Posts Tagged ‘family history

17
Jul
14

7.17.14 … if only these walls could talk …

TBT 1927, family history, kith/kin, 1429 Ponce de Leon, Harman, The Paideia School, if only these walls could talk … : This house at 1429  Ponce de Leon in Atlanta houses the College Counseling Offices for Paideia School. I wonder if anyone at the school knows that someone was born in the house in 1927, that person being my dad. He was born in the Harman Home, the home of his grandparents (my great grandparents). — at The Paideia School.

 

via Paideia School: About Us » Our Campus.

Eleanor “Ellie” Frith, kith/kin, dance, ballet:  One of my favorite families.  A great story!

 

For the love of dance – Frith accepts offer from Houston Ballet II

A follow-up to a Charlotte Observer story

Ballet dancer, Eleanor “Ellie” Frith, is a graduating from the Performance Learning Center’s eLearning Academy. When her fellow classmates walk across the stage on June 11, Ellie will be preparing for her performance in the Houston Ballet Academy’s Swan Lake. Ellie was recently offered a position with Houston Ballet II on a year contract. Ellie was accepted into the Houston Ballet Academy’s year-round program when she was 15 years old. She studied as a virtual student during her junior and senior years of high school packing her schedule with studies, rehearsals, performances and learning the essentials of being independent. Ellie was also accepted to the University of Virginia but has deferred enrollment. See the link to the original story from the Charlotte Observer: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/01/06/4591971/dancers-life-takes-pivotal-turn.html#.U39bSFEUP9c (Contact: Stacy Sneed)

via Grad Stories.

 “On the road”: the ambitious exhibition commemorating the 800th anniversary of St Francis of Assisi’s pilgrimage to Santiago:

“On the road”, the ambitious exhibition commemorating the 800th anniversary of St Francis of Assisi’s pilgrimage to Santiago, will be on display in Santiago de Compostela, Spain until 30 November.

Comprising works by 35 contemporary artists, including Yves Klein, Tacita Dean, Christian Boltanski and Anthony McCall, the exhibition is taking place across three locations in the Galician capital: the church and cemetery of San Domingos de Bonaval, and the Pazo de Xelmírez, adjoining Santiago’s cathedral.

A variety of media — painting, sculpture, installation, video, and art intervention — feature in the exhibition which pays homage to the intercultural character and dynamism of the city, repositioning it as a meeting place for history, spirituality and the future.

Director of Tourism in Galicia, Nava Castro, has described the show as offering the “possibility to rethink” the pilgrimage’s anniversary and to create a cultural event of international relevance and importance.

via American Pilgrims on the Camino (APOC).

It is unlikely, though, that anyone would come away from this huge display, ranging across a palace, a church and a park, without being affected by the enduring ideas St Francis has stamped on our collective consciousness. A new pope who has pointedly called himself Francis; inequality; material versus spiritual value; our troubled place in the natural world: all this is fresh and familiar, even if the actual figure of the friar is blurred in the vast temporal distance that separates us from 1214.

“It is no use walking to preach unless our walking is our preaching” is one of the saint’s aphorisms. Looking at Alÿs’s film loop, pondering why, in an otherwise bare room, a car hubcap is leaning against the wall, I was struck by how pilgrimage has always had a whiff of the postmodern about it. Chaucer knew that to travel talkatively was better than to arrive. Pilgrimage was a medieval road movie, whose goal, and centre, was always shifting.

Every afternoon pilgrims from all countries stream in to Santiago with their blisters and backpacks, continuing the decades-long camino boom triggered partly by Paulo Coelho’s 1987 new-age novel The Pilgrimage. David Lodge’s novel Therapy (1995), or the 2010 film The Way, starring Martin Sheen, also centre on the Santiago route as a balm for modern-day exhaustion and alienation.

On The Road, then, will not lack a global audience. The show is a chance to reposition the city as a fusion of history, spirituality and something more hip, and yet its sheer scale and grandiloquence are sometimes at odds with the thirst for simplicity and scaling back at the heart of this new pilgrimage. For all that Barbi’s final work signs off on a meditative note, it does not quite dispel an overall feeling that less might well be more.

via ‘On the Road’, Santiago de Compostela – FT.com.

Portillo’s, chicagotribune.com:  Best chopped salad ever …

Portillo’s Chicago-style hot dogs and Italian beef have whet the appetite of Boston-based buyers who are eager to introduce the local favorites to more diners nationwide.

The company confirmed Tuesday that Berkshire Partners is investing in Dick Portillo’s eponymous chain, two months after its 74-year-old founder announced he was considering financial alternatives for the restaurant.

“Portillo’s is my life’s work and I remain committed to ensuring the continued growth and success of the business,” Portillo said in a statement. “I was seeking an experienced partner that shared our vision for the company and an appreciation for our culture.”

via Portillo’s future in the hands of Boston buyout firm – chicagotribune.com.

 

02
Jul
14

7.2.14 … “Poetry is the dark side of the moon. It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

Julianna’s:  I just love this place.

As quaint and charming as ever, this cafe serves up a menu of both savory and sweet crepes. Since I hadn’t had lunch yet, I went for savory while Lucy went for the classic sweet combo of strawberries, banana, and honey. Both tasted a bit like the French/Hungarian childhood I never had.

via julianna’s crepes | tide & bloom | inspiration, creativity, and growth | atlanta events, food, culture, beauty.

Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate, Davidson College: Another great day to be a wildcat!

As a Davidson student Wright was a history major and won the college’s Vereen Bell Prize for writing. Davidson awarded Wright an honorary doctor of letters degree in 1997, the year before he won the Pulitzer Prize. “Poetry fulfills a spiritual need, the need to explain to myself what it is I would like to happen,” Wright once told the Davidson Journal.

via The New York Times: Charles Wright ’57, America’s Next Poet Laureate – Davidson College.

“Poetry is the dark side of the moon,” he said. “It’s up there, and you can see the front of it. But what it is isn’t what you’re looking at. It’s behind what you’re looking at.”

via Charles Wright Named America’s Poet Laureate – NYTimes.com.

MegaBus: Odd assortment on the bus … Indian woman in beautiful Indian attire walked up and demanded younger girl give up her seat and younger girl did, very cute chatty younger twenty-something with white skeleton on black background t-shirt and sticker that says “wanted: redneck girl with truck” and African American older woman who is totally upset because somehow she will have a 5 hour wait in Charlotte and she thought it was only an hour.  It was a relatively full bus: I still love my bus!

ACAC Southeast Art Summit 9/50 opening soirée: I know I am getting old … Meow Lin (Chanel Kim) and ZigZagZig (Zopi Kristjanson) hip-hoppin’ their “lunar mythology” with inspiration drawn from Wu Tang Clan, ancient cultures, and personal drama …  funky!

Bloomsday 6.16: Happy Bloomsday 6.16!

James Joyce’s “Ulysses” changed literature and the world, not necessarily in the ways its author intended and certainly in ways we still don’t entirely understand. One of the unexpected effects of the novel, which was first published in its entirety in Paris in 1922, was the most famous obscenity trial in U.S. history, conducted in 1933. That trial serves as the culmination of Kevin Birmingham’s astute and gorgeously written “The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses,’” an account of the tortuous path Joyce’s masterpiece took to print. Publishing is not the world’s most fast-paced and high-stakes business, but when it came to introducing the English-speaking world to a novel that one critic deplored as “full of the filthiest blasphemies” and “afflicted with a truly diabolical lack of talent,” the ride was a wild one.

Countless reams of paper have been consumed by writings on Joyce and “Ulysses,” but Birmingham has two particular, little-discussed themes to bring to the table. First, and most peripheral to his narrative, is Birmingham’s discovery of strong evidence that the eye problems that tormented and eventually blinded Joyce were caused by syphilis. (Birmingham concludes that a medication given to Joyce by his Parisian doctor in the late 1920s was probably “an obscure French drug called galyl,” used only to treat symptoms of syphilis.) Birmingham expands on this a bit by arguing that the effects of pain and disability on the writer and his work have been underestimated. It’s a credible argument, especially once you’ve read this book’s squirm-inducing description of a typical eye surgery Joyce endured and learn that he went through the equivalent a dozen times over. But Birmingham never quite gets around to showing how Joyce’s suffering shaped his work.

via “The Most Dangerous Book”: When “Ulysses” was obscene – Salon.com.

family history, kith/kin: And this is what I was searching for … A picture of my mom that through Facebook reconnecting, a friend from Davidson and I discovered that her mother took this of my mother at Wesleyan College. She had asked my mom to model for her.

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And in response … here’s another pic your Mother may enjoy: the reporter/photographer in action while working on the Anderson Daily Mail!  My Mama – the journalist/photographer – with the elephant! One of my all time favorites!

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kith/kin:  Photos at the train station … they  look like the Addams Family. We think my sis,  a Wednesday’s child, would have made a good Wednesday Addams …

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In Addams’ cartoons, which first appeared in The New Yorker, Wednesday and other members of the family had no names. When the characters were adapted to the 1964 television series, Charles Addams gave her the name “Wednesday”, based on the well-known nursery rhyme line, “Wednesday’s child is full of woe”. She is the sister of Pugsley Addams (and, in the movie Addams Family Values, also the sister of Pubert Addams), and she is the only daughter of Gomez and Morticia Addams.

via Wednesday Addams – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

In all fairness to my sis …

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Hawkinsville GA, Pineview GA:  All my life when I visited Pineview GA, we would visit nearby Hawkinsville GA, and my grandparents would turn down Merritt St and stop in front of this house. They would say that my grandparents house on Bay Street in Pineview had been built in a hurry to replace a house that looked just like this house that had burned down around 1910. My great-grandfather JJ Dennard refused to build another two-story house since two of his girls had to jump to safety from the second story balcony. The new house which still stands is one story and all rooms have a door to the outside.

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Artistic Sushi Rolls,  Edvard Munch:

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via Artistic Sushi Rolls – Edvard Munch inspired Food Art from Sushi Sculptors.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman, Jim Gant, Top Green Beret Officer:  Fascinating story!

via Lawrence of Afghanistan: Rise and Fall of a Special Forces Legend Photos | Image #3 – ABC News.

‘Lawrence of Afghanistan’… And His Woman

General David Petraeus: ‘Going Native’ To Win In Afghanistan

A legendary Special Forces commander was quietly forced to leave the U.S. Army after he admitted to a love affair with a Washington Post war correspondent, who quit her job to secretly live with him for almost a year in one of the most dangerous combat outposts in Afghanistan.

U.S. Army Special Operations Command never publicly disclosed that highly-decorated Green Beret Major Jim Gant was relieved of command at the end of a harrowing 22 months in combat in March 2012.

His commanders charged in confidential files that he had “indulged in a self-created fantasy world” of booze, pain pills and sex in a tribal village deep in Taliban and al Qaeda country with his “wife,” journalist Ann Scott Tyson.

via Jim Gant: Top Green Beret Officer Forced to Resign Over Affair With WaPo Reporter – ABC News.

 

 

27
May
11

5.27.2011 … old news now … I went to Davidson for the public announcement of its 18th president, and SHE is wonderful. She has to be … there are at least 10,000 living alums … and she just got our dream job!

Davidson College, Dr. Carol Quillen, kudos:  Congratulations to Dr. Quillen, Davidson College’s 18th president, to DC’s Presidential Search Committee for a job well done and to Davidson College for being open to an outsider and a woman … the future is bright. I also had the privilege of joining John, a member of the Board of Trustees, for a quick dinner with Dr. Quillen … not only is she everything listed on her cv, she is charming, warm, engaging and humorous.  It a great time to be a wildcat! …

Carol Quillen understands all facets of the academic enterprise. A brilliant administrator and a talented teacher and scholar, she can articulate not only the value, but also the necessity of a liberal arts education. Her values are Davidson’s values. She inspired us, and we could not be more enthusiastic about welcoming her to Davidson.”

via Davidson College – Presidential Search.

At Davidson, a particular religious tradition grounds a foundational commitment to cultivating a broadly diverse and collegial community, where people possessing different talents, from different cultures, whose deepest convictions differ, can learn from and with each other in an environment of warmth and respect. Davidson creates a distinctive culture of inquiry and trust within which students grow as humane thinkers and perceptive leaders precisely because they are simultaneously engaged in the production of knowledge and challenged to build creative, purposeful lives. Davidson graduates morally courageous persons who are not afraid to take intellectual risks. Most important, Davidson somehow enables each student to discover the remarkable human being he or she could become, such that each student seeks to fulfill his or her highest potential—not because they have to, not because other people expect it, not because they will get in trouble if they don’t, but because they genuinely want to be that remarkable human being that this college shows them they are capable of becoming. Somehow Davidson gives students the courage to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for those decisions, so that, whatever they choose to do, they live lives of purpose and consequence in pursuit of their highest aspirations.

I do not know precisely how Davidson has done this—that is why I need to spend some time just listening. I do not know what it will take for Davidson to do this in and for an increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world. That is something we will need to figure out together, the whole Davidson family, and it will be both challenging and exhilarating.

I do know this. Davidson is uniquely able to re-imagine and to exemplify this profoundly valuable kind of education at this crucial time. And because Davidson is uniquely able to do this, Davidson is also obligated to do so. It will be a great privilege to contribute with you to this daunting, urgent and profoundly rewarding task.

via Davidson College – Presidents Office – Remarks by President-Elect Carol Quillen.

colleges, liberal arts:  Some interesting thoughts of the value of a liberal arts education.

Fortunately, as Daniel Pink, author of A Whole New Mind, has pointed out, superior arts education also teaches many of those same skills. High-quality arts and humanities instruction is almost perfectly suited to stimulate imagination, creativity, and the ability to find adaptive solutions. Like Daniel Pink, I believe in enhancing “STEAM” in our institutions of higher education–with an extra “A” in the center of STEM incorporating the Arts as central.

Finally, the value of a liberal arts education cannot be minimized without also minimizing the lessons of history, literature, and science for the present-day. There is a reason why Congress created the National Endowment for the Humanities. I don’t ordinarily quote from statutory language to explicate the value of education, but the provisions of the U.S. Code outlining the purpose of the NEH bear repeating. The law states that Congress finds “an advanced civilization must not limit its efforts to science and technology alone but must give full value and support to the other branches of scholarly and cultural activity in order to achieve a better understanding of the past, a better analysis of the present, and a better view of the future.” Democracy,” the statute goes on to state, “demands wisdom and vision in its citizens.”

The founders, from Thomas Jefferson on, understood that the study of the liberal arts and civic obligation was important– not just to learn the lessons of history, but to preserve a functioning Republic. Walt Whitman once called America “an aesthetic democracy”– and that is a pretty good metaphor for the intellectual life of a liberal arts college.

via The Relevance of Liberal Arts to a Prosperous Democracy: Under Secretary Martha J. Kanter’s Remarks at the Annapolis Group Conference | U.S. Department of Education.

While the tradition of the liberal-arts education may be on the wane nationwide, the most elite schools, such as Harvard, Swarthmore, Middlebury, and Williams, remain committed to its ideal. These top schools are not tweaking their curriculums to add any pre-professional undergraduate programs. Thanks to their hefty endowments, they don’t have to. As the economy rebounds, their students, ironically, may be in the best spot. While studying the humanities has become unfashionable and seemingly impractical, the liberal arts also teaches students to think big thoughts—big enough to see beyond specific college majors and adapt to the broader job market.

via Jobs: The Economy, Killing Liberal Arts Education? – Newsweek.

inns, travel, lists:  Top 10 to-die-for inns and B&Bs.

truth, family history, memoirs, quotes, kith/kin:  A distant cousin has written a semi-autobiographical account of his childhood … which involves much of my family and extended family … So when I came across this NPR story, it just struck home … “‘It’s your own personal truth, and it is not necessarily factually accurate, and it’s not necessarily the truth that other people have possessed.”

In the best-selling memoir Running with Scissors, Augusten Burroughs told the story of his bizarre and occasionally brutal upbringing as the son of a mentally ill mother and an alcoholic father. When the book hit the best-seller lists, it not only established Burroughs as a well-known writer, but it also paved the way for the rest of his family to tell their own versions of the story. His older brother, John Elder Robison, wrote about their childhood in his memoir Look Me in the Eye, and now their mother, Margaret Robison, has added to this family saga with her memoir, The Long Journey Home. Taken together, the three books raise interesting questions about truth, memory and the much-maligned genre of the memoir.

Memoirs have to be true, says Lee Gutkind, a professor at Arizona State University and a specialist in creative nonfiction. But you can’t apply journalistic standards to a memoir — there’s a difference between facts and the truth.

“It’s your story, that’s what a memoir is,” Gutkind says.

“It’s your own personal truth, and it is not necessarily factually accurate, and it’s not necessarily the truth that other people have possessed.”

via In Burroughs’ Family, One Saga, Three Memoirs, Many Competing Truths : NPR.




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