Posts Tagged ‘firsts

06
Mar
14

3.6.14 … breakfast at the White House :) … Atlanta Surge … I clip, btw … 1939 ‘Gone With The Wind’ cast party … Let the wild rumpus start!

 White House, Atlanta:  I ventured out for my favorite diner for breakfast … the White House.  My brother eats here so frequently that they bring him his hot tea as he sits down. The waitress recognized my mom. As we left, she said, “goodbye, mamma.” She loved that!

MLB, Atlanta, Turner Field, urban development: Years ago I read an editorial that asserted that a city was only a real city if it had both an AL and a NL team (i.e., Chicago and New York).  Well, this is indeed interesting, but problematic.

If one man gets his way, Turner Field won’t get razed in 2017 after the Atlanta Braves move up to its new Cobb County stadium. Instead, a brand new baseball team – known as, wait for it … the Atlanta Surge – would replace the longtime professional baseball club at the Ted.

The idea for the Surge comes from veteran Atlanta ad exec Mike McDonald, a self-proclaimed lifelong baseball fan, who wants to bring a second Major League Baseball team to metro Atlanta. And he wants the Surge’s slogan to be the following: “Let’s Turner Lemon into Lemonade!”

The AJC’s Tim Tucker, who first reported on the proposal last night, writes from behind the AJC’s paywall:

He has presented the idea to some local politicos and business folks. He has talked to lawyers about how to challenge MLB. He even wrote a letter to the Tampa Bay Rays, asking if they’d be interested in relocating. The Rays haven’t responded and McDonald has decided he’d prefer the fresh start of an expansion team.

[…]

McDonald already has a name in mind for the AL team he seeks: the Atlanta Surge, drawn from the city motto Resurgens (Latin for rising again). He envisions the city and county receiving an equity stake in the team in return for use of the venue, and an investor group operating the team with him. He says MLB should waive an expansion fee as a way to settle the damages of the Braves leaving the city limits.

He expects people to “take shots” at his plan and says that is fine.

McDonald believes that Atlanta and Fulton County are “owed” a team for their longstanding financial and emotional investments into the Braves’ franchise. But it’s unlikely the region will land another ball club. There’s not enough demand, according to one expert. Plus, the Braves have exclusive rights from MLB for all home games played in most of the metro region – which could be problematic.

The Atlanta Braves declined to comment on the prospects of the Surge. But at least Fulton County Commissioner Robb Pitts said the proposal was “a magnificent idea.” That’s a start!

via Goodbye Atlanta Braves, Hello Atlanta Surge? | Atlanta News & Opinion Blog | Fresh Loaf | Creative Loafing Atlanta.

Is History Repeating Itself?, medium, media, clipping services, Time, Buzzfeed, humble beginnings:  People often ask me about my blog and I quip, “I clip.” I really use my site for a filing cabinet.  I call it a “clipping service” because i remember seeing a picture of the POTUS being given a file of newspaper clippings everyday.  I had no idea that this was the term used to describe the humble beginnings of such media giants as Time and Buzzfeed.

Time began as a clipping service in a small office. A group of writers subscribed to a dozen newspapers and summarized the most important stories, rewriting the news in a more digestible format.

BuzzFeed also started as a clipping service in a small office seven years ago. Instead of subscribing to newspapers, we surfed the web (and used technology) to find the most interesting stories and summarized them into a more digestible format. (You can ask Peggy or Scott how it worked in those early days!)

Of course, both Time magazine and BuzzFeed evolved from our respective early days to become much more ambitious. As Time and BuzzFeed emerged from our respective youths, we both expanded into original reporting, commissioned longform features, and built teams of foreign correspondents. In our case, it only took a few years to go from summarizing web trends in our little Chinatown office to reporting from Syria and the Ukraine with local security, body armor, helmets, and satellite phones. And both Time and BuzzFeed grew by creating irresistible lists such as Time’s “100 Most Influential People” and BuzzFeed’s “42 People You Won’t Believe Actually Exist.”

The big breakthrough for Time Inc., the company, came 13 years after the launch of Time, when printing press technology advanced to enable the launch of Life, the pioneering magazine filled with vivid pictures of people and events. It figured out how to cover cheap paper with a glossy coating, making a mass-produced photo magazine economical for the first time and creating a smash hit that enabled aggressive investment in print journalism at Time and photojournalism at Life.

The big breakthrough for BuzzFeed also came after our early clipping service days when smartphones became social and could display vivid pictures and video for the first time. Suddenly our lists, quizzes, and videos could be seen and shared by an audience of billions of connected readers right from their phones. Social and mobile converged, becoming the primary form of distribution for our content. The leverage provided by this massive reach is why we can make aggressive investments in journalism and entertainment. (We are still in the midst of this shift, with mobile, social, and global distribution accelerating faster than ever).

via Is History Repeating Itself? — Medium.

kith/kin, firsts, Atlanta history, 1939  ‘Gone With The Wind’ cast party, On The Market – Curbed Atlanta, Buckhead – Atlanta, irony, Peachtree Heights:  I attended my first cocktail party as an adult (i.e. as an invitee, not an appendage to my parents) at this beautiful and elegant home.   I was 17 and the host was a college freshman that I was friends with in high school.  I remember walking in and thinking that this was what it was like to be an adult.  There is a great deal of irony in that.  But it was great fun to look at the inside photos and relive a moment of my young adulthood.  And  I never knew that I was in the venue of the 1939 ‘Gone With The Wind’ cast party.  Beautiful and elegant home … great memories. And another thing … I don’t remember  knowing that this “neighborhood” was called Peachtree Heights.

Spending $3.25 million in Buckhead would afford you the opportunity to buy this Habersham Road manse, host a kegger and announce to guests, “This is where the 1939 ‘Gone With The Wind’ cast party happened, y’all!” That’s all well and good. But first you’d have to come to terms with the décor, which is fitting for a historic Cooper and Cooper property but is decidedly grandma chic. We haven’t seen this much floral furniture since The Couch-Swing House, another Peachtree Heights estate. Plusses include the mesmerizing spiral staircase and enchanting floral gardens. The home should appeal to well-to-do socialites with AARP Magazine subscriptions, and if history’s any indication, this pad is primed to party.

· 2878 Habersham Road [Estately]

via For $3.2M, Live Where ‘Gone With The Wind’ Stars Partied – On The Market – Curbed Atlanta.

Davidson Basketball, March Madness 2014, the kenpom.com blog:  Let the wild rumpus start!

The Wildcats provided another good example of how confidence derived from scheduling seems to largely be a myth. They went 4-10 in non-conference play, partly due to games against the likes of Duke, Virginia, and Wichita State, and entered the conference schedule on a five-game losing streak. They proceeded to win 15 of 16 conference games, leading the conference in both offensive and defensive efficiency. Just one of those wins was by single-digits and the loss was by two in overtime. In a normal season, this would have been the most dominant performance by a team relative to its league.

Davidson’s only conference loss was to Elon, who was voted the preseason pick to win the league by the SoCon’s head coaches. I think this was in the same way that Charles Barkley was voted MVP in 1993. People were tired of Davidson winning the conference even though they still figured to be the best team. Elon didn’t do poorly, mind you. But an 11-5 record looks disappointing in comparison to the 13-5 record they had two seasons ago.

via the kenpom.com blog.

Eureka! Plans For Olympia ‘To Match Historical Precedent’?!?, Historic Possibilities – Curbed Atlanta, art deco Walgreens, Coca Cola sign, Atlanta downtown:   I like it!

Surely it’s a mirage, but at first glance, renderings for a proposed revamp of the Olympia Building downtown appear to contain the phrase “To Match Historical Precedent.” Not just once, but with several aspects of the project. In Atlanta. Seriously. A company called CSH-23 Peachtree LLC scooped up the struggling Olympia for $2.2 million last fall, and renderings dated from January suggest the 1930s building could be slated for a Walgreens Pharmacy. The pharmacy’s name would be etched in art deco lettering on a “new black aluminum canopy marquee to match historical precedent,” the plans suggest. New second-floor windows and a tenant blade sign on the side of the building would also reflect the 1930s aesthetic. Could obeying the historical precedent help to set a new precedent for the future?

via Eureka! Plans For Olympia ‘To Match Historical Precedent’?!? – Historic Possibilities – Curbed Atlanta.

01
Aug
13

8.1.13 … aspirational places … the south … vacations … food …

Hot U.S. Cities, jobs, culture, Southern and Modest Sized, The Daily Beast, lists:  A few of my favorite places made the list …

Call them aspirational cities, or magnets of opportunity, but the urban areas attracting today’s ambitious citizens are most likely Southern, culturally vibrant, modest sized, long on jobs, and short on traffic, write Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox.

articleinserts_aspcities1

A city at its best, wrote the philosopher René Descartes, provides “an inventory of the possible.” The city Descartes had in mind was 17th-century Amsterdam, which for him epitomized those cities where people go to change their circumstances and improve their lives. But such aspirational cities have existed throughout American history as well, starting with Boston in the 17th century, Philadelphia in the 18th, New York in the 19th, Chicago in the early 20th, Detroit in the 1920s and 1930s, followed by midcentury Los Angeles, and San Jose in the 1980s.Yes, the great rule of aspirational cities is that they change over time, becoming sometimes less entrepreneurial, more expensive, and demographically stagnant. In the meantime, other cities, often once obscure, suddenly become the new magnets of opportunity.

via Hot U.S. Cities That Offer Both Jobs and Culture Are Mostly Southern and Modest Sized – The Daily Beast.

Washington National Cathedral, Darth Vader, random:  I assumed this was an internet hoax … 🙂

DarthVader

The Star Wars Villain on the Northwest TowerIn the 1980s, while the west towers were under construction, Washington National Cathedral held a decorative sculpture competition for children. Word of the competition was spread nationwide through National Geographic World Magazine. The third-place winner was Christopher Rader, with his drawing of that fearful villain, Darth Vader. The fierce head was sculpted by Jay Hall Carpenter, carved by Patrick J. Plunkett, and placed high upon the northwest tower of the Cathedral.

via Washington National Cathedral : Darth Vader.

recreational mountain climbers, firsts, Moses, Jesus, Elijah, Empedocles,  King Philip V of Macedon, firsts :  Moses, Jesus, Elijah, Empedocles … religiously motivated peak experiences …  King Philip V of Macedon … who?

Moses climbed Mount Sinai to receive the Ten Commandments and ascended Mount Nebo (Jordan) to gaze on the land he would never reach. Jesus took three disciples to a mountaintop to commune with the ghosts of Moses and Elijah. Empedocles, the ancient Greek philosopher, climbed the active volcano Mount Etna on Sicily and leaped into the flaming crater in 430 BC. According to legend, he intended to become an immortal god; the volcano ejected one of his sandals turned to bronze by the heat.

But these religiously motivated peak experiences cannot be described as enjoyable or recreational.

For what may be the earliest summit experience undertaken for pleasure we can look to the ancient Roman historian Livy. King Philip V of Macedon’s mountain climbing expedition was undertaken to admire the spectacular view from Mount Haemus in Thrace, a high peak (ca 7,000 ft) in the Balkan Mountain Range of  Bulgaria.

via Who Were the First Recreational Mountain Climbers?.

Bon Appetit’s August Issue, music playlist, marketing, BA Daily: Bon Appétit, Spotify:  So I think this is interesting marketing  … does it enhance BA or Spotify?

Last month was for grilling and all its excesses; August is for taking a (slightly) healthier turn. Go for simple preparations, fresh produce, the odd indulgence (ice cream sandwiches, anyone?), and a killer soundtrack. This one, ideally.

1. My Kind of Fast Food (p. 16)

Descendents, “I Like Food”

Like the idyllic summer lunch Adam Rapoport describes in his editor’s letter, a perfect meal can still be a quickly assembled one. Ditto a punk anthem.

2. The Chill Zone (p. 25)

EPMD, “You Gots to Chill”

All you need is our recipe, an inexpensive ice cream maker, and 10 minutes. And maybe Erick and Parrish’s advice: “Always calm under pressure, no need to act ill. Listen when I tell you boy, you gots to chill.”

3. One-Dish Wonder Woman (p. 28)

Madonna, “Express Yourself”

Drew Barrymore likes an eclectic soundtrack in the kitchen. The other day, she poured a glass of champagne and blasted Madonna’s “Express Yourself.” Exactly.

4. The Return of the G&T (p. 30)

Merle Haggard, “Misery and Gin”

Country-music great Merle Haggard knew it: Any reason to drink a Gin and Tonic is a fine one.

5. The Foodist (p. 34)

Meklit and Quinn, “This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)”

Andrew Knowlton’s road-trip mix ends with the Talking Heads classic. Mix things up with Meklit and Quinn’s summery cover.

6. Shop the Crop (p. 46)

The Beets, “Now I Live”

Beets–delicious, dark red, cancer-fighting beets!–deserve a second chance. So do the Beets.

7. A Cooler Cookout (p. 50)

Tullycraft, “DIY Queen”

The best way to enliven that backyard meal? Do-it-yourself condiments.

8. Seattle Shines (p. 58)

Mother Love Bone, “Chloe Dancer/Crown of Thorns”

He probably gets this a lot, but Bar Sajor chef Matthew Dillon isn’t the first person with his name to have a starring role in Seattle. Twenty-two years later, the best thing about the Matt Dillon-starring movie Singles is its grungy soundtrack.

9. A Day at the Beach and Dinner at the Sea (p. 66)

JEFF The Brotherhood, “Mellow Out”

These Nashville garage rockers sing a lot about chilling out. That cold corn soup with lobster salad is a good place to start.

10. Virgin Territory (p. 78)

Holopaw, “We Are the Virgin Snow”

However you like your virgin cocktail in the summer–heavy on juices, hard on bitters–you’ll want it winter-cold.

11. Red Green & Gold (p. 80)

Guy Clark, “Homegrown Tomatoes”

There’s a reason Nashville great Guy Clark liked to introduce “Homegrown Tomatoes” as a love song. (The tomatoes, obviously.)

12. The Vegetable Revolution (p. 88)

R.E.M., “You Are the Everything”

Use a mandoline to cut those veggies paper-thin. Use a mandolin to cut to the heartstrings.

via Bon Appetit’s August Issue, Set to Music: BA Daily: Bon Appétit.

lists, The Best Summer Getaways,  Pawleys Island SC, Summer Destinations | OutsideOnline.com:  One of my favorite places … love the description.  🙂

pawleys island pawley's island south carolina myrtle beach

Thank God for Myrtle Beach. While the crowds pack its rowdy shoreline, the Hammock Coast—just 20 minutes south—remains pristine. Five rivers converge on eclectic villages, cypress swamps, and black-water rivers. Grab a kayak (rentals, $35) and paddle two and a half hours to the 9,200-acre Sandy Island nature preserve, an island that’s home to maritime forests and black bears. Refuel with shrimp and grits at Quigley’s Pint and Plate back on the mainland ($16.50) and set up your beachfront campsite at Huntington Beach State Park (from $17).

via The Best Summer Getaways: Pawleys Island, South Carolina | Summer Destinations | OutsideOnline.com.

Louisville Hot Spots , Garden and Gun:  Something new to try in Louisville KY!

Big Four Pedestrian & Bicycle Bridge

This onetime railroad truss bridge has been updated to create a car-free path across the Ohio River. The ramp to Indiana isn’t expected to be open until October, but you can take in river views with access via the on-ramp at the Louisville waterfront. louisvillewaterfront.com

via Louisville Hot Spots | Garden and Gun.

The Care-Package Wars , summer camp, parenting, Bruce Feiler, NYTimes.com:  Anyone else feel like our generations has really screwed up the parenting thing?

In almost every way, the camps were exactly as I had romanticized them. Except one: care packages are now strictly banned. In camp after camp, directors described how they had outlawed such packages after getting fed up with hypercompetitive parents sending oversize teddy bears and bathtubs of M&M’s.

And they’re not alone. Across the country, sleep-away programs of all sizes are fighting back against overzealous status-mongers.

Not taking this in stride, parents have turned to increasingly elaborate smuggling routines, from hollowing out Harry Potter books to burrowing holes in tennis balls to get their little dumplings a taste of the checkout aisle. We have entered the age of the care-package wars, where strong-willed camps and strong-willed parents battle over control of their children’s loyalty and downtime.

via The Care-Package Wars – NYTimes.com.

interactive map, A Month of Citi Bike, graphics, The New Yorker:  Wow, love this “interactive graphic!”  Can’t wait to ride a Citi Bike.

Here are some highlights from the map:

A commuting pattern first emerged in our data on Tuesday, June 11th, when bikers travelled to a central corridor, which begins in midtown Manhattan and moves south, through the Flatiron District and down to the Financial District. The bikes arrived in this “workplace” area at around 9 A.M., and they remained there until around 7 P.M. The next day, an evening-commute shape materialized, with bikers moving toward certain residential neighborhoods: the East Village, the West Village, and Williamsburg. The pattern fell off somewhat on Thursday, but it returned the following week, and thereafter grew increasingly distinct, with workdays attracting bikes to the center of the city.

Temperatures and precipitation also influence bike use, so the map displays weather information alongside bike movement. For instance, the weaker commuting pattern on Thursday, June 13th, can be attributed, in part, to colder temperatures and over an inch of rain.

It’s possible that the Citi Bike system may be too successful for its own good. As the program becomes a more popular method of commuting, the workday leaves some areas bereft of bikes, making it more difficult for those with reverse or off-hour commutes to participate in the program. Citi Bike crews do redistribute the bikes, but the empty areas on the map show how challenging it is to balance their availability across the stations.

On weekends, the commutes are replaced by patternless, recreational movement, in which bikers meander around the city. The continuous weekend use also results in more over-all activity than Citi Bikes see on weekdays. Greg Estren, who compiles data on Citi Bike, calculated that over the six-week period from June 8th through July 19th, there was ten per cent more station activity on weekends than on weekdays.

July Fourth was a bikers’ holiday. As the night grew dark, Citi Bike members pedalled to the Hudson River to see the fireworks.

via Interactive: A Month of Citi Bike : The New Yorker.

Baja Lobster Roll, recipes, OutsideOnline.com:  I am stuffed right now, but if one of these were placed in front of me, I probably could find room.

lobster lobster roll ditch plains Cincinnati senate senate chicago Little Market American Brasseri

What’s with the abundance of lobsters? It’s the culmination of decades of smart conservation efforts, like strict size limits, that have created one of the most sustainable fisheries in the U.S. “We’ve had a strong plan in place for over 100 years,” says Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association. “In some ways, we’ve been a victim of our own success.” We’ll eat to that.

Want to make your own lobster rolls? Try this delicious recipe from the Little Market American Brasserie:

BAJA LOBSTER ROLL (makes two sandwiches)

Chipotle, cabbage slaw, lemon

CHIPOTLE MAYO

1 piece chipotle pepper in adobo

1 egg yolk

½ tbsp. lemon juice

1/8 cup water

1 cup canola oil

Procedure:

1. In a blender, combine chipotle, egg, lemon juice, and water, blend till smooth

2. Slowly add oil on medium speed

3. Adjust seasoning

SLAW

1/8 of a head Napa cabbage, shredded

1/8 of a head read cabbage, shredded

1 small carrot, julienned

LEMON VINAIGRETTE

2 tbsp. lemon juice

1 tbsp. white wine vinegar

½ shallot, minced

6 tbsp. canola oil

Procedure:

1. Combine first lemon juice, white wine vinegar and shallots

2. Slowly emulsify oil with a blender

3. Adjust seasoning

FOR THE ROLL

2 New England style lobster rolls

½ tsp. chopped tarragon

½ tsp. minced shallot

4 oz. cleaned, chopped, fresh Main lobster meat

¼ cup of the mixed slaw

2 tbsp. chipotle mayo

1 tbsp. honey

2 tbsp. lemon vinaigrette

pinch of salt

Procedure:

1. Butter the cut ends of the roll and griddle till golden brown

2. Mix the slaw with the chipotle mayo, honey and salt

3. Mix the lobster with shallot, tarragon, lemon vinaigrette and salt

4. Slice open the griddle bun, making sure not to slice all the way through

5. Fill with the slaw first and place the lobster mix on top

via How to Make Your Own Baja Lobster Roll | Adventure Travel Guide | OutsideOnline.com.

 

24
Feb
13

2.24.13 … feasting on facebook …

Lent, organic smoothies, feast days:  On my feasting day, i saw this … maybe I should try it for a week and then see if I want to go back on …

Here’s a POWERFUL Healing Tonic to help reduce inflammation:

source:Jay Kordich Organic ALKALINE Powerhouse! (makes over 1 quart/ 32
ounces) 1 large (unwaxed) Cucumber (English) 2 Limes peeled 1 cup
Spinach 1 cup Parsley 1 Green Apple 6 ribs Celery 1 inch Fresh
Ginger Root If you drink a tonic like this DAILY, in 30 days you
will notice a big difference in your skin, in your daily challenges
with swollen fingers, hands and your digestion will improve. 90
days of juicing this way, the chronic inflammation you may be
experiencing WILL significantly decrease. Granted, you need to also
mirror your food habits by eating Alkalizing foods as well.
via Facebook.

history, historical films,  Argo, NYTimes.com: Since seeing Argo , I’ve wondered how
much was true.

This awards season, though, some
of the Dream Factory’s highest-profile contenders — “Lincoln,”
“Argo,” “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Django Unchained” — have been
subjected to unusually insistent fact-checking from journalists,
politicians and op-ed pontificators. Among the accusations:
Connecticut congressmen did not vote against the 13th amendment in
1865, as shown in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” Iranian
Revolutionary Guards did not chase a plane carrying six American
Embassy workers down a Tehran airport runway in 1980, as they do in
the climax of Ben Affleck’s “Argo.” And a freed slave in 1858 did
not lay waste to a Mississippi plantation called Candyland to free
his German-speaking wife, as in Quentin Tarantino’s brazenly
fantastical “Django Unchained.” Arguments over these movies raise
familiar questions about art and its uses: Is art supposed to make
us better people, give us moral instruction, work toward the social
good or exist merely for our personal pleasure? Above all, does it
have to be true? When it comes to this recent crop of historically
informed movies, these eternal conundrums have been intensified by
an acute contemporary anxiety about the truth that has less to do
with how rightly or wrongly “Argo,” for instance, gets its facts
than with the crumbling monopolies on the truth held by
institutions like the government and the press. … Movies tend to
tell more than one story. “Argo” isn’t just about a thrilling
rescue: it is also about two powerful institutions — the American
movie industry and the Central Intelligence Agency — that are
masters of dissembling. … Given some of the stories that
politicians themselves have peddled to the public, including the
existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, such concern is
understandable. It can often seem as if everyone is making
stuff up all the time and in such a climate of suspicion and
well-earned skepticism — punctuated by “gotcha” moments of scandal
and embarrassment — movies are hardly immune. But invention remains
one of the prerogatives of art and it is, after all, the job of
writers, directors and actors to invent counterfeit realities. It
is unfair to blame filmmakers if we sometimes confuse the real
world with its representations. The truth is that we love movies
partly because of their lies, beautiful and not. It’s journalists
and politicians who owe us the truth. via The
History in ‘Lincoln,’ ‘Argo’ and ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ –
NYTimes.com
.

Argo, BBC News:

The central element of the story sounds
incredible but is in fact true. The CIA cooked up a plan to spirit
the six out of the country on a scheduled flight from Tehrans
Mehrabad airport, masquerading as Canadians working on a
non-existent science-fiction film. via BBC
News – Argo: The true story behind Ben Afflecks Globe-winning
film

snark v. sweetness, Harvard Business Review: interesting …

Sweetness has a couple of faces. It expresses an openness to the world, a wish to be useful, an
innocence, a goodness, a guilelessness, a disinclination to insist
on your own interests. If there is a poster girl, it is Jess (Zooey
Deschanel), the female lead in New Girl, the new show from Fox. New
Girl turns out to be a veritable shrine to sweetness, as four
roommates rescue one another from the stream of misadventures with
madcap enthusiasm and a touching generosity.

Why sweetness? Well, we are coming out of an era of some darkness. We
seemed almost to celebrate skepticism and snark. We dwelt upon the
grimmest aspects of the human experience. TV and movie making were
increasingly ghoulish, with new standards of viscera and depravity.
Shows like CSI and NCIS dwell lovingly on the crime victim. Bright
lights and strategically placed towels protect our sexual
sensitivities, but everything else on the autopsy table is
enthusiastically examined. Once the standard bearer of
heartlessness, The Silence of the Lambs (1991) now looks a little
quaint. Since its release, we have seen a succession of werewolves,
vampires, serial killers, and human monsters of every kind. If you
are 40 or under, you’ve grown up on a steady diet of heartlessness.
via The Decline of Snark and the Return of Sweetness – Grant McCracken –
Harvard Business Review
.

Evolution Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama), YouTube, LOL:

Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

In honor of the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” campaign, and to
encourage parents everywhere to get up and get moving with their
kids, Jimmy Fallon and Michelle Obama present the “Evolution of Mom
Dancing.” via Evolution
Of Mom Dancing (w/ Jimmy Fallon & Michelle Obama) –
YouTube
.

Smart Ass Cripple, twitter, Roger Ebert:  A tweet I just had to follow up …

Roger Ebert
(@ebertchicago)

2/23/13, 11:15 AM Smart Ass Cripple
gets the last laubit.ly/121KLdB

I’ve found a new way to
amuse myself, which, after all, is what life is all about.One Last
Laugh First, I picture some anthropologists about a thousand years
from now discovering my crippled skeleton. That makes me chuckle.
My skeleton will be a keeper for them because they’ll know right
away it belonged to a cripple.  It bears the ravages of
sitting on my ass all day. It’s twisted and bent. It’s contracted
up fetal. The bones are soupy soft. Sitting takes a toll. If God
intended for humans to sit on our asses all day, she would have
made us all Congressmen. But my body either sits in a wheelchair
(or on a crapper) or lies in bed. Every day I abuse my body by
making it get out of bed.

via Smart Ass Cripple: One Last Laugh.

history, literature, novels:  I feel stupid … I have not read any and have not even heard of all of them.  😦

According to the
novel’s liveliest, undisciplined, and most raucous traditions (and
to the word “novel”‘s etymology), the purpose of fiction is to
bring readers “news” of the real state of things as experienced and
expressed in everyday speech. The novel’s job is to reflect the
truth of our lives in common in a way that official and respectable
languages—whether these be Latin, law, economics, public policy,
cybernetics, or professional humanism (the list goes on and
on)—can’t. History is one of those respectable languages by which
we expect to be instructed in navigating the present by placing
that present within a story of grand human development headed
toward some benign purpose.

via 10 Books That Rewrite History.

Banksy, public art, ownership, Bloomberg:  Who owns it?  good question.

BBC News – ‘Banksy’ boy worker image on Poundland shop wall.The stencilled image depicts a poor child making Union Jack flags on a sewing machine and was located on the wall of a Poundland discount shop in the Wood Green area of north London. The work was later removed and was to be auctioned in Miami. It was withdrawn
moments before the auction. Photographer: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

via Bloomberg.

Michelle Obama’s Bangs, midlife crisis: .Michelle Obamas Bangs

Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview

via Michelle Obama’s Bangs The Result Of Midlife Crisis? First Lady Jokes About Hair During Interview.

Paul McIlhenny,  Tabasco,  RIP, NOLA.com:  RIP, Mr. McIlhenny.

Paul McIlhenny, an ebullient executive who for 14
years led the family-owned company that makes Tabasco sauce and who
reigned as Rex in 2006, died Saturday at his New Orleans home,
apparently of a heart attack. He was 68. Mr. McIlhenny, whom The
New York Times once called “The Scion of Spice,” became the
company’s president in 1998 — the sixth family member to hold that
title — and chief executive officer two years later. At his death,
he still held the latter position and also was chairman of the
board of directors, but a cousin, Anthony “Tony” Simmons, was named
president last year. The company, which was founded by Edmund
McIlhenny in 1868 on Avery Island, near New Iberia, sells Tabasco
sauce in about 165 countries and has 11 websites outside the United
States, in North and South America and Europe. During Mr.
McIlhenny’s years at the helm of the McIlhenny Co., he worked
aggressively to expand the number of items to which the familiar
Tabasco logo could be affixed. They include T-shirts, aprons,
neckties, teddy bears and computer screensavers, as well as seven
varieties of hot sauce. via Paul
McIlhenny, CEO of the company that makes Tabasco sauce, dies at 68
| NOLA.com
.

stress, health:

Roughly 25
percent of people say stress gives them an upset stomach or
indigestion, according to a survey by the American Psychological
Association. Here’s why: Prolonged anxiety slows digestion as your
nervous system directs its energy toward the organs and muscles
most critical to survival. This, in turn, can cause nausea,
constipation, cramping, and bloating.

via Side
Effects Of Stress: How Stressing Out Hurts Your
Body
.

Downton Abbey, Jane Austen, Journal of Victorian Culture Online:
Two of my favorites … linked …

But the connections between Downton Abbey and the
nineteenth-century novel (and Jane Austen’s novels in particular)
go far beyond the American penchant for indulging in the love
stories of “our betters” that come to pass while drinking high tea
in corseted costuming. Even a cursory glance at film adaptations of
Austen’s novels staring Downton Abbey actors reveals the
similarities between the events at Downton and the plots of
Austen’s novels. via Downton
Abbey & Jane Austen; Or, in Praise of Lady Mary | Journal
of Victorian Culture Online
.

The Pope, Twitter:  No surprise …

The Pope Is
Quitting Twitter

The Pope is giving up Twitter
when he leaves his office later this month. via The
Pope Is Quitting Twitter
.

House of Cards, NYTimes.com:  On my list to watch …

The Washington
that majestically unfurls in the credits for “House of Cards” is
recognizable to anybody who has spent time there. But even though
it can be a monumental kingdom filled with portent, it can also be
a fairly quotidian and sometimes ugly small town — but that’s not
the kind of place you make a huge, expensive television show
about.

An original series picked up and distributed by
Netflix, “House of Cards” is a great looking, lavishly made
13-episode series based on a BBC mini-series. It was developed and
produced by Beau Willimon, a guy steeped in politics as an aide to
Charles Schumer, Howard Dean and Hillary Clinton and who also wrote
“The Ides of March,” a film directed by George Clooney that got
high marks from politicos for its verisimilitude. “House of Cards”
revolves around Frank Underwood (played with lizard-like glory by
Kevin Spacey), a Democrat and House majority whip, who, when passed
over for a promotion to secretary of state wreaks revenge on all
who would lay him low. His willing partner is Zoe Barnes (played by
Kate Mara), a reporter/blogger at The Washington Herald, a
fictional establishment newspaper in the capital. via “House
of Cards”: Two reporters talk deconstruct the deck. –
NYTimes.com
.

apps ,
iPhone, Android , Digits – WSJ
:  I am such an iPhone loyalist … but I have friends that love their android …

When it comes to developing apps, the iPhone is
usually the first option. Look at apps like Instagram, which was
exclusive to the iPhone for an extended period of time before
landing on Android. But there are plenty of reasons to want to go
with an Android phone.

via Apps That Might Make You Want to Switch to Android – Digits -WSJ.

Danica Patrick, Daytona 500, firsts, kudos:  Congrats …

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods

Congratulations to Danica Patrick for becoming the first woman in history to win the Daytona 500 pole on Sunday.

via (1) Facebook.

20
Jun
11

‎6.20.2011 … finished The Sweetest Thing … a little PT … good start to a lovely day ..

music, kith/kin:  Another recommendation from a friend.  Enjoy! YouTube – The Hottest Cole Porter – Harry Reser plays Let’s Misbehave, 1928.

Davidson College, kudzu, goats, random, LOL, followup: Another take on the goats …

Runners on the cross-country trail at Davidson College found a furry surprise Saturday in woods once crawling with kudzu.

There in a clearing stood 30 goats in an area that looked freshly mowed.

But no mower had cut the nearly one-acre patch of ground.

The goats had done the job – eating as much as 20 pounds of kudzu per animal per day since they went to work last week.

“On Monday, this side of the trail looked exactly like that side,” said Charles Jolly, pointing at chest-high kudzu as far as you could see.

via Hungry goats are a vine solution at Davidson | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

food-desserts, Jello, LOL:  Upscale Jello?  Looks fun!

Are you entertaining this 4th of July? I stumbled onto the Jelly Shot Test Kitchen over the weekend thanks to Mochatini. Talk about cool, Summertime F-U-N. These sophisticated Jello Shot Recipes are absolutely brilliant. The photographs are incredibly beautiful. The question is: should I make the cucumber-lime margarita, the Paloma Cocktail, or the Cosmopolitan jelly shots first?

via Jello Shot Recipes: Summertime Entertaining | ABCD Design Sketch Book | milestones in life set the tone.

faith and spirituality, Rob Bell, Love Wins, Southern Baptists:  Do you struggle with this?  Is it a black and white issue?

Southern Baptists say hell is an “eternal, conscious punishment” for those who do not accept Jesus, rebutting a controversial book from Michigan pastor Rob Bell that questions traditional views of hell.

Citing Bell’s book “Love Wins,” the resolution announced Wednesday urges Southern Baptists “to proclaim faithfully the depth and gravity of sin against a holy God, the reality of hell, and the salvation of sinners by God’s grace alone, through faith alone, in Jesus Christ alone, to the glory of God alone.”

Several leaders during the Baptists’ two-day meeting in Phoenix coupled warnings about hell with pleas for evangelism – especially in areas where there are no churches or missionaries.

“Is hell real? Is hell forever? Did God really say sinners would perish in eternal torment forever and ever?” asked pastor and author David Platt of Birmingham, Ala. “Oh, readers of Rob Bell and others like him, listen very carefully be very cautious, when anyone says, ‘Did God really say this?'”

via After controversy, Baptists affirm belief in ‘eternal’ hell | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Steph Curry, basketball, Davidson College, community involvement:  I just like the kid …

Professional basketball player Stephen Curry will be the guest speaker at the first local Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) rally June 20.

Jay and Amy Poag in January helped start the Lake Norman chapter of the national FCA organization “in an effort to give the young athletes of our community a way to stay connected while furthering their Christian walk,” Jay Poag said in an email.

Over the last few months, the group has held monthly “workouts,” which are group community service activities. On Monday, the group plans its first “rally,” a community gathering for fun and fellowship.

Hosted by Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, the rally will include games, live music and food, and Stephen Curry will be the guest speaker.

“Our end result is to try and help build our youth into effective Christian role models so that they can take the spirit of our group back into their schools to form what we call ‘huddles,’” which are weekly meetings for bible study and prayer, Mr. Poag said in an email.

WANT TO GO?

The event will be held on the Mt. Zion United Methodist Church front lawn from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday, June 20. Admission is free.

via Stephen Curry to speak at Christian Athletes rally Mon.  | Sports.

teen pregnancy, college, Belmont Abbey College, Room at the Inn, firsts:  … the nation’s first college-based maternity and after-care residential facility for single pregnant women …

It was a summer of romance and fear.

A bittersweet mix that cast a long shadow through the years. One that Debbie Capen, 37, of Charlotte will remember today at the groundbreaking for what is believed the nation’s first college-based maternity and after-care residential facility for single pregnant women.

The home is being built on the campus of Belmont Abbey College and will be run by the Charlotte-based Catholic nonprofit Room at the Inn, a safe haven for single pregnant women. The organization’s outreach programs and offices will remain in Charlotte.

During today’s ceremony, Capen will recall the summer she was a rising sophomore at Winthrop University and waiting tables at North Myrtle Beach restaurants.

A fling with a handsome beach service worker stirred images of sailing off together on his catamaran. But the dream faded when she became pregnant. Afraid to tell her mother and worried about the possibility of having to drop out of college, she couldn’t find an adult who understood.

via College maternity center is a first | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Edward Lindsey, Atlanta Public Schools, kith/kin:  Very bold and very controversial.  But sometimes that is what is needed.

ATLANTA, GA (WABE) – On Monday, June 20th, the Atlanta Board of Education will hold another critical meeting. Among the agenda items this time: the new state law (SB 79), which sets up a process that could end with the ouster of the entire Board. Some sources have told WABE the Board could decide to challenge the new law, in one way or another. WABE’s Denis O’Hayer spoke with Rep. Ed Lindsey (R-Atlanta), who wrote the board review language into the new law. © Copyright 2011, WABE

via WABE: Could Atlanta School Board Challenge New State Law?: A Conversation with Rep. Ed Lindsey (R-Atlanta) (2011-06-17).

 

24
Jul
10

‎7.24.2010 … yesterday blurred into today … and I’m getting a little old for that … GREAT outing with Johns freshman hall crew …. wonderful food and drink … and even better conversation … had some things for the first time … Green Man Beer and “Appalachian Grown” Trout Dip not sure the actually product maker, but I think I ate the pint of dip!

Davidson ’82:  Next year, let’s get a few more … great evening, Mike McGrady!  What do friends talk about 32 years after becoming friends … and some not seeing each other for 20+ years … well, family, life and this year, the  World Cup.  It’s strange, but it felt like 1978.  It was nice not to feel 50!  And thank you,  Martina,  for hosting a group of unknowns!

QUIPS AND CRANKS – 1979.

firsts, favorites:  Loved the Green Man Beer and the Appalachian Grown trout spread … thanks, jerome … I may have to drive to Asheville to see you just to get some more!  Greenman Brewery.

iPad apps, followup, the law:  Flipboard really is beautiful, but is it legal?

Flipboard, the new iPad app that renders links from your Twitter feed and favorite sites in a beautiful, magazine-style layout, has a problem: it scrapes websites directly rather than using public RSS feeds, opening it to claims of copyright infringement.

Unlike some similar news apps like Pulse, Flipboard appears to eschew the older syndication standby RSS to instead grab URLs from Twitter and Facebook feeds. While news sources that maintain their own automatic Twitter feeds tend to link the same stories as they do in their RSS feeds, there’s one critical difference: RSS also allows content to be included in the feed, whereas Twitter provides only the URLs that link back to the full website. (Unless, of course, the site only writes 140 character news stories.)

Back in the ancient days of the mid-aughts, there was a healthy debate online about whether or not news outlets should provide full content feeds or simply headlines and excerpts. Rather than rehash that debate—one that’s still ongoing—just remember this: whether a company chose to publish “full feeds” or excerpts, the choice remained theirs.

A new class of “feed readers” have ditched RSS and built their own content scrapers. The ever-popular Instapaper—the adblocker it’s okay to like!—is a scraper: a reader views a story in their web browser (along with ads and other web chrome); clicks “Read Later”; Instapaper uses some sorting magic to figure out what part of the already-downloaded HTML is content and which is cruft.

From a licensing and copyright perspective it’s a little bit iffy, but since content providers get at least one pageview every time someone uses Instapaper there has been a sort of truce. (One made more steady by the fact that many of those working in the media who might get frustrated by scrapers are also fans of long-form content—exactly the sort of reader to which Instapaper caters.)

via Is Flipboard Legal?.

RIP:  I know his voice so well, but when I saw Mr. Schorr’s picture I realized I had no visual of him.  I will miss his voice on NPR. Rest in peace, Daniel Schorr.

Daniel Schorr, a longtime senior news analyst for NPR and a veteran Washington journalist who broke major stories at home and abroad during the Cold War and Watergate, has died. He was 93.

remembrances

Schorr’s Legacy: Speaking Truth To Power

Schorr, who once described himself as a “living history book,” passed away Friday morning at a Washington hospital. His family did not provide a cause of death.

As a journalist, Schorr was able to bring to contemporary news commentary a deep sense of how governmental institutions and players operate, as well as the perspective gained from decades of watching history upfront.

Schorr joined CBS News in 1953 as one of “Murrow’s boys,” the celebrated news team put together by Edward R. Murrow. He reopened the network’s Moscow bureau, which had been shuttered by Joseph Stalin in 1947. Ten years later, Schorr scored an exclusive broadcast interview with Nikita Khrushchev, the U.S.S.R. Communist Party chief — the first-ever with a Soviet leader. Schorr was barred from the U.S.S.R. later that year after repeatedly defying Soviet censors.

via Journalism Legend Daniel Schorr Dies At 93 : NPR.

Alluring headlines:  Maybe not alluring … but definitely caught my attention … I tried to describe this last night at dinner after one of the guys from 4th rich joked that you needed a p—– to grill … that male bonding boy base humor.  i didn’t want to grill anyway … South African doctor invents female condoms with ‘teeth’ to fight rape – CNN.com.

Jane Austen: A little Jane humor for your weekend.  The creator of this one has a very weird sense of humor …

YouTube – Jane Austen’s Fight Club.

iPad:  I am growing very fond of mine … but it was not immediate.  RIP: Why the iPad ‘killers’ are already dead – Computerworld Blogs.

random, news:  Why do I feel sorry for the bear?

A bear got into an empty car, honked the horn and then sent it rolling 125 feet into a thicket, with the bear still inside, a Colorado family said.

via Bear Takes Car on Short Joyride in Colorado – CBS News.

culture, fads, libraries:

Call it a hunch, but it seems to me that the thing is in the air that happens right before something — families with a million kids, cupcakes, wedding coordinators — suddenly becomes the thing everyone wants to do happy-fuzzy pop-culture stories about. Why?

via Why The Next Big Pop-Culture Wave After Cupcakes Might Be Libraries : NPR.

language, Sarah Palin: just love the illustration, article struck me a funny, too.

.

Far be it from me to criticize Willy Shakespeare and his protégé Sarah Palin. Ol’ Billy pushed the boundaries of literature and we’re better for it. Now, thank goodness Sarah will do the same. Just as her daughter has re-defined abstinence before marriage as “I can do it, but you’re a slut”. I have misuderestimed Sarah, who has redesignafied herself into a wordsmith to add depth and feeling to our needlessly boring language.

So, I thought I would create a few new words to bring about a more worldly and insightful national conversation in America today. Their use will help to explainify things. Please feel free to use them habfitually.

via I’ve been Repoodiated – The redefining of America by Trevor Irvin | LikeTheDew.com.

03
Apr
10

“Eat a live frog every morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” -Mark Twain Week ending 4.3.2010

4.3.2010 almost easter … final four … spring break … very random day

Supreme Court:

Appointed in 1975 by President Gerald R. Ford, Justice Stevens was in those days considered a somewhat idiosyncratic moderate. These days, he is lionized by the left. But Justice Stevens rejected those labels on Friday, saying that his judicial philosophy was a conservative one.

“What really for me marks a conservative judge is one who doesn’t decide more than he has to in order to do his own job,” he said, relaxed in shirt sleeves and his signature bow tie in chambers floodlit by April sunshine. “Our job is to decide cases and resolve controversies. It’s not to write broad rules that may answer society’s questions at large.”

via At 89, Stevens Contemplates Law, and How to Leave It – NYTimes.com.

religion:  I have repeatedly thught that this is not my issue … but Ms. Noonan makes me think it is.  Peggy Noonan: The Catholic Church’s Catastrophe – WSJ.com.

Apple iPad:

So, yeah. He pretty much figured it out in five minutes flat. He instinctively pushed the home button when he got stuck. He knew how to make pictures larger, how to draw on the Etch-a-Sketch app (he preferred it to the actual Etch-a-Sketch we had in the office). And, of course, because he’s a boy, he learned how to shoot the shooting games and steer the racing games. I’m not being sexist. It’s just how it is.

via iPad vs. a 5-Year-Old [Video] | Post Pop | Fast Company.

March Madness:

There aren’t a lot of good reasons to root against Butler unless you’re a Dukie, a Mountaineer or a friend of Sparty.

via Four Reasons To Root For, Or Root Against, Each Of The Final Four Teams : NPR.

random, economy: I don’t think so …

With Earth Day right around the corner, what better tribute to Mother Nature — and your wallet — than some DIY, eco-friendly hair treatments?

via Save Money (and the Environment) With Homemade Hair Treatments – StyleList.

random:

Information from millions of taxi trips provides a telling record of the city’s vital signs. The map shows the average number of pickups for different times of the day and days of week, Jan. – March, 200

via Tracking Taxi Flow Across the City – Interactive – NYTimes.com.

random:

Recent research on what is known as the superstar effect demonstrates that such mental collapses aren’t limited to chess. While challenging competitions are supposed to bring out our best, these studies demonstrate that when people are forced to compete against a peer who seems far superior, they often don’t rise to the challenge. Instead, they give up.

According to a paper by Jennifer Brown, an applied macroeconomist at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, Mr. Woods is such a dominating golfer that his presence in a tournament can make everyone else play significantly worse. Because his competitors expect him to win, they end up losing; success becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

via Tiger Woods and the Superstar Effect – WSJ.com.

design, life:

Design thinking is hot. In a time when companies and cities are finding it increasingly difficult to compete, when economic and social problems seem intractable, when our nation’s way of doing business seems wasteful and unimaginative at best, design thinking is being touted as a way to enhance problem-solving and breakthrough creativity.

As I understand it, design thinking is at the intersection of analytical and intuitive thinking. It’s a third-way approach that incorporates left- and right-brain processing.

Design thinking is more than a methodology. Design is a cultural way of thinking.”

via Rethinking thinking itself – Charlotte Business Journal:.

random, The President:

It is official: Barack Obama is the nation’s first black president.

A White House spokesman confirmed that Mr. Obama, the son of a black father from Kenya and a white mother from Kansas, checked African-American on the 2010 census questionnaire.

via Asked to Declare His Race, Obama Checks ‘Black’ on Census – NYTimes.com.

tv:

As the 100th episode nears (April 8), series’ production team gave us some trivia tidbits sure to delight fans. Prepare to be happier than Hodgins hearing he gets to do an experiment!

via Bones, David Boreanaz | ‘Bones’: 24 Fun Facts! | Photo 1 of 25 | EW.com.

Continue reading ‘“Eat a live frog every morning, and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.” -Mark Twain Week ending 4.3.2010’

27
Mar
10

“History doesn’t repeat itself–but it often rhymes.” – Week Ending 3.27.2010

3.26.2010  beautiful day … march madness continues, Ann and Rob’s birthdays … reading …

March Madness: The answer was no … but love the nerdiness of this article.  Can Cornell Top Kentucky? It’s A Matter Of Style : NPR.

politics, health care reform:

‘And so when you walk into that ballot box, remember that it was my Democratic opponent who favored providing Viagra to pedophiles.”

That isn’t a campaign line any American has heard yet, but give it a few hours. The Senate this week took up its “reconciliation” bill, with its final changes to the law the president signed Tuesday. It wasn’t so much reconciliation as reckoning.

Democrats only got their ObamaCare victory by breaking every rule, and that was always going to come at a price. To lever the health bill through the House, Democrats used the arcane process of reconciliation. It got them a win, but it also meant Senate Democrats this week had to endure the political equivalent of water-boarding.

via Kim Strassel: The Senate Reckoning – WSJ.com.

politics: I really hate politics …

MSNBC host Rachel Maddow took out a full-page advertisement in Friday’s Boston Globe to rip Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown for suggesting she might run against him in 2012.

via Rachel Maddow: Scott Brown ‘made this up’ – Jessica Taylor – POLITICO.com.

firsts, places:

What’s the best thing to do with an old airplane hangar? Why, turn it into a giant trampoline park, of course

via San Francisco Airplane Hangar Transformed Into Trampoline Park | Sustainability | Fast Compan

random, Atlanta: Oops!

Marietta police are trying to determine how hundreds of pounds of marijuana ended up at bakery warehouse Friday morning.

via Marijuana shipped to Marietta bakery  | ajc.com.

music, art: Art history lesson … to music!

How do you add a little culture to pop music? How about a music video that apes a dozen classic works of art? Franco-American band Hold Your Horses has released the most cultured video we’ve seen a while with their clip for “70 Million.” How many paintings can you name?

via Hold Your Horses Art Video 70 Million – Video – The Daily Beast.

book club: Tonight is book club, and I have barely started Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

Apple iPad:

First up: the freebie. Since the iPad supports the open standard epub format, we had assumed that there would be some way to get public domain books onto the device–and a screenshot of the iBookstore confirms that not only will it be possible, but, as reported by AppAdvice, Apple is simply popping the free catalog from Project Gutenberg into the store.

via Apple iPad’s iBookstore to Carry 30,000 Free Public Domain Books, Challenge Kindle on Bestseller Price | Dan’s FC Blog | Fast Company.

design:


The design for the outdoor memorial, selected by the Eisenhower Memorial Commission and unveiled Thursday for a site just south of the National Mall, calls for monumental columns and large memorial tapestries of woven stainless steel that will portray images from the late President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s life.

via Cityscapes: Gehry’s design concept for Eisenhower memorial unveiled.

places: We are planning a weekend with John’s parents … Naples looks fun! A Weekend in Naples, Fla. – NYTimes.com.

Continue reading ‘“History doesn’t repeat itself–but it often rhymes.” – Week Ending 3.27.2010′




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