Posts Tagged ‘food

05
Aug
13

8.5.13 … Newsroom: In case you were wondering why Maggie looks like the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo … “Cooked”: a philosophical journey and practical handbook … Happy B day to the V … Sunday Sermon: What does it mean to “belong to truth,” to be “on the side of truth”?

The Newsroom Recap, Rolling Stone:  So we now know  why Maggie looks like the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo …

As the title, “Unintended Consequences,” suggests, much of this episode is about how Maggie, Neal, Jerry and Will’s idealistic moves in the name of being better journalists are slowly leading to their collective downfall.

via Newsroom Recap: The Shoe Drops | Movies News | Rolling Stone.

“Cooked”, cooking, civilization, Michael Pollan, food, social glue, anti-corporate activism, Brain Pickings:

Thus, Cooked is at once a philosophical journey into the depths of that transformation and practical handbook for tilting the ratio back to its natural, satisfying balance

via How Cooking Civilized Us: Michael Pollan on Food as Social Glue and Anti-Corporate Activism | Brain Pickings.

8.2.1928, The Varsity,  Open for Business, Atlanta icons, restaurants, drive-ins, WABE 90.1 FM, kith/kin:  My father was born in the fall of ’27 … I’d swear he was probably ate his first real food here. One of my favorite places in the world … really.  🙂

The Varsity

Today is August 2nd.  If we were to turn Atlanta’s clock back 85 years to this date in 1928, we’d find a new eatery opening up in town.  In the years since the first burger was flipped, The Varsity on North Avenue has become one of Atlanta’s most endearing landmarks.

via This Day in History: The Varsity Opens for Business | WABE 90.1 FM.

Reverend Pendleton B. Peery,  “With Our Whole Heart: Belonging to the Truth”:  Pen … your sermons have been excellent this summer.  I loved this week’s focus on what is truth.

Exodus 20:1-2, 16

 And God spoke all these words:

2 “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.

16 “You shall not give false testimony against your neighbor.

 …

“Lord, Who May Dwell Within Your House” – hymn no. 164

Who do no wrong, but keep their word And seek no bribe or gain; All those who do such things shall live And safe from harm remain.

John 18:33-38

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

38 “What is truth?” retorted Pilate.

 …

Reverend Pendleton B. Peery,  “With Our Whole Heart: Belonging to the Truth”:

Great sermon, preacher … LIARS.

Certainty hardens our speech.  It makes dialogue difficult. It leaves little room for questions, few opportunities for new insights and new relationships.  … What if we are wrong? … Consider … how our certainty about what is true might affect the way we treat our neighbor  … might lead us to do harm.

 What is truth?” retorted Pilate … being in Jesus’ presence caused him to ask it.

Truth is a “who.”

… whose truth is marked by sacrifice and by love and by justice and by mercy …

02
Jul
13

7.2.13 … Nathalie Dupree: “in her childhood fried food was a once-a-week treat, that rich desserts were served even less often, and that vegetables and grains like rice and grits made up most of what was a healthy, farm-based diet”…

Southern food, Nathalie Dupree, kith/kin: I keep returning to this article because it says so much about Southern food … but Ms. Dupree’s comment about her childhood food is more like mine than what is portrayed on tv … and yes, fried food “was a once-a-week treat.”

Nathalie Dupree, the author of “Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking,” a cooking teacher and food historian in Charleston, S.C … 73, said that in her childhood fried food was a once-a-week treat, that rich desserts were served even less often, and that vegetables and grains like rice and grits made up most of what was a healthy, farm-based diet.

via Paula Deen’s Words Ripple Among Southern Chefs – NYTimes.com.

14
Jun
13

6.14.13 … 2013 Diner en blanc à Paris (yesterday): “It is, rather, a mesmerizing intersection of food and fashion and a stirring display of the power of human connection and collaboration.”

 

 

People, all dressed up in white, arrive for a dinner on June 13, 2013, on the Trocadero square in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The venue of the 25th edition of the annual Diner En Blanc is kept secret from the Paris authorities, and the invited participants are only told where they are to gather earlier in the evening. — PHOTO: AFP

Thousands dined in the shadow of the iconic Eiffel Tower in Paris for the 25th edition of the Diner En Blanc.

The venue is kept a secret from invited guests until the last minute. This year’s edition saw participants gather in the Trocadero Square, which is in front of the Eiffel Tower, and beside the Louvre Pyramid.

via Thousands dine in shadow of Eiffel Tower at Diner En Blanc in Paris.

 …

Un dîner d’exception a eu lieu hier à Paris : les 25 ans du Dîner en blanc

Diner en Blanc: the World’s Largest Dinner Party (2013) More at IMDbPro »

On a June evening in Paris, 13,000 people, dressed elaborately in white, will converge at a secret location for the annual DINER EN BLANC. In fifteen minutes the will position 4,000 tables, unveil miles of linens, crystal, sterling and epicurean delicacies. They’ll eat, drink and dance until midnight when they will depart as swiftly as they arrived. The entire event is devoid of politics and commercialism. It is, rather, a mesmerizing intersection of food and fashion and a stirring display of the power of human connection and collaboration. The dinner remains shrouded in mystery. An anonymous committee of ten decides who will host tables and selects each year’s secret location. This documentary reveals the evolution, orchestration and growing challenges of organizing the world’s largest dinner.

via Diner en Blanc: the World’s Largest Dinner Party (2013) – Plot Summary.

03
Apr
13

4.3.13 … a lot of nothing … a few worth reading …

Jimmy Carter, gender equality, religion, Women’s Press: worth reading …

I am also familiar with vivid descriptions in the same Scriptures in which women are revered as pre-eminent leaders. During the years of the early Christian church women served as deacons, priests, bishops, apostles, teachers and prophets. It wasn’t until the fourth century that dominant Christian leaders, all men, twisted and distorted Holy Scriptures to perpetuate their ascendant positions within the religious hierarchy.

The truth is that male religious leaders have had – and still have – an option to interpret holy teachings either to exalt or subjugate women. They have, for their own selfish ends, overwhelmingly chosen the latter. Their continuing choice provides the foundation or justification for much of the pervasive persecution and abuse of women throughout the world. This is in clear violation not just of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights but also the teachings of Jesus Christ, the Apostle Paul, Moses and the prophets, Muhammad, and founders of other great religions – all of whom have called for proper and equitable treatment of all the children of God. It is time we had the courage to challenge these views.

via Women’s Press » Blog Archive » Losing my religion for equality…by Jimmy Carter.

Suzy Lee Weiss, To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me, diversity, tiger moms, college application process, WSJ.com:  All I can say is OMG … as a parent I have felt this.  Amazing that this woman wrote it and submitted it for publication and that the WSJ published it.  I view college as one of the most transformative experiences of my life. By demanding so much of our kids before they get there, what is left for college to do?  Another worth reading …

For starters, had I known two years ago what I know now, I would have gladly worn a headdress to school. Show me to any closet, and I would’ve happily come out of it. “Diversity!” I offer about as much diversity as a saltine cracker. If it were up to me, I would’ve been any of the diversities: Navajo, Pacific Islander, anything. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, I salute you and your 1/32 Cherokee heritage.

I also probably should have started a fake charity

via Suzy Lee Weiss: To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me – WSJ.com.

Wheres the Beef Stroganoff?, NYT,  sexist obituary,  Twitter, feminism, sexism, Yvonne Brill: wow …

A Twitter avalanche descended on the New York Times Saturday for sexism in an obituary. The Times backed down.  Score one for Twitter and feminism, which, if I’m not completely crazy, just might be rediscovering the voice it left back in the 1970s.

Not that the Times’ Douglas Martin didn’t stick his foot in his mouth. He opened the obituary for gifted rocket scientist Yvonne Brill with the words:

“She made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job and took eight years off from work to raise three children. “The world’s best mom,” her son Matthew said.”

Not until the second paragraph did the obit note that she “was also a brilliant rocket scientist, who in the early 1970s invented a propulsion system to help keep communications satellites from slipping out of their orbits.”

Some were still dissatisfied with that assessment.In the wake of the raging debate ignited by Sheryl Sandbergs “Lean In,” it seems that feminists, both male and female, are waking up and deciding to weigh in on what would otherwise have passed without remark.”The internet just group-edited the NYT,” tweeted Adam Rothstein. “Thats not something that used to happen.”

via Wheres the Beef Stroganoff? NYT Backs Down on Sexist Obit – Yahoo! Movies.

Edward VI, kith/kin:  I call my son, King Me … Edward VI is why …

The boy king Edward VI was crowned on this day in 1547. For those of us interested in Western religion this is a momentous occasion. His father Henry VIII had broken from the Roman church, principally to re-marry. But, he had originally been raised to be a bishop and was in fact theologically sophisticated, and his reformation church was pretty much Catholicism sans pope. With Edward VI being only nine years old, ecclesiastical authority fell to his “advisers,” lurching the church sharply in a Calvinist direction

via A Small Marker in the History of Western Religions.

food, sandwiches, BUTCHER & BEE, Charleston SC, The Bon Appetit Foodist, Bon Appétit: Another list for me to work through …

If you’re not eating a sandwich right now, you’re missing out on the dish of the moment. With practically every chef reimagining old standbys or inventing new ones, there’s a surplus of versions to try, this time with house-cured meats, local pickles, and freshly baked bread. For a taste of just how delicious things have become (when you’re not making your own at home, of course), visit these ten.

BUTCHER & BEE Charleston, SC

Pulled squash with smoked slaw on a hoagie is just one irresistible example of how this forward-thinking spot does some of the most creative takes on the classics in the country.

via 10 Sandwiches You Must Eat Now: The Bon Appetit Foodist: Bon Appétit.

Audrey Hepburn, beauty, icon, fashion, film,  Audrey in Rome, Vanity Fair: Audrey Hepburn is probably my favorite movie icon from my childhood.

 Audrey Hepburn Vanity Fair cover

Hepburn’s iconic look was, according to her son, what she thought of as “a good mixture of defects.” Dotti explains, “She thought she had a big nose and big feet, and she was too skinny and not enough breast. She would look in the mirror and say, ‘I don’t understand why people see me as beautiful.’ ”

via Audrey Hepburn’s Son: My Mother Never Thought She Was Beautiful | Vanity Fair.

Porch Dogs, Garden and Gun:  I own a few porch dogs!

 

For eight years, photographer Nell Dickerson traveled across the South taking portraits of dogs committed to the deep-seated tradition of watching the world. Those photographs comprise her latest book, Porch Dogs, which includes sixty pups, from a Basset Hound in Memphis, Tennessee to a Labrador Retriever in Point Clear, Alabama.

via Porch Dogs | Garden and Gun.

dogs, garden/yard:  Love this!

dog or dogs happily romping in the backyard is a classic dog-owner dream. Achieving this, though, takes more thought than just sending your dog out in the yard and hoping for the best. Take the time to make sure your yard provides your dog with the amenities he or she needs and loves. Fortunately, pet-friendly yard amenities are also great for people as well.

via Cue the joyous soundtrack. These pet-friendly landscape and garden ideas will keep your pooch safe, happy and well exercised outdoors.

 divorce , NC, http://www.wsoctv.com:  I thought NC had one of the longest … unbelievable.

State lawmakers are considering making divorces harder to get in North Carolina.Senate Bill 518, dubbed the Healthy Marriage Act, would double the time it takes for a divorce to be granted, and also force couples to undergo counseling.Currently, the state requires a one-year waiting period for divorce, which Susan Huspeth said is already too long.”Why would you force someone to stay in a relationship when theyre unhappy?” she asked.Hudspeth said her marriage of seven years was unhealthy.”The things that theyre requiring during that two-year period, in my personal opinion, should be required pre-marriage — when you apply for a marriage license,” she said.

via Bill would double time it takes for divorce to be granted in NC | www.wsoctv.com.

Lessons from Living in My Ford Fairmont, Jim Cramer, LinkedIn:  I can imagine someone doing this in the 80’s … now … no way.

First, let me suggest that there were some upsides to my situation. Unlike most in a predicament like mine, I was young, unburdened with family and still employed — I had time, friends and paycheck to keep me optimistic. And, I had ended up in this situation while living in L.A. The fabulous weather made it a rare night that I had to break out the bottle of Jack to keep me warm. The endless freeway rest stops gave me many a safe place to catch some zzzs, not that I ever put my weary head on the plastic seat cover without first being sure that I was in reaching distance of the .22 caliber pistol that’s mandatory for car denizens. Plus, I had a job that required me to be out all night, a homicide reporter always at the ready, never too far from home. Living in your car can be very convenient and, yes, inexpensive as your auto insurance can double as your homeowners in a pinch.

via Lessons from Living in My Ford Fairmont | LinkedIn.

01
Mar
13

2.28.13 … No matter our age, it seems we are all a little bit scared of the dark …

“Solvitur Ambulando” – It is solved by walking, 2013 Lenten labyrinth walks,  Avondale Presbyterian Church:

First, I was scared that the labyrinth would not be well lit. It was well lit. What a relief.
Second, I worried it would be too cold.  It was 42 degrees, a perfect temp.
Third, as I drove up the side street,  the view of downtown was phenomenal.  So i walked to the top of the garden hill (with the cross) and snapped a few shots … I don’t think a picture will capture it,  but here it is …
IMG_6165
I heard the water in the fountain rushing and the chimes ringing.
IMG_6161 IMG_6181 IMG_6179
My shadow was very long.
IMG_6174
Even though I had no reason to be fearful, I  was because it was dark and I was alone.   I found my heart was racing just a little bit and I walked much faster than I usually walk when I walk a labyrinth.
IMG_6178 IMG_6182
My feet were sweating in my garden clogs!!
IMG_6167
Beautiful walk in the shadows of the night.

    IMG_6192   IMG_6172

And as I walked, my thoughts went to the Barbara Brown Taylor lecture I attended last winter … Darkness …

No matter our age, it seems we are all a little bit scared of the dark.

Taylor pointed out, though, that in the original story of creation, it was darkness that provided the backdrop for God’s creation of the light…the story says that darkness covered the face of the deep as God stepped up with God’s divine paintbrush to paint the first stroke; darkness was there as a canvas when God began.

And, recounting stories of a smoky underground jazz club where she worked nights while putting herself through seminary, Taylor pointed out that there is a whole other world that happens after dark, a world that many of us never get to see.

She said we need darkness, not only for the life-giving REM cycles that happen in the dark, but for walking outside under a blanket of stars, far enough away from the big city that we can see clearly the Little Dipper and Cassiopeia and Orion, and in seeing the stars clearly through the darkness can, from time to time, see our own lives with a clarity we were missing before.

We need the darkness, she says.  Without it, we can’t hope to see the light.

via 12 | November | 2012 | Talk With the Preacher.

Peace and grace …

Henri Nouwen:  Loved this one today …

We are afraid of emptiness. Spinoza speaks about our “horror vacui,” our horrendous fear of vacancy. We like to occupy-fill up-every empty time and space. We want to be occupied. And if we are not occupied we easily become preoccupied; that is, we fill the empty spaces before we have even reached them. We fill them with our worries, saying, “But what if …”

It is very hard to allow emptiness to exist in our lives. Emptiness requires a willingness not to be in control, a willingness to let something new and unexpected happen. It requires trust, surrender, and openness to guidance. God wants to dwell in our emptiness. But as long as we are afraid of God and God’s actions in our lives, it is unlikely that we will offer our emptiness to God. Let’s pray that we can let go of our fear of God and embrace God as the source of all love.

via Daily Meditation: Letting Go of Our Fear of God.

Southern art, Romantic Spirits Exhibition, Garden and Gun:

Romantic Spirits, a companion exhibit to the book by the same name, will run from March 7 through May 26 at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. From there, it will travel to the Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina and the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia.

via Romantic Spirits Exhibition | Garden and Gun.

Jennifer Lawrence,  Oscars Interview,  Jack Nicholson , ABC News:  So what does Jack Nicholson have to  do with anything … I’ll be waiting …

Lawrence had just described her big win: “I feel like I can’t even remember. It’s kind of an insane moment and it was just really exciting. It was really just shocking.  It was the first time I’ve ever felt, like, actual shock.”

Out of nowhere, Nicholson, 75, walked into the interview and said to Lawrence, “You did such a beautiful job. I didn’t mean to cross into your interview but I had to congratulate you.”

“You’re being really rude,” Lawrence, 22, joked after thanking him.

They gushed over each others’ movies and said goodbye.

He exited and the actress shouted, “Oh my God,” putting her hands in her face. “Is he still there?”

“I’ll be waiting,” said Nicholson, who popped his head back into the interview as a surprise.

via Jennifer Lawrence’s Oscars Interview Interrupted by Jack Nicholson – ABC News.

Pope Benedict XVI, Twitter, WSJ.com: Tweets Gone, But Not Forgotten …

Along with his papal authority, Pope Benedict XVI relinquishes his twitter handle. WSJ’s Jason Bellini has the story of his not-infallible tweeting career.

via Video – Pope Benedict XVI’s Tweets Gone, But Not Forgotten – WSJ.com.

NBA records, Davidson College,  Stephen Curry, kudos:  Kudos, Steph!

NEW YORK — Stephen Curry rose for another jumper, and by then even the Knicks probably figured it would go in.

Curry had hardly missed in a scintillating second half of the NBA’s most electric performance this season, the crowd cheering even before the ball left his hands.

Felton’s blocked shot led to J.R. Smith’s tiebreaking basket with 1:10 left, and the Knicks overcame Curry’s NBA season-high 54 points to beat the Golden State Warriors 109-105 on Wednesday night.

Curry was 18 of 28 from the field, finishing one 3-pointer shy of the NBA record with 11 in 13 attempts, in a performance that had the crowd hanging on his every shot. But the Knicks and Felton finally stopped him with 1:28 to play and the score tied at 105.

“My main thing is to keep playing. Like I said, once a guy gets it going like that, there’s nothing I can really do. I’ve still got to stay in my mindset, still play my game, and I was still able to come up with some big plays at the end,” Felton said. “We all came up with some big plays to get that win.”

via Golden State Warriors vs. New York Knicks – Recap – February 27, 2013 – ESPN.

Lasso, slippers,  Gaspard Tiné-Berès & Ruben Valensi, Kickstarter:  They are so cute!

Each Lasso slipper is made from a single piece of felt, with a leather sole. The flat pattern is shaped simply by sewing the provided lace through the corresponding precut holes. They are delivered flat-packed with laces of your choice and only take a few minutes to assemble.

So we started to look for a manufacturer and found the Sellerie Parisienne, at Villeneuve-Saint-Georges in the Parisian suburbs, a social enterprise that provides work opportunities for people with special needs. It offered all the skills needed to manufacture, package and ship Lasso to the customer. The die was cast! It took a lot more discussions, coffees, pints, sewing and sweat to establish Lasso: a young, social and responsible brand.

Nike must be smacking their corporate heads that they didn’t think of this first. The Lasso Slipper is essentially the simplest concept of a shoe, with sturdy material and a laces holding it all together — much like a pre-sole version of Nike’s Footscape.

via Lasso Slipper: A Flat-Pack Wool-Felt Slipper You Can Assemble Yourself | The Crosby Press – BETA.

Pope Benedict, resignation

BBC News (UK) @BBCNews

Pope on resignation: “I took this step in full awareness of its gravity” but “with profound serenity of spirit”. LIVE

bbc.in/YYiuP6

Chiditarod,  Shopping Cart Race, Chicago’s Urban Iditarod & Epic Food Drive:  Fun …

Dress Up. Cause Chaos. DO GOOD.

Chiditarod Shopping Cart Race

Chiditarod (think Iditarod) is Chicago’s Epic Urban Iditarod. A charity food drive, beauty pageant, costumed shopping cart race, talent show, fundraiser and chaos generator all in one. And probably the world’s largest mobile food drive, benefitting the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

via Chiditarod Shopping Cart Race | Chicago’s Urban Iditarod & Epic Food Drive.

TEDTalks, food:  have I mentioned how much I enjoy TED …

Five of the conference’s most palatable PowerPoints

via TED’s Most Gluttonous – Drink – Thrillist Nation.

Sir Ravi The Juggler, Stanford Student,  Rubik’s Cube, juggling, NPR,  YouTube, random:  very random …

 

Sir Ravi The Juggler – YouTube.

Bowles-Simpson II. The Sequester , Forbes:  We shall see …

Simpson and Bowles, who chaired a 2010 White House deficit reduction panel, presented a broad framework aimed at reducing the debt to “below” 70 percent of Gross Domestic Product in 10 years. The debt/GDP ratio has become a favorite new target for both Democrats and Republicans though, naturally, they disagree on what it should be.

Many Democrats and some progressives want to aim for about 73 percent of GDP, which is what it is today. Many Republicans and other deficit hawks are shooting for about 60 percent, which was the upper bound of member state deficits set by the creators of the Eurozone (not that it’s done them much good). For context, the Congressional Budget Office figures that under the most likely fiscal scenario, th

via Bowles-Simpson II: A New Plan To Avoid The Sequester – Forbes.

10
Dec
11

12.10.2010 … “The best part of waking up is Folgers in your cup! … Actually not Folger’s … but love BF’s quote!

coffee, quotes, Ben Franklin:  🙂

Coffee Quote: “Among the numerous luxuries of the table…coffee may be considered as one of the most valuable. It excites cheerfulness without intoxication; and the pleasing flow of spirits which it occasions…is never followed by sadness, languor or debility.” — Benjamin Franklin

Davidson College, honor code, self-scheduled exams: … only a question if you have self-scheduled exams! …  🙂

Davidson College

What was your finals strategy? Take them early and get it over with? Wait ’til the last possible minute? One a day? Or…?

via What was your….

 food, restaurants, Kickstand, Charlotte, kith/kin:  Great dinner with Joni Bob and John at Kickstand Charlotte Burgers -n- Bar | Charlotte, NC | Best Restaurant.  We had:

FRIED PICKLES

Served with marinara sauce. Pickle spears fried and served with Ranch.

via Kickstand Charlotte Burger Bar Appetizers | Charlotte, NC Restaurant.

BLEU BURGER SALAD

Mixed greens, herb baked goat cheese, chopped walnuts, dried cranberries, apples, and cherry tomatoes tossed with Apple Vinaigrette dressing. Field greens mixed with corn relish, cherry tomatoes, red onions, crispy bacon and chopped walnuts. Tossed with creamy Horseradish Vinaigrette and topped with a burger patty with melted Gorgonzola crumbles. via Kickstand Charlotte | Best Veggie Burger Bar & Salads | Charlotte, NC

HUNG OVER CYCLIST

Burger and tomato sandwiched between 2 grilled cheese sandwiches. Meatloaf style burger with sundried tomatoes, garlic, and basil, topped with Brie, caramelized onions, and fig spread. via Kickstand Charlotte | Burgers, Sandwiches & Hot Dogs.

THE MORNING RIDE

Burger stuffed with bacon, Swiss cheese, and Cremini mushrooms and topped with horseradish mayo. Burger topped with a fried egg, bacon, American cheese, and hollandaise sauce served on an English muffin. via Kickstand Charlotte | Burgers, Sandwiches & Hot Dogs.

… and I would highly recommend Kickstand!

Davidson College, Davidson basketball, UNC Charlotte:  Love reading the Game Notes … Time to put the game face on … And take it off … Not the ‘cats night… 84-61 … 😦

Susan Dennard, Something Strange and Deadly, zombies, blogging:  One of the more interesting things about keeping a blog is that is show you the search that people used to get to you.  Someone searched “how do you pronounce Dennard in French.”  Since I did not know the answer … I decided to do the search and see what I came up with … and I found Susan Dennard’s blog … an American writer from the South who is married to a Frenchman and lives in France.  So I sent her a note … below is her answer … as well as her story about her new zombie Young Adult novel.  I just love the internet!

“My family pronounces it “Din nerd” as well, though according to my French father-in-law, it IS a French name (from the north of France). He pronounces it “Du Nar” with a slightly stronger emphasis on the second syllable.”

-e-mail from Susan Dennard 12.10.2011

My debut, Something Strange and Deadly, will be available in 2012 from HarperCollins Children’s!

via Susan Dennard | will write for cookies.

There’s something strange and deadly loose in Philadelphia…

Eleanor Fitt has a lot to worry about. Her brother has gone missing, her family has fallen on hard times, and her mother is determined to marry her off to any rich young man who walks by. But this is nothing compared to what she’s just read in the newspaper—

The Dead are rising in Philadelphia.

via Books.

Ted Dennard, Savannah Bee, Pineview GA:  While I performed the above search I found this about Ted Dennard, a distant cousin with roots to Pineview GA, and thought I would do a plug for his honey/honey products.  It really is good!

 

Ted Dennard’s company, Savannah Bee, ranks as one of the most vibrant small companies in the honey industry. Since 2002, Ted’s Savannah Bee continues to expand and diversify by producing some of the purest honey-based products in the country.

St. Simons Island, Georgia, native, Ted Dennard has traveled to New Zealand, Vietnam, Ireland and France to learn various beekeeping practices through the years. Ted’s work ethic, and indelible products earned Savannah Bee a 2010 Ernst and Young Entrepreneur nomination. Recently, Savannah Bee was featured on CNN’s Small Business Spotlight. Savannah Bee products have been exposed in Oprah Winfrey’s magazine, Vogue, Better Homes & Garden, Southern Living and Rachel Ray’s Body & Soul to name a few periodicals.

Ted studied and graduated from Sewanee, The University of the South. In the 90s, Ted lived in Jamaica for over a year–serving a 27-month tour of duty in the Peace Corps–where he taught  virtues of beekeeping to school children and church groups in St. Mary Parish. Ted wrote this as Savannah Bee’s continual earthy ethic:

“Honeybees truly weave magic out of sunshine. These creatures of light continue to enrich their surroundings as they recite their timeless hum. In addition to appreciating the miraculous role played by honeybees, we humans should do whatever we can to live an environmentally-responsible lifestyle and promote a clean and healthy planet. We must do our part to support these wondrous creatures, in gratitude for their many contributions.”

via Swampland:The Buzz Around Savannah Bee: The Ted Dennard Interview.

17
Nov
11

11.17.2011 … MARTA Gold Line to Civic Center to Megabus to Charlotte (with a mere 2 hour delay) … WOOHOO! great visit with the mum and sis!

Atlanta, MegaBus, travel, kith/kin: Megabus to Charlotte. WOOHOO! great visit with the mum and sis… Massive traffic jam … This delay is not Megabus’ fault … View from the bus for the last 1/2 hour … 🙂 — at I 85

.

This is what I was trapped in …

A truck driver has been charged in a wreck that completely shutdown Interstate 85 for four hours on Thursday.

Rafael Lopez, 48, of New Jersey, has been charged with driving too fast for conditions, according to Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Bill Rhyne.

The southbound lanes reopened at about 2 p.m., and traffic started to slowly move again. The northbound lanes reopened at about 2:45 p.m.

A truck ran off the road and into the support for an electronic message board used for AMBER alerts and other information that spans all lanes of the interstate. It caused the structure to collapse across the northbound lanes near mile marker 67, according to the Highway Patrol.

via I-85 Reopens; Driver Charged In Wreck – Local News – Greenville, SC – msnbc.com.

A Very Young Dancer, children’s/YA literature, followup:  Having friends in the ballet world I found this interesting …

IN the fall of 1976 “A Very Young Dancer” leaped into the imaginations of a generation of little girls. This children’s book by the photographer Jill Krementz chronicled the day-to-day life of a 10-year-old student from the School of American Ballet, following her to class and through her starring role as Marie in New York City Ballet’s “Nutcracker,” for which she was handpicked by George Balanchine himself. (“George Balanchine’s Nutcracker,” performed by City Ballet, begins its 57th season on Friday at the Koch Theater.)

Stephanie DePierro was profiled at 10 in Jill Krementz’s 1976 photo book “A Very Young Dancer.”

For a time the book’s subject, Stephanie, was perhaps the most famous and easily recognizable ballerina in the world. Young readers wanted to be her. There were bags of fan mail and appearances on “Today,” “Midday Live With Bill Boggs” and a one-hour “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood” Christmas special.

For anyone who’s read the classic book, it’s easy to see why it was a best seller. Stephanie’s intensity — her beauty, her dark eyes and her seriousness — draws the reader in. The stark black and white lends some of the photos a Grimm’s fairy tale quality, with a haunted undertow that appeals to girls. And it offers a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the most prestigious ballet academy in the country, which has an almost mystical quality for aspiring ballerinas. (My own daughter is a student there.)

via ‘A Very Young Dancer’ and the Life That Followed – NYTimes.com.

Roget’s Thesaurus, words:  You know what, I must be a real nerd … I love Roget’s Thesaurus, too.

A confession: I love Roget’s Thesaurus. Mine is not a popular position to avow. Most writers I know, asked if they use a thesaurus to discover more interesting vocabulary for their essays or stories, bristle with resistance. Haven’t those who look up “say” in the Thesaurus and consequently force characters to “utter,” “breathe,” “pour forth,” “state,” “declare,” “assert,” “aver,” “relate” “murmur,” “mutter,” or “gasp” ruined countless reading experiences? Haven’t students who looked up “refute” and found “confute” next on the list composed arguments that got off on the wrong track, only to be further derailed when they decided that “apodixis” suited them better than “proof”? Whatever folks think of Stephen King, most would agree with his advice, in On Writing:

One of the really bad things you can do to your writing is to dress up the vocabulary, looking for long words because you’re maybe a little bit ashamed of your short ones.  This is like dressing up a household pet in evening clothes . … Make yourself a solemn promise right now that you’ll never use “emolument” when you mean “tip.”

via An Aficionado (Connoisseur, Fan, Devotee, Enthusiast) Speaks

college majors, humanities:

“So, what do you study?”

“I’m an English major and I’m also pre-med.”

Blank stare. Glazed eyes. Crickets. So begins another awkward introduction in the dining hall.

Similar situations are erupting on campuses across the country as a small, but growing number of aspiring doctors choose to major in the humanities or social sciences instead of the usual bio or chem. Last year, nearly a quarter of medical school applicants majored outside the sciences, and for good reason: Nowadays, medical schools don’t care about what you majored in during your undergrad.

Admissions rates are virtually equal for science and non-science majors, and most med schools encourage undergrads to take substantial courses in the humanities to prove that they’re concerned with the human condition, not just the human body.

For pre-med English majors like me, the idea is simple. I want to spend my college days reading Shakespeare; I want to spend my post-college life delivering health care to under-served communities. Why should I have to choose between them?

The possibility of becoming a non-science pre-med is far from obvious to most college students, however.

via Are you pre-med? Major in the humanities | USA TODAY College.

Davidson College, Arab Spring Lecture, William Roebuck:

William Roebuck is director for the Office of Maghreb Affairs in the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs. His office has been on the front lines, helping shape the U.S. government’s diplomatic response to the momentous developments known as the Arab Spring. His lecture will focus on the wave of revolutionary movements across the Arab World, as well as his recent experiences in Libya. A question and answer session will follow the lecture.

via Davidson College – Arab Spring Lecture.

diets, health: Ooh … t00 many questions!

1““““““`11111Have you tried out a trendy diet plan, such as a juice fast, the 17-Day Diet, Wheat Belly, the Paleo Diet, or the Dukan Diet (a.k.a. the “Kate Middleton Diet”)? Or are you committed to an older weight-loss plan, such as Weight Watchers or South Beach? If you’ve found success with a popular diet—or want to rant about your bad experiences with one—we want to hear from you for an upcoming Gourmet Live feature on the best diets for food lovers. Please cut and paste the following questions and send your answers to gourmetlive@condenast.com.

DIET QUESTIONS:

What is the name of (and any books associated with) the diet you tried?

How did you choose this diet?

What foods and drinks—if any—are you required to give up for the diet?

How would you sum up the other “rules” of the diet in three or four sentences?

How did you feel while on the diet (emotionally and physically)?

How long were you on the diet and did you lose any weight (if so, how much)?

What were the best things about the diet?

What about the worst things about the diet?

Would you recommend this diet to a food loving friend? Why or why not?

Can we quote you by name? If so, please supply your name as you’d like to be listed, and (if you are comfortable with this), your age and gender.

via Have You Tried a Trendy Diet Plan? — Gourmet Live.

food, globalization: “And, as our food supply becomes ever more globalised, I can’t help but imagine that more and more producers of “luxury” foods will seek to make their product even more desirable with reference to a hyper-specific, utterly imaginary atlas of aspirational origins.”

Provenance is a tricky issue. Over the past few years, the names of agricultural regions, villages, and even specific farms have proliferated on urban menus and shelf labels, providing the aspirational consumer with a shorthand guarantee of authenticity, taste, and, often, local origin.The idea is that by listing the farm on which your heirloom tomato was picked, chefs honour growers as the co-producer of flavour; meanwhile, by achieving protected designation of origin (PDO) status, traditional makers of pork pies and prosciutto preserve the geographic context of their product, as well as its artisanal technique and, often, its continued economic viability.For consumers, however, these place names tend to form a more abstract cartography of implied inherent value. I confess to finding it reassuring that the lamb on offer at the restaurant up the street comes from Jamison Farm, even though I have no idea where that is, and I look for San Marzano DOP tomatoes despite the fact that (this is a little embarrassing) I couldn’t point to their carefully protected origin on a map….However, it is the branding geniuses at Marks & Spencer, suppliers of underwear and luxury ready-meals to the UK, who have taken the abstract, yet powerful, geography of food labeling to its logical, imaginary conclusion. While re-reading Sarah Murray’s excellent book, Moveable Feasts (of which more later), I came across this nugget:Sometimes places that are entirely fictional are created to add to the appeal of a food. British chain Marks & Spencer recently introduced “Lochmuir salmon,” despite the fact that Lochmuir cannot be found on a map.Marks & Spencer is refreshingly open on the subject of Lochmuir’s non-existence, with Andrew Mallinson, the company’s “fish expert,” explaining to The Scotsman newspaper that “it is a name chosen by a panel of consumers because it had the most Scottish resonance. It emphasises that the fish is Scottish.”

And, as our food supply becomes ever more globalised, I can’t help but imagine that more and more producers of “luxury” foods will seek to make their product even more desirable with reference to a hyper-specific, utterly imaginary atlas of aspirational origins. Chinese fois gras will come from the French-sounding Beauchâteau, Vietnamese mozzarella will be marketed under the faux-Italian name of San Legaro, and the role of geography in food description — originally intended as a means to reconnect consumers and producers — will end up further disguising the industrial commodity chain while creating an entirely alternate universe, made up of the places that we dream our food comes from.

via The Atlas of Aspirational Origins.

The Vatican, lawsuits,  Benetton,ad campaigns:  Truly bizarre:  world leaders kissing!

The Vatican is promising legal action to stop the distribution of a photo of Pope Benedict kissing an imam on the mouth. The photo is fake, by the way, and is part of a shock-factor advertising campaign by Italian fashion company Benetton that features world leaders getting fresh.

Benedict’s inamorata in the photo is Ahmed Tayeb, leader of Al Azhar in Cairo, Sunni Islam’s most influential institution. Another ad shows President Obama kissing Chinese President Hu Jintao.

The new campaign, as well as the UNHATE Foundation, a new Benetton think tank aimed at, um, communicating love, are part of the company’s social responsibility strategy. Click here for the foundation website and here for slideshow of the ads. WSJ’s Heard on the Runway has more here, and the Journal has a story on the ad campaign here.

The Vatican, however, isn’t feeling the unhate. It said in a statement Thursday its lawyers in Italy and around the world had been instructed to “take the proper legal measures” to stop the use of the photo, even in the media, Reuters reported. And Here‘s a link to the statement in Italian, for what it’s worth. (Prego.)

The statement said the ad was “damaging to not only to dignity of the pope and the Catholic Church but also to the feelings of believers.” It wasn’t clear whether the Vatican intended to sue Benetton directly.

via The Vatican is threatening a legal response Italian fashion company Benetton’s new ad campaign of world leaders kissing – Law Blog – WSJ.

art, photography, Nate Larson, Marni Shindelman, “Geolocation”series: “The images originate as tweets that Larson and Shindelman select for their poignancy, humor or some other quality. They then travel to the places that the tweets were sent from, indentified by GPS coordinates embedded in the messages, and take a picture. The resulting works pair image with words, to sometimes startling effect.” … interesting concept.

Every photograph in Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman’s “Geolocation”series starts with a caption. But the artists don’t write them themselves.

The images originate as tweets that Larson and Shindelman select for their poignancy, humor or some other quality. They then travel to the places that the tweets were sent from, indentified by GPS coordinates embedded in the messages, and take a picture. The resulting works pair image with words, to sometimes startling effect.

A selection of “Geolocation” images is on view at Montpelier Arts Center. Read my review of the exhibition (whose images are also available in book form), and check out a few of the pictures after the jump.

via Art in focus: Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman – Going Out Gurus – The Washington Post.

Storify:  How Storifying Occupy Wall Street Saved The News … still trying to figure out storify!

In the dead of night on Monday, November 14, Zuccotti Park in New York City was raided by police. In the preceding days, there were crackdowns at several of the major Occupy protests around the country. The effort had apparently been coordinated between cities. Monday night’s actions against the original Occupy Wall Street encampment were stern, heavy enough to bring a decisive end to the protest. But the raid only served to turn up the heat in New York and around the country.

As they have since the Occupation began, people on the ground fired up their smartphones to report the events as they happened, and curators around the Web gathered and retweeted the salient messages. But early on in the raid, mainstream media outlets began reporting that the police were barring their reporters from entering the park. The NYPD even grounded a CBS News helicopter. The night had chilling implications for freedom of the press. But the news got out anyway. The raw power of citizen media – and the future of news envisioned by a site called Storify – thwarted the media blackout.

But for the Monday night raid at Zuccotti Park, and indeed for much of the Occupation, Storify has come into its own as the social news curation tool par excellence. In fact, thanks to the media blackout Monday night, some of the most important news outlets in the country would not have had a story if not for Storify.

In October, it rolled out a brand new editing interface making the tool vastly easier to use. And one week ago, just before the police raided Zuccotti Park, Storify made its move, redesigning its homepage as a destination featuring the most important stories on the social Web. Storify’s vision is no less than a leveling of the media playing field. On the Storify homepage, lifelong and first-time journalists stand side by side.

Damman says this is the perfect demonstration of the Storify redesign. These social media documents are the real story, and the NYPD’s obstruction of credentialed journalists only shows how out of touch the police are. “The police in New York don’t realize that it doesn’t matter to not have journalists on the scene,” Damman says, “because everybody is a reporter. What happened last night shows that they don’t get that.”

“Most of the content comes from the people on the ground, from the 99%.”

via How Storifying Occupy Wall Street Saved The News.

tweet of the day, Steph Curry:  🙂

Stephen Curry (@StephenCurry30)
11/17/11 8:00 PM
Lol no doubt i have something nice in store RT @sdotcurry: Cmon son! #blood RT @StephenCurry30: Big game tomorrow. What do I wear lol?
Occupy Wall Street:  Do you think OWS reflects the sentiment of  50 % of the country?

The Occupy Wall Street protests continue to spread around the country, highlighting grievances some Americans have about banks, income inequality and a sense that the poor and middle class have been disenfranchised. A recent New York Times/CBS News poll found that almost half of the public thinks the sentiments at the root of the movement generally reflect the views of most Americans. What are your thoughts about the movement? Do you agree with the protesters’ methods? Please note you must be logged in to post a comment.

via Public Opinion and the Occupy Movement – Interactive Feature – NYTimes.com.

criminal acts, fashion, Marc Jacobs:  Thought this one interesting …

In a case that seems ripe for Sherlock Holmes, Scotland Yard is investigating an alleged theft of samples from designer Marc Jacobs‘s Spring 2012 fashion collection that took place along a posh London Street.

The missing clothes, shoes and handbags were from the collection that the designer showed on his New York runway in September, as well as less-dramatic looks from his so-called pre-collection, according to a person familiar with the situation. Police estimated the value at £40,000, or a little more than $63,000.

Marc Jacobs executives declined to comment.

[JACOBS]ReutersMarc Jacobs had to cancel its planned London ‘press day’ for fashion editors; above, a look from the Spring 2012 collection.

Sales to retailers of the Marc Jacobs collection closed in October, and the loss won’t affect products destined for stores next spring, said the person familiar with the situation. Those items are already being manufactured. What’s more, the brand has duplicates of the samples in New York, the person said.

But as a result of the samples’ disappearance, the Marc Jacobs brand was forced to cancel its planned London “press day” where fashion editors and reporters are invited to view the collections. Press days allow publications to see and select items they may photograph in future issues.

via Marc Jacobs’s Spring Collection Allegedly Stolen in London – WSJ.com.

President Abraham Lincoln, Mormons, history:  Very interesting piece!

On Oct. 20, 1861, a vital piece of the Utah puzzle was solved, as the final lines of a telegraph were strung together, linking the

Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific, through an office in Salt Lake City. On that auspicious occasion, which spoke so loudly of union, Brigham Young remarked,“Utah has not seceded, but is firm for the Constitution and laws of our once happy country.” Those were words guaranteed to warm Lincoln’s heart. Two days later, more good news, as General J. Arlington Bennett wrote him to ask if he could recruit 1,000-10,000 Mormons to fight for the Union.

But the question was far from solved, and on Nov. 18, Lincoln attacked the Mormon question in a most Lincolnian way. Instead of ordering an invasion, Lincoln ordered information. Specifically, he asked the Library of Congress to send him a pile of books about Mormonism, so that the aggregator-in-chief could better understand them. These included “The Book of Mormon” in its original 1831 edition, and three other early studies of the Mormons, with extensive, lurid chapters covering their polygamy. For some reason, he also ordered a volume of Victor Hugo, in French, a language he could not read.

Fortified by his reading, Lincoln came to a great decision. And that decision was to do nothing. Sometimes that, too, can be a form of leadership — what Churchill called “a masterly inactivity.”

Typically, Lincoln reached his decision through a homely parable, told to a Mormon emissary:

When I was a boy on the farm in Illinois there was a great deal of timber on the farm which we had to clear away. Occasionally we would come to a log which had fallen down. It was too hard to split, too wet to burn, and too heavy to move, so we plowed around it. You go back and tell Brigham Young that if he will let me alone I will let him alone.

That parable is about as much as we will get in the way of a formal explanation, but it is enough. To his generous store of common sense, we might also add the freshness of Lincoln’s memories of the bloodshed at Nauvoo in 1844, when angry mobs had killed the Mormon leaders, with elected officials standing by and doing nothing. And the centrality of Utah to the grand vision of a transcontinental republic, embraced fully by America’s most western president to date.

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10.29.2011 … Molly and John on the tarmac early this am … running in the Runway 5K Run out at CLT. (Oh, and Molly so beat her daddy :))

food, kith/kin, random: Ever heard of white sweet potatoes? Ask Elizabeth  and Ballard … I laughed about as hard as I have ever laughed about special white sweet potatoes from VA at “67.” Who else was there? Jimmy? And why did I think of this …

When potato plants bloom, they send up five-lobed flowers that spangle fields like fat purple stars. By some accounts, Marie Antoinette liked the blossoms so much that she put them in her hair. Her husband, Louis XVI, put one in his buttonhole, inspiring a brief vogue in which the French aristocracy swanned around with potato plants on their clothes. The flowers were part of an attempt to persuade French farmers to plant and French diners to eat this strange new species.

Today the potato is the fifth most important crop worldwide, after wheat, corn, rice and sugar cane. But in the 18th century the tuber was a startling novelty, frightening to some, bewildering to others—part of a global ecological convulsion set off by Christopher Columbus.

via How the Potato Changed the World | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine.

Brene Brown, TED, culture:  I have posted this before, I think … but it is one of my favorite TED videos … Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability | Video on TED.com.

Christmas 2012, stocking stuffers:  I really love the little gifts … The Container Store – The Original Storage and Organization Store®.

zombies, pop culture, kith/kin:  Once again the Teagues are ahead of the game. 🙂

That glazed look in their dead eyes, the stench of rotting flesh, their hunger for fresh human brains — zombies seem to be everywhere.

The fascination with the undead has been creeping up on the sexy vampires of the “Twilight” dynasty. Over the past decade, movies such as “Resident Evil,” “I Am Legend ” and the spoofy “Zombieland” — not to mention the vast array of zombie DVDs, video games and accessories — have brought in $5 billion.

Seven million people watched the premiere of the hit AMC series “The Walking Dead” last week. Greg Nicoterro, the co-executive producer for the TV show said people have become “really obsessed” with zombies.

“You know vampires also have this huge following, they’re sort of been made sexy by the Twilight movies,” he said. “I honestly believe it’s the fact that as people grow up being fans of the horror genre that there’s something about zombies that are iconic.”

It’s arguable that Nicoterro is responsible for this most recent zombie contagion. He has created about 400 zombies for just season two of “The Walking Dead,” and his professional life has been dedicated to transforming regular-looking people into an army of flesh-feasting, blood-slurping ghouls.

via Move Over ‘Twilight,’ Zombies Are Creeping Up as the Popular Horror Obsession – ABC News.

Halloween costumes,  Steven J. Baum, Great Recession, PR nightmares:  Sometimes grown-ups can be really stupid.

These pictures are hardly the first piece of evidence that the Baum firm treats homeowners shabbily — or that it uses dubious legal practices to do so. It is under investigation by the New York attorney general, Eric Schneiderman. It recently agreed to pay $2 million to resolve an investigation by the Department of Justice into whether the firm had “filed misleading pleadings, affidavits, and mortgage assignments in the state and federal courts in New York.” (In the press release announcing the settlement, Baum acknowledged only that “it occasionally made inadvertent errors.”)

MFY Legal Services, which defends homeowners, and Harwood Feffer, a large class-action firm, have filed a class-action suit claiming that Steven J. Baum has consistently failed to file certain papers that are necessary to allow for a state-mandated settlement conference that can lead to a modification. Judge Arthur Schack of the State Supreme Court in Brooklyn once described Baum’s foreclosure filings as “operating in a parallel mortgage universe, unrelated to the real universe.” (My source told me that one Baum employee dressed up as Judge Schack at a previous Halloween party.)

I saw the firm operate up close when I wrote several columns about Lilla Roberts, a 73-year-old homeowner who had spent three years in foreclosure hell. Although she had a steady income and was a good candidate for a modification, the Baum firm treated her mercilessly.

When I called a press spokesman for Steven J. Baum to ask about the photographs, he sent me a statement a few hours later. “It has been suggested that some employees dress in … attire that mocks or attempts to belittle the plight of those who have lost their homes,” the statement read. “Nothing could be further from the truth.” It described this column as “another attempt by The New York Times to attack our firm and our work.”

I encourage you to look at the photographs with this column on the Web. Then judge for yourself the veracity of Steven J. Baum’s denial.

via What the Costumes Reveal – NYTimes.com.

define: person, social sciences, the natural sciences, liberal arts education, What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up, books:  Age old question … who should answer it?

We’ve previously explored three different disciplines’ perspectives on what it means to be human and a neuroscientist’s search for the self. But what, exactly, is a person? That’s exactly what sociologist Christian Smith examines in What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up — a fascinating and ambitious meditation on the grand existential question, the answer to which determines our view of our selves, our expectations of others, and our conception of what makes a good society, arguing that much of contemporary theory and thought on personhood is incomplete, short-sighted, misguided even.

Above all, Smith debunks the idea that science, morality, politics, and philosophy are separate matters that don’t, and needn’t, intersect — a byproduct of the ill-conceived model demanding the social sciences emulate the natural sciences. What Is a Person? is thus as much a compelling case for cross-disciplinary curiosity as it is a testament to the power of the synthesizer as a storyteller, weaving together existing ideas to illuminate the subject for a new

via What Is a Person? | Brain Pickings.

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10.26.2011 … Coffee with Bob and Joni … Again we will solve the problems of the world … John is on his way back from Kuwait … 26 hours in Kuwait City … 24 hours travel time each way!

travel, kith/kin:  24 hours to KWI … 26 hours in KC … 24 hours back …and now  eagle landed and is snoozing on the sofa … Poor thing … Off on the early bird to LGA in the AM.

Halloween, cartoons, viral videos:  Now for a little fun …

.

Halloween Light Show 2011 – This Is Halloween – YouTube.

Steven Pinker, language, RSA Animate: I love these animated whiteboard videos!  And Steven Pinker is one of my new favorites (thanks katie!) – Language as a Window into Human Nature – YouTube.

RSA Animate Language as a Window into Human Nature – YouTube.

potatoes, food, history, changed the world:  Food history … also interesting …

When potato plants bloom, they send up five-lobed flowers that spangle fields like fat purple stars. By some accounts, Marie Antoinette liked the blossoms so much that she put them in her hair. Her husband, Louis XVI, put one in his buttonhole, inspiring a brief vogue in which the French aristocracy swanned around with potato plants on their clothes. The flowers were part of an attempt to persuade French farmers to plant and French diners to eat this strange new species.

Today the potato is the fifth most important crop worldwide, after wheat, corn, rice and sugar cane. But in the 18th century the tuber was a startling novelty, frightening to some, bewildering to others—part of a global ecological convulsion set off by Christopher Columbus.

About 250 million years ago, the world consisted of a single giant landmass now known as Pangaea. Geological forces broke Pangaea apart, creating the continents and hemispheres familiar today. Over the eons, the separate corners of the earth developed wildly different suites of plants and animals. Columbus’ voyages reknit the seams of Pangaea, to borrow a phrase from Alfred W. Crosby, the historian who first described this process. In what Crosby called the Columbian Exchange, the world’s long-separate ecosystems abruptly collided and mixed in a biological bedlam that underlies much of the history we learn in school. The potato flower in Louis XVI’s buttonhole, a species that had crossed the Atlantic from Peru, was both an emblem of the Columbian Exchange and one of its most important aspects.

Compared with grains, tubers are inherently more productive. If the head of a wheat or rice plant grows too big, the plant will fall over, with fatal results. Growing underground, tubers are not limited by the rest of the plant. In 2008 a Lebanese farmer dug up a potato that weighed nearly 25 pounds. It was bigger than his head.

Many researchers believe that the potato’s arrival in northern Europe spelled an end to famine there. (Corn, another American crop, played a similar but smaller role in southern Europe.) More than that, as the historian William H. McNeill has argued, the potato led to empire: “By feeding rapidly growing populations, [it] permitted a handful of European nations to assert dominion over most of the world between 1750 and 1950.” The potato, in other words, fueled the rise of the West.

Equally important, the European and North American adoption of the potato set the template for modern agriculture—the so-called agro-industrial complex. Not only did the Columbian Exchange carry the potato across the Atlantic, it also brought the world’s first intensive fertilizer: Peruvian guano. And when potatoes fell to the attack of another import, the Colorado potato beetle, panicked farmers turned to the first artificial pesticide: a form of arsenic. Competition to produce ever-more-potent arsenic blends launched the modern pesticide industry. In the 1940s and 1950s, improved crops, high-intensity fertilizers and chemical pesticides created the Green Revolution, the explosion of agricultural productivity that transformed farms from Illinois to Indonesia—and set off a political argument about the food supply that grows more intense by the day.

via How the Potato Changed the World | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine.

‘Inhalable’ Caffeine, inventions: Would you snort one?

Courtesy of AeroShot

Is caffeine addictive? Certainly, it produces tolerance and withdrawal symptoms if it is stopped abruptly. But even though it is the most widely used drug in the world, few caffeine users exhibit signs of serious addiction — namely, compulsive drug-related behaviors despite negative consequences. That could be in part because caffeine is legal and easily and cheaply obtained. Or, it could be because the effects of caffeine use — especially in a hyperefficient society — are generally positive.

So, while previous products, like inhalable aerosolized alcohol, led to bans in multiple states, AeroShot seems more likely to garner praise (especially from employers — and editors).

The new product will hit stores in New York City and Boston in January and will be available online in several weeks, according to Edwards. The retail price is expected to be $2.99 per inhaler — cheaper than a Starbucks latte.

via What We’ve All Been Waiting For: Zero-Calorie, ‘Inhalable’ Caffeine – TIME Healthland.

Moammar Gadhafi, legacy: to many Africans he is a “martyr, benefactor, instigator.”  Leaves a conflicted image.

Moammar Gadhafi’s regime poured tens of billions of dollars into some of Africa’s poorest countries. Even when he came to visit, the eccentric Libyan leader won admiration for handing out money to beggars on the streets.

“Other heads of state just drive past here in their limousines. Gadhafi stopped, pushed away his bodyguards and shook our hands,” said Cherno Diallo, standing Monday beside hundreds of caged birds he sells near a Libyan-funded hotel. “Gadhafi’s death has touched every Malian, every single one of us. We’re all upset.”

Gadhafi backed some of the most brutal rebel leaders and dictators on the continent, but tens of thousands are now gathering at mosques built with his money and are remembering him as an anti-colonial martyr, and as an Arab leader who called himself African.

While Western powers heralded Gadhafi’s demise, many Africans were gathering at mosques built with Gadhafi’s money to mourn the man they consider an anti-imperialist martyr and benefactor.

Critics, though, note this image is at odds with Gadhafi’s history of backing some of Africa’s most brutal rebel leaders and dictators. Gadhafi sent 600 troops to support Uganda’s much-hated Idi Amin in the final throes of his dictatorship.

And Gadhafi-funded rebels supported by former Liberian leader Charles Taylor forcibly recruited children and chopped off limbs of their victims during Sierra Leone’s civil war.

“Is Gadhafi’s life more important than many thousands of people that have been killed during the war in these two countries?” asked one shopkeeper in the tiny West African country of Gambia, who spoke on condition of anonymity fearing recrimination.

“Gadhafi was a godfather to many Ugandans,” said Muhammed Kazibala, a head teacher at a Libyan-funded school in the country’s capital.

The Libyan leader also built a palace for one of Uganda’s traditional kingdoms. It was a fitting donation for a man who traveled to African Union summits dressed in a gold-embroidered green robe, flanked by seven men who said they were the “traditional kings of Africa.”

Gadhafi used Libya’s oil wealth to help create the AU in 2002, and also served as its rotating chairman. During the revolt against Gadhafi, the AU condemned NATO airstrikes as evidence mounted that his military was massacring civilians.

Gadhafi’s influence even extended to Africa’s largest economy: The Libyan leader supported the African National Congress when it was fighting racist white rule, and remained close to Nelson Mandela after the anti-apartheid icon became South Africa’s first black president.

via Across Africa, Gadhafi remembered as martyr, benefactor, instigator in the continent’s wars – The Washington Post.

rhinos, South Africa, endangered species: A group of rhinos is called a “crash.”  But why do people destroy animals for human rituals … craziness.

Black rhino in Kenya

Johannesburg’s bustling O. R. Tambo International Airport is an easy place to get lost in a crowd, and that’s just what a 29-year-old Vietnamese man named Xuan Hoang was hoping to do one day in March last year—just lie low until he could board his flight home. The police dog sniffing the line of passengers didn’t worry him; he’d checked his baggage through to Ho Chi Minh City. But behind the scenes, police were also using X-ray scanners on luggage checked to Vietnam, believed to be the epicenter of a new war on rhinos. And when Hoang’s bag appeared on the screen, they saw the unmistakable shape of rhinoceros horns—six of them, weighing more than 35 pounds and worth up to $500,000 on the black market.

Investigators suspected the contraband might be linked to a poaching incident a few days earlier on a game farm in Limpopo Province, on South Africa’s northern border. “We have learned over time, as soon as a rhino goes down, in the next two or three days the horns will leave the country,” Col. Johan Jooste of South Africa’s national priority crime unit told me when I interviewed him in Pretoria.

You might also wonder why they bother. The orneriness of rhinos is so proverbial that the word for a group of them is not a “herd” but a “crash.” “The first time I saw one I was a 4-year-old in this park. We were in a boat, and it charged the boat,” said Bird. “That’s how aggressive they can be.” Bird now makes his living keeping tabs on the park’s black rhinos and sometimes works by helicopter to catch them for relocation to other protected areas. “They’ll charge helicopters,” he added. “They’ll be running and then after a while, they’ll say, ‘Bugger this,’ and they’ll turn around and run toward you. You can see them actually lift off their front feet as they try to have a go at the helicopter.”

via Defending the Rhino | Science & Nature | Smithsonian Magazine.

twitter, women, Occupy Wall Street:  Where are the women?

Twitter is still the social media outlet of choice for Occupy Wall Street, but new analysis into the #OWS tweets has found a surprising gender imbalance in those who’re talking about the protests: Fewer women seem to be doing so, despite Twitter being a female-dominated service overall.

According to analysis by Attention released yesterday, only 30% of tweets mentioning Occupy Wall Street were from female users, even though over 64% of all Twitter users are believed to be female as a result of a 2010 Pew survey. That number is actually up from where it was a month earlier; by mid-September, fewer than 20% of Occupy Wall Street tweets were from women.

via Why Aren’t Women Tweeting About Occupy Wall Street? – Techland – TIME.com.

The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, Will Ferrell, FYI:  Never heard of this award … have to look it up.

Actor and comedian Will Ferrell jokingly gives the thumbs-down during his introduction as the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor honoree at the Kennedy Center in Washington. At left is his wife, Viveca Paulin.

via The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor: The red carpet – The Washington Post.

The Mark Twain Prize recognizes people who have had an impact on American society in ways similar to the distinguished 19th century novelist and essayist best known as Mark Twain. As a social commentator, satirist and creator of characters, Samuel Clemens was a fearless observer of society, who startled many while delighting and informing many more with his uncompromising perspective of social injustice and personal folly. He revealed the great truth of humor when he said “against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

The event is created by the Kennedy Center, and executive producers Mark Krantz, Bob Kaminsky, Peter Kaminsky, and Cappy McGarr. The Kennedy Center established The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in October 1998, and it has been televised annually. Recipients of the Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize have been Richard Pryor (1998), Jonathan Winters (1999), Carl Reiner (2000), Whoopi Goldberg (2001), Bob Newhart (2002), Lily Tomlin (2003), Lorne Michaels (2004), Steve Martin (2005), Neil Simon (2006), Billy Crystal (2007), George Carlin (2008), Bill Cosby (2009), and Tina Fey (2010).

via The Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize for Humor.

Gabrielle Giffords, therapy, Asheville NC:  Must be a pretty good therapist in Asheville!

TUCSON, Ariz. — U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is in North Carolina for two weeks of intensive therapy sessions as she continues to recover from a gunshot wound to the head.

Giffords’ office says in a statement Sunday that the Arizona congresswoman is expected to spend time with a therapist who has worked with her in Houston for the last several months and has been extensively involved in her therapy.

Giffords will work with the therapist from Monday through Nov. 4 in Asheville, N.C. No other specifics on her therapy were given.

Her staff says the trip is strictly rehabilitation-related and has been planned for several months. No public appearances or events are scheduled.

Giffords is recovering from a brain injury suffered on Jan. 8 in Tucson. Six people were killed and 13 were wounded, including Giffords.

via Gabrielle Giffords In Intensive Therapy For Two Weeks.

time:

What the second law of thermodynamics has to do with Saint Augustine, landscape art, and graphic novels.

Time is the most fundamental common denominator between our existence and that of everything else, it’s the yardstick by which we measure nearly every aspect of our lives, directly or indirectly, yet its nature remains one of the greatest mysteries of science. Last year, we devoured BBC’s excellent What Is Time? and today we turn to seven essential books that explore the grand question on a deeper, more multidimensional level, spanning everything from quantum physics to philosophy to art.

via 7 cross-disciplinary books to understand time, Steve Jobs in 200 timeless quotes, and more.

Chemistry: A Volatile History, tv, BBC:  I just love the BBC shows!

Now, thanks to the fine folks at BBC Four — who previously pondered such captivating issues as the nature of reality, the age-old tension between science and religion, how music works, and what time really is — you can refresh and enrich your understanding of this complex world with Chemistry: A Volatile History, a fascinating three-part series by theoretical physicist Jim Al-Khalili, exploring everything from the history of the elements to the rivalries and controversies that bedeviled scientific progress to the latest

via BBC’s Volatile History of Chemistry | Brain Pickings.

Mitchell International Airport, Mitchell International Airport, “recombobulation area”:  I have to ask my Milwaukee friend Donna if she’s utilized the “recombobulation area.”

Taking off your shoes and pulling out your laptop at airport security may leave you feeling discombobulated.

The Mitchell International Airport staff has set up some chairs and a sign just past one of the security checkpoints to help you out.

They’ve labeled it the “recombobulation area.”

Yes, it’s a joke. At airport security.

The sign has been hanging at the Concourse C security checkpoint for about a month. Some passengers get it immediately. Some take a few steps, then laugh. Others look up and say, “Huh?”

“See? You’re getting recombobulated right now,” Melissa Fullmore said Tuesday morning to another traveler who was putting on his belt.

via Airport draws smiles with ‘recombobulation area’ – JSOnline.

gender differences, economic hardship, Great Recession:

Measured in terms of absolute job loss, men bore the brunt of the Great Recession, hence the term “mancession.” On the other hand, men have fared better than women in regaining jobs during the slight rebound sometimes called the recovery.

Interesting comparison, but gender differences in economic hardship reach beyond employment statistics.

Many people – even those who live alone – share a portion of their earnings or devote unpaid hours of work to family members, including children and others who are dependent as result of age, sickness, disability or unemployment. Measures of economic hardship should take responsibility for dependents into account.

Women tend to be more vulnerable in this respect than men, primarily because they are more likely to take both financial and direct responsibility for the care of children.

via Nancy Folbre: The Recession in Pink and Blue – NYTimes.com.

Lake Lanier GA, Atlanta, FYI:  Lake Lanier to within 9 feet of historic low … 😦

Authorities say Lake Lanier has dropped below 1,060 feet above sea level and is now just nine feet above the historic low it reached during Georgia’s devastating drought of 2007-2009.

The lake has been on a downward trend for months now, away from the full pool of 1,071 feet and stirring memories of the drought.

The lake’s historic low water level of 1,051 feet was set on Dec. 26, 2007.

Business owners tell The Times of Gainesville (http://bit.ly/oVGFJi) that the low water level has drained some tourism.

Bob Benson, a lake guide, said there are stumps everywhere sticking out of the water, and many people aren’t going out on the lake.

via Lake Lanier drops to within 9 feet of historic low  | ajc.com.

Aftershock Survival Summit, books, Global Recession:  Not pretty!

At one point, Wiedemer even calls out Ben Bernanke, saying that his “money from heaven will be the path to hell.”

This wasn’t the first time Wiedemer’s predictions hit a nerve. In 2006, he and his team of economists accurately predicted the four-bubble meltdown in the housing, stock, private debt, and consumer spending markets that almost sunk America.

Regardless of his warnings and survival advice, Bernanke and Greenspan were not about to support Wiedemer publicly, nor were the mainstream media.

As the warnings went unheeded, and America suffered the consequences, Wiedemer penned his latest prophetic work, “Aftershock: Protect Yourself and Profit in the Next Global Financial Meltdown.”

Once again his contrarian views ruffled feathers and just before the book was publicly released, the publisher yanked the final chapter, deeming it too controversial for newsstand and online outlets such as Amazon.com.

Despite appearances, “Aftershock” is not a book with the singular intention of scaring people, explains DeHoog. “The true value lies in the sound economic survival guidance that people can act on immediately. I was able to read the original version with the ‘unpublished chapter,’ and I think it’s the most crucial in the entire book. After contacting Wiedemer, we [Newsmax] were granted permission to share it with our readers. In fact, viewers of the Aftershock Survival Summit are able to claim a free copy of it.”

In the Aftershock Survival Summit, Wiedemer reveals what the publisher didn’t want you to see. Citing the unthinkable, he provides disturbing evidence and financial charts forecasting 50% unemployment, a 90% stock market collapse, and 100% annual inflation.

“I doubted some of his predictions at first. But then Robert showed me the charts that provided evidence for such disturbing claims,” DeHoog commented.

via Aftershock Survival Summit Predicts the Unthinkable.

coffee, cities, lists:  It seems surprising to me that the home of the chain Starbucks is “the mother ship for coffee-loving AFC voters.”  But I have been there ad it is true!

No surprise—the home of Starbucks is the mother ship for coffee-loving AFC voters. But there is more than just that familiar logo here—you’ll find plenty of indie coffeehouses all over the city, as well as espresso shacks and carts on street corners and in parking lots. All that caffeine gives the locals an edge, but in a good way: they ranked No. 2 for smartest locals in the AFC. And while colder months seem like a great time to enjoy that hot cup, the Emerald City took last place for winter visits.

via America’s Best Coffee Cities- Page 2 – Articles | Travel + Leisure.

books, media, viral, discourse:  All I can say is interesting …

There is something both ridiculous and refreshing about all this. Ridiculous because 90 percent of Morozov’s criticisms are wildly unfair (and also because, you know, http://bit.ly/AnsweringMrGrumpy)…and refreshing because here is a work of book-bound nonfiction — chock full of claims to be assessed and arguments to be discussed — that is actually being assessed and discussed. In a public forum! Discourse, and everything!

That shouldn’t be an anomaly, but it is. Books both e- and analog — the kind that exist not to tell a tale, but to advance an argument — face a fundamental challenge: The interests of books-as-artifacts and books-as-arguments are, in general, misaligned. Books are great, definitely, at capturing ideas. Books are great at claiming cultural ownership of ideas. Books are great at generating speaking gigs based on ideas. Books are great at getting authors paid for ideas. But books are much, much less great at actually propagating ideas — particularly ideas of the relative nuance that Morozov’s “Internet intellectuals” tend to favor.

Which is a flaw that’s easy to forget, given books’ cultural status. A book deal is a big deal; those who have gotten one will make a point, as they should, of highlighting the achievement. A writer and an author.

via ‘Public Parts’ and its public parts: In a networked world, can a book go viral? » Nieman Journalism Lab.

vertigo farming, Queens NY, organic produce, locavore:  Innovation … got to love it.

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm is at the forefront of urban agriculture in the United States. Operated by four young entrepreneurs on an acre of rooftop in Queens, New York, the farm grows organic produce that is sold to local restaurants, co-ops and farmers markets across New York City. Business is growing quickly, with a second location opening in the Spring of 2012 and booming demand for rooftop vegetables, herbs and honey. To educate urban dwellers about the food systems upon which they rely, the farm hosts regular educational tours, workshops and field trips for schools and community groups.

via World Challenge 2011 – 2011 Finalist – Vertigo Farming.

Condoleezza Rice,  Freedom Agenda, The Freedom War, books: “There is both a moral case and a practical one for the proposition that no man, woman, or child should live in tyranny. Those who excoriated the approach as idealistic or unrealistic missed the point. In the long run, it is authoritarianism that is unstable and unrealistic.”

“We pursued the Freedom Agenda not only because it was right but also because it was necessary,” Rice writes in her book. “There is both a moral case and a practical one for the proposition that no man, woman, or child should live in tyranny. Those who excoriated the approach as idealistic or unrealistic missed the point. In the long run, it is authoritarianism that is unstable and unrealistic.” So there’s no sense dwelling on the final demise of tyrants, whether Gaddafi or, for that matter, Saddam Hussein, whose hanging turned into a hideous spectacle as well. “Time to move on,” says Rice.

But the fascination of Rice’s memoir, and it is fascinating, is less in the broad vision put forth for a more democratic world than in the gritty description of the way decisions were made in the White House and the State Department as the Bush administration sought to adapt to a universe radically changed by Al Qaeda’s attacks on the United States in 2001.

Rice’s account of the immediate aftermath, as seen from inside the halls of the White House, is both vivid and disturbing. The threat of a second wave of attacks was real. The possibility that biological or other weapons might be used seemed imminent: some lunatic had put anthrax in the mail; one report received at the White House said many of the people there might have been poisoned with botulinum toxin; another report said a plot was afoot to disseminate smallpox. The intelligence was rarely definitive, and it took a toll on everyone involved.

Rice is honest enough to say that at one point she was just about burned out. While attending a ceremony on the White House lawn soon after she became secretary of state, she saw an airliner approaching. It was on a normal route to land at Reagan National Airport, but for a few moments she thought it was coming straight toward the executive mansion. “Tomorrow I am going to tell the President that I want to leave at the end of the year,” she thought. “I can’t do this anymore.”

But she soldiered on, and key to Rice’s role was the confidence of the president, who emerges from her book as sharper than the clichés indulged in by his critics, but perhaps too familiar, too folksy with those he likes and relies on.

The wars launched by the Bush administration have cost the United States more than $1 trillion and many thousands of lives. Were they worth it? The Middle East has been a volatile region, with countless wars at countless cost, Rice said as we talked in Stanford. “I don’t think you put a price on a Middle East that will look very different without Saddam Hussein and with movement toward freedom.”

via Condoleezza Rice Memoir: The Freedom War – The Daily Beast.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, book club:  My book club is reading this book this week.  I had never heard of Henrietta Lacks or of the book.  I have not read it and cannot go, but I am intrigued after reading this review.

When Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951), an African-American mother of five who migrated from the tobacco farms of Virginia to poorest neighborhoods of Baltimore, died at the tragic age of 31 from cervical cancer, she didn’t realize she’d be the donor of cells that would create the HeLa immortal cell line — a line that didn’t die after a few cell divisions — making possible some of the most seminal discoveries in modern medicine. Though the tumor tissue was taken with neither her knowledge nor her consent, the HeLa cell was crucial in everything from the first polio vaccine to cancer and AIDS research. To date, scientists have grown more than

via 5 Unsung Heroes Who Shaped Modern Life | Brain Pickings.

Bob Pierpoint, RIP:  Another from a different era of broadcast journalism is dead.  Don’t you love this picture?  Rest in peace, Bob Pierpoint.

Pierpoint_White_House_large.jpg

Bob Pierpoint was a mainstay of CBS News during the golden age of that organization. He was part of the Murrow team and covered the Korean War while in his 20s. He became a White House correspondent during the Eisenhower Administration and stayed on that beat through the time of Jimmy Carter and beyond. It was some time in the 1970s that the picture above, which delighted him, was taken. He was an avid tennis player and had just come from a match on the White House court when he had to do a standup, obviously framed from mid-torso upward. I first saw that picture in Barney Collier’s book Hope and Fear in Washington (The Early Seventies), and I believe it was the jacket photo on Bob’s own book, At the White House. I got it from the collection of his papers at his alma mater, the University of Redlands.

When I was growing up, Bob Pierpoint was the most glamorous product of my home town in California. (That was before Redlands’s own Brian Billick went on to win the Super Bowl, and Landon Donovan became Mr. Soccer USA.) He would come back and tell our public school assemblies what it was like to cover the Kennedy or Johnson Administrations; this was as close as we came to first-hand contact with national politics. He was patient, generous, and non-big-shot-ish in a way I noticed then and admire more in retrospect. He was two days older than my father, and a good friend to my parents and tennis rival to my father when he was in town. When my wife and I first moved to Washington he and his wife Patty served in loco parentis for a while.

He will be remembered, and should be, as a connector to a different, prouder era in broadcast news. But he was also a good friend, husband, and father. Our sympathies to his family.

via Bob Pierpoint – James Fallows – National – The Atlantic.

time: I have always wanted a chiming clock in the house … it keeps you conscious of and accountable for time.

Each hour when my watch, computer, or phone beeps, I stop whatever I’m doing, take a deep breath, and ask myself two questions:

1. Am I doing what I most need to be doing right now?

2. Am I being who I most want to be right now?

At first it seemed counterintuitive to interrupt myself each hour. Aren’t interruptions precisely what we’re trying to avoid? But these one-minute-an-hour interruptions are productive interruptions. They bring us back to doing what, and being who, will make this a successful day.

This isn’t all about staying on plan. Sometimes the beep will ring and I’ll realize that, while I’ve strayed from my calendar, whatever it is I’m working on is what I most need to be doing. In those situations I simply shift items on my calendar so my most important priorities still get done and I make intentional choices about what I will leave undone.

For me, a once-an-hour reminder, one deep breath, and a couple of questions, has made the difference between ending my day frustrated and ending it fulfilled.

via The power of an hourly beep | Daniel Pink.

summer jobs, internships, college, summer camps:  I think there i something here …

For the most part, interns do work that is wholly unrelated to any sort of day-to-day task that full-time employees fulfill. Indeed, not only do most offices give interns mundane tasks that the aforementioned employees would never do, but they are also given tasks that will only be taken over by another intern. In short, interning in any office, regardless of the field, will likely mean you will be performing more secretarial duties than industry-specific ones. Anyone thinking that taking an internship with Goldman Brothers will give him or her a better shot at becoming a full-time employee is misguided. As such, taking an internship for the sake of career advancement is an unwise decision.

As alluded above, internship experience rarely parallels relevant work experience. Moreover, a student with (all else equal) an internship experience — indeed, even two — will not receive a substantive boost in the hiring process. The dirty secret of the professional world is that everyone knows that internships are vehicles through which companies can unload their undesirables onto unsuspecting college students.

Given this, it is reasonable to conclude that internships provide few potential benefits for their laborious components. Not only are interns wasting time in their respective offices by performing arcane duties, they also are allowing their last free summers to go by the wayside. Indeed, for all intents and purposes, college summers are the last ones for which we will have a legitimate array of choices. Accordingly, students would be well advised to engage in activities that they would enjoy, as opposed to activities that they misguidedly believe will yield long-term benefits. To this end, there are more efficacies in volunteering, working in non-profits or even taking classes than doing an internship. However, the most benefit comes from being a camp counselor.

At my particular summer camp, Four Winds Westward Ho, I have learned many workplace skills that are more relevant than what I could obtain from an internship. For example, at Four Winds, located on tiny Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands off the coast of Seattle, I am fully integrated into the aforementioned professional hierarchy. I am given great responsibility; indeed, I am responsible for the physical, emotional and mental well-being of up to seven children for two four-week sessions.

via Opinion: Skip the internship, go to camp | USA TODAY College.

D.C., Georgetown, urban planning: Shooting itself in the foot?

IMAGINE A CITY telling its largest private employer — one that pays millions in taxes and salaries, strives to hire local residents and voluntarily does community service — that it can’t grow anymore, that it might have to cut back. That seems far-fetched in light of today’s scary economy, but it’s essentially what D.C. officials are telling Georgetown University by insisting it either house all its students or cut back enrollment. The District seems distressingly disinterested in promoting a knowledge-based economy.

Georgetown’s 10-year plan for its 104-acre main campus, the subject of hearings before the D.C. Zoning Commission, would cap the undergraduate population at current levels while increasing graduate students by about 1,000. Enrollment in 2010 was 14,033, of whom 6,652 were undergraduates. The plan is modest: It contains no major new building, no additional parking and an offer to reduce the main campus enrollment by moving some graduate students to satellite locations. Still, adjacent neighborhoods — particularly Burleith and Foxhall — are up in arms, and they seem to have city officials on their side.

via It’s D.C. vs. Georgetown in urban planning – The Washington Post.

Lululemon killing:  Too weird.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys on Monday began selecting a jury in the trial of Brittany Norwood, a 29-year-old charged with killing her co-worker in an upscale Bethesda yoga shop.

via Lululemon killing trial begins Monday – Crime Scene – The Washington Post.

social media,  police,  gangs, antisocial side:  Darwin Award?  Why is social media so hard to resist?

Gangs are just following societal trends,” said a federal law enforcement official who spoke about the issue on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss how agents use social media to target gangs. “Facebook and Myspace are now some of their primary methods of communication.”

via Antisocial side of social media helps police track gangs – The Washington Post.

economics, unrest: “… relatively undemocratic governments have historically extended voting rights in order to convince a restive public of the promise of future redistribution. In the West, that is not an option. A bit more growth and a bit less austerity might take the edge off public anger. But if social unrest has its roots in the effects of structural economic changes, a more fundamental societal reckoning may be needed. ”

Growth that undermines existing social institutions and dislocates workers is also likely to generate instability. In China mass migrations associated with rapid catch-up growth and urbanisation are often blamed for causing instability. Instances of “mass disturbances” have risen steadily since 1993, even as the Chinese economy has enjoyed scorching growth. Ricardo Hausmann of Harvard University similarly argues that Egypt’s steps towards economic liberalisation stimulated an appetite for greater opportunity that fuelled discontent with the ruling regime.

Research by MIT’s Daron Acemoglu and Harvard’s James Robinson finds that relatively undemocratic governments have historically extended voting rights in order to convince a restive public of the promise of future redistribution. In the West, that is not an option. A bit more growth and a bit less austerity might take the edge off public anger. But if social unrest has its roots in the effects of structural economic changes, a more fundamental societal reckoning may be needed. A study by Patricia Justino of the University of Sussex examined inequality and unrest in India and found that redistribution can quell an outcry. That may well be the outcome of the current turmoil, too.

via Economics focus: Unrest in peace | The Economist.

skywatching, Aurora Australis:  Aurora seen from the ISS in Orbit – YouTube.

Check out this awesome video captured from the International Space Station as it flew over the Aurora Australis. Stunning!

via Flying above the Aurora Australis | Go Make Things.

recipes, scrambled eggs, chopsticks:  Scramble with chop sticks!

And last but not least, ditch that fork! Scramble your eggs with a heat-proof spatula, a flat-topped wooden spoon, or for the perfect curd, chopsticks.

via 5 Common Scrambled Eggs Mistakes : BA Daily: Blogs : bonappetit.com.

13
Oct
11

10.13.2011 … Home again, home again … no … Away again, away again … off to Keeneland for a DC Alum Event …

Steph Curry, Davidson College, senior theses: Steph Curry’s senior sociology thesis is on tattoos and the way they affect athletes’ images!  TATTOOS!

Curry admits he’d rather be playing basketball than researching his senior thesis, which by the way is on tattoos and they way they affect athletes’ images. What’s he trying to figure out?

“For those who have extremely visible tattoos and a lot of them, how they manage … across different social spheres when you come into contact with marketers, owners of teams and fans and that kind of the thing,” Curry says.”

A professor has joked with Curry that not many researchers would get access to NBA players for such a project, but that Stephen is just the man for the job.

via As NBA lockout drags on, Steph is back at Davidson | Sports.

travel, fall travel, fall leaves: With the exception of the maple leaves, fall color looks pretty much the same in NC and TN it does in MA, CN, NH, VT, NY and ME. 🙂

travel, Keeneland, Lexington KY, food, horse racing, Davison College Local Alumni Connect:  Love going to Keeneland … food was fun, atmosphere was wonderful.  Burgoo to start … Bread pudding laced with Maker’s Mark and everything imaginable in between.

Great Depression, history, board games, random:  Loved this history …

But George S. Parker was bored by such moralistic games—like the card game called Everlasting he’d play with his brothers as a kid. He changed the game up a little bit, made it about trading stocks, and named it Banking, which he self-published in 1883 at the age of 16.

While the Parker Brothers company set about trying to make board games fun, publishing action-packed games about the Gold Rush or the Spanish-American War, some folks around the turn of the century were still bent on using the board as moral instruction. Elizabeth Magie Phillips, for example, was a devotee of Henry George, an economic-reform activist who believed it was wrong to get wealthy from property ownership. In 1903, she created a game called The Landlord’s Game, which used the neighborhood streets of the players, to point out the evils of the real-estate market.

Thirty years later, in the middle of the Great Depression, another version of The Landlord’s Game, landed on George Parker’s desk. An out-of-work engineer named Charles Darrow presented his hand-painted board, based on streets in Atlantic City, called Monolopy. This time, it wasn’t intended as moral lesson, but as a vicarious way to gamble as a real-estate tycoon.

Now, you’d think that the inventor of Banking would appreciate this concept. But Parker rejected the game, giving Darrow a list of “52 reasons” the game would fail, including the fact that it took more than 45 minutes to play.

Unruffled, Darrow took his game to the Wanamaker Department Store in Philadelphia, where his hand-painted boards sold faster than he could make them. In 1935, Parker Brothers agreed to publish Monopoly, which brought in big bucks for the company—real ones. At the same time, the game captured the public’s imagination with the intoxicating power to accrue pretend fortunes that most people would never see in real life.

In the 1930s, a slew of games about capitalism and profiteering flooded the market, including Cargoes, Bulls and Bears, Big Business, Easy Money, and even the original The Landlord’s Game. Another take on The Landlord’s Game strikingly similar to Monopoly, called Finance and Fortune, came out in 1932, three years before Parker Brothers’ game, but for some reason never achieved the same sort of monolithic success.

And board games promoting virtue all but disappeared. Being calculating and ruthless was now the way to reach a game’s end goal—be that money, property, or a big promotion to the office on the corner. Even The Checkered Game of Life was reconfigured as The Game of Life in 1960. This time—you guessed it—in the end, the player with the most cash wins.

via Occupy Boardwalk: How Games Got Greedy | Collectors Weekly.




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