Posts Tagged ‘etiquette

10
Jul
13

7.10.13 … So, Rory’s marrying Darcy :) … On ice in NYC … Bartoli’s great comeback: “I am not a blonde, yes … but have I dreamed about winning Wimbledon?” … “To Marilyn from the Man in the Moon” … and to think I used to HATE garden tomatoes … Mark Twain’s Advice to Little Girls …

Vincent Kartheiser,  Alexis Bledel (aka Rory from “Gilmore Girls):

Cheryl Klein

Mental Disjunctions of the Day: Pete from “Mad Men” is playing Mr. Darcy at the Guthrie. (As Vincent Kartheiser says, “Both have very upper-class upbringing.There’s a certain formality and stiffness that I believe will be carried over.”) Minnesota friends, if you go, I’d love to hear what it’s like! (Bonus Fact: He is now engaged to Alexis Bledel, aka Rory from “Gilmore Girls.”) http://www.vita.mn/arts/214046491.html?page=all

Minneapolis boy Vincent Kartheiser swings from playing neurotic Pete Campbell on “Mad Men” to romantic Mr. Darcy in “Pride and Prejudice” at the Guthrie.

via Vincent Kartheiser comes home to Guthrie | Vita.mn.

NYC, ice bar, minus 5 ice bar:

After days of sweltering heat, New Yorkers are ready for a cooling off period. The opening of New York Citys first ice bar is providing just that. July 9

via Ice Bar Opens As New York City Swelters – YouTube.

Twitter, sexism, Bartoli, great combacks: 

Twitter / EverydaySexism: Best. Response. Ever. #Bartoli ….

The Real Housewives of NASA Astronauts, America’s first reality TV stars,  NYTimes.com: So was Genie a “cape cookie”?

In your book, you describe the wives of the astronauts as “America’s first reality TV stars.” What do you mean by that?

Their saga, with its countless launch parties, and endless bottles of Champagne, at times seemed less like “The Right Stuff” and more like “The Valley of the Dolls” — or “The Real Housewives of NASA.” After their husbands became astronauts, Life magazine bought the rights to the couples’ “personal stories” for half a million dollars in 1959, so the astronaut families were all thrust into the spotlight. They were constantly exposed to the public, with reporters embedded in their suburban homes in the wonderfully named Houston “space burbs,” near NASA. The wives’ mantra throughout the space race was “Happy, proud and thrilled.” It was their “keep calm and carry on” motto, 1960s style, a way of coping with having their lives turned inside out. The press camped out on their lawns during the missions. They had tea with Jackie [Kennedy] and attended high-society galas. They had to smile perfectly after a Life magazine makeover, balancing their extravagantly lacquered rocket-style hairdos. (If you’ve seen the Slim Aarons photos of the young moms and matrons of Palm Beach, they actually look very astro-wifey.) They banded together to cope with the unique pressures of being married to spacemen — including dealing with absentee husbands constantly tempted by “Cape Cookies,” as the astronaut groupies were known.

Back then, when Jim was on the flight, he sent Marilyn — waiting back on earth — a special gift, a mink jacket from Neiman Marcus that arrived via a chauffeured Rolls-Royce and came with the most romantic card in the universe: “To Marilyn from the Man in the Moon.”

via Fashion Flashback | The Real Housewives of NASA Astronauts – NYTimes.com.

etiquette, deliberate polish: entering a row of seats:  Excuse me …

148_Deliberate Polish

DELIBERATE POLISH: ENTERING A ROW OF SEATS

we answer the eternal conundrum of which way to face, in our latest column on minding your (modern) manners

via deliberate polish: entering a row of seats.

Marinated Cucumbers Onions and Tomatoes, summer, recipes:  Just looks good … and to think I used to HATE garden tomatoes.

Marinated Cucumbers, Onions, and Tomatoes

So yummy and healthy!!

3 medium cucumbers, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 medium onion, sliced and separated into rings

3 medium tomatoes, cut into wedges

1/2 cup vinegar

1/4 cup sugar

1 cup water

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper

1/4 cup oil

Combine ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.

Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving

To SAVE these Recipe for use later, be sure to click this photo and SHARE so it will store on your personal page.

 

Advice to Little Girls,Mark Twain, 1865 Childrens Book, Brain Pickings:

 

I’m enormously delighted to announce that Advice to Little Girls public library is officially out this week — a true labor of love nearly two years in the making. You might recall a sneak peek from my TED Bookstore selections earlier this year. Grab a copy, enjoy, and share!

via Advice to Little Girls: Young Mark Twains Little-Known, Lovely 1865 Childrens Book | Brain Pickings.

http://www.amazon.com/Advice-Little-Girls-Mark-Twain/dp/1592701299/?tag=braipick-20

24
Jun
11

‎6.24.2011 … Labyrinth walk #4 at Kanuga … very nice … happy camper, I mean junior counselor, is home … hail here now …

labyrinth walk,  Kanuga Conference Center:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The labyrinth is a walking meditation, a tool that enables us, in the midst of the business of life, to be still, to focus our thoughts and feelings. Labyrinths can be found in cathedrals all over Europe and have been used by Christians for hundreds of years as a means of meditation and experience of the Divine Presence. The Kanuga Labyrinth is an exact replica of the one set in the floor of Chartres Cathedral.

To enter a labyrinth is like entering a cathedral. You sense the presence of The Holy.

It should be noted that there is a difference between a maze and a labyrinth. A maze has many entrances and many exits. It is a puzzle to be solved. The labyrinth has only one path that takes you to the center and back. It is a spiritual path.

There are now over 1,000 labyrinths across the United States, mainly in churches, but also prisons, hospitals, parks and retreat centers.

via Kanuga, Chapels: The Labyrinth.

JK Rowling, Pottermore, digital media:  Fascinating … she held back the digital rights to her books 13 years ago …

Ms. Rowling has made a bold move in going direct to consumers to sell her e-books, instead of relying on online retailers like Amazon.com Inc. and Apple Inc.’s iBookstore. Whereas publishers for other authors often own both the print and digital rights for books, Ms. Rowling owns the rights to the digital versions of the Harry Potter books herself. The digital rights aren’t held by her U.K. publisher Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, or by Scholastic Inc., which owns the U.S. print rights.

Now, Pottermore is Ms. Rowling’s next step toward keeping the franchise alive and vital beyond the book series.

Users can travel through the first book in the series—”Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”—and Ms. Rowling will then gradually reveal the online ecosystem tied to the subsequent six books over the course of a few years. Digital editions for all seven books, however, will be available in October.

via Rowling Conjures Up Potter E-Books – WSJ.com.

music, kith/kin:  From e …

new york city 1982, 1983…listened to wanna be startin’ somethin’ on walkman while taking subway to smith barney office on wall street…chapel hill June 2011…listening to same song on mp3 player while taking bus to unc hospitals…

social networking, gender differences:  Intriguing article … I don’t get LinkedIn!  Women Still Don’t ‘Get’ LinkedIn, Says LinkedIn – Technology – The Atlantic Wire.

Gone with the Wind, literature:  “narrative vigor”  … I enjoyed this video essay on the literary merits of GWTW.  I personally sdon’t think it is “great” literature … but it is a great story.  Maybe that is what F. Scott Fitzgerald  meant by “narrative vigor.”

Margaret Mitchell won the Pulitzer Prize in the spring of 1937, to the dismay of some critics and the delight of others. William Faulkner had expected to receive the award for his novel Absalom Absalom and F. Scott Fitzgerald, who never received the prize, would soon be working on the screenplay of Mitchell’s novel. On a warm night in May, Mitchell received news of the prize by phone, along with multiple requests for interviews. Hating publicity, she fled to a gospel concert at a small black church in Atlanta with her husband John Marsh, her publisher Harold Latham and her black housekeeper Bessie Jordan. The press scoured the city but never found her. It was a glorious night for Margaret Mitchell.

via PBS Arts : Pulitzer Prize Night.

Braves, baseball, Gone with the Wind, literature, Atlanta:  Hoopla!  I like corny things to get the fans to the ballpark … but this one seems wacky to me!!

If you’re going to the Atlanta Braves game on July 2, bring your glove and your hoop skirt.

The Braves, the Atlanta History Center and the Margaret Mitchell House are teaming up for “Gone with the Wind Night” to celebrate the novel’s 75th anniversary. Fans who show their July 2 Braves ticket stub at the Atlanta History Center or Margaret Mitchell House afterward will receive $5 off admission to either venue.

Fans who come to the game dressed as their favorite GWTW character on July 2 get $10 off Upper Box (regularly $18) or Outfield Pavilion (regularly $28) tickets. A Scarlett O’Hara impersonator will greet fans beginning at 4:30 p.m. and host GWTW trivia.

via “Gone With the Wind” night at Turner Field | The Buzz.

quotes, Bertrand Russell:

“Man needs, for his happiness, not only the enjoyment of this or that, but hope and enterprise and change.”
 Bertrand Russell

social networking, FBI, followup:  Just the other day, 6/21,  I posted about how the FBI was using social networking and lo and behold it worked!

On Monday, the FBI had announced a new television campaign aimed specifically at women, in the hopes of tracking down Greig.

Bulger is wanted in connection with 19 murders, while Greig is accused of harboring a fugitive; the two have been on the run together since 1995, according to the Associated Press. The FBI was offering $2 million for information leading to Bulger’s arrest.

via ‘Whitey’ Bulger Arrested: ‘Departed’ Mob Inspiration Nabbed in California – ABC News.

neuroscience, common chorus, music:  This is really fascinating.

Bobby McFerrin demonstrates the power of the pentatonic scale, using audience participation, at the event “Notes & Neurons: In Search of the Common Chorus”, from the 2009 World Science Festival, June 12, 2009.

via YouTube – World Science Festival 2009: Bobby McFerrin Demonstrates the Power of the Pentatonic Scale.

tweet of the day, Wimbledon, culture, etiquette:  I hate to say it but I think the grunting is annoying.

Opinion on grunting players at #Wimbledon RT @alexabahou: Great pkg, haha! Grunting is part of the game! @johnsberman

3 minutes ago via HootSuite

via Good Morning America (GMA) on Twitter.

houses, US, real estate, trends, followup: Like I said, my children’s favorite house is our smallest.

David Brooks wrote about this trend in American real estate a decade ago, in an article called “Castle in a Box.” Brooks visited a new development of five-million-dollar tract mansions in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, where the front doors could be set for fingerprint or iris recognition, and motion sensors activated room lights.

In the past five years, McMansions along these lines have been cropping up all across suburban America. The houses tend to be similar: the two-story “lawyer foyers” when you walk in; the four-car “garage mahals” jutting out front; the altar-like spas in the master baths, with those whirlpool tubs that look so suggestively sexy before you move in but seldom get used afterwards.

via Back Issues: Big Houses: Lawyer Foyers and Garage Mahals : The New Yorker.

social media, privacy: Good question …

Nothing is anonymous or invisible. Will the recent cases make people more careful about how they behave? Will they keep their tempers in check at the post office, or stop telling strangers how to raise their children? How does this growing “publicness” affect civility, privacy rights and free expression?

via You’re Mad! You’re on YouTube! – Room for Debate – NYTimes.com.

Apple, piracy:  I would never think to film a movie with my phone … I would not make a good pirate.  So it is fine with me if Apple disables my ability to violate the law.

Apple’s recent patent for an invisible infrared sensor that would block piracy at concerts and movies has net neutrality enthusiasts rattled, but some patent bloggers enthused about the possibilities.

The SavetheInternet.com coalition, a group of some two million people devoted to a free and open Internet, want to send Steve Jobs an online petition, “Dear Apple, Don’t Shut Down My Phone Camera,” to ask that he reconsider the patent. The patent, which would enable a device’s camera to shut down during a movie or concert, applies to iPhones, the iPod Touch and iPad 2.

via Dear Apple, don’t shut down my phone camera – BlogPost – The Washington Post.

education, philanthropy, kudos:  Kudos, PoP!  And I hope you are successful in your worthy endeavor.

Pencils of Promise (PoP) is a non-profit organization that endeavors to bring the possibility of education to communities of underprivileged children. Braun and PoP believe that education is a basic human right, and that by building educational structures, it will bring self-sustainability and ownership to the areas.

It is with this philosophy that Braun partnered with Bieber to create the “Schools 4 All” initiative. PoP is an interactive organization that allows participation, not just donation.

That’s where Bieber comes in. Whoever can raise the most money with their fundraising page gets a special visit by the pop star himself at the school of the winner’s choice. Creating a page is easy: All you need to do is visit schools4all.org and get started.

via Justin Bieber and Pencils of Promise partner to make education dreams come true – What’s Trending – CBS News.

Phantom of the Fox, Fox Theater, Atlanta, news, random:  Didn’t know there was an apartment in the Fox?  What a cool place to live.

It’s official: Joe Patten — the longtime Fox Theatre resident affectionately known as “The Phantom of the Fox” — can remain in the apartment he’s maintained in the historic Midtown venue for more than 31 years.

The Fox announced today that a settlement has been reached in the dispute between Atlanta Landmarks, its owner and operator, and Patten, who helped save the theatre from the wrecking ball in the 1970s.

Patten, who’d renovated the apartment with $50,000 of his own cash since moving in in 1979, claimed the theatre’s board committed housing discrimination when it terminated his lifetime lease and asked him to sign an occupancy agreement — complete with several stipulations — after he experienced a stroke.

via ‘Phantom of the Fox’ won’t have to leave Midtown theatre | Atlanta News & Opinion Blog | Fresh Loaf | Creative Loafing Atlanta.

quotes, Frank Lloyd Wright:

“Where I am, there my office is: my office me.” — Frank Lloyd Wright

travel, Europe:  I think we bought at the top!

Did you put off booking a trip to Europe this summer after plane ticket prices skyrocketed?

Here’s your chance to be a little impulsive. A quick scan of Bing Travel this afternoon indicated that ticket prices to Europe this summer are dropping quickly. (I used July 14-July 21 as travel dates.)

A one-stop flight (with less than an hour-and-a-half layover) from Atlanta to London from US Airways is priced at $1087, one of the lowest prices since the beginning of this year (the highest was $1493). Fights to Paris on multiple airlines were priced at $1223 (they peaked at $1775 in March), with prices expected to drop as well. Amsterdam is down to $1312, Frankfurt at $1297 and Prague at $1237.

via Summer airfare to Europe quickly dropping | Atlanta Bargain Hunter.

2012 Presidential Election, politics, polling, statistics:  Very interesting …

In a new Gallup poll, 22 percent of Americans say they would not vote for a “generally well-qualified person for president who happened to be Mormon.”

That’s the same number since Gallup began asking the question back in 1967, when George Romney, father of Mitt, was running for president. However, as Gallup notes, 25 percent of Americans in 1959 said they wouldn’t vote for a Catholic, and one year later John Kennedy was elected president.

A few other tidbits:

– Democrats (27 percent) were more likely than Republicans (18 percent) to reject a Mormon candidate.

– Two-thirds of Americans said they would support a well-qualified presidential candidate who happened to be gay, compared to only 26 percent in 1978.

– Fewer than half — 49 percent — would support an otherwise well-qualified candidate who happened to be atheist. But that too has changed. In 1958, the first year it was asked, just 18 percent would have supported an atheist.

You hear a lot of people talk about how much America has changed, and they seldom imply it’s for the better. But in many ways the changes of the last 50 years have made this a much better, stronger and united nation.

via Most voters would back Mormon or gay, but not an atheist | Jay Bookman.

cities, bookshelf: I am reading a book on urban living now … and here is a discussion of several more that I could add to my bookshelf.  I”ll wait …

The key factor in determining whether a city is successful is how significant a cohort of the Creative Class it attracts. “It would be a mistake for cities to think they can survive solely as magnets for the young and hip,” the Harvard economist Edward Glaeser writes in his new book, “Triumph of the City” (Penguin Press; $29.95), by way of dismissing Richard Florida. For Glaeser, the key factor that makes cities successful is not the presence of the Creative Class but “proximity,” the way they bring people into contact, enabling them to interact in rich, unexpected, productive ways. Though Edward Glaeser considers Richard Florida’s celebration of cities sentimental and unrigorous compared with his own celebration of cities, the same trump card of hard-hearted rigor could be played against Glaeser. An odd, fascinating new book called “Aerotropolis” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $30) predicts that, in the future, cities will reorient themselves around enormous airports.

via The City-Suburb Culture Wars and Globalization : The New Yorker.

twitter, lists: People should think before they tweet … Outrageous Tweets: A Short History – Photo Gallery – LIFE.

Jane Austen, zombie, genre, LOL:  There are people, including boys, reading Jane to better understand the Zombie takeoffs … LOL

Whoa! Pride and Prejudice? Darcy’s dip in the lake certainly was not written by Jane. Even Geek Mom knew that. So she went to the source to find out why pimply pre-pubescent boys would read a spinster’s 200 year-old-novel:

“If you’re wondering about that last one … well, as Nick, another of the boys in the group, explained, “It’s good to read to get the cultural references.” I suspect the allusions Nick was trying to understand involved the Undead, but hey, I’m not going to argue with anything that could get my kids to voluntarily pick up Jane Austen.”

They’re reading the original in order to understand Pride and Prejudice and Zombies??!!!! Ack! Guess that’s is better than endlessly playing World of Warcraft or hanging around the mall.

via Jane Austen Today: Will Banned Books Get Boys Interested in Jane Austen?.

food, places: Food is key to a sense of place … What do you crave from home?

Atlanta (me):  Henri’s PoBoys, Varsity onion rings, Greenwood peppermint ice cream with fudge sauce … they served it  the funeral reception of my kith uncle … a true Atlantan!

Cincinnati, OH – Graeter’s Mocha Chip Ice Cream ( Graeter’s peach is also divine.)

Southeast: CHCK-FIL-A!!!!! and “Hot Now” KrispyKreme doughnuts …

NJ – Philadelphia area – hoagies and cheese steak sandwiches

I’ve only been to the Bojangles’ in Union Station once since it opened, but I have to say, knowing it’s here, in the District, with a Cajun chicken biscuit and fries anytime I need, is soothing. It’s one of the things I think of when I think of home, in North Carolina. (And yes, I know they’re in Prince George’s, too, and yes, I have driven well out of my way to get to one. But I don’t have a car, so my options are limited.)

(Richard A. Lipski – WASHINGTON POST) It seems most people’s memories of their home towns are closely entwined with food, as we learn in Monica Hesse’s story of Manhattan transplants. They talk about missing cheap food, good Chinese takeout and bagels. (But they’re happy about the Shake Shack.)

A quick survey of my co-workers had everyone thinking about what they’d like to import

Anna’s Taqueria. (Eric Athas – The Washington Post) to Washington: Anna’s Taqueria for the Bostonians. Jack in the Box for the Californian. Bertman Ballpark Mustard for the Clevelander. A cherry limeade from Sonic for the guy who went to school in Kansas. Zapps’ potato chips for the New Orleanian. (At least now that she can get sno-balls here.)

No matter how much you like Washington, there’s still probably something you sometimes want to import. What would it be? Your answer doesn’t have to be food-related, though that’s the way our conversation went. What are you missing from your home town (or another city you called home for a while)? Tell us in the comments below or by using #DCWishList on Twitter.

via What you want imported to Washington (#dcwishlist) – The Buzz – The Washington Post.

music, generation gap, rant:  I found this amusing … no one wants to feel culturally insignificant!

… but is it . not distressing that parenthood and age, in combination, signify cultural insignificance?

via Immutable/Inscrutable., The New Yorker to One-Third of All Music Listeners in America: You Don’t Matter.

18
Mar
11

3.18.2011 … peace before the storm of spring break … not the right attitude … I am really looking forward to CH, Naples and Chicago …

iPhone, superlatives, JD Powers:

Apple continued a winning streak on Thursday after a new JD Power study of cellphone owners gave it the lead. For the fifth consecutive time, the iPhone had the highest satisfaction of any phone with a 795-point score. While down slightly from the summer, Android manufactuers’ scores were down significantly more; Motorola and HTC fell from 791 and 781 points each to 763 and 762, barely above the 761-point average.

Those below average were more consistent but included the same audience as before. Palm (now HP) moved up slightly, but the Android-based Galaxy S did nothing to salvage Samsung’s reputation at 734. Nokia improved to 734, but the BlackBerry sank further and was the lowest of the top seven, reaching 732.

via iPhone tops JD Power ranks, widens lead over Android | Electronista.

autos, superlatives, JD Powers:  A Lincoln???

The No. 1 brand in this year’s J.D. Power vehicle dependability study was Ford’sF_ Lincoln, which led for the first time in the history of the closely-watched study.More on F Ford, GM, Cabot: Analysts’ New Ratings 10 Stocks to Watch: Celera, Quest, Nike Ford Honors Global Suppliers For Strong Performance In 2010Market Activity Ford Motor Co| F UP General Motors Co| GM UP Toyota Motor Corporation| TM DOWNAmong the 50 vehicles, both cars and others, that the firm rated, ToyotaTM_ received the most awards with seven. Ford was second with four. The Lincoln nameplate, counted separately, had two awards, while Lexus and Scion had two each.

via 10 Most Dependable Cars On the Road – TheStreet.

Japan Earthquake/Tsunami, twitter:  One week ago …

WSJ Wall Street Journal

Japan’s devastating earthquake struck one week ago today at 2:46 p.m. JST (via @JapanRealTime) http://on.wsj.com/fUm4yU

via (6) Twitter / Home.

travel, etiquette:  I think the middle seat gets both! 🙂

Travel in coach these days and expect to be infringed upon somehow. Stress, fatigue, thin air and the yearning to stretch out bring out the worst manners in many. Travelers do things they’d never do at home or in the office. Among strangers, they elbow each other over arm rests or splay legs to grab as much real estate as possible.

Frustrated and fatigued parents watch with resignation as their children kick seats or pound tray tables. Game-players and music listeners leave the volume up, never thinking that those around them must listen to their beat as well.

To some, the decline in civility aboard passenger jets coincides with a decline in airline service and comfort and an increase in airline rules and fees. By pushing seats closer together, filling middle seats far more frequently and replacing amenities with fees, airlines have helped bring out the worst in their customers.

via So Who Gets the Armrest? – WSJ.com.

Davidson College, John Kuykendall: Nice interview … wonderful leader.

19 First thought when approached about being interim president? As Angelo Roncalli said when he became Pope John XIII—“This was one of God’s little surprises!

via Ten Things to Know About Davidson’s Interim President | davidsonjournal.

20
Jan
11

1.20.2011 global connections at Davidson … sometimes it is fun to be back in school …

Davidson, globalization:  Attended a gathering at Davidson with John on Global Connections and so enjoyed being in the educational environment.  We heard from Chris Alexander on Tunisia, Shelly Ridder on China, a student panel of 4 current students (2 international students currently at Davidson and 2 US students who recently returned from India and Syria, respectively) and skyped with a student in the Dominican Republic and another in Egypt.  Fascinating.

Williams’ commitment to the best possible study-abroad experience for every student is front and center, especially now: this year’s campus theme is “Global Connections.”

via Global Connections | davidsonjournal.

… Here is a list of the topics I encountered at this gathering:

  1. Tunisia and it’s recent turmoil. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunisia
  2. McWorld
    The two axial principles of our age — tribalism and globalism — clash at every point except one: they may both be threatening to democracy by Benjamin R. Barber
    http://www.globalissues.org/print/article/374
  3. clash of civilizations … http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/48950/samuel-p-huntington/the-clash-of-civilizations
  4. Devolution of rights
  5. Wars of necessity v. Wars of choice
  6. Minutization, transnational travel, communication
  7. Warmaking values: great moral good v great moral evil (language of religion) or non religious. We use language of religion.
  8. Privatized predatory corruption.
  9. Power Transition theory … http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_transition_theory
  10. Rising Power Theory … http://mearsheimer.uchicago.edu/pdfs/A0034.pdf
  11. MIddle Kingdom Syndrome …

Some even say that the restoration of an international order where the Middle Kingdom gains supremacy in the region and beyond is on the agenda of the Chinese leadership.

An October article in the online edition of the U.S.-based ‘Foreign Policy’ magazine claimed that Beijing has abandoned its philosophy of a “peaceful rise”. It argues that China is harking back to a Sino-centric view of the world where it sits atop the political hierarchy and other sovereign states are seen as lesser entities in deference to the Middle Kingdom.

Disquiet about the revival of a Sino-centric mentality among the Chinese ruling elite has surfaced even in hardcore nationalistic media outlets like China’s ‘Global Times’ newspaper.

“China’s success is the result of reform and opening up but success has not brought a more open mind. On the contrary, it has caused the return of a self-centred ideology,” said a signed opinion piece on Oct. 11. “The cultures around China have, historically, worried about being engulfed by other powerful civilisations. Now they feel uncomfortable with …China’s over- emphasis on its own civilisation,” it said.

via Growing China Worries Neighbours – IPS ipsnews.net.

… and John and I kept looking around the room wondering if maybe the next college president was sitting with us.  🙂

Apps: While at Davidson I took notes on my iPad.  I think I will get this App and try it next time I am in that environment.

PaperDesk for iPad ($1.99)

If you want a fully featured do-everything inking app, PaperDesk for iPad is the one for you. It has all of the basic features you’d expect to find in an inking app, such as five different paper types, plus a rainbow of ink color choices and full control over brightness, opacity, and pen size. But there’s a lot more to PaperDesk than that: it allows you to combine text, sketches, and audio recordings on the same page. That means that you can record your class lectures and take notes at the same time!

This app also solves the problem I mentioned with Penultimate, because it slightly shrinks the drawing area and minimizes the toolbar when in landscape mode. It isn’t a perfect solution, but it greatly reduces the amount of scrolling necessary while still offering a large drawing surface.

You can sync your notes with myPaperDesk.com, ensuring that all of your notes will always be accessible. Notes can also be shared via email. At just $1.99 for the full version in the App Store, this is a must-buy app for anyone who takes notes by hand. If you’re still not sure, a free lite version is available, which limits you to three notebooks.

via Best Student Organizer and Notetaking Apps for the iPad.

college, application process, UNC-CH:  Using the Common App increases applications 15-20 percent!

More than 400 universities currently use the Common Application in an effort to simplify the college admissions process.

“It allows the student to fill out an application one time and then to choose the colleges among those members of the group to submit the application to,” said Barbara Polk, deputy director of undergraduate admissions.

UNC would expect an increase of 15 to 20 percent in total applicants if the Common Application were enacted, Polk said, adding that peer institutions such as the University of Virginia and University of Michigan-Ann Arbor experienced similar increases when they adopted the application.

Triangle-area schools such as Duke University and Meredith College in Raleigh have already adopted the Common Application.

“Most of the top-tier colleges in the country use the Common Application, and we’re one of the few that don’t,” Polk said. “That isn’t necessarily good for the positioning of the University.”

via The Daily Tar Heel :: UNC may switch to the Common Application.

education, Davidson:  Interesting history of courses at Davidson.

In the spring of 1911, the college issued a new college catalog – one that contained a small but significant shift. The course listings for 1909-1901o catalog included a heading for Mental and Moral Philosophy.  The new catalog listed Philosophy and Psychology.

The name change signals a shift in ideas about classical education and the acceptance of new academic fields. Davidson College had offered a course in Mental Philosophy since its beginnings, usually offered only to seniors and as part of a collection of “philosophies”–moral, natural, mechanical, and mental -using readings from classical authors to explain the wonders of the natural world and humankind.  Three years earlier, the February 1908 catalog carried the first listing for a class in Biology.  Seven years earlier than that (taking us back to 1901), the college had its first president with a Ph.D.

via From Mental Philosophy to Psychology — Around the D.

iPhone:  Edward has been holding out for a white one.

You probably hear a rumor about the white iPhone 4 once a week, but it seems this time the news might be true. Macrumors has received a screenshot of what supposedly is a Best Buy inventory database showing that the mythical product will be available in stock February 27, just in time for a late Valentine’s Day present. It could be a well thought out prank, but the SKU and model numbers match the ones that Best Buy issued when the white iPhone was available for pre-order last year before Apple delayed the release.

via Best Buy: Nothing To Share or Announce This Time About White iPhone 4 – Techland – TIME.com.

media, technology, changes: It’s definitely changed how and when I read.

Printed media used to allow us to read in the places we found most comfortable.  When you imagine yourself reading the newspaper it’s probably in your favorite chair, at the breakfast table, or at the cafe with an orange mocha frappuccino in your hand.

Unfortunately, as news and media moves online, it moves us away from these places and into our desk chairs.  Even worse, consuming content is no longer on our own schedule.  The flood of content disrupts us all day as if we have an maniacal paperboy throwing new editions on our doorstep every 15 seconds.

However, after studying Read It Later’s own data, it seems that this trend is being reversed.  I’ve found that as devices become more mobile, it’s not only changing where we read, but when.  Today, I’d like to show you some of the data behind this movement.

via Is Mobile Affecting When We Read? « Read It Later Blog.

Apple:  I hate to admit it but I am part of the cult.

The difference, and the reason for the near-hysteria and the mammoth market reaction, is that Apple isn’t just any old stock, it is the quintessential cult stock. One of the reasons that Apple is a cult stock is what we’re seeing today: an unhealthy obsession with its founder and CEO.

Now don’t get me wrong. I share the high regard that everybody seems to have for Steve Jobs, just as I understand why the company’s products seem to engender such fanatical, cult-like loyalty. He is certainly one of the truly outstanding figures of our time, and his products are said to be pretty darn good too.

The cult factor, however, is something that is beyond the control of this or any company. Shareholders need to get a grip. They need to realize that, whether the company says so or not, the CEO of this company may very well be a very sick man. They also need to realize that even if they aren’t cultists themselves, this company has a fanatical following, and that its share price is subject to rapid and severe movement — particularly, as happened today, when the reason is Steve Jobs.

via Apple’s Cult Factor Emerges as Drawback – Newsweek.

etiquette, politics, diplomacy:

But what to do with the Clintons, Bill and Hillary?

Former President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived for the State Dinner.Mandel Ngan/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Former President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived for the State Dinner.

Should the secretary of state, Hillary Rodham Clinton, be listed as the invited guest, with Mr. Clinton as her “plus one”?

Or does that honor automatically go to former presidents, with Mrs. Clinton as the tag-along?

Alas, neither would do. And so the pair are simply listed separately:

The Honorable Hillary R. Clinton, Secretary of State; the Honorable William J. Clinton, former President of the United States.

Ah, diplomacy.

via The Etiquette of Inviting Two Clintons – NYTimes.com.

csr, globalization, business models: Interesting perspective.

COMPANY towns used to be common in the West. The Cadburys and Rowntrees built them in England, as did William Hesketh Lever, founder of what is now Unilever. At one point the United States had more than 3,000 of them. They were particularly popular in the South and West, and in the mining and lumber industries. But they have long since disappeared, destroyed by the motorcar, the cult of corporate focus, and the general maturing of the economy.

As so often, what is dying in the West is surviving or being reborn in the emerging world. New company towns are being constructed from nothing, most notably in China. And old ones are being given a new lease of life. But even with all this new activity Jamshedpur, the corporate headquarters of Tata Steel and home of its biggest steel plant, continues to lead the pack.

The Western doctrine of “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) has also given the founder’s very Victorian vision a new lease of life.

via Company towns: The universal provider | The Economist.

technology, viruses, history:

Has it been 25 years already? Jump in the Wayback Machine and check out this TIME article that details the first ever PC virus.

Brothers Amjad and Basit Alvi of Lahore, Pakistan ran a neighborhood computer shop specializing in PC repair and software sales. After Amjad caught wind that one of the programs he’d written was being pirated, he leaked copies containing “a self-replicating program that would ‘infect’ an unauthorized user’s computer, disrupt his operations and force him to contact Amjad for repairs,” according to the article.

And with that, the first PC virus was born. It was January of 1986.

via Happy Birthday, Jerk: First PC Virus Born 25 Years Ago – Techland – TIME.com.

random, literature, end of an era, RIP: Rest in Peace, Poe Toaster!

 

Culture

The Man Who Leaves Roses on Edgar Allan Poe’s Grave Every Year Has Disappeared

One of the best pieces of arcana of American letters is the man known as the “Poe Toaster.” Every year on January 19 (Edgar Allan Poe’s birthday), the toaster appears in the Baltimore graveyard where the author is buried and leaves a half-empty bottle of cognac and four roses. No one knows his identity or his motives. Last year, for the first time in 60 years, the mysterious man did not show up. Last night, he failed to show up again, leaving many to think that the tradition is now over.

I like to imagine the sons of the Poe Toaster feeling incredible guilt and meeting some sad punishment for not carrying out their father’s legacy, as would befit people tied up in a Poe story. As is, you have to imagine the impostors will continue. Perhaps we can anoint one of them the new Poe Toaster, as this tradition is simply too poignant for us to give up. And, really, the poor soul needs his cognac.

via Poe Toaster a No Show in 2011 – Culture – GOOD.

technology, business:  I tried to buy one …

And on Wednesday LivingSocial is making waves with a deal for another major, national retailer; it is selling $20 Amazon.com gift cards for $10.

But LivingSocial’s Amazon discount has an unusual wrinkle. Unlike with other deals, LivingSocial might be losing money selling the Amazon coupons.

Typically, retailers sell the coupons directly to consumers for the discounted price, and LivingSocial takes a cut, generally 30 percent. But for this deal, LivingSocial bought the gift cards from Amazon and is selling them itself.

LivingSocial declined to say how much it paid Amazon for the gift cards. Amazon also said it would not disclose the terms of the deal.

If LivingSocial paid Amazon $20, then LivingSocial is absorbing the losses. If it paid Amazon less, then Amazon is losing money.

via LivingSocial Gets Attention for Amazon Discount – NYTimes.com.

random, technology: toasters … and the winner is a Kalorik Aqua 2-Slice Toaster … a brand I have never heard of!

Today, even the simplest toasters come with fancy features like digital countdown timers, bagel buttons, “hi-lift” levers to remove hot toast, and defrost functions. But have more than 80 years of innovations accomplished the basic goal of producing golden-brown toast, fast? We gathered seven 2-slot toasters priced from $30 to almost $70 and tested them on bagels, toaster pastries, frozen waffles, and, above all, bread.

Two of the toasters couldn’t even fit a slice of our favorite supermarket white bread, Arnold. We had to bend the bread to make it fit, scorching it on the side where the slice curved too closely to the heat. When we tried turning the slices to their short sides, the last inch stuck out.

via Two-Slot Toasters – Cooks Illustrated.

high school, education, parochial schools, Charlotte:  When parachochial schools are closing down in many parts of the country, Charlotte’s diocese  is adding a new high school.  Definitely refects the changing character of Charlotte.

The new Christ the King Catholic High School, which is scheduled to open this fall at a temporary location in Huntersville, will host a meeting Thursday to update families on progress on the new school.Newly hired project director Daniel Dolan will lead the meeting, which will be at 7 p.m. at St. Therese Catholic Church, on Brawley School Road in Mooresville.The new school will be run by the Catholic Diocese of Charlotte. Mr. Dolan came to the diocese recently after many years of service to the Catholic Schools in the Diocese of Richmond and Arlington, Va.

via New Catholic H.S. hosts meeting Thursday | DavidsonNews.net.

 

06
Jan
11

‎1.6.2011 … Epiphany Greetings!

holidays, Advent, Epiphany:  Always enjoying learning something new …

Advent January 6th is Epiphany, which means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal”. On this day we as the body of Christ are reminded of our mission to seek to as best we can to be used by God to “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. With this we end the 12 days of Christmas and celebration of the Christmas/Advent season. Next year we will start again. Hope this was a blessing to you. God bless!

via Advent.

-and-

Epiphany is the climax of the Advent/Christmas Season and the Twelve Days of Christmas, which are usually counted from the evening of December 25th until the morning of January 6th, which is the Twelfth Day. In following this older custom of counting the days beginning at sundown, the evening of January 5th is the Twelfth Night. This is an occasion for feasting in some cultures, including the baking of a special King’s Cake as part of the festivities of Epiphany (a King’s Cake is part of the observance of Mardi Gras in French Catholic culture of the Southern USA).

In some church traditions, only the full days are counted so that January 5th is the Eleventh Day of Christmas, January 6th is the Twelfth Day, and the evening of January 6th is counted as the Twelfth Night.

In traditional Christian churches Christmas, as well as Easter, is celebrated as a period of time, a season of the church year, rather than just a day. The Season of the Church Year associated with Christmas actually begins with the first Sunday of Advent, four Sundays before Christmas Day.  Advent is marked by expectation and anticipation in preparing to celebrate the coming of Jesus.  Christmas begins with Christmas Day December 25 and lasts for Twelve Days until Epiphany, January 6, which looks ahead to the mission of the church to the world in light of the Nativity. The one or two Sundays between Christmas Day and Epiphany are sometimes called Christmastide.

For many Protestant church traditions, the season of Epiphany extends from January 6th until Ash Wednesday, which begins the season of Lent leading to Easter.  Depending on the timing of Easter, this longer period of Epiphany includes from four to nine Sundays.  Other traditions, especially the Roman Catholic tradition, observe Epiphany as a single day, with the Sundays following Epiphany counted as Ordinary Time. In some western traditions, the last Sunday of Epiphany is celebrated as Transfiguration Sunday.

The term epiphany means “to show” or “to make known” or even “to reveal.” In Western churches, it remembers the coming of the wise men bringing gifts to visit the Christ child, who by so doing “reveal” Jesus to the world as Lord and King. In some Central and South American countries influenced by Catholic tradition, Three Kings’ Day, or the night before, is the time for opening Christmas presents. In some eastern churches, Epiphany or the Theophany commemorates Jesus’ baptism, with the visit of the Magi linked to Christmas. In some churches the day is celebrated as Christmas, with Epiphany/Theophany occurring on January 19th.

via The Season of Epiphany.

Congress, The Constitution:  I agree.  Why edit the Constitution, Republicans?  I think it a great idea to read it … but you should read the entire Constitution.

Today’s reading of the Constitution on the House floor was surely intended by the GOP leadership as a Tea Party moment. But it looks like it has turned into a progressive moment instead.

Before the House started the reading, two Democratic congressmen stood up to inquire about the language the House leadership had deemed appropriate to read aloud on the House floor. While this elicited some laughter in the chamber — oh, the conservatives must have thought with a chuckle, how delightful that the liberals are revealing that they are so ignorant of the Constitution that they need to ask for clarification on its language via parliamentary procedure! — this was a significant, legitimate point. Rather than reading the entire Constitution, with all its flaws and corrections, the GOP-led House was going to read an “edited” version of our Nation’s charter.

One cannot fault members of the House for being reluctant to read the portion of the original Constitution that declared slaves to be three-fifths of a person for purposes of representation, or the fugitive slave clause. But, as Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., so powerfully explained before the reading began today, the fact that these portions of the original Constitution were superseded by Amendments that abolished slavery and guaranteed equality is an important one. These Amendments — as well as the Amendments to secure the vote for women and remove poll taxes from standing in the way of low-income voters, among others — were the result of generations of men and women who gave blood, sweat, and treasure in the struggle to improve our founding charter and create a “more perfect union.”

via Elizabeth B. Wydra: Why Did the GOP “Edit” the Constitution?.

holidays, LOL, me:  My friend Claudia of Tutu.com tweeted the below … and I laughed at myself for not getting the choice of the day before …

National Tutu Day is fast approaching! 02/02/2011! What tutu will YOU be wearing on National Tutu Day?

via Twitter / @Tutu.Com: National Tutu Day is fast ….

Great Recession, Banking Meltdown, Great Recovery, politics, words:  Two things …  1) This is very difficult for anyone in the industry to have their compensation structure dictated by the government … and I believe if the employer has paid back its TARP that should be the end of it.  2) What does “nous” mean?  It means “British informal common sense; practical intelligence” via definition of nous from Oxford Dictionaries Online.

DISPLAYING new-found political nous, Britain’s biggest banks have reportedly asked the government for guidance on “what sort of bonus payments will be acceptable”. One suspects the answer won’t be to their liking.

The bankers’ entreaties follow the recent announcement of EU and Financial Services Authority (FSA) guidelines on bonuses. The new rules, an effort to end “over-individualistic behaviour”, will limit upfront cash awards to 20-30% of the total bonus, and require banks to set aside at least 50% of a bonus for 3-5 years (depending on employees’ “risk profile”). Non-EU banks will have to apply the rules to their European employees, while EU-based banks will have to apply the rules globally.

You don’t have to be a red-clawed capitalist to see this as remarkable and unhealthy regulation. It’s highly unusual for governments to dictate the structure of private sector compensation, and for good reason: Soviet-style pay rules risk introducing far more problems than they solve.

Because the new regulations only address the symptoms of sky-high financial sector compensation, rather than the underlying causes, they amount to squeezing a balloon: financial companies will simply adjust their remuneration structures to maintain similar levels of “benefit” to employees. Starting salaries, for example, have reportedly gone up 15-20% this year alone.

via Financial sector compensation: Bad bonus rules are worse than bad bonuses | The Economist.

etiquette:  I actually think about this when I e-mail someone.  What is the proper way to open and close and e-mail message?  What do you think?

Correspondence styles have changed since 1860, when Abraham Lincoln addressed this letter to Mary Todd Lincoln ‘Dear Wife.’

Like many modern communicators, Ms. Barry, a spokeswoman for Rep. Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, has nixed the salutation “dear” in her emails.

“Dear is a bit too intimate and connotes a personal relationship,” she said.

Ms. Barry said she wants to keep her business communications with the press at “the utmost and highest level of professionalism.”

Across the Internet the use of dear is going the way of sealing wax. Email has come to be viewed as informal even when used as formal communication, leaving some etiquette experts appalled at the ways professional strangers address one another.

People who don’t start communications with dear, says business-etiquette expert Lydia Ramsey, “lack polish.”

“They come across as being abrupt,” says Ms. Ramsey, who founded a Savannah, Ga., etiquette consultancy called Manners That Sell.

via Hey, Folks: Here’s a Digital Requiem for a Dearly Departed Salutation – WSJ.com.

children,education, play, parenting:  Do you think our parents ever thought that they had to teach us how to play.  My generation really screwed this one up as parents …

Ms. Wilson has embraced a growing movement to restore the sometimes-untidy business of play to the lives of children. Her interest was piqued when she toured her local elementary school last year, a few months before Benjamin was to enroll in kindergarten. She still remembered her own kindergarten classroom from 1985: it had a sandbox, blocks and toys. But this one had a wall of computers and little desks.

“There’s no imaginative play anymore, no pretend,” Ms. Wilson said with a sigh.

For several years, studies and statistics have been mounting that suggest the culture of play in the United States is vanishing. Children spend far too much time in front of a screen, educators and parents lament — 7 hours 38 minutes a day on average, according to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation last year. And only one in five children live within walking distance (a half-mile) of a park or playground, according to a 2010 report by the federal Centers for Disease Control, making them even less inclined to frolic outdoors.

via The Movement to Restore Children’s Play Gains Momentum – NYTimes.com.

Arianna Hufffington, TED videos, health:  Great TED video … “Sleep your way to the top, literally.” – as only Arianna could say it!  Arianna Huffington: How to succeed? Get more sleep | Video on TED.com.

Apple, iPad: Apple iPad 2 Rumors Circulate the Web – NYTimes.com.

politics:  Oops, Mr. President.

President Obama’s comment Wednesday that departing White House spokesman Robert Gibbs has worked awfully hard for his “relatively modest” pay of $172,200 may have sounded to some like a rationalization for Gibbs joining the private sector to earn some big bucks.

But the remark to the New York Times got the attention of the Washington Post “Federal Eye” columnist, who posted a lengthy story questioning just how modest such a six-figure salary is in a weak economy with high unemployment and complaints about government spending. Gibbs’ compensation falls just under the $200,000 mark that the pre-tax-compromise Obama administration once pegged as upper income for an individual — and undeserving of a continued tax break from the Bush-era reductions.

via Obama Comment That $172,000 Is ‘Relatively Modest’ Pay Has Tongues Wagging.

history, Civil War: Interesting website … I wonder how many people will plan a vacation around the sesquicentennial celebration of the Civil War?  Civil War in Georgia – Plan a Trip – Georgia Civil War Events and Attractions.

 




Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 618 other followers

May 2020
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31