Posts Tagged ‘Embroidering Royalty

30
Apr
11

4.30.2011 … the day after … the dress … the hats … the kiss … the second kiss … made for a fun day on Friday …

Royal Wedding, the dress, Embroidering Royalty, history:  Interesting history …

If clothes make the man … consider Henry VIII. In one famous image of him he’s absolutely encrusted in gold, and jewels. In Henry’s day, you wore your wealth. It was embroidered onto your doublet … pounds and pounds of it, if you were king – by law, the only man in England allowed to wear this much finery.

Lucy Worsley, chief curator for England’s historic royal palaces, showed Teichner Hampton Court Palace, one of Henry’s sixty (sixty!) palaces. “He had loads of palaces,” Worlsey said.

“He always looked forward to coming here, ’cause this is the place that he came for hunting, holidays and honeymoons. It was a pleasure palace,” she said.

Southwest of London along the River Thames, Hampton Court is where Henry VIII plotted his divorces and multiple remarriages – and where, according to a letter written at the time, he himself (yes, Henry VIII) may have taken up embroidery.

“The way it’s written, you could read it as though he was actually doing the embroidery,” said Dr. Susan Kay-Williams.

via Embroidering royalty – CBS Sunday Morning – CBS News.

Royal Wedding, hats:  And the winner is ...

From Princess Beatrice’s giant sculpted bow, to Victoria Beckham’s spiky alien antenna, the royal wedding featured headwear so wacky it would put Lady Gaga to shame.

via Mad Hatters: 13 Ridiculous Royal Wedding Hats – Photo Essays – TIME.

Royal Wedding, LOLKeep Calm, Harry is Still Single Posters at AllPosters.com.


Zombies: So if you are tired of the wedding … a little more on zombies …

The flesh-hungry undead, often in the form of ghouls and vampires, have been a fixture of world mythology dating at least since The Epic of Gilgamesh,[2] in which the goddess Ishtar promises:I will knock down the Gates of the Netherworld,I will smash the door posts, and leave the doors flat down,and will let the dead go up to eat the living!And the dead will outnumber the living![2]One Thousand and One Nights is another early piece of literature to reference ghouls. A prime example is the story “The History of Gherib and His Brother Agib” from Nights vol. 6, in which Gherib, an outcast prince, fights off a family of ravenous ghouls, enslaves them, and converts them to Islam.[3]Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, while not a zombie novel proper, prefigures many 20th century ideas about zombies in that the resurrection of the dead is portrayed as a scientific process rather than a mystical one, and that the resurrected dead are degraded and more violent than their living selves. Frankenstein, published in 1818, has its roots in European folklore,[4] whose tales of vengeful dead also informed the evolution of the modern conception of vampires as well as zombies. Later notable 19th century stories about the avenging undead included Ambrose Bierces “The Death of Halpin Frayser”, and various Gothic Romanticism tales by Edgar Allan Poe. Though their works couldnt be properly considered zombie fiction, the supernatural tales of Bierce and Poe would prove influential on later undead-themed writers such as H. P. Lovecraft, by Lovecrafts own admission.[5]

via Zombies in popular culture.

Apps, Roadify:

It is easy to see how Roadify could be useful. But it is the kind of service that gets better as more people sign up, and it has not reached critical mass. It is not uncommon to click on, say, the E train at Queens Plaza, only to find an update saying the station is crowded — from six hours earlier. There is also some development work to be done: More than 20 bus lines have yet to be entered into the database, meaning that if you live in many parts of Queens you’re out of luck. And the subway information is arranged by line, not by station. Trying to decide which train to take from Times Square? You have to check each line individually. Roadify is also largely nonfunctional underground, a serious shortcoming for something you want to use on the subway.

via Roadify Turns to Commuters for News on the Commute – NYTimes.com.

fashion, clothing, preppy clothing, Tommy Hilfiger, pop-ups:  Ok, the only thing I want at ths pop-up is the wind vane … look closely!  I never realized that my favorite 4 footed friend was “preppy”.

Prep Squad – NYTimes.com.

Jane Austen, popular culture: 🙂

Sometimes I feel like everything I know about life I learned by reading Jane Austen. The funny thing is, I never wanted to read her in the first place. I was 26, a pompous young graduate student who preferred to associate himself with the big, masculine modernist heroes: James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Ernest Hemingway, Vladimir Nabokov. Jane Austen? She was for girls. But when I had to read her for a course, I found out what an idiot I had been. Not just about her, I mean, but about everything. In other words, how much I had to learn about life. So I let her teach me. In A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me About Love, Friendship, and the Things That Really Matter, I talk about the lessons I learned and how I learned them.

via Bill Deresiewicz: 12 Life Lessons You Can Learn From Jane Austen (PHOTOS).

Great Recession:  Great Recession or Great Depression II?

The Two-Track Recovery (or ‘Depression’?)

By CATHERINE RAMPELL

Despite what the gross domestic product report released Thursday shows, nearly a third of Americans believe the country is in a depression, according to a new Gallup poll.

The poll, conducted April 20-23, found that 29 percent of Americans thought the economy was in a depression, and an additional 26 percent thought it was in a recession.

The recession technically ended nearly two years ago, according to the Business Cycle Dating Committee of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Some of the disconnect between expert and popular views may be due to semantics. To economists, the words “recession” and “expansion” refer to a change in economic activity — that is, which direction is the economy moving in. But most laypeople who hear these terms probably think of the level of economic activity — that is, does the economy feel healthy or not.

via The Two-Track Recovery (or ‘Depression’?) – NYTimes.com.




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