Posts Tagged ‘entertainment

01
Mar
13

3.1.13 … the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again …

high school classics, YA literature, entertainment, The Atlantic Wire:  Rereading books from my YA era is something I’ve always found to be insightful.  While studying for the bar at 25,  I reread Madeleine L’Engle’s trilogy centered on A Wrinkle in Time, which at that time had become a quartet (and I read the 4th book).  When I read them to my children, the quartet had become a quintet …

If the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again, the classics that we read in high school offer endless possibilities for rediscovery, for looking at ourselves then and now. That’s part of what makes Kevin Smokler’s new book, Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread 50 Books You Haven’t Touched Since High School, so much fun. His homages to 50 titles, including Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, The Bluest Eye, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, and even The Scarlet Letter (he writes, “I don’t like it either,” but argues for rereading it nonetheless), offers a truly enjoyable trip down one’s personal memory lane of books. It’s also a love letter to the act of reading, to continual learning, and to making an effort to slow down and savor the good books in life.

Not all of the works Smokler writes about fall into the category of Y.A., or, for that matter, are even books (and his book, of course, is intended for grownups). There are William Shakespeare plays and Emily Dickinson poems and even the fantastic David Foster Wallace essay, “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again.” Many of the books he reconsiders, for instance, To Kill a Mockingbird and The Catcher in the Rye, while not explicitly intended for teens by their authors, have been huge hits among that readership. The Phantom Tollbooth is widely considered a book for younger readers, and A Separate Peace and The Bell Jar—the latter of which a friend told him, “is for teenage girls what On the Road is for teenage boys”—are surely read most by people under 20. But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Y.A. for Grownups, Kevin Smokler, Books, Publishing, Y.A. Fiction/literature: How had I missed this column …

But more than whether the books are Y.A. or not, the idea of reading what you read then to know yourself better now is part of why I started the Y.A. for Grownups column in the first place. I wanted to reevaluate books I’d read as a kid with grownup eyes … and I did that, but I also developed an appetite for new Y.A., and a desire to look at what it means to read those books in “reverse,” as an adult. So, I was eager to talk to Smokler about his experience of rereading so many high school classics, and to find out what he gained in the process.

via The Case for Rereading the High School Classics – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire.

Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus, rereading, ChristCare:  My ChristCare group is indulging me by reading/studying a book I read in high school, Malcolm Muggeridge’s Jesus … the group is journeying with me.  🙂

Tim Cook, Apple, AAPL: 😦

On Wednesday afternoon, Apple CEO Tim Cook addressed investors and the media at the company’s annual shareholders meeting. It was the sixth time in the last five months that Cook has made something like a public appearance; and it is also the sixth time in the past five months that Apple’s stock (AAPL) has closed down after Cook appeared.

Consider this: The last six times that Cook has put himself out there, Apple’s stock declined afterwards. It’s a streak that dates back to October 2012, when Cook introduced the iPad mini, and it is a trend that has gone unbroken for about five months now: When Cook appears, AAPL goes down

via The Last 6 Times Tim Cook Has Talked, Apple’s Stock Has Dropped.

Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader, historic handshake, iconic images, picture is worth a thousand words:  OK, again  I saved this during my sabbatical from blogging … but this is a very significant picture …

June 27, 2012

In a meeting symbolizing the end of years of enmity between British rule and Northern Ireland republicans, Queen Elizabeth shook hands Wednesday with a former Irish Republican Army commander.

Martin McGuinness, now a deputy first minister of Northern Ireland and a member of the pro-republican Sinn Fein party, was a senior IRA member in the years of sectarian violence. During that time, the group was responsible for blowing up the yacht of Lord Louis Mountbatten, the queen’s cousin, killing him and three others while they vacationed off the coast of Northern Ireland in 1979.

The once unthinkable handshake took place away from media eyes — apart from one camera crew — behind closed doors at a charity arts event in Belfast, witnessed by the queen’s husband, Prince Philip, and leading politicians including Irish President Michael Higgins and Northern Ireland’s first minister, Peter Robinson.

The seemingly mundane greeting was widely heralded as a turning point. Peter Sheridan, host of the event, told reporters, “It’s a huge act of reconciliation, you cannot underestimate how important this is.”

via Queen Elizabeth, ex-IRA leader share historic handshake – latimes.com.

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27
Nov
11

11.26.2011 … post-Thanksgivng down time in Louisville … visited cemetery … enjoyed time with family … bittersweet, but thankful … …

Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville KY, kith/kin:  We visited CHT’s grave as a family.  It’s still hard to believe he is not with us.  You see him in each of his sons … my husband and his two brothers.  I am very fortunate to have had such a great father-in-law.  The cemetery is another story.  It is huge and the roads meander through it.  Interesting history …

Like any Pioneer, when William Johnston decided to build a brick house in the countryside of the fledging town of Louisville, he first searched for a good spring. He found one that helped feed Beargrass Creek, emanating from a large cave that kept it well protected.

When surveyed by Edmund Lee in 1847, the spring was 11 feet above the creek, which was later made into a lake. The spring is protected by a sizeable cave which can be entered on foot for about 30 feet. Crawl space extends another 45 feet. However, footing is treacherous, and the cave is off limits.

via Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky.

Waffle Houses, crime spree:  Classically southern … comforting.  So it is ironic that it has become the target of a crime spree.

“Another day, another Waffle House robbery,” began one article in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, as 18 Waffle Houses were robbed this summer.

Throughout the South, it was not so much the three-week crime spree that caught people’s attention. It was the location.

Waffle House, a ubiquitous chain of yellow-roofed diners, is as much a fixture of Southern life as the grits, hash browns and crispy waffles that it serves all day, every day, even on Christmas. In Georgia, where the 1,600-store chain originated, it is hard to find an Interstate exit without the restaurant’s yellow block-letter sign nearby.

In the Atlanta area alone, there are 230 locations, all offering heaping portions, strong coffee and jukeboxes that play songs about Waffle House. And federal emergency officials even use what they call the Waffle House Index to determine how severe natural disasters are in the South. If a local Waffle House is closed, along with a Home Depot or a Wal-Mart, it indicates a longer recovery process.

But in recent weeks, bad news has kept coming for the restaurant chain.

via At Waffle Houses, a Side of Drama With Breakfast – NYTimes.com.

Cooking Solves Everything, Mark Bittman, books, manifesto:  I love it when they use terms like manifesto … rarely lives up to the hype.

Cooking Solves Everything

 

Bittman argues that a simple meal prepared at home is a powerful tool: It’s one small step toward improving your health and, by extension, the health of the planet. Our reliance on prepared food—in the form of snacks, soft drinks, frozen meals, and fast food—supports a system of agriculture that is playing havoc with our bodies, our economy, and the environment. How can we break the cycle? By cooking.“People who prepare meals—even infrequently—achieve outcomes that extend far beyond the morsel at the end of the fork,” writes Bittman. “Cooking may not solve everything, but it solves a lot. When people make food a priority in their lives, they actively contribute to society. Cooking can change our collective lives for the better.”

Cooking Solves Everything is an engaging manifesto that inspires non-cooks to reach for a pan (Bittman’s shopping list and foolproof recipes will get them started) and encourages all of us to take a closer look at how we feed ourselves and our loved ones.

via iTunes – Books – Cooking Solves Everything by Mark Bittman.

brands, tv, entertainment,  infographics:

A brief infographic history of hidden product placement   (via)

Everything You Should Know About Hidden Product Placement

via Everything You Should Know About Hidden Product Placement | OnlineMBA.

11
Sep
11

9.11.2011 … so where were you 10 years ago … where are you today?

where were you when …, 9/11, kith/kin:

My 911

 It was normal day, a beautiful Tuesday.

We lived in Chicago (which is CST), and the kids had just left for school.  As was my habit at the time, I turned on my computer to check e-mail and do a little research.

Shortly after that, I received a call from John on the cell. He told me to turn the TV on, something had happened in New York.   I then spent the rest of the morning glued to the TV and internet … and we had dial-up internet. I never thought about getting our children from school, just never dawned on me. Although talking to my neighbors, I realized they had all called school to see if school had been closed, and if they should come get their children

I just thought about what was going on in New York. Around mid day, I finally got off the Internet and my phone rang immediately. It was my brother Edward.  Edward had been traveling and was in the air at the time of the New York event. His plane with rerouted to Chicago, and everyone was removed from the plane and hustled off. He had spent several hours trying to reach me by telephone, but of course I was using the old dial-up internet line.

He was going to come to my house. Sorry, but I don’t remember whether I went to the airport or he took the train, etc.  But he got there

Next to arrive home was John.  His office was downtown and the central business district near the Sear’s Tower had been evacuated.  The authorities thought the Sear’s Tower might be another terrorist target.

Finally the children came home.  We calmly let them unwind and tell us what they knew.  We really did not know much more.  Over the next several days, we just let them ask questions, and we tried to answer with facts.

Interestingly, I really enjoyed the 48 hours with my brother. He had never been to my home in Chicago.  We enjoyed just sorting things out and trying to put it in perspective.   And  Lindseys are news junkies, and we devoured every piece of information trying to make sense of it all.

Thinking back … In Wilmette, my favorite visual image is of Janie and Tim Jenkins, our neighbors, hanging a huge flag from their upstairs windows.  I remember going to church “religiously that fall.”  I needed that comfort that things were under control.  I also remember specifically two articles that were published shortly thereafter which put 9/11 in perspective.  One was by Fareed Zakaria in Newsweek (The Politics Of Rage: Why Do They Hate Us? – Print View – The Daily Beast.) and the other by Joseph Hough in the NYT (Q&A; Acknowledging That God Is Not Limited to Christians – New York Times).  In addition, I remember several photographs … one of the second plane going in to the South Tower, another of a man in a suit covered in ash, and finally, the ones of folks who choose to jump rather than burn.  Horrifying images to reconcile with our lives in a civilized world.

Over the next few weeks and months, I continued to talk with friends and family trying to make sense of the world. I was impressed with the renewed sense of faith, of patriotism and of unity

One of the most meaningful conversations took place at Thanksgiving.  We traveled to Atlanta where the children and I had dinner with Rev. Debbie Shew, a college friend of mine, and an Episcopal priest in inner city Atlanta.  Debbie succeeded in giving my children a very real sense of what had happened.   Debbie had volunteered to go to Ground Zero where she worked for approximately two weeks. She described this in detail to my children. And I saw in their expressions that they were really beginning to get it. We got in the car and my middle child Edward said, “she is so cool.” He never said anything like that about anyone other than a sports hero. I was thrown because it was the first time I felt like he had really gotten in touch with the World. It was memorable. It was a turning point in his perception of the world. That meeting impacted all three children, but to the largest extent Edward.

Going forward, we all had the same changes … we take our shoes off at the airport and take a lot longer to get from point a to point b.  My children probably can’t remember what it was like before.  This is their world.

We, “older Americans” want to go back in time, but we cannot … now we must make good of this new world for our children.  We can’t live in the past.  This is the new normal. As we travel through life, let’s pray for safe travel, travel in God’s care and consistent with God’s plan.

Godspeed,

Dennard

9/11/2011

And from my brother, Edward Lindsey …

Dear Friends and Neighbors:I hope you will forgive me if I deviate from my normal discussion of politics and policy in this e mail.  This weekend requires a different focus.Often at holiday times I send out an e mail to staff and lawyers in my firm to invite them to remember and share stories of good times from their past holidays.  This weekend is different.  There were, of course, no good times to share from 9/11/2001.  I dare say, however,  that we can all remember that day.

 

I was headed to California that morning.  My children were in an unusually good mood for a Tuesday morning school day when I woke them early to say good bye.   The sky was brilliant blue without a cloud in the sky.  Traffic getting to the airport was nonexistent. The line through security was uncharacteristically short.  No one was in the two seats next to me.  The headline in the AJC heralded my hero Michael Jordon buying the Washington basketball team.    A perfect day to fly cross country. 

 

My plane lifted off from Atlanta at just before 8 a.m. bound for California. That was approximately the same time as the two flights from Boston took off that ended up colliding into the World Trade Center. My plane was safely diverted to Chicago as the FTA scrambled to ground all flights in the U.S.  I remember the shock of the other passengers in my plane when we discovered what had happened, the eerie silence in O’Hare as they evacuated us off the plane, the stunned looks on everyone’s faces as we waited for our bags (no one really cared about their bags), the grief we all felt for our fellow travelers that day when we learned off the crash in Pennsylvania, and the desire of everyone to connect with loved ones. 

 

I eventually made it to my sister’s house in the Chicago suburbs (she had only moved north a few months earlier and I had to scramble to get her address).  Four days later I was able to share a ride home with other stranded travelers — one trying to get home to Louisville and the other to Nashville. Strangers were family that week and everyone just wanted to go home.

 

I left home on September 11, 2001 for an ordinary nondescript business trip and safely returned with a moderately interesting tale to tell my friends and family.  Three thousand innocent people did not have that good fortune.  For the next several months the New York Times published a short bio on everyone who perished that day.  I made a point of reading each bio. I was taken by the number of extraordinary lives who perished on a day that was supposed to be ordinary for them.  The deserved to go home to their families as well but fate dealt them a different hand.     

 

Remember.  Cherish the moment.  Even the ordinary nondescript ones.  We never know what fate God has in store for us in the next sweep of the second hand. 

 

May the peace of the Lord be with you.   

  

Edward Lindsey 

where were you when …, 9/11, perspective, oral history:  Apocalypse?  This is a great article because it takes people’s memory bites and orders them with the timeline for the day.  Worth reading.

Witness to Apocalypse

Days after the 9/11 attacks, researchers at the Columbia Center for Oral History began asking New Yorkers to describe their experience.

via The 9/11 Decade – Witness to Apocalypse. A Collective Diary. – NYTimes.com.

where were you when …, 9/11, Lucky Penny: “Because the surprise attacks were unfolding, in that innocent age, faster than they could arm war planes, … “I would essentially be a kamikaze pilot.” ”

Late in the morning of the Tuesday that changed everything, Lt. Heather “Lucky” Penney was on a runway at Andrews Air Force Base and ready to fly. She had her hand on the throttle of an F-16 and she had her orders: Bring down United Airlines Flight 93. The day’s fourth hijacked airliner seemed to be hurtling toward Washington. Penney, one of the first two combat pilots in the air that morning, was told to stop it.

The one thing she didn’t have as she roared into the crystalline sky was live ammunition. Or missiles. Or anything at all to throw at a hostile aircraft.

The events of September 11, 2001, left a lasting impact on the small town of Shanksville, Pa. In the decade since Flight 93 crashed in a field nearby, the community has worked to construct a memorial that honors the heroes and victims who perished that day, and offers closure and a place of healing to those who visit.

Because the surprise attacks were unfolding, in that innocent age, faster than they could arm war planes, Penney and her commanding officer went up to fly their jets straight into a Boeing 757.

“We wouldn’t be shooting it down. We’d be ramming the aircraft,” Penney recalls of her charge that day. “I would essentially be a kamikaze pilot.”

For years, Penney, one of the first generation of female combat pilots in the country, gave no interviews about her experiences on Sept. 11 (which included, eventually, escorting Air Force One back into Washington’s suddenly highly restricted airspace).

But 10 years later, she is reflecting on one of the lesser-told tales of that endlessly examined morning: how the first counterpunch the U.S. military prepared to throw at the attackers was effectively a suicide mission.

via F-16 pilot was ready to give her life on Sept. 11 – The Washington Post.

9/11, media coverage:  I always wondered how the morning news show hosts felt about the change in their day … they became real journalists, at least for a day.  10 Years Later: ‘GMA’ Anchors Remember September 11th Terror Attacks | Video – ABC News.

9/11, oral history, aviation tapes:  Lots of ways to tell the story.

For one instant on the morning of Sept. 11, an airliner that had vanished from all the tracking tools of modern aviation suddenly became visible in its final seconds to the people who had been trying to find it.

The 9/11 Tapes: The Story in the Air

It was just after 9 a.m., 16 minutes after a plane had hit the north tower of the World Trade Center, when a radio transmission came into the New York air traffic control radar center. “Hey, can you look out your window right now?” the caller said.

“Yeah,” the radar control manager said.

“Can you, can you see a guy at about 4,000 feet, about 5 east of the airport right now, looks like he’s —”

“Yeah, I see him,” the manager said.

“Do you see that guy, look, is he descending into the building also?” the caller asked.

“He’s descending really quick too, yeah,” the manager said. “Forty-five hundred right now, he just dropped 800 feet in like, like one, one sweep.”

“What kind of airplane is that, can you guys tell?”

“I don’t know, I’ll read it out in a minute,” the manager said.

There was no time to read it out.

In the background, people can be heard shouting: “Another one just hit the building. Wow. Another one just hit it hard. Another one just hit the World Trade.”

The manager spoke.

“The whole building just came apart,” he said.

That moment is part of a newly published chronicle of the civil and military aviation responses to the hijackings that originally had been prepared by investigators for the 9/11 Commission, but never completed or released.

Threaded into vivid narratives covering each of the four airliners, the multimedia document contains 114 recordings of air traffic controllers, military aviation officers, airline and fighter jet pilots, as well as two of the hijackers, stretching across two hours of the morning of Sept. 11, 2001.

Though some of the audio has emerged over the years, mainly through public hearings and a federal criminal trial, the report provides a rare 360-degree view of events that were unfolding at high speed across the Northeast in the skies and on the ground. This week, the complete document, with recordings, is being published for the first time by the Rutgers Law Review, and selections of it are available online at nytimes.com.

“The story of the day, of 9/11 itself, is best told in the voices of 9/11,” said Miles Kara, a retired Army colonel and an investigator for the commission who studied the events of that morning.

Most of the work on the document — which commission staff members called an “audio monograph” — was finished in 2004, not in time to go through a long legal review before the commission was shut down that August.

Mr. Kara tracked down the original electronic files earlier this year in the National Archives and finished reviewing and transcribing them with help from law students and John J. Farmer Jr., the dean of Rutgers Law School, who served as senior counsel to the commission.

At hearings in 2003 and 2004, the 9/11 Commission played some of the recordings and said civil and military controllers improvised responses to attacks they had never trained for. At 9 a.m., a manager of air traffic control in New York called Federal Aviation Administration headquarters in Herndon, Va., trying to find out if the civil aviation officials were working with the military.

“Do you know if anyone down there has done any coordination to scramble fighter-type airplanes?” the manager asked, continuing: “We have several situations going, going on here, it is escalating big, big time, and we need to get the military involved with us.”

One plane had already crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center. Another had been hijacked and was seconds from hitting the south tower. At F.A.A. headquarters, not everyone was up to speed.

“Why, what’s going on?” the man in Herndon asked.

“Just get me somebody who has the authority to get military in the air, now,” the manager said.

via Newly Published Audio Provides Real-Time View of 9/11 Attacks – NYTimes.com.

Post 9/11, media coverage,  Fareed Zakaria, faith and spirituality, Joseph Hough:  I still remember these two articles:  Fareed Zakaria’s article and Joseph Hough’s editorial, both cited above.  Here is some followup … these issues are still issues I think about frequently.

I guessed instantly who had done it. I had followed Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda for a few years, through the attacks on the U.S. embassies in Africa and on the USS Cole in Yemen. In my previous job, as Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, I had published a commentary on bin Laden’s then-little-known fatwah against the United States by the eminent Princeton historian, Bernard Lewis. But I was still stunned by the attack – by its audacity, simplicity and success. In one respect, I was thoroughly American. I imagined that America was an island, a rock, far away from the troubles and infections of the rest of the world. And like most Americans, I felt a shock, an intrusion, a violation.

I put my book project on hold and spent all my spare hours reading and thinking about what had caused the attack.  What explained this monstrous evil? I wrote my columns for Newsweek on it and then, a couple of weeks later, I was talking to Newsweek’s Editor, Mark Whitaker, and we decided that I would write a full-length essay explaining the roots of this rage against America. I spent three days and nights in a white heat, reading, researching and writing. The result was a 6,000-word cover essay that ran in Newsweek worldwide titled, “Why They Hate Us?” It got a lot of attention – more than anything I had ever written. It was a moment that Americans – in fact, people around the world – were deeply curious for answers, explanations and understanding. The piece did deal with America and American foreign policy in small measure, but it was mostly about Islam and the Arab world in particular. It was mostly about them.

That’s how 9/11 was discussed and analyzed at the time – mostly with a focus on them. Who are they? Why are they so enraged? What do they want? What will stop them from hating us? That discussion of Islam and the Arab world had its problems, but its was a fruitful discussion, especially once it was joined by Arabs and Muslims themselves. I have often said that the most influential piece of writing of the last decade was a United Nations report, the UNDP’s Arab Development Report, written by Arabs, that documented in granular detail the decay of the Arab world. Once Arabs began to focus on how stagnant and repressive their societies had become, it set off a chain of ideas and actions that I believe has led to the discrediting of al Qaeda and its philosophy and the rise of the Arab Spring.

But if 9/11 was focused at the time on them, ten years later the discussion is mostly about us. What is America’s position in the world today? Are we safer? Are we stronger? Was it worth it? Some of these questions are swirling around because the United States is mired in tough economic times and at such moments, the mood is introspective not outward looking. Some of it is because of the success in the war against al Qaeda. The threat from Islamic terrorism still seems real but more manageable and contained.

But, in large part, the discussion about the United States is the right one to have. History will probably record this period not as one characterized by al Qaeda and Islamic terrorism. That will get a few paragraphs or a chapter. The main story will be about a rapidly changing world and perhaps about the fate of the world’s sole superpower – the United States of America. History might well record 9/11 as the beginning of the decline of America as planet’s unrivaled hegemon.

The day on 9/11, the world was at peace, and the United States strode that world like a Colossus. It posted a large budget surplus. Oil was at $28 a barrel. The Chinese economy was a fifth the size of America’s. Today, America is at war across the globe; it has a deficit of $1.5 trillion and oil is at $115 a barrel. China is now the world’s second largest economy.

Al Qaeda will be forgotten. Few people today remember what the Boer War was about. But what they do know is that, around that time, the dawn of the 20th Century, Great Britain spent a great many of its resources and, more importantly, its attention, on policing the world and sending its troops to Africa and…Afghanistan and Iraq – some things never change. But Britain forgot that the real threat to its power came from the economic rise of Germany and the United States, which were challenging its industrial supremacy.

America needs to get back its energy and focus on its true challenge – staying competitive and vibrant in a rapidly changing world. That requires not great exertions of foreign policy and war but deep domestic changes at home. The danger comes not from them but from us.

via Zakaria: Reflections on 9/11 and its aftermath – Global Public Square – CNN.com Blogs.

“The End Times and the Times of Ending” – a sermon: Joseph C. Hough, Jr..

Bill Moyers talks to Joseph C. Hough, president of the Union Theological Seminary, where his teaching and research interests are in social ethics, theological education, the Church and ministry. Hough discusses where politics and religion intersect and why he thinks it is the duty of Christians, Jews and Muslims to join together and fight growing economic inequality in America. Hough has sharp words for politicians who tout their religions, but don’t apply its teachings to actions that could help those in need. “I’m getting tired of people claiming they’re carrying the banner of my religious tradition when they’re doing everything possible to undercut it. And that’s what’s happening in this country right now, ” says Hough, “The policies of this country are disadvantaging poor people every day of our lives.”

via NOW with Bill Moyers. This Week | PBS.

9/11, history, children:  How did you tell your children?  This is an interesting take … A Sept 11 Story for Children …

The Washington Post (@washingtonpost)

9/9/11 10:39 PM

#Sept11 story for children:http://t.co/oC53hFh

On September 11, 2001, 19 members of a terrorist group called al-Qaeda (al-KYE-da) hijacked four U.S. airplanes and used them to strike various targets on the East Coast. The carefully planned attacks killed nearly 3,000 people, making it the worst attack on the United States in history.

Al-Qaeda is a small, very violent group of people who practice the Muslim religion and who want to create a Muslim state independent of other countries. Al-Qaeda considers the freedoms that U.S. citizens have to be evil and doesn’t want the United States to spread those freedoms to other countries. Most Muslims don’t share al-Qaeda’s beliefs.

Under the leadership of Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda has carried out many terrorist attacks all over the world, but the attacks on September 11 were the deadliest by far.

Two of the hijacked planes hit nearly identical skyscrapers, known as the twin towers, at a complex called the World Trade Center in New York. The buildings collapsed, and thousands of people died. A third plane was flown into the Pentagon in Arlington, where the U.S. military is headquartered, killing 189 people. A fourth plane, thought to be heading for the Capitol in Washington, crashed in rural Pennsylvania after passengers onboard fought the hijackers. All 44 people on the plane were killed.

The United States responded by attacking al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan, one of several countries where the group had operations. The government in Afghanistan was brutal and supported the terrorists, so less than a month after the attacks of September 11, the United States invaded Afghanistan to break up al-Qaeda and the Afghan government.

During the years after the attacks, the United States was involved in another war, one in Iraq. The main reason for this war was because many countries, including the United States, believed that Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein had weapons that could be used in terrorist attacks. No weapons were ever found, and no link between Hussein and bin Laden was ever proved. There is a now a new government in Iraq.

U.S. forces finally located and killed bin Laden in May of this year. Al-Qaeda is much weaker without him, but there are terrorist groups other than al-Qaeda that want to harm the United States.

Since the September 11 attacks, the government has greatly increased security around the country, particularly at airports, government buildings and public events. The government has also worked to improve the way it shares information. (Some people think the attacks of September 11 might have been prevented if groups within the U.S. government had communicated better).

Before September 11, 2001, a massive terrorist attack against the United States seemed unimaginable to many Americans. But 10 years later, the events of that day continue to affect the way Americans live.

via What was 9/11? – The Washington Post.

Post 9/11, Super Bowl Ads, Anheuser Busch, kudos:  This was not an ad but a tribute.  It made me cry then … and now.

post 9/11, Rebirth, documentary film, rebuilding the World Trade Center:

As filmmaker Jim Whitaker stood at Ground Zero, amid the rubble of the World Trade Center one month after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, he felt a palpable sense of anxiety. Yet he knew that some day, something different would take shape in that bleak landscape.

“I thought, Wow, wouldn’t it be great to be able to give an audience a feeling of going from this dread and this anxiety to, in a very short period of time, a feeling of hope,” he said.

Whitaker decided that the way to do that would be with cameras: multiple cameras filming at Ground Zero every day, capturing on film the cranes and construction workers tackling the site’s ongoing transformation. Today, the result of all that filming — time-lapse footage from 2001 to 2009 — is featured in Whitaker’s new documentary, “Rebirth.”

Though the film debuted earlier this year, Whitaker’s cameras, now 14 in all, will stay focused at Ground Zero for years to come. The footage will be provided to the Library of Congress and used for a permanent exhibit at the National 9/11 Memorial and Museum located at Ground Zero.

The cameras “will be there until there’s some ceremony that happens or someone says, ‘O.K., we’re finished here,'” Whitaker said.

“Rebirth” also turns the lens on the lives of five people affected directly by the terrorist attacks. Each person was interviewed once a year, every year, until the film’s completion.

via Rebirth: Film Captures Time-Lapse Transformation of Ground Zero, Rebuilding of Lives – ABC News.

Post 9/11, President George W. Bush, FL 2nd Grade Class, followup:  Have you ever wondered what happened to the teacher and kids in the classroom with President Bush when he learned the news.  9/11: Florida Students with President Bush Grow Up; Discuss George W. Bush’s Reaction to Attacks | Video – ABC News.

Post 9/11, photo icons:  What pitures do you remember?  I rememeber the one of the second place hitting the WTC, of the suited man with briefcase covered in ash, and of the suicide jumpers.  Newseum’s Photos | Facebook9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most – LightBox.

Post 9/11, international relations, US decline:

But then came 9/11 — a mass-casualty terrorist provocation on an unprecedented scale — and the Bush Administration convinced itself, and much of America, that the world had changed. The new president had found his “calling” in a campaign to “rid the world of evil doers”, declaring a “war on terrorism” that would become the leitmotif and singular obsession of U.S. foreign policy for the remainder of his presidency — a presidency that despite massive, kinetic displays of military force, left the U.S. strategically weaker at its close than when Bush entered the Oval Office.

“We’d always treated terrorist attacks before primarily as a law enforcement problem… going after and finding the guilty party, bring them to trial and put them in the slammer,” Vice President Dick Cheney told TIME in an interview published in this week’s edition. “After 9/11, you couldn’t look on those as just law enforcement problems anymore. It was clearly an act of war. And that’s a significant shift. You’re going to use all of the means available…”

But while the scale and brutality of the attacks might have been akin to an act of war, 9/11 was the work of a tiny network of transnational extremists, founded on the remnants of the Arab volunteers who’d fought in the U.S.-backed Afghan jihad against the Soviet Union.

via How 9/11 Provoked the U.S. to Hasten its Own Decline – Global Spin – TIME.com.

Post 9/11, perspective, faith and spirituality:  What have we learned?  Articles are interesting … perspective varied!

        via On Faith: A forum for news and opinion on religion and politics – The Washington Post.

Post 9/11: “You’ve got to be loyal to pain sometimes to be loyal to the glory that came out of it.”

Many heartbreaking things happened after 9/11 and maybe the worst is that there’s no heroic statue to them, no big marking of what they were and what they gave, at the new World Trade Center memorial.

But New York will never get over what they did. They live in a lot of hearts.

They tell us to get over it, they say to move on, and they mean it well: We can’t bring an air of tragedy into the future. But I will never get over it. To get over it is to get over the guy who stayed behind on a high floor with his friend who was in a wheelchair. To get over it is to get over the woman by herself with the sign in the darkness: “America You Are Not Alone.” To get over it is to get over the guys who ran into the fire and not away from the fire.

You’ve got to be loyal to pain sometimes to be loyal to the glory that came out of it.

via We’ll Never Get Over It, Nor Should We – Opinion – PatriotPost.US.”

Post 9/11, movies, entertainment, define: terrorist: Terrorists …

The 1985 film “Invasion U.S.A.” starred Chuck Norris, who single-handedly defeated an invading army of Communist fighters out to terrorize Americans and destroy our way of life.

Terrorists had become a standard and reliable villain for Hollywood action movies, but when real-life terrorism struck within America’s borders, the game changed.

via Terrorism in movies, pre- and post-9/11 Pictures – CBS News.

9/11 10th anniversary, kith/kin, FPC, Ordination of Mary Bowman, senior pictures:

Text from my sister – “God is my refuge” – Psalm 46, Obama read it at Ground Zero

Church: “Praise my Soul, the King of Heaven,” Psalm 46, ” I Believe in the Sun,”, Mark 15: 25-32, Katie Crowe’s Sermon – “Remembering,” “O God, Our Help in Ages Past,” and “Now Thank We All Our God.”

Mary’s Service: ‎… Attended the Service of Ordination for Mary Henderson Bowman … What a blessed and joyful event!

Senior Pictures:  I just realized that Molly was the same age as the students in the room with the President when 9/11 occured … they are all grown  as is my baby!  All beautiful.

9/11, graphics:  My favorite graphic commemorating 9/11.

From Linda – I don’t know who created it, just found it on someone’s page – I loved that it incorporates the WTC towers, the Pentagon and even the farmland in PA with the flag’s stripes.

16
Apr
11

4.16.2011 … It was a dark and stormy morning …

design,neighborhoods, cities, urban development, New Urbanism, pocket neighborhoods, quotes, Brookwood Hills, Atlanta, CAGE, Wilmette, Chicago:  “‘Biology is destiny’, declared Sigmund Freud. But if Freud were around today, he might say “design is destiny”—especially after taking a stroll through most American cities.” … And I still think BH is the perfect neighborhood … with the CAGE in Wilmette coming in a close second.

Biology is destiny, declared Sigmund Freud.

But if Freud were around today, he might say “design is destiny”—especially after taking a stroll through most American cities.

The way we design our communities plays a huge role in how we experience our lives. Neighborhoods built without sidewalks, for instance, mean that people walk less and therefore experience fewer spontaneous encounters, which is what instills a spirit of community to a place. That’s a chief cause of the social isolation, so rampant in the modern world, that contributes to depression, distrust, and other maladies.

You don’t have to be a therapist to realize all this creates lasting psychological effects. It thwarts the connections between people that encourage us to congregate, cooperate, and work for the common good. We retreat into ever more privatized existences.

Commons can take many different forms: a group of neighbors in Oakland who tore down their backyard fences to create a commons, a block in Baltimore that turned their alley into a pubic commons, or the residential pedestrian streets found in Manhattan Beach, California, and all around Europe.

Of course, this is no startling revelation. Over the past 40 years, the shrinking sense of community across America has been widely discussed, and many proposals outlined about how to bring us back together.

One of the notable solutions being put into practice to combat this problem is New Urbanism, an architectural movement to build new communities (and revitalize existing ones) by maximizing opportunities for social exchange: public plazas, front porches, corner stores, coffee shops, neighborhood schools, narrow streets and, yes, sidewalks.

But while New Urbanism is making strides at the level of the neighborhood, we still spend most of our time at home, which today means seeing no one other than our nuclear family. How could we widen that circle just a bit, to include the good neighbors with whom we share more than a property line?

That’s an idea Seattle-area architect Ross Chapin has explored for many years, and now showcases in an inspiring and beautiful new book: Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating a Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World.

He believes that groupings of four to twelve households make an ideal community “where meaningful ‘neighborly’ relationships are fostered.” But even here, design shapes our destiny. Chapin explains that strong connections between neighbors develop most fully and organically when everyone shares some “common ground.”

That can be a semi-private square, as in the pocket neighborhoods Chapin designed in the Seattle area. In the book’s bright photographs, they look like grassy patches of paradise, where kids scamper, flowers bloom, and neighbors stop to chat.

via How to Design a Neighborhood for Happiness by Jay Walljasper.

iPhone, kith/kin:  Edward will be so happy.

Since the initial announcement of the iPhone 4, many users have been clenching onto the opportunity of purchasing the elusive white variant. Plagued by manufacturing challenges such as peeling paint and bleeding of light, Apple has apparently managed to remedy those causes. According to Bloomberg, multiple sources have gleaned information that point to a release within the coming weeks for both carriers. Stay tuned for more information

via Rumor: White iPhone 4 Coming Soon | Hypebeast.

places, great stories, Greenbriar:  One of my favorite places is the Greenbriar.  I hope it gets its 5th star back!

The story since then, of how a coal miner returned the legendary resort to near-profitability in 18 months, with record occupancy rates, a PGA golf tournament and a glitzy casino, is partly a story about daring, financial risk and business vision. But mostly, it’s a story about one man and the little postage stamp of America he calls home.

“I knew I just couldn’t mess this up,” Justice mused one day in his office, with a gesture to the hotel. “I mean, the employees know where I live.”

The Greenbrier has been everything to the rural area since the resort’s mineral springs began drawing the well-heeled and socially connected before the Civil War. It employs about 1,850 in a county of 35,000. Everybody has a family member who works there or has dinner with someone who does.

But the grand dame lost her prestigious fifth star from the Mobil Travel Guide in 2000, and not even $50 million in upgrades by the hotel’s longtime owner, CSX Corp., could keep a slow decline from turning into a death spiral.

By 2009, the place was losing nearly $1 million per week. Half of the staff, about 600 workers, was laid off. It was declared bankrupt. There were nights when as few as 40 guests roamed the vast hallways, the ballrooms, the chandeliered restaurants. West Virginia’s then-governor and now U.S. senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) was so desperate to save the state’s “marquee attraction” that he called Donald Trump and asked the real-estate mogul to take it on.

Ah, no, said the Donald.

There was only one offer to keep the hotel alive. It required CSX to lend Marriott $50 million to take it over – against a sale for as much as seven years down the line that might net CSX as little as $60 million. The future was diminishment or dismemberment on the auction block.

via Reaching for the stars: W.Va. billionaire Jim Justice’s mission to restore the Greenbrier resort to glory.

art, collage, Romare  Bearden, Charlotte, public parks, public art: An artist worthy of a new park!

It’s no secret that Uptown Charlotte lacks green space, specifically a park where people can  lunch, exercise, or relax. Romare Bearden Park has been planned for over 10 years and due to delays construction hasn’t started. The park will be a full city block located at the corner of S. Church and 3rd St. right in the heart of Uptown Charlotte.  It will be a signature park for Uptown Charlotte.

via Romare Bearden Park in Uptown | CLT Blog.

Romare Bearden is recognized as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the 20th century.  His work is currently on display in New York City’s  Michael Rosenfield Gallery to celebrate the centennial of Bearden’s birth. Read a recent article from the NY Times. There is a good biographical post of Bearden’s life on the Romare Bearden Foundation website.

via Romare Bearden Park in Uptown | CLT Blog.

Romare Bearden (1911-88) spent more than 30 years striving to be a great artist, and in the early 1960s, when he took up collage in earnest, he became one. A small exhibition at the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, organized to celebrate the centennial of Bearden’s birth, delivers this message with unusual clarity. It contains only 21 collages, all superb, in an intimate context that facilitates savoring their every formal twist and narrative turn, not to mention the ingenious mixing of mediums that takes them far beyond collage.

via Romare Bearden at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery – Review – NYTimes.com.

To see a slide show of his work  click here: ‘Romare Bearden Collage’ – Slide Show – NYTimes.com.

random, technology, culture:  So, have you ever stolen a towel?

THIS will not be of any relevance to honest readers of The Economist, of course, but a company in America has come up with a way to stop hotel guests from stealing linens. The radio-frequency identification chips designed by Linen Technology Tracking can be put in towels, sheets and bathrobes to keep track of stock and, more importantly, to ensure their return when light-fingered guests forget their manners.

The market for such items sounds well developed. CNN quoted William Serbin of Linen Technology Tracking saying, “Any given month, [hotels] can lose 5 to 20 percent of towels, sheets and robes.” And the economies to be made from the tags, which will work through 300 washes, also sound rather impressive. One of the three hotels using them is reportedly saving $16,000 a month by reducing the number of pool towels stolen from 4,000—an almost unbelievable 130 a day—to 750.

via Hotel linen: The towel thieves’ comeuppance | The Economist.

random, entertainment, LeBron James:  Serials, like on tv, on YouTube … I guess I knew they were out there, but I never paid any attention.  Episode One of “The LeBrons” Hits YouTube | The Sporting Rave.

technology, culture, law, csr, apps, Apple, Google:  Found this very interesting … and the responses or lack thereof by Apple and Google.

FRIENDS don’t let friends drive drunk. If they can’t take their friend’s keys away, they take their smartphone. Why? The phone may have an app that can help them avoid sobriety checkpoints.

Enlarge This Image

A handful of smartphone apps, like Buzzed, track the locations of sobriety checkpoints so drivers can reroute around them.

Last month, Senators Harry Reid, Charles E. Schumer, Frank R. Lautenberg and Tom Udall asked Apple, Google and Research In Motion, the maker of BlackBerrys, to remove apps from their online stores that help drunken drivers evade sobriety checkpoints.

On March 23, the day after the letter went out, the group said BlackBerry agreed to pull the apps and thanked the group for bringing them to its attention.

Apple and Google? Nothing.

An Apple spokeswoman said the company would not comment. A Google spokesman said the apps did not violate the company’s content policies.

via Apps for Avoiding Sobriety Checkpoints Stir Controversy – NYTimes.com.

02
Nov
10

11.02.2010 … tonight chicken tikka masala curry with Mrs. Ball’s Chutney … recipe to follow tomorow …

film/lit, movies, holidays: Any that interest you?

Here is a round-up of five upcoming literary movies

via 5 Upcoming Literary Adaptations – GalleyCat.

advertising, Coca-Cola, Christmas:  So does this get you in the mood … Coca-Cola Shake it up! Coca-Cola’s 2010 Christmas song from Train.

YouTube – Train – Shake Up Christmas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6njG4TL4WOg&feature=share

… or maybe this one … ’tis the season …

YouTube – Coca Cola Commercial – Christmas Video #1.

iPad Apps, me: $7.99 to have Martha teach me to make cookies … and I actually am considering it.

Martha Stewart Makes Cookies for iPad on the iTunes App Store.

random, Superlatives, Glasgow UK: Poor Glasgow!

The Most Miserable Day of the Year

A poll released today revealed 66 percent of Britons will feel depressed on November 1 — “the most miserable day of the year.” The changing of the clocks, falling temperatures, and impending government cuts make this first of November uniquely grim (as determined in a study carried out by the Canary Islands Tourist Board), and Glasgow, Scotland takes the prize — or whatever the miserable equivalent might be — as the most miserable place of all. Behold … the misery! Above: The entrance to the Easterhouse shopping center, Glasgow.

via The Most Miserable Day of the Year – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

politics, campaign ads: Enjoy! Campaign Ads 2010: The Good, the Bad and the Funny.

The Supreme Court, free speech: I think the photo is powerful.

Corporations vote with their dollars, and thanks to the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, they have more influence in elections than ever before. That includes corporations that have been convicted of crimes or regulatory violations, settled similar charges without admitting guilt or otherwise run afoul of the law.

Here are some of the leading corporate criminals that are active participants in the electoral process. The figures on their political spending are no doubt understated, given the various ways that companies can now invest in elections and keep it secret.

via ISS – VOICES: The corporate crime PAC.

technology, entertainment, culture: Why are video games so violent?  Is that fun?

The case revolves around a California law passed in 2005 (but never enacted) that made it illegal for retailers to sell violent video games to anyone under 18. California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown maintain that violent games are on the same level as sexual materials, giving the government the right to restrict sales.

The video game industry argues there have been no conclusive studies proving games have any sort of negative effects on players – and that no other entertainment field is subject to this sort of regulation. Restricting the sale of any games, it says, would be violation of the First Amendment rights of developers and publishers.

via Video Game Industry to Get Its Day in Court – CNBC.

random, health/exercise, London:  Making a game of running …

Nike has turned the city of London into a game board for a two-week competition called the GRID which the shoe manufacturer hopes will ultimately encourage young people who already jog for exercise to start identifying themselves as “runners.”

The company has broken the city down into its 48 zip codes. Each zip code (or “postal code” as they say in England) has four traditional phone boxes. Players compete by doing runs, which they start by going to one of the phone boxes, dialing a specific number, entering their unique identifier, and then following the instructions they’re given, which send them to other phone boxes in the city.

via Nike Turns London Into a Game Board to Get People Running | Fast Company.

culture, history:

We always live in a world we partially construct for ourselves by a ring of ideas. This holds true for the society that shapes us and that we shape. In this blog I want to sketch familiar ideas that frame us, and will critique them in later blogs.

We can begin 4,900 years ago with Abraham, breaking the idols in his father’s idol shop, and his putative role in inventing monotheism. With that shift from polytheism, the ancient Jews culled 100,000 years of beliefs in multiple gods to be appeased, with their conflicting egos – think of the Greek gods and their strife – into a single Creator Agent God and that God’s Creativity acting in the ongoing becoming of the universe: “In the Beginning was the Word…”, Genesis, our current religious Abrahamic creation myth among three billion of us on this planet.

The ancient Jews lived stubbornly with Yahweh, debating the interpretations of His Laws, and sought to live righteously with those commandments. They were a people deeply of history, namely, their own as the Chosen People with their God, who would also love their non-Jewish neighbors.

via Re-Imagining Society: Are We Trapped By Old Ideas? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR.

politics, media: This generation’s Woodstock?

In previews, some commentators speculated that the rally could become this generation’s Woodstock. Maybe it was, but only in the sense that it was largely apolitical while playing out in the most political of contexts.

The majority of more than 50 people interviewed in a crowd organizers estimated at around 250,000 said the rally will have a negligible impact on the impending elections, even as they hoped otherwise.

via Democrats can’t ride Jon Stewart’s wave – James Hohmann and Marin Cogan and Byron Tau – POLITICO.com.

food, South Africa:

South Africans and expats alike love Mrs Ball’s Chutney.

The name chutney was adopted from a Hindi word in India, chatni, meaning ‘made from fresh fruit and spices”. In South Africa it’s mainly used as a marinade and a sauce to accompany meat, curries and bobotie.Undoubtably the most famous South African Chutney is Mrs Balls.

via Cape Food & Beverage – Mrs Ball’s Chutney.

22
Oct
10

10.22.2010 … Soon I will join the “Wasabi Wildcats.” :)

journalism, media:

Like many other news organizations, NPR expects its journalists to avoid situations that might call its impartiality into question — an expectation written into the organization’s ethics code.

That expectation can erode under television lights and on Twitter. At outlets like NPR, some journalists have found it difficult to not share their opinions, especially when they are speaking in forums that lend themselves to commentary, like “The O’Reilly Factor.”

via One Comment, Two Takes at NPR and Fox – NYTimes.com.

random, charity, Ground Zero, NYC:

The New York Post reports that $10,000 in cash was found on Tuesday evening in one of the area’s donation boxes. The newspaper writes that no face or name has been attached to the stash of 99 100-dollar bills and five 20-dollar bills deposited for collection. (See TIME’s 9/11 multimedia piece: Remembering the Landscape.)

The National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum’s customary donations come from areas like souvenir sales and documented contributions.

But as the Post report notes, surveillance tapes have yet to pinpoint the individual behind the gracious measure.

via Ground Zero Miracle: $10,000 Found in 9/11 Memorial Box – TIME NewsFeed.

1984, media, twitter:

There was a fascinating post over at the Gourmet Live site today, about restaurant hosts using the power of the Internet to identify those who come into their establishments. (Hat-tip to Eater for, as they say, surfacing the material.)

The article, by Sarah Rich, opens with an anecdote about a fellow en route to New York from Montreal who put up a message on Twitter about a burger he ate at the airport — “an amuse-bouche for my dinner at Eleven Madison Park.”

The next evening, at the restaurant, he and his guests were served an amuse-bouche of small lamb burgers on diminutive buns. “We hope these are better than the one you had at the airport,” the waiter said, according to Ms. Rich. Hosts had been scanning social networks that morning, looking for mentions of the restaurant. Spotting this one, they had notified the kitchen.

Google alerts. Hosts employing Google image search to look for those reserving tables. Hosts sharing information about diner’s likes and dislikes via the database at the reservation site opentable.com. Is all this electronic snooping and sharing helpful or invasive, charming or creepy? Opinions vary greatly, and we’d love to hear yours.

via Where Everybody Knows Your Name, and a Lot of Other Things About You, Too – NYTimes.com.

google doodles:


In case you havent used Google today Oct. 21, you may not have noticed an unusual design on the home page: a razzmatazz boogie of semi-abstract art with a likeness of Dizzy Gillespie.Today would have been Dizzys 93rd birthday, and — 17 years after his death — he remains one of the most unforgettable characters of American music. Its sad that jazz has become such a marginal part of modern life, because if more people knew the story of Dizzys life and music, the world would be an immeasurably better place.

via Post Mortem – Google and Dizzy Gillespie.

yesterday:  Liv should be safely in Jo’burg … then on to Durban … then Nottingham Road … a very long way

Nederland CO, followup:

The shopping in Nederland is completely unique as well. Practically free from corporate domination, the town is full of locally owned small businesses that are happy to serve visitors. The stores are not tourist-oriented gift shops often found in most vacation spots, but instead are interesting places selling unique wares. Although it was closed, the Alpaca Store and More looked very intriguing.The food in Nederland is also comparable to its beauty. Whistler’s Cafe offers a delicious, inexpensive breakfast. The New Moon Bakery features a distinctive-tasting iced tea and one of the best slices of carrot cake west of Boulder.

via Abusing Your RTD bus pass: Nederland | CU Independent.

movies, entertainment: I want to go …

One of your favorite things returns to the big screen for two nights only on October 19 and 26 with The Sound of Music Sing-Along Event: 45th Anniversary Celebration! Don’t miss the opportunity to sing along with Julie Andrews (The Tooth Fairy) and Christopher Plummer (Up) in the extraordinary, Academy Award-winning classic back in theatres in true HD! Tickets on sale now!|

via The Sound of Music Sing-Along Event.

RIP, icons:  Rest in Peace, Mrs. Cleaver.

Barbara Billingsley, who gained supermom status for her gentle portrayal of June Cleaver, the warm, supportive mother of a pair of precocious boys in Leave it to Beaver, died Saturday. She was 94.

Billingsley, who had suffered from a rheumatoid disease, died at her home in Santa Monica, said family spokeswoman Judy Twersky.

via Barbara Billingsley, Beaver Cleaver’s TV mom, dies – USATODAY.com.

travel, quotes: I beg to differ, Mr. Emerson … “Travel, he famously wrote, “is a fool’s paradise,” a sickness that afflicts those who don’t realize that wisdom is inward. Instead of broadening the mind, travel narrows it.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson, high priest of American letters and patron saint of homebodies everywhere, reserved his harshest words for the voyager. Travel, he famously wrote, “is a fool’s paradise,” a sickness that afflicts those who don’t realize that wisdom is inward. Instead of broadening the mind, travel narrows it.

If Emerson is correct, my mind must be so narrow by now that I could fit my head through a standard-size letter slot. I have measured out my adult life in passport pages, acquiring stamps from most countries that exist and several that do not. I have written about dozens of them, and each time I produce what one might call “travel writing,” I can hear Ralph Waldo sneering that I’d be better off saving my plane fare.

via Travel Writing Is Dead – By Graeme Wood | Foreign Policy.

news, politics:  If Nixon gets one, so should Bush.  Let it be.

While anonymous donors put his photograph on highway billboards that say “Miss Me Yet?” Mr. Bush all but shuttered his ranch near Crawford, scene of some of the more spectacular protests against his administration, moving instead to a quiet cul-de-sac in the upscale Preston Hollow enclave of Dallas. He even waited until his beloved Texas Rangers began their current baseball playoff run to openly attend games.

But now Mr. Bush is bringing out the bullhorn.

“Breaking New Ground: Presenting the George W. Bush Presidential Center,” an exhibit set to open this weekend on the campus of Southern Methodist University, prominently features the handgun taken from Saddam Hussein and the loudspeaker used to address rescue workers at the World Trade Center in September 2001.

via New Bush Exhibit Opens Rift at S.M.U. – NYTimes.com.

fashion, If I had a million dollars: If I had a million dollars … I would wear Chanel.  Chanel – Timeline – 1913 – Designer Central Collections – Designer Central – InStyle.

random, travel: GotSaga+6-most-exotic-hotels-in-the-world.

 

22
Jul
10

7.22.2010 … degraying is done … quiet time at chez teague (i.e. two bassets and a cat have weasled their way into the ac and onto my bed) …

Apple iPad, LOL:

An enterprising Japanese blogger has transformed his iPad into a virtual sushi platter. It’s a revolutionary idea with one nasty flaw: your iPad might be left with an unwelcome fishy smell.

The first experiment (above) involved turning a less-than-appealing package of supermarket tuna sushi and turning it into something more appetizing. After re-plating the sushi on his iPad, it suddenly became delicious!

via Introducing the iDish | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

archeology, places, history:

British archeologists are calling the discovery of an underground structure next door to the famous Stonehenge columns the biggest find there in five decades.

via Shadow Stonehenge Discovered At Historic Site : NPR.

random, news: “part high-tech Huck Finn”

Even in the age of the search engine, Mr. Harris-Moore seemed untraceable and unknowable, part high-tech Huck Finn, part cunning criminal.

via For ‘Barefoot Bandit,’ Life on the Run Started Early – NYTimes.com.

graphics, entertainment:  FROM MY NIECE … Loving this Dirty Harry typographic poster/video!

Dirty Harry typographic movie poster on the Behance Network.

iPad apps:  Really like this one … and it will only get better.

The stealthy Kleiner Perkins-backed startup called Flipboard has now been revealed to be, as some suspected, a social application for the iPad. The new Flipboard iPad app bills itself as a “social magazine” – that is, one which aggregates status updates, tweets, photos and articles from those you’re connected to on social networking sites, like Twitter and Facebook. These updates are beautifully laid out into an easily digestible view which you can flip through with your fingers.

via Flipboard, New “Social” iPad Magazine will be Powered by Semantic Data.

food, sports: disgusting …

The all-you-can-eat food — the nachos, hot dogs, peanuts, popcorn, lemonade, sodas and ice cream — that he was entitled to with the purchase of a ticket in the Orioles’ Left Field Club Picnic Perch was that big of a draw.

“It’s an easier walk,” Cavalier said.

The left-field sections at Camden Yards are part of the growing trend of all-you-can-eat style options in major league ballparks. At a cost of $40 per ticket in the section, fans are entitled to a buffet-style choice that includes all the above-mentioned foods and even salad — you know, in case you are feeling guilty.

via All-you-can-eat sections in major leagues expanding – MLB – SI.com.

design, retro:  Like the look … but comments say dangerous.

Italian bespoke appliance manufacturer Meneghini rebuilds old iceboxes with modern fridges inside, an exceedingly winning combo (especially the ones with portholes!). They’re insanely expensive (five figures!), but they’re fun to day-dream about!

via Fridges built from old iceboxes – Boing Boing.

archeology, NYC:

The 18th-century boat unearthed last week at the World Trade Center site is about to make its first journey in more than 200 years.Starting on Monday, archaeologists will dismantle the ship’s crumbling wooden beams and move them to storage to study them further, said Steve Coleman, spokesman for the Port Authority.

via 18th-Century Boat to Leave World Trade Center in Pieces Monday – DNAinfo.com.

favorites:  I am a redbox fan.

The DVD rental service Redbox has already helped put Blockbuster on deathwatch notice, and now the company has its sights on the Netflix-dominated segment of the home entertainment market. Though a concrete plan is not worked out, Redbox is looking to the web and figuring out the best online distribution model with which to compete with Netflix and others. According to a report from Bloomberg, it’s not even definite the company will make the digital leap, though they would be stupid not to.

via Redbox Heads Online, Challenges Netflix to a Brawl – Cinematical.

random:

Instead of bridesmaids and groomsmen, there will be “head counselors” when Serena Orgel, 35, and Josh Young, 36, get married this September at Lake Bryn Mawr Camp in Honesdale, Pa. During the weekend festivities, guests will sing songs in a talent show and roast marshmallows at a bonfire. The newlyweds plan to paddle away in a canoe with a “Just Married” sign. Guest attire? “Camp chic,” says the bride-to-be.

via Sleep-Away Camp Weddings – WSJ.com.

Kagan nomination:  done deal

Yesterday the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to endorse Elena Kagan’s nomination to the Supreme Court. The final tally was thirteen “aye”s to six “nay”s, with Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) joining the committee’s twelve Democrats to vote in Kagan’s favor. Today’s editions of USA Today, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and the Washington Post all have coverage of this step toward confirmation, as do NPR, Slate, CNN, and Politico. C-SPAN has video coverage of the nearly three-hour committee meeting.

via SCOTUSblog.

Davidson:  Congrats, Annual Fund!

THANK YOU, Davidson alumni, for a remarkable year in supporting the college and the Annual Fund. Together we raised record-breaking dollars, received a record-breaking number of gifts, and… wait for it… we’ve made Davidson NUMBER ONE in the country in Annual Fund participation (this year, 61%).

via Notes From the Alumni Director: Number One. Yes, Number One..

random, Great Recession:

While many communities are fearfully contemplating extensive cuts, Maywood says it is the first city in the nation in the current downturn to take an ax to everyone.

The school crossing guards were let go. Parking enforcement was contracted out, City Hall workers dismissed, street maintenance workers made redundant. The public safety duties of the Police Department were handed over to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

At first, people in this poor, long-troubled and heavily Hispanic city southeast of Los Angeles braced for anarchy.

Senior citizens were afraid they would be assaulted as they walked down the street. Parents worried the parks would be shut and their children would have nowhere to safely play. Landlords said their tenants had begun suggesting that without city-run services they would no longer feel obliged to pay rent.

The apocalypse never arrived. In fact, it seems this city was so bad at being a city that outsourcing — so far, at least — is being viewed as an act of municipal genius.

“We don’t want to be the model for other cities to lay off their employees,” said Magdalena Prado, a spokeswoman for the city who works on contract. “But our residents have been somewhat pleased.”

That includes Mayor Ana Rosa Rizo, who was gratified to see her husband get a parking ticket on July 1, hours after the Police Department had been disbanded. The ticket was issued by enforcement clerks for the neighboring city of Bell, which is being paid about $50,000 a month by Maywood to perform various services.

via A City Outsources Everything. Sky Does Not Fall – NYTimes.com.

The President, race issues:

The election of Barack Obama, America’s first black president, was supposed to be a sign of our national maturity, a chance to transform the charged, stilted “national conversation” about race into a smarter and more authentic dialogue, led by a president who was also one of the nation’s subtlest thinkers and writers on the topic.

Instead, the conversation just got dumber.

The America of 2010 is dominated by racial images out of farce and parody, caricatures not seen since the glory days of Shaft. Fox News often stars a leather-clad New Black Panther, while MSNBC scours the tea party movement for racist elements, which one could probably find in any mass organization in America. Obama’s own, sole foray into the issue of race involved calling a police officer “stupid,” and regretting his own words. Conservative leaders and the NAACP, the venerable civil-rights group, recently engaged in a round of bitter name-calling that left both groups wounded and crying foul. Political correctness continues to reign in parts of the left, and now has a match in the belligerent grievance of conservatives demanding that hair-trigger allegations of racism be proven.

“This is the way race plays out all too often these days — as soon as the accusation of racism is made, good will, the benefit of the doubt, presumption of innocence all go out the window. It’s seen as a virtue to jump to the least charitable conclusion when the issue is race — those who reserve judgment are accused of naivete or complicity,” he said.

Though Obama’s candidacy was widely hailed as a new day for race in America, there were always dissenters, and the Sherrod episode seems to suggest the skeptics had a point. On the right, writer Ramesh Ponnuru warned against freighting Obama with too much racial baggage: “What if Obama becomes our first black president, and he comes to be seen as a failure in office?” he asked, calling the notion that voting for Obama would improve race relations “a risky gamble.”

….

Others believe that Obama’s election, with its implication that America was over its race problem, has paradoxically brought out the bigots.

“People who in the past would have been reluctant to express their feelings [now] feel free to do so,” said David Bositis, a senior research associate at the liberal Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington.

Others say that the current uproar is simply a symptom of the country’s enduring racial obsession – something only the naïve could have expected Obama to banish.

The recent public flaps “tell us that all the talk about post-racialness aside, the race question is still a burning question in American life. People will use it in all sorts of different ways. But it doesn’t surprise me,” said Harvard Law School Professor Randall Kennedy, author of “Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word.”

Blair Kelley, a professor of history at North Carolina State University, put a similar observation more bluntly on Twitter Tuesday in response to this reporter’s inquiry.

“The ‘national conversation on race’ has always been this stupid,” she wrote. “Just much less frequent.”

via So much for that ‘conversation’ on race – Ben Smith – POLITICO.com.




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