Posts Tagged ‘evangelism

25
Jan
11

1.25.2011 … Isaiah Study … then lunch with a special friend … focusing on Yahweh Shalom …

followup, ChristCare, faith/spirituality:  Great discussion of I Am The Good Shepherd by Stan Kellner – http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/karen_trust/IAM/Shepherd.html … I definitely am in a period of focusing on God as

Jehovah My Peace—Yahweh Shalom. Jesus’ shalom during this process is enabling me to find quiet meadows and waters of rest, especially as my anxious spirit wells up inside me. He speaks words of comfort and hope into my turmoil:

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.

—Mt. 11:28-30

via Discipleship Journal Archives :: I Am The Good Shepherd.

Jekyll Island GA, travel, GA, Childhood, history:  Saw this today on Facebook and just remember being fascinated by this plastic box that contained an old-fashioned phone where “THE first transcontinental phone call” was made … whatever that was!


This first call was made during the 1915 opening ceremony which consisted of a four-way call between Jekyll Island, Washington D.C., New York City, and San Francisco.

via FIRST Transcontinental Telephone Call – Jekyll Island, Georgia – First of its Kind on Waymarking.com.

Atlanta History Center

On this day in 1915, the first public transcontinental telephone call was placed from Jekyll Island, GA by AT&T president Theodore Vail.

via Facebook.

Supreme Court, Justice Clarence Thomas: I always thought ignorantia juris non excusat (Latin for “ignorance of the law does not excuse” ) … Thomas Says He Erred on Disclosure Forms – NYTimes.com.

culture, Disney Princesses: I think I took the approach that the Barbie/Disney Princess/ pink phase was just that a phase that most girls went through … and would pass.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self- appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

via Book Review – Cinderella Ate My Daughter – By Peggy Orenstein – NYTimes.com.

new blog: Just discovered this weekly NYT blog on Civil War history … very good.

The story of the Civil War will be told in this series as a weekly roundup and analysis, by Jamie Malanowski, of events making news during the corresponding week 150 years ago. Written as if in real time, this dispatch will, after this week, appear every Monday. Additional essays and observations by other contributors, along with maps, images, diaries and so forth, will be published several times a week. For another perspective on the war, see this op-ed by Tony Horwitz. — The Editors

via DISUNION – Opinionator Blog – NYTimes.com.

GA history:  … and this week’s Disunion blog is on Georgia’s decision to secede.  Showdown in Georgia – NYTimes.com.

quotes, Margaret Mitchell:

“In a weak moment, I have written a book.” − Margaret Mitchell.

via http://www.atlantahistorycenter.com/pr_view.asp?id=47

Billy Graham, evangelism, Charlotte:  Good article on Billy Graham … he regrets close connections to politics.

“[S]uccess is always dangerous, and we need to be alert and avoid becoming the victims of our own success. Will we influence the world for Christ, or will the world influence us?”

via Billy Graham’s Regret: ‘I Would Have Steered Clear of Politics’.

Supreme Court, LOL, culture: This story analyses Sup. Ct. transcripts to determine which justice has the best sense of humor by the number of “(Laughter.)” responses recorded …

On the other hand, there was surely an intended sting in the best line of the term so far, from the generally dour Justice Alito. In an argument over a law barring the sale of violent video games to minors, Justice Scalia asked what the drafters of the First Amendment thought about government restrictions on depictions of violence.

“I think what Justice Scalia wants to know,” Justice Alito said, “is what James Madison thought about video games.”

“(Laughter.)”

via Study Analyzes Laughs at Supreme Court – NYTimes.com.

Children’s/YA literature, Eric Carle, art history:  I am a big fan of Eric Carle since my son Edward slept with his Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? for the almost two years.  So this book sounds very interesting.

In October, children’s author Eric Carle will publish The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, a book inspired by the work of “banned Expressionist painters” the author first encountered as a student in World War II-era Germany.Although he has written over 70 books, Carle pictured, via is best known for two classic titles: The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Scheduled for publication in October 2011, Penguin Young Readers Group’s Philomel imprint has planned a first printing of 300,000 copies.Here’s more from the release: “[The book] is  inspired by the work of the great Expressionist painter Franz Marc, a founder of the artists’ group known as Der Blaue Reiter The Blue Rider, who famously used abstract blue horses in his paintings. Eric Carle’s new book tells the story of an artist who paints the world as he sees it—a red crocodile, an orange elephant, a purple fox, a black polar bear. His brilliant new work will captivate and educate readers with its colorful and magical story of Expressionist art and the imaginative leaps of a painter.”

via Eric Carle to Publish Children’s Book Inspired by Formerly Banned Expressionist Art – GalleyCat.

If I had a billion dollars: Enough said, I would buy this old house.

This home on King Street in the historic district was built by ODonnell over the period of 1852-1870. He was building the house for his bride but he took so long finishing the job that his fiancé married another. The home was once lived in by the women who inspired the character of Melanie in Margaret Mitchells Gone with the Wind. The home has an 18th century Venetian palazzo exterior with a cross-ventilated New York brownstone interior and wide Charleston-style porches. The home has been beautifully restored. Details to swoon for include random width heart pine floors, heavy moldings and ceiling medallions, 11 fireplaces with faux marble mantles, French doors and an antique elevator.

via Historic Patrick ODonnell House Gets Big Price Cut.

08
Nov
10

‎11.8.2010 … wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened … studying forgiveness with my ChristCare group … blessed …

Billy Graham, Charlotte, evangelism:  Happy Birthday, Rev. Graham.  It is hard not to know who Billy Graham is if you live in Charlotte.  I frequently drive down Billy Graham Boulevard (on my way to the airport) and by the Billy Graham Library.  His column appears regularly in our paper.  But on my recent trip to South Africa, Simon, our guide in Kruger,  asked me if I knew Billy Graham … knew in the sense of knew who he was … I said yes and told him that Charlotte, my home, was Rev. Graham’s childhood home and the home of his world-wide ministry.  Simon spent several minutes retelling of his multi-day encounter with Rev. Graham as a guide to him, his family and traveling party.  He was touched by Mr. Graham.  And when Rev. Graham left he gave him his “expensive” animal and plant guide … well used and well-worn now.  He truly touched Simon.  Rev. Graham knew Simon and Simon knew Rev. Graham.  I know Rev. Graham a little better now.  If someone who reads this knows how to get a message to Rev. Graham.  Tell him Simon says hello and thank you.

It will be a quiet celebration today in Montreat, as Billy Graham gathers with family to mark his 92nd birthday.

via Graham still looking to serve the Lord at age 92 – CharlotteObserver.com.

law, copyright, me: I hope I show adequate legal and intellectual respect for the work of others … My blog is a “clipping service.”  The comments are mine.

What makes this story astonishing, really, is that unless it’s an incredibly elaborate hoax, this isn’t some isolated example. This is how this magazine apparently did business for years — and that lends credibility to the idea that Griggs may have honestly thought that she was allowed to just copy whatever she wanted from the Internet. Again, she was crediting the authors. Not always the sources, but at least the writers. It’s a weird head-fake in the direction of treating people fairly, which smells a little bit like — just as she told Gaudio — she actually thought this was fair.

There’s much about this that isn’t known, and it’s important to hold to your skepticism about some of what’s happened since this turned into a meme (for instance, some additional obnoxious responses showed up on Facebook yesterday purporting to be from Griggs, but not everyone thinks they actually were). Griggs hasn’t been heard from directly since all this happened.

Internet justice is always swift and often severe, which can be satisfying at a moment like this if you happen to be a person who creates content. At the same time, it’s a really sobering reminder that in this case, the mob may very well be correct, but what would it have taken to slow it down if it weren’t true?

via The Day The Internet Threw A Righteous Hissyfit About Copyright And Pie : Monkey See : NPR.

bookshelf, quotes, Great Recession: Maybe I will get this book for my kith/kin children …  “All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

Since then, Taibbi’s columns have been a destination for those trying to understand what happened in the aftermath of the financial meltdown. His new book, Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids and the Long Con That Is Breaking America, tries to make the subject even clearer in the colorful language Taibbi’s readers know well.

“All these big institutional investors essentially got sold oregano when they thought they were buying weed,” Taibbi tells NPR’s Guy Raz.

via ‘Griftopia’: The Financial Crisis Easily Explained : NPR.

LOL. As Seen On TV :  The egg thing reminds me of a scene in Bridget Jones Diary!  An As Seen on TV Thanksgiving: Products that could help.

Facebook, British Monarchy: I “Liked” them …

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has joined Facebook, adding a presence on the world’s most popular social network to the royal family’s accounts on Twitter, photo-sharing site Flickr and YouTube.

The British monarchy‘s Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/TheBritishMonarchy) does not allow users to “friend” the Queen or to send her messages, but offers updates on royal news and diary events.

via Britain’s Queen Wins 60, 000 Fans on Facebook Debut – NYTimes.com.

parenting, motherhood, culture, me:  I bought into cloth diapers and organic food (but not homemade) … silly me.

In the oscillations of feminism, theories of child-rearing have played a major part. As long as women remain the gender most responsible for children, we are the ones who have the most to lose by accepting the “noble savage” view of parenting, with its ideals of attachment and naturalness. We need to be released from guilt about our children, not further bound by it. We need someone to say: Do the best you can. There are no rules.

via Erica Jong on the Madness of Modern Motherhood – WSJ.com.

If I had a million dollars …:  Just the description makes me want one. 🙂  Canon G Series: The Aspirational Point-and-Shoot | Plugged In – WSJ.com.

business, urban life, pop-ups: As I have said before I want to live in a city big enough to support pop-ups.  They are a modern-day indicia of a BIG city.

The two-year pilot program provides temporary seating platforms for restaurants not eligible for sidewalk cafés licensed by the Department of Consumer Affairs because of narrow sidewalks or zoning restrictions.

The owners of Fika Espresso Bar and Bombay’s Restaurant, located near each other on Pearl Street in the Financial District, housed the city’s first pop-up café, which went up in August and is expected to come down in the next two weeks.

The first curbside wooden platform, measuring 6 feet wide by 84 feet long provided space for about 50 chairs and 14 tables, and attracted throngs of lunch goers.

“My business went up by about 14%,” estimated Prashant Bhatt, owner of Bombay’s Restaurant. “If you come at lunch time there’s no place to sit outside.”

The business owners split the cost of the pop-up café, which they said was slightly more than $10,000 each.

via Pop-Up Cafés to Reappear in 2011 – WSJ.com.

random, men, consumer products, gift ideas:  OK, years ago  (pre-internet) my law associates and I would get into these highly intellectual conversations about certain topics (i.e., is the chocolate milk product Yoohoo or Yahoo … we called a 7-11 to find out).  One topic was why is a man’s “makeup” bag called a “dopp” kit … We found the answer from an older army man … But anyway here is a great Christmas idea for the man  who has everything (and the answer to the question) …

Dopp kit, Il Bisonte; John Allan’s mint conditioner; Sephora travel dental kit; Mason Pearson pocket brush; Kiehl’s Facial Fuel eye de-puffer; Jurlique Chamomile Soothing Mist; Diptyque Tam Dao body lotion; Anthony facial scrub; John Allan’s ocean shampoo; Lightfoot Pure Pine shave creme soap; Marvis Classic Mint travel toothpaste; Clark’s Ultra Rich Lip Balm; The Art of Shaving pure badger brush; Jack Black Double-Duty face moisturizer; Hermès Eau d’Orange Verte soap.

via The Best Ways to Fill Your Dopp Kit – WSJ.com.

Apple, IBM: Good article … two of my favorite stocks.  Like the illustration, too.

Illustration by The New York Times

The two companies have long been cast as polar opposites, even before Apple’s commercial during the 1984 Super Bowl that depicted a female rebel (Apple) striking a blow against a corporate Big Brother (I.B.M.).

Today, Big Blue is seen as a machine — a company that caters to big corporate and government customers and is known for steady improvement and five-year profit plans. Indeed, I.B.M.’s profit rose 12 percent for the third quarter, the 31st consecutive quarter that the company delivered higher earnings. Apple, by contrast, is seen as a consumer-product hit factory that is on a roll.

Yet I.B.M. and Apple can be viewed as the yin and the yang of high-tech innovation, as two companies with more in common than is generally understood. There is a lot of eureka invention and deep science in I.B.M.’s varied businesses, industry experts say. And Apple’s continuing success, they add, is explained in good part by its ability to make innovation a managed system, more machinelike.

via Apple and I.B.M. Aren’t All That Different – NYTimes.com.

Great Recession:  Hope so …

But positive indicators can and do disappoint, so I decided to consult an expert on these matters: Ian Shepherdson, chief United States economist at High Frequency Economics. As a reader of economic tea leaves over the last five turbulent years, Mr. Shepherdson has a darn good record. For instance, unlike the throng of economists who failed to see the housing crisis coming, Mr. Shepherdson warned his clients in fall 2005 that real estate would crash and a recession would ensue.

He was early, of course, and now acknowledges that he was not nearly emphatic enough in his warnings. But he was fundamentally right back then and has been consistently on target since. So, I am happy to report that he sees the beginnings of a turn in the economy that could translate to a rise in gross domestic product growth and an improving employment picture in the second half of 2011.

via Forecaster Ian Shepherdson Sees an End to Economic Gloom – NYTimes.com.

random, culture, Charlotte: Enjoy … and let me know if you hear about such an event in Charlotte!

Knight Foundation is funding 1,000 Random Acts of Culture over the next three years. So if you live in any of these eight cities – Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami – be on the lookout and have your cellphones ready.

via What a Joyful Noise: 650 Singers Burst into Hallelujah as part of Random Act of Culture | Knight Arts.

random, kith/kin, new blog:  I could so see some of my friends doing this!  On the Road with Honey: Atlanta to Chicago by Kevin Austin | LikeTheDew.com.

media, journalism, boundaries:  I always thought the New Yorker was more literary than political commentary.  They certainly jump right into the fray with their covers!

In his inaugural address in January 2009, President Barack Obama promised a new era of diplomacy in foreign affairs. “To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history,” he said. But, he continued, “we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.”

He didn’t know that he might as well have been speaking to the Republicans.

The November 15, 2010 cover of The New Yorker features Obama offering to shake the hand of Republican congressman John Boehner, who is expected to take over as the next Speaker of the House. Instead of offering his hand to shake in return, Boehner offers Obama his fist.

The illustration is by Barry Blitt and recalls his controversial July 2008 cover for the magazine, which featured Obama wearing a turban and giving a fist bump to Michelle Obama in the Oval Office.

via John Boehner Gives Obama ‘Terrorist Fist Bump’ On New Yorker Cover.

tv, Sherlock Holmes, me: wow, PBS’s Sherlock has my head spinning … now I will have to watch the whole series to figure out what happened …

In with three criminally clever whodunits, A Study in Pink (October 24), The Blind Banker (October 31) and The Great Game (November 7), consulting detective Sherlock Holmes teams up with former army doctor John Watson to solve a dizzying array of crimes with his signature deductive reasoning. From the writers of Doctor Who, Sherlock is co-created and written by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat.

via Masterpiece | Sherlock | PBS.

recipes, chicken, comfort foods:  Roast chicken is one of my favorite “comfort foods.”  I will try this … Rozanne Gold’s “Opinionated Way to Roast a Chicken” | The Food Section – Food News, Recipes, and More.

The Supreme Court, politics:  great article …

One of the legacies of the pitched battle ten years ago is that voters appreciate now, in a way they did not before Florida 2000, that our elections, like any human endeavor, are fraught with errors. Bush v. Gore thus opened eyes and lowered expectations. Voting in America is guaranteed by law but not in fact. The votes of some simply don’t get counted.

So did the Court lose respect among Americans for its ruling in Bush v. Gore? Did it lose legitimacy? You can argue it both ways and scores of legitimate scholars have gleefully done so. If the Court did lose some credibility, and I think it did, clearly it did not lose enough to generate much of an anti-Court backlash. The Justices are still going strong– witness their landmark corporate speech case this past January in Citizens United. And so are their critics. Bush v. Goredidn’t change the world. The world changed shortly after Bush v. Gore and it’s likely never going to change back.

via Bush v. Gore: The Disputed Election Fades Into History.

architecture, design,Chicago: As my kids say … fail …

Sprucing up a dull city plaza sounds good in theory, but the outcome depends upon the vision of enlightened clients and the talents of skilled designers. Both, unfortunately, are in short supply in the tidy but clinical revamp of the Plaza of the Americas, a small public space whose importance is magnified because it provides one of the few openings along densely-packed North Michigan Avenue.

When it opened in 1965, the plaza possessed a multitude of smaller touches that made it a welcoming public space. Planter boxes filled with shrubs, trees and flowers lent color to the cityscape. The planters had broad ledges where pedestrians were free to sit. Multi-colored lights made the plazas’s fountains sparkle at night. The plaza’s aggregate surface, with its varied hues of crushed stone, was a cut above dull gray concrete.

But flash forward to the first decade of the 21st Century, and the picture looked very different. The aggregate was crumbling and the plaza’s drainage grates were failing. In winter, water would pool up and turn into dangerous sheets of ice. The plaza’s undergirding was deteriorating, too. That raised a simple but contentious question: Who would pay to fix things up?

via Cityscapes | Chicago Tribune | Blog.

Jane Austen, movies:  Mollywood … Mormon film industry!

Alert Janeite Sylvia M. let us know that a new, modern-set version of S&S, called Scents and Sensibility, is in production for release in 2011. It looks like it is a product of the Mormon film industry, which also produced a modern-set version of P&P a few years back. Not much info available yet about the new movie, but well, hello Brandon.

(Somebody else told us about this–it has something to do with perfume–and we wish they would remind us about it comments! Sorry!)

via AustenBlog.




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