Posts Tagged ‘family art

04
Sep
11

9.4. 2011 … Today would be my dad’s 84th birthday … for 11 months of the year he was my mom’s “gigolo” … it took me a long time to get the joke. :)

‎!♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪
Happy Birthday, Dad!

1927 -2003
♪♫•*¨*• .¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪

Labor Day Weekend, End of an Era (Summer), kith/kin, EHL sr., Shakespeare, mixtape:  Labor Day Weekend is poignant.  My dad’s birthday always falls near it, if not on it (it is today 9/4), and the end of the summer always meant one last vacation at the beach.  It was Jekyll Island GA as a child and then DeBordieu SC as an adult with my children. When my last graduates, we will find our next phase end-of-the-summer beach.  And it will be wonderful.  I love this New Yorker “mixtape” of poems and prose about the end of the summer. Funny, even Shakespeare captured it …

“And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”

via The Book Bench: Literary Mixtape: Summer’s End : The New Yorker.

“If”, Rudyard Kipling, kith/kin, poetry, favorites:  Just like with music, if a friend recommends a poem, i will read it.  Bob T. recommended “If, ” by Rudyard Kipling (“I love this poem. I don’t always follow its advice, but it reminds you to just keep plugging.”)  “If” is a Lindsey family favorite as well. So much so that my sister offered all her children and nieces and nephews $100 if they would memorize “If” for their 13th birthday.

If

If you can keep your head when all about you

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,

But make allowance for their doubting too:

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,

Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,

Or being hated don’t give way to hating,

And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;

If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,

If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same:.

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,

And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings,

And never breathe a word about your loss:

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew

To serve your turn long after they are gone,

And so hold on when there is nothing in you

Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,

Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,

If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,

If all men count with you, but none too much:

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,

And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

via If by Rudyard Kipling.

A history of the World in Six Glasses, bookshelf, lists:  This book comes highly recommended by Allison B. I can’t wait to get to it on my list.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Standage starts with a bold hypothesis—that each epoch, from the Stone Age to the present, has had its signature beverage—and takes readers on an extraordinary trip through world history. The Economist’s technology editor has the ability to connect the smallest detail to the big picture and a knack for summarizing vast concepts in a few sentences. He explains how, when humans shifted from hunting and gathering to farming, they saved surplus grain, which sometimes fermented into beer. The Greeks took grapes and made wine, later borrowed by the Romans and the Christians. Arabic scientists experimented with distillation and produced spirits, the ideal drink for long voyages of exploration. Coffee also spread quickly from Arabia to Europe, becoming the “intellectual counterpoint to the geographical expansion of the Age of Exploration.” European coffee-houses, which functioned as “the Internet of the Age of Reason,” facilitated scientific, financial and industrial cross-fertilization. In the British industrial revolution that followed, tea “was the lubricant that kept the factories running smoothly.” Finally, the rise of American capitalism is mirrored in the history of Coca-Cola, which started as a more or less handmade medicinal drink but morphed into a mass-produced global commodity over the course of the 20th century. In and around these grand ideas, Standage tucks some wonderful tidbits—on the antibacterial qualities of tea, Mecca’s coffee trials in 1511, Visigoth penalties for destroying vineyards—ending with a delightful appendix suggesting ways readers can sample ancient beverages.

via Amazon.com: A History of the World in 6 Glasses (9780802715524): Tom Standage: Books.

See also – The World in a Glass: Six Drinks That Changed History.

Marthame Sanders, i feast therefore i am, favorite blogs, faith and spirituality, definition: religion:  Quite a while back I posted a sunday school  discussion on the definition of religion. 2.27.2011 … thinking about how we define things … from Sunday School … “religion.” How do you define “religion?” « Dennard’s Clipping Service.  I love Marthame’s definition and where he takes us from there.

And that, in my opinion, is what the conversation offers us as people of faith, whether we define ourselves as “spiritual” or “religious”. For the author, the important distinction is between private spirituality and religious community.

The word “religion” itself is all about connection – re-ligio, as in ligament, a re-connection. Listen to what the author writes:

Being privately spiritual but not religious just doesn’t interest me. There is nothing challenging about having deep thoughts all by oneself. What is interesting is doing this work in community, where people might call you on stuff, or heaven forbid, disagree with you. Where life with God gets rich and provocative is when you dig deeply into a tradition that you did not invent all for yourself.

In an odd way, the very thing that happened on Facebook was just that: people were calling each other on stuff and having an honest conversation.

Being Jesus’ disciple, following Christ faithfully, means doing so in community.

This is such a crucial point to make in 2011. We have the world before us in ways that we never had. Technology has given us more access to information than ever. Gutenberg’s printing press doesn’t hold a candle to the internet. Not even language is a barrier, as pages written in other languages can be translated with the click of a mouse.

And yet, the irony is that we are becoming more and more isolated by virtue of the same technology which holds such promise. There are more places to get information than ever before. And yet the tyranny of choice usually means that we self-select for those sources that agree with what we already say. Whether we choose Fox News or MSNBC, it is so much more comforting to listen to those who will confirm our self-satisfaction rather than challenge it.

And even places of apparent neutrality choose for us, and we don’t even know it. A Google search is now based not only on the term you are looking for, but also your history as an internet user. Two people looking for the same thing will get different results based on what they prefer, meaning a further narrowing of the information we get. And Facebook, which prompted this whole conversation today, slowly removes updates from your friends whom you rarely click on, meaning the ones who challenge your thinking will cease to be a part of your social media experience.

In many ways, we see this siloing of opinion at work in the partisan absurdities inWashington, and in the news channels competing to see who can have more people on screen at the same time screaming at each other. But I’m not convinced this is anything new and peculiar to this day and age; it just has a different flavor, and it gives the church a crucial role.

Do you want an experience that will tell you how right you already are? There are plenty of those out there, and you can pretty much do that on your own. Do you want a place that convinces you of your own self-righteousness? There are plenty of organizations and, yes, even churches that will do just that.

Or are you looking for a community where you will be welcomed as you are and celebrated for you who are and, at the same time, challenged to grow and stretch as you confront the world as it really is? Then we just might be the place for you.

I’d like us, as we close, to consider the prayer that the author uses in her article:

Dear God, thank you for creating us in your image and not the other way around.

Amen.

via We Can Work It Out « i feast therefore i am.

kith/kin, family art: I love it!  However, I feel like I am the hippopotamus and my little bird has outgrown me … That’s my interpretation.  Molly says she is just making whimsy of reality.  Her grandmother GoGo was looking for something much deeper … the bird survives the mammal.  What do you see?  That is what makes art fun!

PostSecret, apps, review:  I think it will be nice for some to send in via the internet … but the homemade postcards were more personal.  And I loved the relationship between the mail carrier and Frank, the site’s creator (see below).  Oh, and I hope Frank’s dad is wrong.

PostSecret (@postsecret)
9/3/11 1:57 PM
My dad believes that when the PostSecret App goes live tonight, the Blog will die because no one will mail me postcards anymore.

However, as time went on the postcards began to more than just trickle in. We at the post office were having a blast reading them every day. There were silly, funny, serious, sad, lonely, hateful, every kind of emotion you could imagine on these little postcards. The exceptionally funny ones were passed around the office for everyone to share. One of my co-workers said she couldn’t believe that this person lived on MY route. She said, “of all people to get this on their route, YOU!” I took it to mean that she knew I was thoroughly enjoying it and maybe she was a tad jealous! I have to say that it was fun and a great conversation topic, but despite all that, I began to learn from it. There are many many sad and lonely people out there and some of these postcards would break your heart. Suddenly the problems that I or my friends might have, seemed small in comparison to the ones I was reading. It certainly made me take a look at my life and realize how lucky I was. I just wanted to reach out and help but they were always anonymous except for the postmark you hadn’t a clue where the card came from.

via fromUKtoUSwithlove: POSTSECRET August 6, 2010.

blog scrapers, Goggle:  I hope no one ever thinks I am a blog scraper …If you think I have taken something without citing it, please contact me …

Scaper sites have stolen content from writers for years, building spam websites that copy and paste your writing into a new online location. Now Google needs your help to weed out these sites that clog search results and pirate content.

Check it out: “Google is testing algorithmic changes for scraper sites (especially blog scrapers). We are asking for examples, and may use data you submit to test and improve our algorithms. This form does not perform a spam report or notice of copyright infringement. Use [this link] to report spam or [this link]  to report copyright complaints.”

These phantom websites sometimes score higher than the original content in Google search results, frustrating thousands of writers. The data you share with Google will help the search giant block these online pests. (Via Jose Afonso Furtado)

via How to Report Scraper Sites to Google – GalleyCat.

twitter, Kathy Reichs, ads, LOL:  Ok I assumed she was taking me to a Bones ad! Great ad. 🙂

Kathy Reichs (@KathyReichs)
9/3/11 12:53 PM
What’s the ad for? Guess before it ends.http://t.co/XgjDDY7

Sir Conan Doyle, Sherlock Homes, literary afterlife:  I have often commented on Jane Austin’s nine lives. Other writers with similar afterlives are certainly Dickens, Shakespeare and Sir Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes.  Can you think of others?

A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon

Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6

King (The Beekeeper’s Apprentice and 10 other Mary Russell novels) and Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) have not stuck to the usual suspects for this stellar anthology of 16 new short stories that pay homage to the great detective. Perhaps the highlight is S.J. Rozan’s “The Men with the Twisted Lips,” a particularly clever alternate take on a canonical Holmes story. Phillip and Jerry Margolin provide a fair-play whodunit centering on the purported discovery of evidence of a Holmes story written exclusively for Queen Victoria in “The Adventure of the Purloined Paget.” Colin Cotterill takes a humorous approach in his illustrated selection, “The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story,” while Charles Todd’s “The Case That Holmes Lost” convincingly recreates Doyle himself, grappling with a lawsuit aimed at his most famous creation. Other contributors include Lee Child, Neil Gaiman, Laura Lippman, Margaret Maron, and Jacqueline Winspear. (Nov.)

via Fiction Review: A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon by Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6.

iPad, Ipad commercial use:  I have never seen one used in business (other than in the Apple Store).  I promise I will tell you the first time I do.

We’ve all been there; wandering aimlessly up and down the grocery aisles, silently screaming, “My kingdom for an iPad dock on this shopping cart!”

One supermarket chain in the U.K. is looking to do the unthinkable by rolling out (pun intended!) shopping carts—or “trolleys” as they’re charmingly called across the pond—with built-in iPad docks.

The supermarket chain, Sainsbury’s, will be testing the carts in one of its West London stores and if everything goes well, the project may be extended to the rest of its locations across the U.K. No word on whether we’ll see something like this in the U.S., but this is America. Go start your own supermarket chain and order some of these if you want them that badly.

via Supermarket Rolls Out Shopping Carts with Built-in iPad Docks – Techland – TIME.com.

The future of flight attendant luggage may end up being even smaller than those tiny carry-on bags you often see them wheeling around as they roam airports in flight attendant packs; British Airways is testing to see whether iPads will make cabin crews helpful and more productive during loading and flights.

100 cabin crew members will be given the tablets as part of a pilot program to see how they impact in-flight service, replacing printed charts, timetables and other material they normally carry.

via British Airways Flight Attendants to Be Outfitted with iPads – Techland – TIME.com.

la guerre des Post-It, Post-It wars, Only in France, LOL:  If someone sees this in the US, let me know.

 Just when it seemed like Ubisoft Montreuil had won the French Post-It War with their three-story Ezio from Assassin’s Creed, a new challenger appears.

Société Générale Bank has trumped both Ubisoft and their rivals at BNP Bank with this 11,000-note creation.

Sorry, other Post-It teams. You just got Asterixed.

via Post-It War Update of the Day – TDW Geeks.




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