Posts Tagged ‘Eric Carle

25
Jan
11

1.25.2011 … Isaiah Study … then lunch with a special friend … focusing on Yahweh Shalom …

followup, ChristCare, faith/spirituality:  Great discussion of I Am The Good Shepherd by Stan Kellner – http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/karen_trust/IAM/Shepherd.html … I definitely am in a period of focusing on God as

Jehovah My Peace—Yahweh Shalom. Jesus’ shalom during this process is enabling me to find quiet meadows and waters of rest, especially as my anxious spirit wells up inside me. He speaks words of comfort and hope into my turmoil:

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.

—Mt. 11:28-30

via Discipleship Journal Archives :: I Am The Good Shepherd.

Jekyll Island GA, travel, GA, Childhood, history:  Saw this today on Facebook and just remember being fascinated by this plastic box that contained an old-fashioned phone where “THE first transcontinental phone call” was made … whatever that was!


This first call was made during the 1915 opening ceremony which consisted of a four-way call between Jekyll Island, Washington D.C., New York City, and San Francisco.

via FIRST Transcontinental Telephone Call – Jekyll Island, Georgia – First of its Kind on Waymarking.com.

Atlanta History Center

On this day in 1915, the first public transcontinental telephone call was placed from Jekyll Island, GA by AT&T president Theodore Vail.

via Facebook.

Supreme Court, Justice Clarence Thomas: I always thought ignorantia juris non excusat (Latin for “ignorance of the law does not excuse” ) … Thomas Says He Erred on Disclosure Forms – NYTimes.com.

culture, Disney Princesses: I think I took the approach that the Barbie/Disney Princess/ pink phase was just that a phase that most girls went through … and would pass.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self- appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

via Book Review – Cinderella Ate My Daughter – By Peggy Orenstein – NYTimes.com.

new blog: Just discovered this weekly NYT blog on Civil War history … very good.

The story of the Civil War will be told in this series as a weekly roundup and analysis, by Jamie Malanowski, of events making news during the corresponding week 150 years ago. Written as if in real time, this dispatch will, after this week, appear every Monday. Additional essays and observations by other contributors, along with maps, images, diaries and so forth, will be published several times a week. For another perspective on the war, see this op-ed by Tony Horwitz. — The Editors

via DISUNION – Opinionator Blog – NYTimes.com.

GA history:  … and this week’s Disunion blog is on Georgia’s decision to secede.  Showdown in Georgia – NYTimes.com.

quotes, Margaret Mitchell:

“In a weak moment, I have written a book.” − Margaret Mitchell.

via http://www.atlantahistorycenter.com/pr_view.asp?id=47

Billy Graham, evangelism, Charlotte:  Good article on Billy Graham … he regrets close connections to politics.

“[S]uccess is always dangerous, and we need to be alert and avoid becoming the victims of our own success. Will we influence the world for Christ, or will the world influence us?”

via Billy Graham’s Regret: ‘I Would Have Steered Clear of Politics’.

Supreme Court, LOL, culture: This story analyses Sup. Ct. transcripts to determine which justice has the best sense of humor by the number of “(Laughter.)” responses recorded …

On the other hand, there was surely an intended sting in the best line of the term so far, from the generally dour Justice Alito. In an argument over a law barring the sale of violent video games to minors, Justice Scalia asked what the drafters of the First Amendment thought about government restrictions on depictions of violence.

“I think what Justice Scalia wants to know,” Justice Alito said, “is what James Madison thought about video games.”

“(Laughter.)”

via Study Analyzes Laughs at Supreme Court – NYTimes.com.

Children’s/YA literature, Eric Carle, art history:  I am a big fan of Eric Carle since my son Edward slept with his Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? for the almost two years.  So this book sounds very interesting.

In October, children’s author Eric Carle will publish The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, a book inspired by the work of “banned Expressionist painters” the author first encountered as a student in World War II-era Germany.Although he has written over 70 books, Carle pictured, via is best known for two classic titles: The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Scheduled for publication in October 2011, Penguin Young Readers Group’s Philomel imprint has planned a first printing of 300,000 copies.Here’s more from the release: “[The book] is  inspired by the work of the great Expressionist painter Franz Marc, a founder of the artists’ group known as Der Blaue Reiter The Blue Rider, who famously used abstract blue horses in his paintings. Eric Carle’s new book tells the story of an artist who paints the world as he sees it—a red crocodile, an orange elephant, a purple fox, a black polar bear. His brilliant new work will captivate and educate readers with its colorful and magical story of Expressionist art and the imaginative leaps of a painter.”

via Eric Carle to Publish Children’s Book Inspired by Formerly Banned Expressionist Art – GalleyCat.

If I had a billion dollars: Enough said, I would buy this old house.

This home on King Street in the historic district was built by ODonnell over the period of 1852-1870. He was building the house for his bride but he took so long finishing the job that his fiancé married another. The home was once lived in by the women who inspired the character of Melanie in Margaret Mitchells Gone with the Wind. The home has an 18th century Venetian palazzo exterior with a cross-ventilated New York brownstone interior and wide Charleston-style porches. The home has been beautifully restored. Details to swoon for include random width heart pine floors, heavy moldings and ceiling medallions, 11 fireplaces with faux marble mantles, French doors and an antique elevator.

via Historic Patrick ODonnell House Gets Big Price Cut.




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