t experienced much discrimination when people find out that I am.”

via Humans of New York.

Jack Perry, community ambassador,  diplomat, Dean Rusk Center, Davidson College, CharlotteObserver.com:  I admit I was wrong.  When Jack Perry came to Davidson, I thought, Davidson needs someone from Davidson … I was so wrong.  RIP, Jack Perry and thank you for raising the bar.

 Shortly after Kuykendall arrived at Davidson in 1984, he hired Perry to run the college’s fledgling international studies venture, named for another Georgian diplomat, former Secretary of State Dean Rusk.

“When I came, the Dean Rusk program was a name, an aspiration,” Kuykendall said. “But but we needed somebody to lead it.”

Perry put his stamp on the program, which had been started by Kuykendall’s predecessor, Sam Spencer.

“Sam Spencer’s intention was to take (Davidson) from a regional school to a school with a national reputation and a school globally engaged,” said Chris Alexander, current director of the Rusk program.

“The program by its name and by its existence really announced to students and the broader Charlotte community … that an international education is a fundamental part of a liberal arts education.”

Perry ran the program until 1995. Over that time, the percentage of Davidson students who received some kind of international experience rose dramatically. According to Alexander, more than 80 percent of students travel or study abroad during their four years.

via Jack Perry: A community ambassador with a life of diplomacy | CharlotteObserver.com.

schadenfreude: It’s a cruel world … And here I am sharing.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=022_1392441250

Schadenfreude, oh, blessed schadenfreude.

A dad who had gone to pick his kids up from school was waiting in his car when he noticed groups of schoolchildren falling on the icy pathway.

What better way to spend your minutes waiting than filming the series of unfortunate pupils stacking it?

The person who filmed it, known only as Alan, is heard in the six-minute footage doing a bit of a commentary and laughing his socks off.

At one point, he says: ‘I’m not laughing at you, I’m laughing with you.’

When his daughter gets in the car they’re both creasing up and he tells her about the impending falls that he predicts are on the way: ‘Okay watch this kid, I guarantee that he’s going to drill it.’

via School run dad can’t stop laughing at pupils slipping on ice in YouTube video | Metro News.

400 years, mathematics,new class of shapes, Goldberg polyhedra, Ars Technica:

The works of the Greek polymath Plato have kept people busy for millennia. Mathematicians have long pondered Platonic solids, a collection of geometric forms that are highly regular and are frequently found in nature.

Platonic solids are generically termed equilateral convex polyhedra. In the millennia since Plato’s time, only two other collections of equilateral convex polyhedra have been found: Archimedean solids (including the truncated icosahedron) and Kepler solids (including rhombic polyhedra). Nearly 400 years after the last class was described, mathematicians claim that they may have now identified a new, fourth class, which they call Goldberg polyhedra. In the process of making this discovery, they think they’ve demonstrated that an infinite number of these solids could exist.

via After 400 years, mathematicians find a new class of shapes | Ars Technica.

Martin Scorsese,  Poland’s Communist-Era Art Films, NPR:  

Martin Scorsese fell in love with Polish movies when he was in college.

“The images have stayed in my head for so many years, since the late ’50s,” he says. “I close my eyes, I see them, especially from Ashes And Diamonds, from The Saragossa Manuscript. They’re very vivid, expressive, immediate.”

The tradition of filmmaking in Poland is as long as the history of filmmaking itself. In fact, a Polish inventor patented a camera before the famed, pioneering Lumiere brothers in France. It’s a tradition that includes the names Andrzej Wajda, Roman Polanski, Krzysztof Kieslowski and Agnieszka Holland. But unless you spent a lot of time in art house theaters in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, you probably haven’t seen many Polish movies. Now, a new series of 21 films handpicked by Scorsese is beginning a tour of 30 American citie

via Martin Scorsese Takes Poland’s Communist-Era Art Films On The Road : NPR.

bacon: Need I say more?

Photo: Need I say more?

The Piano Guys, Angels We Have Heard on High, youtube:

via ▶ Angels We Have Heard on High (Christmas w/ 32 fingers and 8 thumbs) – ThePianoGuys – YouTube.

Watch this Christmas cover of “Angels We Have Heard on High,” performed by Paul Anderson, Jon Schmidt, Al van der Beek and Steven Sharp Nelson, on one single piano to feel the festive spirit come alive.

via The Piano Guys Will Blow You Away With ‘Angels We Have Heard On High’ (VIDEO).

5 Ages Dancing,  YouTube: 

 

Dancers aged 85 ,65, 45, 25 and 5 perform the same sequence: Sage Cowles, Marylee Hardenbergh, Lori Mercil, Erin Simon, and Shelby Keeley.

via ▶ 5 Ages Dancing YouTube sharing – YouTube.

How Our Ancestors Used to Sleep Twice a Night, sleep therapy:

8 hour sleeping is a modern invention.

via How Our Ancestors Used to Sleep Twice a Night.

An Instagram short film:

An Instagram short film on Vimeo

via An Instagram short film.




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