Posts Tagged ‘favorite blogs

04
Sep
11

9.4. 2011 … Today would be my dad’s 84th birthday … for 11 months of the year he was my mom’s “gigolo” … it took me a long time to get the joke. :)

‎!♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪
Happy Birthday, Dad!

1927 -2003
♪♫•*¨*• .¸¸♪♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪

Labor Day Weekend, End of an Era (Summer), kith/kin, EHL sr., Shakespeare, mixtape:  Labor Day Weekend is poignant.  My dad’s birthday always falls near it, if not on it (it is today 9/4), and the end of the summer always meant one last vacation at the beach.  It was Jekyll Island GA as a child and then DeBordieu SC as an adult with my children. When my last graduates, we will find our next phase end-of-the-summer beach.  And it will be wonderful.  I love this New Yorker “mixtape” of poems and prose about the end of the summer. Funny, even Shakespeare captured it …

“And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.”

via The Book Bench: Literary Mixtape: Summer’s End : The New Yorker.

“If”, Rudyard Kipling, kith/kin, poetry, favorites:  Just like with music, if a friend recommends a poem, i will read it.  Bob T. recommended “If, ” by Rudyard Kipling (“I love this poem. I don’t always follow its advice, but it reminds you to just keep plugging.”)  “If” is a Lindsey family favorite as well. So much so that my sister offered all her children and nieces and nephews $100 if they would memorize “If” for their 13th birthday.

If

If you can keep your head when all about you

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,

But make allowance for their doubting too:

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,

Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,

Or being hated don’t give way to hating,

And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;

If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,

If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same:.

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,

And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings,

And never breathe a word about your loss:

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew

To serve your turn long after they are gone,

And so hold on when there is nothing in you

Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,

Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,

If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,

If all men count with you, but none too much:

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,

And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

via If by Rudyard Kipling.

A history of the World in Six Glasses, bookshelf, lists:  This book comes highly recommended by Allison B. I can’t wait to get to it on my list.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Standage starts with a bold hypothesis—that each epoch, from the Stone Age to the present, has had its signature beverage—and takes readers on an extraordinary trip through world history. The Economist’s technology editor has the ability to connect the smallest detail to the big picture and a knack for summarizing vast concepts in a few sentences. He explains how, when humans shifted from hunting and gathering to farming, they saved surplus grain, which sometimes fermented into beer. The Greeks took grapes and made wine, later borrowed by the Romans and the Christians. Arabic scientists experimented with distillation and produced spirits, the ideal drink for long voyages of exploration. Coffee also spread quickly from Arabia to Europe, becoming the “intellectual counterpoint to the geographical expansion of the Age of Exploration.” European coffee-houses, which functioned as “the Internet of the Age of Reason,” facilitated scientific, financial and industrial cross-fertilization. In the British industrial revolution that followed, tea “was the lubricant that kept the factories running smoothly.” Finally, the rise of American capitalism is mirrored in the history of Coca-Cola, which started as a more or less handmade medicinal drink but morphed into a mass-produced global commodity over the course of the 20th century. In and around these grand ideas, Standage tucks some wonderful tidbits—on the antibacterial qualities of tea, Mecca’s coffee trials in 1511, Visigoth penalties for destroying vineyards—ending with a delightful appendix suggesting ways readers can sample ancient beverages.

via Amazon.com: A History of the World in 6 Glasses (9780802715524): Tom Standage: Books.

See also – The World in a Glass: Six Drinks That Changed History.

Marthame Sanders, i feast therefore i am, favorite blogs, faith and spirituality, definition: religion:  Quite a while back I posted a sunday school  discussion on the definition of religion. 2.27.2011 … thinking about how we define things … from Sunday School … “religion.” How do you define “religion?” « Dennard’s Clipping Service.  I love Marthame’s definition and where he takes us from there.

And that, in my opinion, is what the conversation offers us as people of faith, whether we define ourselves as “spiritual” or “religious”. For the author, the important distinction is between private spirituality and religious community.

The word “religion” itself is all about connection – re-ligio, as in ligament, a re-connection. Listen to what the author writes:

Being privately spiritual but not religious just doesn’t interest me. There is nothing challenging about having deep thoughts all by oneself. What is interesting is doing this work in community, where people might call you on stuff, or heaven forbid, disagree with you. Where life with God gets rich and provocative is when you dig deeply into a tradition that you did not invent all for yourself.

In an odd way, the very thing that happened on Facebook was just that: people were calling each other on stuff and having an honest conversation.

Being Jesus’ disciple, following Christ faithfully, means doing so in community.

This is such a crucial point to make in 2011. We have the world before us in ways that we never had. Technology has given us more access to information than ever. Gutenberg’s printing press doesn’t hold a candle to the internet. Not even language is a barrier, as pages written in other languages can be translated with the click of a mouse.

And yet, the irony is that we are becoming more and more isolated by virtue of the same technology which holds such promise. There are more places to get information than ever before. And yet the tyranny of choice usually means that we self-select for those sources that agree with what we already say. Whether we choose Fox News or MSNBC, it is so much more comforting to listen to those who will confirm our self-satisfaction rather than challenge it.

And even places of apparent neutrality choose for us, and we don’t even know it. A Google search is now based not only on the term you are looking for, but also your history as an internet user. Two people looking for the same thing will get different results based on what they prefer, meaning a further narrowing of the information we get. And Facebook, which prompted this whole conversation today, slowly removes updates from your friends whom you rarely click on, meaning the ones who challenge your thinking will cease to be a part of your social media experience.

In many ways, we see this siloing of opinion at work in the partisan absurdities inWashington, and in the news channels competing to see who can have more people on screen at the same time screaming at each other. But I’m not convinced this is anything new and peculiar to this day and age; it just has a different flavor, and it gives the church a crucial role.

Do you want an experience that will tell you how right you already are? There are plenty of those out there, and you can pretty much do that on your own. Do you want a place that convinces you of your own self-righteousness? There are plenty of organizations and, yes, even churches that will do just that.

Or are you looking for a community where you will be welcomed as you are and celebrated for you who are and, at the same time, challenged to grow and stretch as you confront the world as it really is? Then we just might be the place for you.

I’d like us, as we close, to consider the prayer that the author uses in her article:

Dear God, thank you for creating us in your image and not the other way around.

Amen.

via We Can Work It Out « i feast therefore i am.

kith/kin, family art: I love it!  However, I feel like I am the hippopotamus and my little bird has outgrown me … That’s my interpretation.  Molly says she is just making whimsy of reality.  Her grandmother GoGo was looking for something much deeper … the bird survives the mammal.  What do you see?  That is what makes art fun!

PostSecret, apps, review:  I think it will be nice for some to send in via the internet … but the homemade postcards were more personal.  And I loved the relationship between the mail carrier and Frank, the site’s creator (see below).  Oh, and I hope Frank’s dad is wrong.

PostSecret (@postsecret)
9/3/11 1:57 PM
My dad believes that when the PostSecret App goes live tonight, the Blog will die because no one will mail me postcards anymore.

However, as time went on the postcards began to more than just trickle in. We at the post office were having a blast reading them every day. There were silly, funny, serious, sad, lonely, hateful, every kind of emotion you could imagine on these little postcards. The exceptionally funny ones were passed around the office for everyone to share. One of my co-workers said she couldn’t believe that this person lived on MY route. She said, “of all people to get this on their route, YOU!” I took it to mean that she knew I was thoroughly enjoying it and maybe she was a tad jealous! I have to say that it was fun and a great conversation topic, but despite all that, I began to learn from it. There are many many sad and lonely people out there and some of these postcards would break your heart. Suddenly the problems that I or my friends might have, seemed small in comparison to the ones I was reading. It certainly made me take a look at my life and realize how lucky I was. I just wanted to reach out and help but they were always anonymous except for the postmark you hadn’t a clue where the card came from.

via fromUKtoUSwithlove: POSTSECRET August 6, 2010.

blog scrapers, Goggle:  I hope no one ever thinks I am a blog scraper …If you think I have taken something without citing it, please contact me …

Scaper sites have stolen content from writers for years, building spam websites that copy and paste your writing into a new online location. Now Google needs your help to weed out these sites that clog search results and pirate content.

Check it out: “Google is testing algorithmic changes for scraper sites (especially blog scrapers). We are asking for examples, and may use data you submit to test and improve our algorithms. This form does not perform a spam report or notice of copyright infringement. Use [this link] to report spam or [this link]  to report copyright complaints.”

These phantom websites sometimes score higher than the original content in Google search results, frustrating thousands of writers. The data you share with Google will help the search giant block these online pests. (Via Jose Afonso Furtado)

via How to Report Scraper Sites to Google – GalleyCat.

twitter, Kathy Reichs, ads, LOL:  Ok I assumed she was taking me to a Bones ad! Great ad. 🙂

Kathy Reichs (@KathyReichs)
9/3/11 12:53 PM
What’s the ad for? Guess before it ends.http://t.co/XgjDDY7

Sir Conan Doyle, Sherlock Homes, literary afterlife:  I have often commented on Jane Austin’s nine lives. Other writers with similar afterlives are certainly Dickens, Shakespeare and Sir Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes.  Can you think of others?

A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon

Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6

King (The Beekeeper’s Apprentice and 10 other Mary Russell novels) and Klinger (The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes) have not stuck to the usual suspects for this stellar anthology of 16 new short stories that pay homage to the great detective. Perhaps the highlight is S.J. Rozan’s “The Men with the Twisted Lips,” a particularly clever alternate take on a canonical Holmes story. Phillip and Jerry Margolin provide a fair-play whodunit centering on the purported discovery of evidence of a Holmes story written exclusively for Queen Victoria in “The Adventure of the Purloined Paget.” Colin Cotterill takes a humorous approach in his illustrated selection, “The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story,” while Charles Todd’s “The Case That Holmes Lost” convincingly recreates Doyle himself, grappling with a lawsuit aimed at his most famous creation. Other contributors include Lee Child, Neil Gaiman, Laura Lippman, Margaret Maron, and Jacqueline Winspear. (Nov.)

via Fiction Review: A Study in Sherlock: Stories Inspired by the Holmes Canon by Edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger. Bantam, $29.95 (350p) ISBN 978-0-8129-8246-6.

iPad, Ipad commercial use:  I have never seen one used in business (other than in the Apple Store).  I promise I will tell you the first time I do.

We’ve all been there; wandering aimlessly up and down the grocery aisles, silently screaming, “My kingdom for an iPad dock on this shopping cart!”

One supermarket chain in the U.K. is looking to do the unthinkable by rolling out (pun intended!) shopping carts—or “trolleys” as they’re charmingly called across the pond—with built-in iPad docks.

The supermarket chain, Sainsbury’s, will be testing the carts in one of its West London stores and if everything goes well, the project may be extended to the rest of its locations across the U.K. No word on whether we’ll see something like this in the U.S., but this is America. Go start your own supermarket chain and order some of these if you want them that badly.

via Supermarket Rolls Out Shopping Carts with Built-in iPad Docks – Techland – TIME.com.

The future of flight attendant luggage may end up being even smaller than those tiny carry-on bags you often see them wheeling around as they roam airports in flight attendant packs; British Airways is testing to see whether iPads will make cabin crews helpful and more productive during loading and flights.

100 cabin crew members will be given the tablets as part of a pilot program to see how they impact in-flight service, replacing printed charts, timetables and other material they normally carry.

via British Airways Flight Attendants to Be Outfitted with iPads – Techland – TIME.com.

la guerre des Post-It, Post-It wars, Only in France, LOL:  If someone sees this in the US, let me know.

 Just when it seemed like Ubisoft Montreuil had won the French Post-It War with their three-story Ezio from Assassin’s Creed, a new challenger appears.

Société Générale Bank has trumped both Ubisoft and their rivals at BNP Bank with this 11,000-note creation.

Sorry, other Post-It teams. You just got Asterixed.

via Post-It War Update of the Day – TDW Geeks.

06
May
11

5.6.2011 …it seems Osama bin Laden got my attention today … and cardinals …

Stephen Curry, Davidson College, Davidson basketball, NBA, kudos: Well, he went to Davidson …

Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors is the recipient of the Joe Dumars Trophy presented to the 2010-11 NBA Sportsmanship Award winner, the NBA announced today.

Curry (Pacific) was one of six divisional winners, which included Charlotte’s D.J. Augustin (Southeast), Chicago’s Luol Deng (Central), New Jersey’s Deron Williams (Atlantic), Portland’s LaMarcus Aldridge (Northwest), and San Antonio’s George Hill (Southwest).

Curry received 88 first-place votes (2,445 total points) of a possible 347. The NBA will make a $10,000 donation on behalf of Curry to Habitat For Humanity East Bay, which uses volunteers to build affordable homes in Alameda and Contra Costa counties.

via WARRIORS: Stephen Curry Wins 2010-11 NBA Sportsmanship Award.

faith and spirituality, favorite blogs, Davidson College, kith/kin:  I love the cardinal guest post by college friend Diane on college friend Cary’s blog, a favorite of mine. I don’t have a great redbird story other than I have always been told to wish on a cardinal because it will bring you good luck.  Read on …

Yesterday I requested “cardinal stories” from readers, since several told me (in response to a post on hope on Tuesday) that they’d had cardinal encounters recently (what’s going on?)  So for the next couple of days, I’ll stick with the cardinal theme.

Here’s a post from a college friend, Diane Cooper.  Let me tell you a little about her first:

Diane Cooper is the mother of four children, including sweet David Cooper, her seventeen-year-old son who died suddenly two years ago from Athlete Sudden Cardiac Arrest while rowing with his crew team at McCallie School in Chattanooga.

via Guest Post by Diane Odom Cooper « Holy Vernacular.

Let us always make sure that it is protected and never take it for granted. Whenever you see a cardinal, smile and say, “Thank you!” You have received one of the ultimate blessings of Nature.

via The ultimate backyard bird | Backyard Birder | a Chron.com blog.

Osama bin Laden’s death, President Obama, photography:  As they say a picture is worth a thousand words … I enjoyed this insightful analysis of this picture.

President Barack Obama and his national security team watch updates on the mission to capture Osama bin Laden on Sunday.

Most commentators have focused on the historic nature of the photo: Obama staring at the screen with a grim intensity; Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, covering her mouth to repress her reaction — the epicenter of U.S. military power hunting down its most hated foe.

But look deeper and that photo becomes historic in a more subtle way. It’s a snapshot of how much this nation’s attitudes about race, women and presidential swagger are changing, several scholars and historians say.


“The photo is visually suggestive of a new American landscape that we’re still crossing into,” says Saladin Ambar, a political science professor at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania.

“When Obama was elected, there were some people who thought that we had crossed a racial threshold,” Ambar says. “What his presidency is revealing is that there are many crossings.”

via What ‘Situation Room Photo’ reveals about us – CNN.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, OBL’s family: Never understood the concept of mail order bride … do you think she loved him …

While little is known about Bin Laden’s daughter, his wife, Amal, “was a kind of mail-order teenage bride from Yemen, whom he married while living in Afghanistan during the 1990s, according to the account of bin Laden’s former Yemeni bodyguard,” according to Steve Coll, the author of “Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the C.I.A., Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.”

….

Although it is far from clear what will happen to Bin Laden’s surviving family members in Pakistan, or if we will ever hear directly from them about what they saw when the American commandos shot Osama bin Laden, his wife, Amal, did speak to the media at least once. In March 2002, she granted an interview to Al Majalla, a Saudi magazine in London, which was reprinted by The Guardian.

In the interview, she explained that, following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, her husband had arranged for her to be transported from Afghanistan with her children and handed over to Pakistani authorities. On that occasion, she was, reportedly, allowed to return to Yemen.

via Left Behind: Bin Laden’s Wife and Daughter – NYTimes.com.

Osama bin Laden’s death, law:  Can you imagine what a nightmare of a bar exam question this would be???

International law recognizes a country’s inherent right to act in self-defense, and it makes no distinction between vindicating these rights through a drone strike or through a boots-on-the-ground operation. Administration officials have described the raid as a “kill or capture” mission and asserted that the SEALs would have taken Osama bin Laden alive had he surrendered and presented no threat to U.S. personnel or the others in the compound that night. This, according to official accounts, did not happen.

Much has been made of the disclosure that Osama bin Laden was unarmed, but this, too, is irrelevant in determining whether the operation was lawful. The SEALs entered the compound on a war footing, in the middle of the night, prepared to encounter hostile fire in what they believed to be the enemy leader’s hideout. They reported that they became embroiled in a firefight once inside; they had no way of knowing whether Osama bin Laden himself was armed. Even if he had signaled surrender, there is no reason to believe that danger had evaporated. As Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said during a congressional hearing on Wednesday: “From a Navy SEAL perspective, you had to believe that this guy was a walking IED,” prepared to blow up himself and those around him or possibly to detonate an explosive that would have engulfed the entire house.

It is easy in the light of day to second-guess decisions made in the heat of war. It is particularly easy for those who refuse to acknowledge that war in the first place. Based on information released by the administration, the covert military operation that brought down the most wanted terrorist in the world appears to have been gutsy and well executed. It was also lawful.

via In killing Osama bin Laden, U.S. had the law on its side – The Washington Post.

Osama bin Laden’s death, covert operations:  Amazing …

The SEALs did the shooting inside bin Laden’s compound, but an elite Army unit called Task Force 160 flew them there and back, and the pilot of one of the Blackhawk helicopters may have been the difference between success and failure, CBS News national security correspondent David Martin reports.

The SEALs were about to fast rope into the courtyard in front of bin Laden’s house when the Blackhawk lost lift. Imagine what would have happened if it had crashed into the courtyard with all its SEALs still aboard.

Chris Marvin doesn’t have to imagine. It happened to him in Afghanistan.

“How close did he come? As close as any helicopter pilot can, maybe closer,” said Marvin, “but he had or she had the talent and skill level to land the aircraft safely and let everybody off without injuries.”

via Blackhawk pilot’s quick thinking credited in raid – CBS News.

Osama bin Laden’s death, covert operations:  Anatomy of a Raid: Osama bin Laden’s Final Moments – Video – TIME.com.

04
Dec
10

12.4.2010 … barking dogs are winning again … :)

art, Africa, NYC: I found this article very interesting and insightful.  What do you think?

Africa is everywhere, so pervasive in our lives that we barely see it. Since it is in all likelihood the continent where human evolution began, it is literally in the bloodstream of everyone. DNA aside, huge portions of everyday life and cultural achievement are unthinkable without Africa.

What would Modern art be like if Matisse had never gone to Morocco or if he, Picasso and the German Expressionists had never set eyes on the sculptural innovations of sub-Saharan Africa? Very hard to say. And popular music? Around the world, it incorporates sounds and rhythms that originated in Africa. More locally, jazz — not Abstract Expressionism — was the first American art form of international stature.

via ‘Global Africa Project’ at Museum of Arts & Design – Review – NYTimes.com.

fashion, comedy, Conan:  Poor, Conan!

It all started Wednesday night when O’Brien had fashion expert and “Project Runway” star Tim Gunn on his show. Talk turned to a new fashion craze known as jeggings. That’s leggings styled to look like tight jeans for you less fashion forward folks.

Anyhow, Gunn let it be known that jeggings are not just for the ladies, at which point, O’Brien vowed to wear a pair for an entire show. And that he did on Thursday night.

via When Conan met jeggings – The Marquee Blog – CNN.com Blogs.

issues:  We have a almost adult picky eater at our house and he had reflux as an infant.  hmmm.

Researcher Nancy Zucker at Duke says these exceptionally picky adults may be suffering from a previously unrecognized illness called selective eating disorder (SED). They’re not just being bratty, Zucker tells LiveScience’s Robin Nixon. Rather, selective eaters may experience food differently than other people: they tend to reject food because of look or smell, rather than taste, and they often have had early negative associations with food, like stomach problems or acid reflux in infancy, LiveScience reports.

via Does Extremely Picky Eating in Adulthood Signal a Mental Disorder? – TIME Healthland.

blogsDamn You Auto Correct! – Funny iPhone Fails and Autocorrect Horror Stories.

restaurants, locavore: Add to the  list.

Charleston, South Carolina, is no stranger to restaurant buzz, but lately there’s a roar about chef Sean Brock’s new establishment, Husk. We stopped by earlier this week to find out if the food and drink lived up to the hype, and came out preaching the Brock gospel. (Click here to see a gallery of photos from our visit.) If you haven’t heard, Brock abides by one rule at Husk: All ingredients must come from the South, from the triggerfish and the pork to the mustard and the butter (both of which are whipped up in the kitchen). “This isn’t about Southern dishes,” says Brock, “it’s about Southern food. And no one has better ingredients than the South.”

via The Most Southern Restaurant Ever.

art, NYC, technology:  Another reason to go to NYC.

It was a view bequeathed by another gilded age, the 19th century one that gave rise to the Park Avenue Armory, in whose vast drill hall all this art-historical re-enacting was taking place. In other words, the traveling Peter Greenaway painting-cinema-lecture-installation-whatever-it-might-be extravaganza had finally come to town.

via Peter Greenaway’s ‘Last Supper’ at Park avenue Armory – NYTimes.com.

technology, change, end of an era:  I was talking with a photographer  friend last night and he says a friend (Pulitzer Prize winning) uses his iPhone wiht various apps almost exclusively.

The point-and-shoot camera, which has been a part of American households since 1900, when George Eastman introduced the Kodak Brownie, is endangered. Like other single-use devices — the answering machine, the desktop calculator, the Rolodex — it is being shoved aside by a multipurpose device: the smartphone and its camera, which takes better snapshots with each new model.

via In Smartphone Era, Point-and-Shoots Stay Home – NYTimes.com.

Advent, advertising: I think this is creative advertising.  Share a Red Cup of your favorite Holiday Coffee at Starbucks | Starbucks.

favorite blogs, quotes:  I always enjoy Cary … but liked this one especially.

“Search me, God, and show me my heart.  Test me and know my anxious thoughts.  See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting” (Psalm 139:23, 24).

via Corrections, Retractions, Forgiveness and the Holy Spirit « Holy Vernacular.

NYC, places, Times Square, urban planning, urban redevelopment:

The plan, to radically make over 13 acres, between Broadway and Eighth Avenue, primarily fronting 42nd Street, outlived three mayors, four governors, two real estate booms and two recessions. It faced widespread derision in the beginning from jaded New Yorkers who were wise to grand plans. It faces occasional derision today from New Yorkers who speak of the old Times Square with newfound fondness.

It embodied both the hubris of urban master planning and its possibilities, and showed the value of ripping up blueprints and starting over in midstream. And it has been a touchstone experience for a city that is now building, or trying to build, several multibillion-dollar projects, including ground zero, the Atlantic Yards, Willets Point and the Hudson Yards.

“So often, people say New York can’t build large-scale projects anymore,” said Lynne B. Sagalynn, a professor of real estate finance at Columbia University and the author of “Times Square Roulette: Remaking the City Icon.”

But, Professor Sagalynn said, “Times Square is an example of how a city was able to think on a grand scale and carry it out.”

via Times Square Redevelopment Is Complete – NYTimes.com.

The Rebirth of 42nd Street – Interactive Feature – NYTimes.com.

cabins:

Not too many luxury weekend getaways sport plastic-coated canvas tents and a communal, co-ed bathroom.

via Camping Out: A Luxury Compound in Aptos, Calif. – WSJ.com.

Apps: App Review: Djay for iPad — Engadget.

gift ideas:  Some of these look fun. 10 cool games – chicagotribune.com.

Atlanta,zoos, pandas: Ok, so I love the pandas.

Melissa Ruggieri, mguggieri@ajc.com, Melissa Ruggieri

Two members of Zoo Atlanta’s medical staff takes measurements on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, of the baby giant panda born to Lun Lun.

He’s 2.2 pounds, 35 centimeters from nose to tail and squeals when his mommy momentarily lumbers away.

In a few years, he’ll haul almost 300 pounds on a 3-foot frame and, presumably, be more interested in a bamboo stalk than the whereabouts of his mother.

But for now, the 1-month-old panda cub at Zoo Atlanta is behaving exactly as he should.

via Panda cub thriving at Zoo Atlanta  | ajc.com.

30
Sep
10

9.30.2010 … off to Atlanta for a four score and four celebration for the mother …

old times: Shout out to our old neighbors Lea and Herb and Cindy and Elizabeth …

There is a common joke involving fortune cookies that involves appending “between the sheets” or “in bed” to the end of the fortune, usually creating a sexual innuendo or other bizarre messages (e.g., “Our greatest glory is not in never falling but in rising every time we fall [in bed]”).[9]

via Fortune cookie – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

street art:  As I have said before i love public art and street performers are a type of public art in my opinion.  I have become much more conscious of them in recent years and they add to the character of a city.

Curry said he sees street performing as a sort of study of the human condition.

“It’s an interaction with people with a myriad of socio-economic backgrounds,” he said.

Like many street performers, Curry said he feels good when he makes others feel good. As he got in his car to go home and grill a New York Strip for his wife and daughters, he offered one last piece of life advice:

“Follow your bliss,” Curry said.

via Through their eyes | CU Independent.

Continue reading ‘9.30.2010 … off to Atlanta for a four score and four celebration for the mother …’

22
Aug
10

8.22.2010 … RIP VARSITY JR … nest is empty again … very quiet, refrigerator almost empty …

RIP, food – Southern, icons, Atlanta, oral history, my dad:  I never thought about it until now, but the Varsity Jr opened when I was 5 and we went there frequently when we went to the old Hastings location.  My dad always made some comment about it not being the same as the real Varsity downtown.  Just like me, he was slow to accept change!  I will miss you Varsity Jr.

Joey Ivansco, AJC File Susan Gordy, retired since 2006, ran the Varsity Jr. since 1980, when her husband, Frank Gordy Jr. (son of Varsity founder Frank Gordy) was killed in a shooting accident.

What’ll ya have before the Varsity Jr. closes its doors?

Sunday will be the last day to enjoy chili dogs and onion rings at the Lindbergh Drive location, according to the iconic Atlanta restaurant chain.

After 45 years, the Varsity Jr. will close due to an inability to meet zoning requirements with the City of Atlanta. Restaurant owners had hoped to build a new facility, complete with indoor restrooms.

via Varsity Jr. closes Sunday after 45 years  | ajc.com.

college advice, favorite blogs:   Well, not too crazy!  Put Yourself Out There and Do Something Crazy – The Choice Blog – NYTimes.com.

games:  Rarely find anything interesting in Bill Gates’ blog, which is unfortunate.  But found this article about bridge partners interesting.  Bill Gates – Infrequently Asked Questions – What Makes for a Good Bridge Partner? – The Gates Notes.

cities, urban development:  Very interesting articles on one of my favorite subjects.  I agree that the cities in developing nations are not the cities that the world wants …they are little more than “sprawling slums.”

In looking across the last 50,000 or so years of cultural evolution, the creation of cities has to be recognized as a revolution in itself. From Babylon and Sumer to Athens and Rome, the organization of human society into powerful cities, and the empires which often supported them, marked a critical turning point in our development.

Now with the human population poised to reach 9 billion or more over the next century, what is the future of our material-cultural organization? While the United States has poured its treasure into building energetically unsustainable suburbs, nations like China have seen their cities grow at phenomenal rates. In many poorer countries the growth of cities has come to include sprawling slums. This is where a significant fraction of that population increase will live.

via 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR.

green, NC:  I believe this needs to happen.

Duke Energy Carolinas has abandoned plans to build three wind turbines in the Pamlico Sound as an offshore wind demonstrator project because costs have ballooned to almost $120 million.

But Duke is committed to spending about $750,000 more on studies UNC Chapel Hill has undertaken to determine the commercial viability of windmills off the Carolina coast. That will bring Duke’s total investment in the university’s offshore wind studies to about $4 million.

via Duke Energy drops wind project off N.C. coast, citing cost – Charlotte Business Journal.

libraries, places, Atlanta:  it would be nice to find a new use for libraries … sources for information and community center.  Does anyone remember going to the beautiful little midtown library (next First Pres. or the not so beautiful Buckhead library? … it was hoppin’.

As budget cuts chop library programs out of schools, public libraries are becoming increasingly important in their roles to educate entire communities. But they also serve another purpose as town squares for neighborhoods–places where people can come together and share ideas. The new Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library, which opened this month in Washington DC hopes to become the center of the neighborhood by adding uses that reach beyond reading, and creating a dynamic space that transcends the typical tomb-like library setting.

via A Neighborhood Revival Starts With a New Public Library | Co.Design.

college, our children, UGA: Our kids live in a different world.

It’s been two weeks since the University of Georgia was named the No. 1 party school in the nation by the Princeton Review. Apparently, authorities are paying attention.

Twenty University of Georgia students were arrested for alcohol-related charges Thursday night in Athens, including underage possession of alcohol and DUI, according to Athens-Clarke County jail records.Those arrests – by university and Athens-Clarke County police – bring the total of drug-and alcohol-related arrests made in the last two weeks to 43, according to The Red and Black, the campus newspaper.

via Arrests of UGA students on partying charges up sharply  | ajc.com.

Great Recession, real estate: I thought my childhood home in Brookwood Hills was huge … and it is about 1/2 of my home.  I would rather have a 2200 sq. foot home.  Keeps the family close.

It increasingly seems like that’s the case. As we’ve written before, the American love affair with massive and mass-produced luxury homes is fast coming to a close. The average home size peaked at 2,521 square feet in 2007. (WSJ reporter Kelly Evans noticed home sizes shrinking in the second quarter of 2007.) Home size came in flat in 2008 and fell in 2009 as builders built smaller, less ornate homes priced lower to compete with foreclosures.

In a WSJ story in November, Michael Phillips looked at the luxury home business and found that many builders were scaling back, “struggling to distinguish among what home buyers need, what they what they want and what they can live without — Jacuzzi by Jacuzzi, butler’s pantry by butler’s pantry.”

via Good-Bye McMansion, Hello Tiny House? – Developments – WSJ.

postsecret, random:  I laughed at this … I have never felt like my luggage has been opened.  Maybe I will try leaving a note.

RT @kaynemcgladrey: “Am I the only guy who leaves notes to the TSA, knowing they’ll open my luggage? It’s like @postsecret in my suitcase.”

via Twitter / Home.

teenagers, risky ventures:  I think the Dutch court was right the first time.

A Dutch court released Laura last month from the guardianship of Dutch child protection agencies, who had tried to block her voyage because of fears for her safety and psychological health.

via Dutch teen sets sail in secrecy on solo world trip – More Sports – SI.com.




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